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Full text of "American quarterly register"

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I 1792359 




THE 



AMERICAN 



QUARTERLY REGISTER 



Conducted by 

B. B. EDWARDS 



VOL. VII 



BOSTON: 

PRINTED BY PERKINS, MARVIN, & CO, 

1835. 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1835, by William Cogswell, 
Secretary of the American Education Society, in behalf of said Society, in the Clerk's 
Office of the District Court of Massachusetts. 



1792359 



INDEX 



TO THE PRINCIPAL MATTERS CONTAINED IN 



VOI.. VII. 



Ability to Acquire Knowledge, 
A Veteran Laborer, . 
Adams, Rev. Charles S.'s Report, 
American Education Society, . 
American Advocate of Peace, . 
Anniversaries, .... 
Annual Concert of Prayer for Colleges, 
Archbishop Laud, Literary Services of 

Babcock's Teacher's Office, 
Baptist Churches in Boston, 
Beneficiaries on Refunding, 
Berkshire, List of Ministers in 
Boston Education Society, 
British India, the Press in 
Brettell's Sketches in Verse, 



City Missions, .... 
College of New Jersey, History of 
Connecticut, Ministers in . 
Connecticut, Education Society in 
Concert of Prayer for Colleges, 
Comprehensive Commentary, 
Cressy's Address, 



Page. 
. 357 



82, 283 
73, 168, 265, 361 
. 147 
73, 83, 176, 283 
. 284 
. 262 

. 147 

. 53 

. 362 

. 31 

. 77 

. 40 

. 67 



. 70 

. 42 

. 24 
86, 366 

. 284 

. 70 

. 70 



Daily Concert of Prayer 370 

Deaths of Ministers, ... 72, 156, 264, 360 
Dissertation on Education for the Ministry, . 371 
Donation of Tracts to American Education So- 
ciety, 361 

Doddridge's Rise and Progress of Religion, . 355 

Ellis, J. M.'s Report, . . 83,175,283,365 

English Missionaries in America, ... 26 
Essex County, Ministers in .... 21 
Essex County, Churches and Ministers in . 246 

Farmer's List of New England Graduates, 93, 181, 

289 
Felt's Annals of Salem, 149 

Gambier's Guide to the Study of Moral Evidence, 70 

Gardiner's Address, 146 

152 

69 
167 



General Post Office, .... 
Gregg's Address, .... 

German Education Society, 

History of the College of New Jersey, 
History of Leicester Academy, 
History of Columbia College, . 
Hooker, E. W.'s Address, . 
Hooker, Herman, on Portion of the Soul, 
Humphrey's Sermons, 



42 

51 

344 

355 

356 



Page. 
Importance of a Christian Literature, . . 14 
Incomprehensibility of God, .... 358 
Influence of Piety on the Mind, ... 9 

Intelligence, Education Society's 81, 168, 282, 361 

Jean Baptiste Say, 62 

Judge Hall's Address, 168 

Letters from Beneficiaries, .... 363 
Leicester Academy, History of . . . .51 
List of Graduates at the New England Col- 
leges, 93,181,289 

Life of President Brown, 133 

Lord, Eleazer, Esq. Letter of ... . 371 

Maine Education Society, . . . 87, 281 

Malan's Gospel Seeds, 68 

Manual Labor, 64 

Massachusetts, Ministers in . . .21 

Massachusetts, Complete List of Congrega- 
tional and Presbyterian Ministers in . 2S 
Mather, VV. L.'s Report, .... 81, 276 
Memnon, Statue of, at Thebes, .... 353 
Methodist Episcopal Churches in Boston, . 56 

Middle States in 1759, 26 

Ministry, A Call to 157 

Ministers in Massachusetts, .... 21 
Ministers in Rhode Island, New Hampshire, 

Connecticut, 24 

Ministerial Education Supported by Scripture, 350 

New England in 1760, 20 

New England Colleges, List of Graduates of 93, 181, 

289 
New Hampshire Education Society, . .176 

North American Indians, 153 

Notes on Berkshire County, .... 35 

Notes on Essex County, 256 

Notices of New Publications, . . 67, 146, 354 

Oration, by J. Adams, President of Charleston 

College, 356 

Ordinations, .... 71, 155, 263, 359 



Papacy in the United States, . 
Periodical Press in British India, 
Perkins, Dr. Nathan, Notice of 
Piety, Influence of, on the Human Mind, 
Porter's Musical Cyclopedia, 
Presbyterian Education Society, 
Presidents of New England Colleges, 
President Woods's Address, 
Protestant Episcopal Churches in Boston, 
Province of New York in 1771, 



77. So 

245 

147 

55 

96 



IV 



INDEX. 



Refunding, 3G2 

Report on Classical Education, . . . 150 

Rhode Island, Ministers in .... 24 

Scudder, Dr., Letter from 376 

Sprague's Hints, 68 

Sprague's Letters, 149 

Statistics, 20 

Statue of Memnon, at Thebes, . . . .353 

Study of Hebrew, 63 

Suffolk, Ministers in 21, 28 

Tabular List of New England Graduates, . 341 
Taylor's Views of the Saviour, . . . 354 
Todd's Lectures to Children, .... 7] 
Treasurer's, American Education Society Re- 
port, 90,177,285,377 



The Religious Offering, 355 

Union Theological Seminary, .... 261 
United Brethren, Missions of . . . .38 

United States, Papacy in 57 

United States, Finances of .... 154 

Vermont Education Society, . . . .177 

Western Reserve Education Society, . . 269 

Western Education Society, .... 265 

West on the Resurrection of Christ, . . 68 

Wesleyan University, Sketch of 154 

Wants of the World, 352 

Works Published on Continent of Europe in 

1833, : . 27 

Wright's Address 69 



Erratum. — In the No. for August, page 54, instead of the last paragraph on the page, read the 
following. "On the 28th of August, 1828. nineteen individuals were recognized as a branch of the 
Federal Street Baptist Church, Boston. On the 1st of March, 1831, fifty-two brethren and sisters 
were publicly recognized as the ' South Baptist Church of the City of Boston. 7 The neat and 
beautiful edifice now occupied as their place of worship, is 72 feet long by 57 wide, and was dedi- 
cated to the service of God, on the 22d of July, 1830. The Rev. R. H. Neale was pastor of this 
church from October, 1830, to March 19th, 1834. On the 25th of May, 1834, Rev. T. R. Cressy 
was recognized as pastor of this church. The number of its members in September last, was 
133." 



j 



THE 






QUARTERLY REGISTER. 



Vol. VII. AUGUST, 1834. No. 1 



INFLUENCE OF EMINENT PIETY ON THE HUMAN MIND. 

An opinion is entertained to a certain extent, that superior mental 
cultivation is inconsistent with distinguished attainments in holiness. It 
is supposed that deep and thorough scholarship is incompatible with pure 
and elevated religious affections. Before proceeding, therefore, to a direct 
consideration of the subject, it may be proper to look at some of the reasons 
why this idea has been entertained. 

One cause of the prevalence of this opinion, is the want of enlargement 
of mind on the part of some pious students. An individual does not see the 
bearing of a particular study upon his piety, or upon his future profession, 
and consequently renounces it in disgust, or attends to it with an utter 
indifference. He thus loses sight of the fact that his mind is an 
instrument, in a great degree unfitted for work, and that it is of little 
importance whether he has knowledge of his future profession or not, so 
long as his mind is rude and shapeless. His great object is not instruction, 
it is education; it is not acquisition, it is dicipline. But if he allows his 
mind to fasten on the secularity of his study, or on its want of correspond- 
ence with his future profession, he will not, as a general thing, advance 
either in piety or in science. 

Another cause of the prevalence of the idea, to which I have allijded, 
arises from the injudicious remarks which some eminently pious men have 
made, in their diaries, respecting the worthlessness of human learning. 
Owing, perhaps, to a defect in early education, to a temptation into which 
they have been betrayed, or to want of Christian candor, they have uttered 
sentiments adverse to the general current of their thoughts' — sentiments 
which have been eagerly seized upon and made the excuse or the occasion^ 
in some instances, of a nearly total neglect of mental discipline and im- 
provement. Such sentiments should be counteracted and neutralized by 
opinions on the other side equally decisive and far more numerous. 

Again, the prevalence of this idea may be ascribed in part to the perver- 
sion of a few texts of Scripture. From passages like that wherein- it is 
asserted that God has chosen the weak things of this world to confound 
the wise, it has been most absurdly inferred that human knowledge i? of 
little value. But all the passages and facts of Scripture, which relate to 
this subject, are to be taken in connection. Why did God choose Moses 
for the leader of his people through the desert, a man learned in all the 
wisdom of the Egyptians ? Why select Solomon, the wisest of the children 
of men, to build his temple ? Why was the man educated at the feet of Ga- 
vol. vii. 2 



10 EMINENT PIETY. [AlJGr 

maliel, inspired to write almost one half of the New Testament, and to pub- 
lish the name of his Saviour in almost every land of the Roman dominions? 
Why must the priest's lips keep knowledge, and why were schools of the 
prophets so early founded, and continued for so many ages? The truth is, 
that one simple principle of the New Testament would determine the whole 
question. We are commanded to present to God our bodies and souls as a 
living sacrifice : — not our souls without cultivation, but with all possible 
cultivation and enlargement. We are as really commanded to discipline 
and perfect our understanding, and to present the fruits of it to the Lord, 
as we are that which relates to any other part of ourselves. 

Another cause of the erroneous idea, which I am endeavoring to combat, 
is found in the prominence which has been given to literary ambition as a 
motive for effort. Our plans of study have been based for ages on the 
principle of competition. It has, in a considerable degree, swallowed up 
all other incitements to literary effort. Religious students have either 
yielded to the impulses of this powerful motive, and been subjected to all 
its disastrous effects, or they have quietly relinquished the literary object 
before them, and have been contented with mediocrity of attainment and 
usefulness. The inquiry does not seem to have been made whether there 
were or were not motives for effort equally strong, and less objectionable 
in their character. One marked effect of the prevalence of the motive of 
ambition, has been a belief in the minds of many pious and estimable 
persons, that there was an inseparable connection between the exercise of 
bad passions and the attainment of eminent knowledge. 

I am now prepared to present some considerations in favor of the pro* 
position, that piety is eminently beneficial in its effects on the mind. 

Eminent piety will tend to give an increased importance to the human 
mind in general. The mental constitution, is the work of the Creator, and 
displays exquisite skill in its formation and its adaptedness to the uses for 
which it was designed. The man of pious feeling will love to trace the 
proofs of divine wisdom, which are visible in his mind, as well as elsewhere. 
He will see, in a clearer light than other men, the high destiny of the 
human soul. He will learn to think of it with more seriousness, and will 
attach to it an importance commensurate, in some degree, with its powers, 
and the end of its creation. One reason why the worldly-minded professor 
of religion regards with such apathy his own condition, and the ruined 
state of multitudes around him, is his utterly inadequate ideas of the value 
of the human mind. He does not separate the material from the immortal, 
the transitory from the permanent. He looks on the world of rational 
agents very much as he does on any of the animal tribes, as created to 
breathe, to eat, to sleep, to play and to perish. It Is not so where Chris- 
tianity exerts its full influence. There a solicitude is awakened and 
sustained by a sense of what the mind is, and of what it is able to accom- 
plish. One fundamental reason why men are held in civil bondage, in 
any part of the earth, is the want of a vivid apprehension that those men 
have minds rational and immortal. Impart to a community a strong and 
abiding impression of the presence of God, of the reality of eternity, of the 
importance of a state of probation, and every intellectual shackle will be 
sundered. The mind is not seen in its real dignity, except in the light of 
another world. Looking at it as immortal, the importance of its cultiva- 
tion, and of its perfect discipline, is immensely increased. 

The influence of eminent piety is seen in leading the scholar to an inti- 
mate acquaintance with his Gwn mind. The habit of self-inspection is 
important in regard to the intellectual progress as well as to the- spiritual 



1834.] EMINENT TIETY. 11 

There is no toiling successfully in darkness. An individual must know his 
mental constitution, the defects and the excellencies of his education, what 
remedies to apply to those defects, how his mind has been influenced 
under various outward causes, and in what way he can secure it against 
further injury. One reason which prevents a frequent and thorough 
mental analysis, is literary pride. Many men are not willing to know 
.precisely on what ground they stand. They are conscious of serious 
mental deficiencies, but they are not willing to have them pointed out, 
,or to dwell upon them themselves. But he who has been disciplined in 
tthe school of Christ, has divested himself of pride and self-conceit. There 
is no dark corner in his mind, which he is not willing to examine. There 
is no weak point, which he is not ready to investigate. His habits of 
moral self-investigation have both given him courage to undertake this 
inward review, and power to do it. He is not accustomed to shrink at 
the moral corruption and imperfection within him ; why should he at the 
mental irregularities and disproportions which he may witness. He has 
the habit of looking difficulties which respect himself, calmly and firmly in 
the face. He has the humility which will bear the trial of permitting his 
faults to be pointed out. The man will wish to be estimated as he is in 
reality. He will not desire to obtain credit for what he is not. 

Eminent piety will have the effect to give to an individual a good 
practical judgment. An imposing hindrance to intellectual effort, is the 
habit of over-estimating a particular branch of study. It is perfectly 
obvious that all the powers of the human mind cannot be developed in one 
direction, or by an exclusive attention to one pursuit. A single tendency 
•cannot be nurtured to a great extent without weakening or destroying 
another. It is not needful, indeed, that an individual should be an univer- 
sal scholar ; but, in order to develope all the powers of his mind, he must 
have a general acquaintance with science and literature. There is a cor- 
respondence between the material world and the human mind. Created 
nature must be studied in its various parts, before the mind can receive all 
the benefits from it which its Creator intended. So it is with truth of every 
kind. There is an adaptation of it, in all its forms, to some powers and 
aspects of the human mind. God has not been parsimonious in furnishing 
aliment for the nurturing of the souls which he has formed. Now the man, 
who is the most familiar with the character and with the providence of 
God, is prepared to apprehend truth of all kinds, not only in a higher degree 
than other men, but in better proportions. He is in the habit of looking at 
universal truth. He has the key which unlocks the treasures of the 
material and moral world. Other things being equal, he has a better 
practical judgment. The religious truth which he has contemplated, he 
has been accustomed to refer to an invariable system — the Bible. The 
actions which he has performed, he has compared with an unerring stand- 
ard — the Divine Law. Of course he has a better internal director, in his 
judgment, than other men have. 

Another advantage of the eminently pious student, is the aid which he 
derives from his conscience. Rapid progress in knowledge is not com- 
patible with inward uneasiness. The conscience must be in its healthiest 
and best state, or in a condition of extreme torpor, to allow a scholar to 
prosecute his studies constantly, and to the highest advantage. Such men 
as Hume, Diderot, and Laplace, pursued their intellectual studies with great 
calmness and self-possession, probably in part from the fact, that their con- 
science had either been perverted, or wholly silenced. But the intermediate 
State between that and the possession of a good conscience, both towards 



12 EMINENT PIETY. [AUG. 

God and towards man, is full of delay and difficulty. The scholar, who 
with an enlightened conscience is living in conformity with the world, is 
at war with his own improvement. The inward feeling that his heart is 
not in a right condition, is a constant source of uneasiness. When about 
to engage in a protracted intellectual exercise, he cannot escape the con- 
viction, that another thing is more needful first. The feeling of insecurity 
in regard to his eternal state, harasses him wherever he goes. Now, no 
condition of mind is more inconsistent with an uniform advance in knowl- 
edge than this. It weakens the resolution, and throws a chill over the 
brightest intellectual prospects. The student is sometimes eyen compelled 
to stop, and engage in some direct religious exercise, as a sort of penance 
or quietus to an alarmed conscience. But the eminent Christian has none 
of these misgivings. If he has not, at all times, an assured hope of heaven, 
still he has a prevailing and delightful conviction that he has secured his 
eternal salvation, and that if he should be cut off in the midst of an in- 
tellectual exercise, all would be well. He can thus act with undivided 
power. Every thing within him is harmonious. Conscience has become 
a powerful auxiliary to his intellect. 

Distinguished piety is eminently conducive to intellectual advancement, 
by the serenity and 'purity which it spreads over the affections. How totally 
unfit is the man of proud and of self-sufficient feelings for investigating any 
of the truths of natural science. Questions connected with the higher 
mathematics, and with the nature of the soul, require that the affec- 
tions should be in a state of calm serenity, so that the mind can fasten on 
pure truth, undimmed by the mists of passion or prejudice. What con- 
nection have the elevated truths of astronomy, with the impure dreams of 
the sensualist ? None at all. It is, doubtless, true, that a love for a 
particular literary pursuit may become so strong as to amount to a passion, 
which will swallow up every thing else, and in fact, cut off a man from 
human sympathy, and make him an exile from social life. Some of the 
French analytical philosophers have appeared to rid themselves of every 
thing but simple, dry intellect. Still it is capable of the fullest proof, that 
this is not a condition best adapted to intellectual improvement. Intellect 
cannot flourish in a desert. Man cannot pervert or overlook any part of 
that constitution which the Creator has given him, without injury to all the 
other parts. The cultivation of the social affections is necessary to the 
highest intellectual progress. The connection between all the parts of the 
human constitution is intimate, and is not to be trifled with. Destroy the 
affections, and as a general thing you cripple the intellect. Blot out a 
human sympathy, and you destroy mental energy. What is termed an 
original thought, depends, in no inconsiderable degree, upon original emo- 
tions. Some of the more important works of reasoning, as well as those of 
the imagination, would have never seen the light had it not been for the 
social affections. It is of incalculable importance, therefore, that the 
affections of the soul should be refined by Christianity. They will be thus 
purified from disorders. They will flow forth towards praiseworthy objects, 
and will come into that state which will qualify them to be the assistants 
and the handmaids of the intellect. 

The influence of eminent piety upon the memory, is by no means unimpor- 
tant. The best rule, probably, which could be given, for the cultivation of 
that power of the mind, is a conscientious and habitual utterance of the 
truth on all subjects. What is termed a deceitful or treacherous memory, 
if not always, is generally occasioned by loose and desultory habits in 
conversation, and intercourse with society. Now the eminently pious man 






1834.] EMINENT PIETY. 13 

is conscientious in regard to all his minor duties, and less important 
promises and engagements. "His lips still speak the thing they mean; 
he swears to his own hurt and changes not." His intercourse with his 
fellow-men is marked by unbending rectitude, by exact propriety, by un- 
deviating adherence to the rule of the Saviour, of doing to others as 
he would have others do to him. A material defect in these points is 
inconsistent with eminent piety. Such is the connection between moral 
and mental rectitude, that good habits in the former will have an immediate 
and strong tendency to produce good habits in respect to the latter. 

Eminent piety will furnish the most powerful motives to intellectual 
effort. One of these motives is the utility of every talent and attainment. 
In proportion to the depth of a man's religion, will be his conviction that 
he has no superfluous means for doing good — that he has not a particle of 
power which may be squandered. As he sees the openings on every side 
of him for active exertion, he will deeply regret that he has no more re- 
sources. The great fact of his lamentable deficiency, will be ever pressing 
upon him. His intimate acquaintance with the providence of God, and 
his habit of seizing upon all occasions for benefitting his fellow-men, 
will compel him to add as much as possible to his mental resources, and to 
subject the use of them all to the rules of a rigid economy. Another 
motive of commanding weight, is the belief that he is not only accountable 
for all his actual power, but for all possible attainments ; not only for what 
he is, but for what he can be. He knows that he is to render account for 
slighted opportunity as well as for perverted talent. Some of the darkest 
pages, which the light of the final day will disclose, will belong to the 
history of those who have buried their talents in the earth. They had 
minds, but they let them run to waste. They had the principle of immor-? 
tal life, which they might have girded with strength, and made fair as the 
garden of the Lord, but they neglected to do it. Now the enlightened 
and consistent Christian, is distinguished from all other men by his deep 
and habitual acknowledgment of the providence of God. He presses on 
in the path of intellectual existence, because to retrace is guilt, to stand 
still is guilt. He does not allow the claims of a false modesty to deter him 
from his purpose. He makes the most unremitted effort to develope and 
expand the faculties which have been given to him. Another motive of 
great urgency is a desire to secure the approbation of his Maker. He has 
placed the securing of his favor, as a definite and most delightful object 
before him. He knows that he cannot worthily celebrate that name to 
which he owes all his blessings, but he wishes to render to it the homage 
of the highest excellence which he can command. He feels a noble desire 
to serve God in the most vigorous exercise of the understanding of which 
he is capable. He learns to live as in the divine presence. There is 
always a commanding object before him — the same in sickness and health, 
in despondency and in joy, in the solemn hour of midnight reflection, in 
the bustle of active scenes, in life and in death. The more he contem- 
plates this great motive, the more inspiring and ennobling does it become. 
It is not like the fire of ambition, which blazes for a moment, and is either 
consumed, or consumes its wretched victim. That yields no support in 
the day of adversity, this gathers strength in the fire and in the flames; 
that cannot bear the solemn scrutiny of conscience, this acquires vigor 
from the most severe self-examination ; that shrinks from the glance of the 
omniscient eye, this rejoices in the notice of Him whose favor is life. 

The eminently pious man t in attending first to his moral character and 
relations to God, is in the path of obedience to the divine admonition, 



i4 IMPORTANCE OF A CHRISTIAN LITERATURE. [AUG. 

Seek first the kingdom of God. The necessary things which will be 
added thereunto, doubtless include intellectual as well as material blessings. 
The pious man does not look so much from nature up to nature's God, as 
from God to nature. He studies the great original before he gazes upon 
his works. He is first baptized with the fire of the Holy Ghost, before he 
contemplates these material heavens. He thus obtains an excellent 
preparation of mind and of heart to understand and fully to relish those 
sciences, which describe portions of his work, or combinations of those 
elements which he has formed. It is beyond all question the best course 
for an individual to study Revelation primarily and thoroughly. A heathen 
has only the book of natural theology to study, and must reach the Creator, 
if at all, by comparatively slow and toilsome steps. But those persons who, 
in a Jand enjoying the light of revealed truth, endeavor to study the works 
of God, without resorting to the Bible, in order to come to a practical 
belief of his existence, will probably rest in a religion of poetry and sen- 
sibility. 

It is a serious mistake to suppose that the time of a scholar is lost by the 
faithful discharge of his religious duties. Some students imagine it to be 
a great burden that they are required by their Maker to pray, to keep the 
Sabbath holy, and to read the Bible seriously and constantly. But it may 
be safely affirmed, that he who observes the Sabbath day with the most 
delight, other things being equal, will be the most successful student 
during the following week. The maxim of Luther, that to pray well is to 
study well, is true in more senses than one. In addition to the blessing of 
God, which it secures, it has a necessary and direct connection with in- 
tellectual attainment. The commands of God are adapted to the constitu- 
tion of man ; to sin against them, is to sin against our own mind and body 
as well as soul. There is reason to believe that in the most flourishing 
period of religion yet to be, the human mind will be developed and cul- 
tivated in a far higher degree than has ever been witnessed on earth. 
There will be a millennium of taste and genius, not preceding, but follow- 
ing and resulting from a millennium of religion. There will be that 
humility and purity of heart which are consequent from piety, and which 
will powerfully aid all intellectual researches, and which will strengthen 
every intellectual faculty. There will be more thoughtful walkers, like 
Newton, on the margin of the great ocean of truth. God will be wor^ 
shipped by myriads of cultivated as well as holy worshippers. It will be 
seen by all intelligent creatures that atheism is folly, that religious indiffer- 
ence is folly, that want of eminent piety is folly, and that a good under* 
standing have all they who keep God's commandments. 



IMPORTANCE OF A CHRISTIAN LITERATURE. 

There are many considerations which show the importance of the cul- 
tivation, in this country, of an elevated Christian Literature. In the first 
place, there will be a great number of human beings to be affected by it. 
It would be of, comparatively, little importance to have a Christian litera- 
ture in Holland. The Dutch language will never be widely diffused, 



1834.] IMPORTANCE OF A CHRISTIAN LITERATURE. 15 

The population of the country is nearly stationary. But here the case is 
very different. Our population is spreading its roots to the river, and its 
branches to the sea. A few generations hence, many millions, on the 
American continent, will speak the English language. Let a man estimate, 
if he can, the influence of a single publication, or a single able work, 
when there shall be fifty millions of adult, intelligent readers, when books 
shall issue from the press, in number and in rapidity, of which we can 
have now little conception. 

In the second place, the number of educated men in this country is 
rapidly increasing. There are about fourteen thousand alumni of our 
colleges living. Not far from thirty-eight hundred are members of the 
colleges. About fifty collegiate institutions are in operation. At the 
present rate of increase there will be, in twenty years more, one hun- 
dred. Four new ones will be soon established in the single State of 
New York ; and when this is accomplished, there will be portions of thai 
State one hundred and fifty miles from either of the eight colleges. In a 
few years hence, the State of Ohio will need as many colleges as the whole 
of New England, if education is to keep pace at all with the growth of 
population. She has now six or seven chartered colleges, while the oldest 
has been in existence less than thirty years, and all but one, less than ten 
years. 

Look forward, therefore, to the year 1850 — one hundred colleges in 
this country — all advancing gradually in the career of improvement, all 
drawing around them preparatory schools, and opening their doors to the 
higher seminaries ; all collecting together ten thousand scholars, with seven 
hundred instructors, having access, in the aggregate, to one million of 
volumes of books ; and ten thousand families, in nearly as many towns, 
connected with these colleges, in the most near and important relation- 
ship. In view of these facts, how important it is, that there should 
be a Christian literature. Christianity, pure as it came from heaven, 
should pervade and sweetly blend and mingle with all the rays of human 
genius. 

In the third place, men of taste and talent, in greater and greater num- 
bers, are coming under the dominion of their Sovereign and Redeemer. 
Shall they be brought into contact with rude and uncultivated taste ? 
Shall a wish to return to their previous opinions and habits ever enter into 
their hearts 1 Shall they not find the ways of wisdom to be ways of 
enlarged thought, and of elevated sentiment ; that the cross of Christ is 
no cramping iron on the human faculties, that Christianity opens to its 
possessors boundless fields of knowledge, and is adapted to the intellect of 
man, in its highest developments ? 

In the fourth place, our population is ready to be acted upon ; it is 
ready to be moulded by a vigorous Christian literature. We were not 
prepared for it in our colonial state. We were not prepared for it in our 
revolutionary period, nor in the years immediately subsequent. We were 
employed in laying the foundations of our civil government. 

There is a period, or there are periods, in the history of every nation, 
when the great currents of thought receive their direction, when the organs 
of intellectual life begin to move. Of what immense benefit had it been 
to England, in all subsequent ages, if her Elizabethan era had been a 
Christian era ; if the great men who then toiled in the fields of knowledge, 
had been Boyles and Mil tons. How different would have been the destiny 
of France, if her literary men of the age of Louis XIV. had been Pascals 
and Fenelons ; if that gorgeous constellation of intellect had been tempered 



16 IMPORTANCE OF A CHRISTIAN LITERATURE. [AUG. 

with the mild beams of Christianity. How bright might have been the 
pages of her now blood-stained history 1 The traveller on the fields of 
Flanders, might not have been compelled to stop, and inquire the cause of 
those rank tufts of corn, and those luxuriant patches of grass, which now 
meet his eye. Hell would not then have opened her mouth, without 
measure, under ill-fated France. It was learning without religion, that 
did the horrible work. It was the negative, or the infidel, or the licentious 
literature of antecedent years. It was because that in the age of Louis 
XIV., the forming age of France, men thought, and wrote, and reasoned, 
irrespective of the Bible. 

The great lesson which these facts teach us, is, to be on our guard — 
to seize the favorable moment — to pre-occupy the ground. Our state of 
probation in this respect is not past. We have not left it on record, to our 
disgrace, that we could be satisfied with powerful intellectual resources dis- 
connected from moral obligation. With a few exceptions, we have no per- 
manent literature now. We have written no Analogy, no Principia, no Pil- 
grim's Progress, no Paradise Lost. We have nothing which can be called 
a national literature. It is only indulging a useless vanity, and placing an 
obstacle in the way of our future success, to think that we have. Our 
literature is yet to be created. Those great controlling influences, which 
lift themselves into the upper firmament of thought, which are to be 
like the polar light, always visible and always to be regarded, are yet to 
be collected together. Light is here. There are scattered rays every 
where. But they have not been concentrated into reigning and radiant 
orbs. The fourth day is not come. 

There are men among us, capable of furnishing original and funda- 
mental productions. The remark, which is frequently made, that we are 
attached to a light and superficial literature, and, like children, pleased 
With excitement, is not entirely true. There is a considerable number of 
men, who judge of a production according to its intrinsic worth, who in 
their common reading, are accustomed to analyze and refer to general 
principles. New England, on this very point, is exerting an influence, 
which is felt to Detroit and Mobile. Instances of bad taste, which occur 
in the productions of our western brethren, are explained as demanded in 
a new country, or as atoned for in the existing circumstances. Boston 
exerts the same influence on Cincinnati, that London does on Boston. If 
we are guilty, we fear, whatever we may say to the contrary, the condem- 
natory voice which is coming over the waters. So our western friends, 
however much they may despise the little territory east of the Hudson, are 
extremely sensitive in regard to the opinion which shall be entertained of 
them here. 

A great object, therefore, an ultimate object, which all our colleges, and 
which every man educated in them, should have in view, now and forever, 
is the highest possible cultivation of science and literature tn connection 
with religion. It is an object great enough for the consecration of every 
energy, physical and mental and moral, which God has given us. Here 
may be exhibited a vigor of intellect, a purity of taste, a strength and 
fervor of religious feeling — all in delightful combination, such as the old 
world has never yet seen. 

Now is the time. We have separation enough from the other continents. 
We have sphere enough. We have no need to record our discoveries on 
columns of stone, to be wearily deciphered by some subsequent age. We 
may spread them out before a great people. We may record them on ten 
thousand living and breathing hearts. 






1834.] IMPORTANCE OF A CHRISTIAN LITERATURE. 17 

The possession of such a literature is consistent with an earnest attention 
to the Greek and Roman classics. 

A strenuous attempt has been made to maintain the position that the 
classics do not furnish materials of thought — that if they were all cut off 
in a single night by some Caliph Omar, or General Amrou, there would be 
little cause for lamentation. Now the reverse of this is undeniably the 
fact. There are, and there forever will be, in them, materials for thought. 
In one sense, there is no exhausting the literature of any age. Materials 
for thinking will be gathered from the past in all the future changes of 
society. One age is not set over against another age simply. It is set 
over against all others. Illustrations from the arts and sciences of Greece 
and Rome can be gathered now, which could not have been suggested two 
hundred years ago. On the other hand, in some future aspect of society, 
certain events which transpired long since may give rise to original and 
important trains of thought. Every age is immortal. Individuals may 
die and be forgotten, but the collected wisdom, the embodied sense of 
every generation will live till time shall be no longer. Because William 
Cowper translated Homer, and William Gifford translated Juvenal, is the 
inference to be made that we have the whole material of thought which 
can be furnished by the poet of Scio, or the satirist of Rome ? Would 
the best possible translation of Paradise Lost into French, exhaust that 
amazing effort of human genius? Rays of thought emanate, in all 
directions, from an original author ; which a score of translators cannot 
gather up. Suppose an individual is deeply interested in such writers as 
Plato, Pindar, Thucydides, and Tacitus — having followed their luminous 
track a certain distance, he feels an unwonted energy in his own mind. 
He springs from the beaten path, and seizes on some new combination of 
thought, or views of truth, which never occurred before to a human mind. 
There are many passages in the classic authors which give the student the 
power to think. A man who thoroughly understands and relishes an original 
author, will think well himself. Show me an individual whose favorite 
book is Chillingworth, or Butler, or Pascal, or John Howe, and I will show 
you an individual, who can strike out trains of reflection for himself. 

To my mind, the objection in regard to the corrupting moral influence 
of the classics is equally futile. Where is the human production which is 
not capable of perversion, or thit cannot furnish aliment to a depraved 
heart? We are not to judge of a book, any more than we are to judge of 
an individual, by a single trait or passage, by a single, or by half a dozen 
incidents. But we are to inquire what is the general tendency ? What 
are the great principles inculcated ? What, on the whole, is the effect on 
the reader ? Now I am willing that the principal classics should be tried 
by this rule. I am willing that Xenophon's Anabasis, and Tacitus's five 
books, and Virgil's Georgicks, and the Essay on the Sublime, and the im- 
mortal Plato, should be subjected to a most rigid scrutiny. It is saying 
nothing to the purpose, to aver that there are things which will offend a 
delicate taste and a Christian heart in Anacreon, and Terence, Ovid, and 
Aristophanes, and Horace, any more than it is disparaging Addison, and 
Collins, and Knox, and Johnson, to say that there are such writers in the 
same language as Congreve, and Shenstone, and Fielding, many of whose 
works would have disgraced Babylon and Corinth. The" fact is worthy of 
mention, in this place, that the principles of taste, which a few of the best 
writers of Greece and Rome, adopted, were of such a character as were 
inconsistent with the lower forms of depravity. By the assistance of a 
few scattered rays from Revelation, shining on the reason of these men, 
vol. vii, 3 



IS IMPORTANCE OF A CHRISTIAN LITERATURE. [AUG> 

they caught some glimpses from the unseen world, which placed them 
immeasurably above the throng which crowded the Piraeus, and the 
Campus Martius, or even with the majority who frequented the Lyceum 
and the Grove. The mind of Tacitus seems to have' been preserved from 
all the grosser forms of defilement, by the state of his country ;— a melan- 
choly presentiment of the cause of her overthrow, appears to have made 
him unwilling to add to the vices which were undermining her strength. 

Again, an original, Christian literature, in this country, is consistent with 
a diligent attention to foreign modern literature. Some men imagine that 
the great object — the acquisition of an American literature — could be ac- 
complished, if we were to prohibit the importation of all books from 
London : — that if we were left to work. our' own stock, independent of the 
intellectual warehouses on the other side of the waters, new forms of 
beauty and grandeur would spring from beneath our wonder-working 
hands. But is the case thus 1 Is a literary monopoly, any where, a good 
thing ? Does the fact that we have but a scanty original literature, show 
that the booksellers in St. Paul's church-yard and Piccadilly are the cause 1 
No : let the gates of knowledge be opened wide into every land. If better 
books can be made in England than we can make, let us have them. We 
need the productions of the British press in order to maintain the English 
language in its purity. It is of inestimable service for us to have reviews 
there. If any one thinks that we are in no danger, let him read 
the Biography of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence. 
Our best models, what we call thoroughly native American works, were 
written by men well versed in English literature. Some of the admired 
state papers, of the early years of our revolutionary struggle, were written 
by such men as Wilson and Witherspoon, men who were educated at the 
British universities. In later days, such writers as Dennie of the Port 
Folio, Professor Frisbie, and the late Mr. Evarts, were thoroughly con- 
versant with English literature. Our most eminent living statesman now 
devotes two months out of the twelve to these same studies. 

Instead, therefore, of decrying the models of taste and genius of past 
ages, and of other countries, it is our wisdom to study them patiently and 
thoroughly. This is not slavery. This is no degrading subjection to the 
models of antiquity, which will cramp our genius. 

Instead of placing a prohibition on foreign books, would that our 
presses teemed with the thoughts of Pascal, and of bishop Beveridge, and 
of Thomas Adam, and of John Howe. It is the borrowers ; it is the 
second rate authors, who complain of the effect of the introduction of 
English books—men who draw their resources from the shallows and flats 
of Alison and Hugh Blair, and never come within reach of the gigantic 
shadows of John Howe and of Joseph Butler. 

Another object, of no little importance, is, that all our books for Sabbath 
schools, and for children, should be properly written, both in regard to 
sentiment and style. The American Sunday School Union have no unim- 
portant and irresponsible concern in providing the intellectual aliment, and 
in regulating the taste, of half a million children. Why not give to 
children a correct literary taste from the first? Why invent a barbarian 
language for their special benefit ? Why must the elements of a bad taste 
be first rooted deep, in order that the best portions of youth should be spent 
in correcting and reforming them ? Why must boys write in a turgid and 
excessively ornamented style ? There are those, who are taught to express 
manly thoughts in manly language, who are very early imbued with the 
principles of pure taste ; who, for instance, are instructed to compare the 



1834.] IMPORTANCE OF A CHRISTIAN LITERATURE. 1<J 

delineations of nature which are found in the Bible, and in our best poets, 
with the original; who can see and feel how accurately and how beautifully 
they describe the riches of the earth, and the glories of the heavens. 

Another desirable measure, is the establishment of scholarships, or some- 
thing equivalent, in connection with our colleges. 

Suppose, for instance, that thirty thousand dollars should be given to a 
collegiate institution, to be distributed into portions of two or three thou- 
sand dollars each — the income to support, in part at least, eight or ten 
scholars, for a few years after they had graduated — might not the results 
be of great importance? It is not unfrequently the fact that an individual, 
at the end of his four years' course, is too young to enter with advantage 
on his professional studies. More thoroughly-formed habits of study, and 
more mature consideration of various topics, over which he might have 
passed, would be of eminent utility — as preparatory to entering on the 
study of either of the professions. There may be, also, a few young men, 
in every college, to whom such a course is the obvious one which Provi- 
dence has assigned to them as a permanent employment. There is no 
danger of too much study and mental discipline in this country. The 
warning, which is frequently uttered against scholastic habits, and literary 
seclusion, is a mere unmeaning outcry. If our colleges only taught the 
theory of the sciences, without one practical application, they would be 
worthy of all the support which they have ever received. There is little 
ground for apprehension, that any of our professional men will become too 
learned. The danger is all on the other side. The demand for cultivated 
and uncultivated talent in this country, of all kinds, is now very great, and 
it will be greater. Twenty men will go prematurely to their work, where 
one will remain too long at a collegiate or professional school. Almost 
every circumstance in youthful character and feelings, almost every feature 
in the character of this country, and of this age, unite, in saying to the 
scholar, as the Hebrew prophet said to the Jews, Let us depart hence. 
But with that same prophet I would say, Wo to him who goes on the 
ocean of public life in its present agitated state, without well digested 
knowledge. Radically defective is that system of collegiate or professional 
instruction, which does not lay the foundations of knowledge below the 
waves of excitement, on the rock of fixed principle. It is no doubt a fact 
that some of our public men fail of doing much good — not from any 
physical or moral defect, but because they entered on public life too early. 
The resources of any man will be soon exhausted unless he is constantly 
and systematically acquiring. Another advantage of the arrangement 
would be, that these scholarships would help to form a literary atmosphere 
around a college — an object, it is needless to say, of great importance. 
Another unquestionable benefit would be, that they would occasionally 
furnish an individual who would seize some one of the commanding 
eminences of literature, and on it erect a strong and never-failing 
light. 

There is an opportunity to perform an important service for our country 
and for mankind in several departments of our literature. Let an individ- 
ual write the history of the United States, with purity of taste, with liberal 
and philosophic views, with thorough research and analysis, and with the 
spirit of an enlightened Christian, and he would do an incalculable good. 
Let another individual, choosing early and beginning late, with a close 
acquaintance with human nature, with a knowledge and love of our free 
institutions, write the life of General Washington — not concealing, Hayley- 
like, the clear evidence that Washington feared God and obeyed his com- 
mandments. 



20 statistics. [Aug. 

Any arrangement at our colleges, which could supply such a deficiency, 
any provision, which would have the tendency to furnish the men, who 
would breathe through every department of literature the spirit of the 
gospel of Jesus Christ, surely ought to be cheered with ample encourage- 
ment. There are more than a million of Christian professors in this 
country ; yet our literature is not by any means a Christian literature. 
Many of the men who create it, or who copy it, and diffuse it, are either 
opposed to Christianity, or entirely indifferent to its claims. They may 
speak well of religion in the abstract, but they do not like its living power. 
Some of them are believers in general, and infidels in particular. 



STATISTICS. 

The subject of Statistics, is the investigation and exposition of the actual 
condition of states and nations, in regard to their internal organization and 
foreign relations. It embraces literature, science, political economy, art, trade, 
morals, religion, and in fact all the subjects of human knowledge. Schlozer, as 
quoted in the American Encyclopedia, says, " History is statistics in a state of 
progression ; statistics is history at a stand." It differs from geography in this 
respect, that though many particular facts belong equally to both, yet geography 
arranges them always on the principle of locality, but statistics with reference 
to their effect on the general condition of a nation. Statistics was first treated 
scientifically in Germany. Achenwall gave it, in 1749, its name and systematic 
form. The principal writers on this subject are Schlozer, Hassel, Niemann, 
Stein, Balbi, Gioja, Dupin, a French writer of the first order, Meusel, Staudlin, 
Colquhoun, Von Hammer, Pitkin, Seybert, Holmes, Darby, &c. &c. 



NEW ENGLAND IN 1760. 



From a discourse preached by the Rev. Ezra Stiles, before the convention of the Con- 
gregational clergy of Rhode Island, April 23, 1760, we have gathered a number of 
interesting particulars, respecting the ecclesiastical condition of New England, seventy- 
five years since. The following, as he supposed, was the condition of the different 
sects. Jews, 70. Moravians, 70. Episcopalians, 2,100 families, or 12,600 souls. 
There were 27 Episcopal missions, including two itinerances. The 27 missionaries, 
with three other ministers, officiated in 47 churches and places of divine worship. 
Six or seven of the congregations were large, others were small; some not exceeding 
15 or 20 families each. Friends, 16,000 — a large estimate. Baptists, 22,000. Belong- 
ing to no sect, 10,000. The sum of all these deducted from 500,000, the population of 
New England at that time, leaves 440,000 Congregationalists* "At present," says 
Dr. Stiles, "the Congregationalists have about 515 churches, which double in less 
than 30 years. The aged ministers, now living, have in their day, seen 130 churches 
increase to 530. In 1643, the 15,000 souls in New England, were cantoned into 34 

* If there be any error in the preceding account, we are inclined to think that it is in estimating the 
number of nothingarians too low. There were then no Methodists in the country. The first regular 
Methodist preacher was the Rev. William Black, who arrived in Boston in 1781. As early as 1768, some 
of the British soldiers in Boston, were Methodists, and held meetings. The first regular Roman Catholic 
congregation in Boston was assembled in 17S4. 



1834.] 



MINISTERS OF MASSACHUSETTS. 



21 



churches in the year 1645. In 1650, there were about 40 churches, and 7,750 com- 
municants. Perhaps there may now be (1760) 60 or 70,000 communicants. In 1696, 
there were 130 churches, of which 35 were in Connecticut. Now there are 530 
churches, of which 170 are in Connecticut. Hence the period of doubling for the 
churches, is 30 years at furthest. In 115 years, we have increased 500 chorebea upon 
34." The following is the list of ministers in 1760. b stands for Baptist, e for Episcopa- 
lian,^ for Presbyterian, /for Friends. 



Massachusetts. 



Suffolk County. 
Joseph Sewall, D. D. Boston. 
Charles Chauncy, D. D. 
Jonathan Mayhew, D. D. 
Thomas Foxcroft. 
Samuel Checkley. 
Ebenezer Pemberton. 
Mather Byles. 
Samuel Mather. 
Andrew Croswell. 
Andrew Eliot. 
Samuel Cooper. 
Samuel Checkley, Jr. 
John Moorhead. p 
Timothy Cutler, D. D. e 
James Greaton. e 
Henry Caner. e 
John Troutback. e 
William Hooper, e 
Jeremiah Condly. b 
Ephraim Bowns. b 

Ebenezer Gay, Hingham. 

John Brown. 

Daniel Shute. 

William Smith, Weymouth. 

James Bayley. 

Anthony Wibert, Braintrce. 

Moses Taft. 

Samuel P. Niles. 

Miller, D. D. e 

Samuel Veazy, Hull. 
Nathaniel Robbins, Milton. 
Nathaniel Bowman, Dorchester. 
Samuel Dunbar, Stoughton. 
Jedidiah Adams. 
Philip Curtiss. 

Joseph Bean, Wrentham. 

Barnum. 

Nathan Bucknam, Medway. 

David Thurston. 

Jonathan Townsend, Medfield. 

Philips Payson, Walpole. 

Thomas Balch, Dedham. 

Andrew Tyler. 

Jason Haven. 



Nathaniel Walter, Roxbury. 
Amos Adams. 

Jonathan Townsend, Needham. 
Elnathan White, Bellingham. 

Philip Payson, Chelsea. 
Joseph Jackson, Brookline. 
John Phillips, Castle William. 



Essex County. 
Peter Clark, Salem. 
James Dimon. 
Elias Smith. 
Dudley Leavit. 
Nathan Holt. 
Thomas Barnard. 
William M'Gilchrist. e 

Nathaniel Henchman, Lynn. 
Joseph Roby. 
Benjamin Adams. 

John Barnard, Marblehead. 

Simon Bradstreet. 

Peter Bours. e 

Joseph Swain, Wenham. 

John Chipman, Beverly. 

Joseph Champney. 

Samuel Wigglesworth, Ipswich. 

John Walley. 

Nehemiah Porter. 

Lesley. 

Nathaniel Rogers. 
Alexander M' Do wall. 
John Cleveland. 
Jedidiah Jewet, Rowley. 
James Chandler. 
John Emerson, Topsfield. 
John Lowel, Newbury. 
John Tucker. 
Moses Parsons. 
William Johnson. 
Moses Hale. 
Jonathan Parsons, p 
Edward Bass, e 

Samuel Webster, Salisbury. 
Edmund Noyes. 
Samuel Phillips, Andover. 
William Symmes. 
William Balch, Bradford. 
Joseph Parsons. 

Bailey, Methuen. 

Christopher Sargeant. 
Edward Barnard, Haverhill. 
James Cushing. 
Benjamin Parker. 
Samuel Bachelor. 



John Cushing, Boxford. 
Elizur Holyoke. 
Thomas Hibbard, Amesbury* 
Payne Wingate. 

Joshua White, Gloucester, 
Samuel Chandler. 



22 



MINISTERS OP MASSACHUSETTS. 



[Aug. 



John Rogers. 
Ebenezer Cleveland. 

Jaquish. 

Bradstreet. 

Benjamin Toppan, Manchester. 

Middlesex County. 
Nathaniel Appleton, Cambridge. 
Samuel Cook. 

Estis Apthorp. e 

Hull Abbot, Charlestown. 

Thomas Prentice. 

Seth Storer, Watertown. 

Daniel Bliss, Concord. 

Josiah Sherman, Woburn. 

Thomas Jones. 

William Hobby, Reading. 

Israel Loring, Sudbury. 
William Cook. 
Aaron Smith, Marlborough. 
Jonas Clark, Lexington. 
Jonas Miriam, Newtown. 
Joseph Emerson, Maiden. 
Eliakim Willis. 

Matthew Bridge, Framingham. 
Ebenezer Turell, Medford. 
Henry Gardner, Stow. 
Ebenezer Bridge, Chelmsford. 
John Chandler, Billerica. 
Samuel Locke, Sherburne. 
Joshua Prentice, Holliston. 
Caleb Trowbridge, Groton 
Joseph Emerson. 

Josiah Goodhue, Dunstable. 

Thomas Parker, Dracut. 
John Searl, Stoneham. 
Daniel Rogers, Littleton. 
Samuel P. Barrett, Hopkinton. 

Nathaniel Sherman, Bedford. 
Willard Hall, Westford. 
Isaac Morrell, Wilmington. 
Samson Spaulding, Tewksbury. 
John Swift, Acton. 
Jacob Cushing, Waltham. 
Phineas Hemingway, Townsend. 
Stephen Badger, Natick. 
William Lawrence, Lincoln. 

Worcester County. 
Thaddeus Macarthy, Worcester. 
Isaac Jones, Western. 
Eli Forbes, Brookfield. 
Joseph Parsons. 
Nathan Fisk. 

Joseph Roberts, Leicester. 
Joshua Eaton, Spencer. 
Thomas Green. 6 

Job Cushing, Shrewsbury. 

Ebenezer Morse. 

Ebenezer Parkman, Westborough. 

John Martyn. 

Nathan Stone, Southborough. 

Charles Gleason, Dudley. 



John Campbel, Oxford. 

, Charlton. 

, Sturbridge. 

Fish, b 

David Hall, Sutton. 
James Welman. 

Marsh. 6 

Aaron Hutchinson, Grafton. 
Nathan Webb, Uxbridge. 

Elisha Fish. 

Joseph Dorr, Mendon. 

Amariah Frost. 

William Phipps, Douglass. 
David White, Hardwick. 
Benjamin Ruggles, New Braintree. 
James Humphries, Perquiage. 
Aaron Whitney, Petersham. 
Thomas Frink, Rutland. 
Joseph Buckminster. 

, Princeton. 

Joseph Davis, Holden. 

, Narraganset, No. 6. 

, Westminster. 

Timothy Harrington, Lancaster. 

John Mellen. 

John Rogers, Leominster. 

Thomas Goss, Bolton. 

Joseph Whaler, Harvard. 

David Stearns, Lunenburgh. 

Jona. Winchester, Dorchester, Canada. 

Lemuel Hedge, Roxbury, Canada. 

, Ipswich, Canada. 

Hampshire County. 
Jonathan Ashley, Deerfield. 

Billings, Greenfield. 

Joseph Ashley, Sunderland. 
Judah Nash, Montague. 
Samuel Hopkins, D. D. Hadley. 
John Woodbridge, South Hadley. 
David Parsons, Amherst. 
Timothy Woodbridge, Hatfield. 
John Hooker, Northampton. 
Jonathan Judd. 

. Cutler, Quobbin. 

Stephen Williams, Springfield. 
Robert Breck. 
Noah Merick, 
John M'Kinstry. 
Elijah Lothrop, 



John Ballantine, Westfield. 
Bridgham, Brimfield. 



Jedidiah Smith, Granville. 

Morton, Blandford. 

Strong, New Marlboro', 

Jones, No. 3. 

Ebenezer Martin, No. 4. 
Stephen West, Stockbridge. 

, Falltown. 

Jonathan Hubbard, Sheffield. 
Samuel Hopkins. 

Jesse Clark, Spencer. 



1834.] 



MINISTERS OF MASSACHUSETTS'. 



23 



, Egremont. 

Justus Forward, Cold Spring. 
Abraham Hill, Rhodetown. 

M'Dole, Colcrainc. 

Ezra Thayer, Ware River. 
Adonijah Bidwell, No. 1. 
Isaac Abercrombie, Pelbara. 

, West Hoosic. 

, Pontoosac. 

, Palmer. 

John Hubbard, Northfield. 

Plymouth County. 
Jacob Bacon, Plymouth. 
Chandler Robbins. 

William Rand, Kingston, 
Charles Turner, Duxbury. 
Atherton Wales, Marshfield. 
Thomas Brown. 

Shearjashub Bourn, Scituate. 
David Barns. 

Thompson, e 

Samuel Baldwin, Hanover. 
Gad Hitchcock. 

Thomas Smith, Pembroke. 

Dodge, Abington. 

Daniel Perkins, Bridgewater. 
John Angier. 

John Shaw. 

John Porter. 

Solomon Read. 

Jonathan Parker, Plympton. 

John How land. 

Sylvanus Conant, Middleborough. 

Ebenezer Hinds, b 

Isaac Backus, b 

Roland Thatcher, Wareham. 

Timothy Ruggles, Rochester. 

Ivory Hovey. 

Thomas West. 

Patten, Halifax. 

Bristol County. 
Josiah Crocker, Taunton. 

White, Norton. 

Joseph Palmer. 

Carpenter. 

, Easton. 

, Dartmouth. 

4 meetings. / 

Silas Brett, Freetown. 

Samuel Tobey, Berkley. 
Nathan Fisher, Dighton. 
John Wales, Raynham. 

Wood, b Swanzey. 

Job Mason, b 

Russell Mason, b 

Abijah Welde, Attleborough. 
Peter Thatcher. 

Carnes, Rehoboth. 



Rogerson. 

Peck. 

Daniel Martin, b 
Nathan Pierce, b 

Rounds, b 

Barnstable County. 
Caleb Upham, Truro. 

Isaiah Lewis, Eastham. 
Edward Cheever. 
Joseph Crocker. 
Stephen Emery, Chatham. 
Josiah Dennis, Yarmouth. 
Grindal Rawson. 
Isaiah Dunster, Harwich. 
John Dennis. 

Chase. 5 

Joseph Green, Barnstable. 

, Shaw. 

Abraham Williams, Sandwich. 

Gideon Hawley, Marshpee Indians. 
Solomon Bryant, do. 

Samuel Palmer, Falmouth. 

Dukes County. 
Andrew Boardman, Chilmark. 

, Tisbury. 

, Edgartown. 

, Gayhead Indians. 

Zechariah Mayhew, Christiantown. 
, Nantucket. 

York County. 
Isaac Lyman, York. 
Samuel Lancton. 
Benjamin Stevens. 
John Rogers. 
Josiah Chase. 
Jacob Foster, Berwick. 
John Morss. 

Hemingway, Wells. 

Little. 

John Hovey, Arundel. 
Moses Morrel, Biddeford. 

Cumberland County. 
Thomas Smith, Falmouth. 
John Wiswall. 
Ephraim Clark. 

Nicholas Loring, Yarmouth. 
Elisha Eaton. 

Richard Elvin, Scarborough, 

Duulap, Brunswick. 

, Gorhamtown. 

Lincoln County. 

Bailey, Pownalborough. 

, Georgetown. 

, Woolwich. 

, Newcastle, 



24 MINISTERS OF N. HAMPSHIRE — R. ISLAND AND CONNECTICUT. [AlJG. 



New Hampshire. 



Arthur Brown, e Portsmouth. 

Marmeduke Brown, e 

Samuel Langdon. 

Samuel Haven. 

Woodbridge Odlin, Exeter. 

Daniel Rogers. 

Ward Cotton, Hampton. 

Josiah Baily. 

Jeremiah Fog. 

Nathaniel Gookin. 

William Allen, Greenland. 

Samuel M'Clintock, do. 

Stephen Chase, Newcastle. 

Samuel Parson, Rye. 

Joseph Adams, Newington. 

Joseph Adams, Stratham. 

Joseph Second), Kingston. 

Peter Coffin. 

William Parsons, Southampton. 

Josiah Cotton, Sandown. 

Ebenezer Flagg, Chester. 

John Wilson, p 

David M'Gregore, p Londonderry. 



William Davidson, p 
Timothy Walker, Rumford. 
Daniel Wilkins, Souhegan. 
Daniel Emerson, Hollis. 
Benjamin Butler, Nottingham. 
Josiah Stearns, Epping. 
Nathaniel Trask, Brentwood. 
Jonathan Cushing, Dover. 

./ 

John Tuck, Gosport. 
James Pike, Somersworth. 

Ezra Carpenter, Ashwelot. 
John Moody, New Market. 
John Adams, Durham. 
Joseph Prince, Madbury. 
Jonathan Eames, Newton. 
Benjamin Butler. 
James Hobbs, Pelham. 
Abner Bagley, Salem. 
James Scales, Hopkinton. 

Whittemore, Suncook. 

Kincaid. p 

Samuel Hill, Rochester. 



Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. 



Ezra Stiles, Newport. 


. / 


Thomas Pollen, e 


. f Jamestown. 


William Vinal. 


John Windsor, b Smithfield. 


Edward Upham. b 


• / 


John Maxson. b 


, b Scituate. 


Gardner Thurston. 6 


David Mitchell, b Gloucester. 


, Moravian. 


, / Charlestown. 


, Jews. 


Benjamin Gardner, b W. Greenwich 


• / 


Peter Worden, b Coventry. 


Joseph Snow, Providence, b 


, b Exeter. 


. 


John Usher, e Bristol. 


Greaves, e 


John Burt. 


. / 


Othniel Campbell, Tiverton. 


Samuel Windsor, b 


David Rounds, b 


. f Portsmouth. 


. / 


Charles Holden. b Warwick. 


Jonathan Ellis, Little Compton. 


Benjamin Pierce, b 


Timothy Brown. 


• • f 


• f 


. e 


Townsend, Warren. 


Joseph Park, Westerly. 


Maxwell. 


. f 


Cook, 6 Cumberland. 


Samuel Aldborough. b N. Kingston. 


, / Richmond. 


Joseph Torrey. 


Thomas Burlingham, b Cranston. 


Samuel Fayerweather. e 


. f 


James Rogers, e 


Thomas Hiscox, 6 Hopkinton. 


, 5 


Thomas Clark, b do. 


. N. Shoreham. 


. / 


John Gorton, E. Greenwich. 




Conne 


cticut. 


New Haven County. 


Noah Williston. 


Joseph Noyes, New Haven. 


Ebenezer Sanderson, e 


Chauncy Whittlesey, do. 


. 


Isaac Stiles. 


. e 


Benjamin Woodbridge. 


. e 



Samuel Bird. 
Naphtali Daggett. 
Nicholas Street. 



Samuel Whittlesey, Milford. 

Job Prudden. p 

Thomas Ruggles, Guilford. 



1834.] 



MINISTERS OP CONNECTICUT. 



25 



Amos Fowler, Guilford. 
Jonathan Todd. 
James Sprout. 
John Richards. 
Richard Ely. 

Jonathan Merrick, Bran ford. 
Philemon Robbins. 
Warham Williams. 
Samuel Hall, Wallingford. 
Theophilus Hall. 
James Dana. 

Elizur Goodrich, Durham. 
Daniel Humphrey, Derby. 
Jonathan Lyman. 
Richard Mansfield, e 
Samuel Todd, Waterbury. 

Mark Leavenworth. 
John Trumbull. 
James Scovel. e 

Hartford County. 
Elnathan Whitman, Hartford. 
Edward Dorr. 
Eliphalet Williams. 
Nathaniel Hooker. 
Daniel Russel, Wethersfield. 
James Lockwood. 
Joshua Belding. 
Hezekiah Bissell, Windsor. 
William Russell, Jr. 
Thomas Potwine. 
Joseph Perry. 
Seth Norton. 



William Russell, Middletown. 

Moses Bartlett. 

Edward Eells. 

Benjamin Bowers. 

John Norton. 

Ichabod Camp, e 

Samuel Newell, Farmington. 
Timothy Pitkin. 
Ebenezer Booge. 
Samuel Clark. 
Benjamin Chapman. 
John Smalley. 



William Gibbs, e Simsbury. 
Joseph Strong. 
Jesse Roots. 

Eleazar May, Haddam. 

Grindal Rawson, E. Haddam. 

Hobart Eastabrook. 

Joseph Fowler. 

Ephraim Little, Colchester. 

Thomas Skinner. 

Elijah Mason. 

Benjamin Pomroy, Hebron. 

VOL. VII. 4 



Samuel Lockwood. 

Elijah Lothrop. 

Samuel Peters, e 

Isaac Chalker, Glastenbury. 

John Eells. 

Peter Reynolds, Enfield. 

Ebenezer Gay, Suflield. 

John Graham, Jr. 

Frcegrace Leavitt, Somers. 

Thomas White, Bolton. 

Willard, Stafford. 

Gideon Noble, Willington. 
Nathan Williams, Tolland. 

Fairfield County. 
John Beach, e Fairfield. 
Noah Hobart. 
Joseph Lamson. e 
Daniel Buckingham. 
Nathaniel Bartlett. 
Samuel Sherwood. 
Seth Pomroy. 
Jedidiah Mills, Stratford, 
Christopher Newton, e 
James Beebee. 
Izrahiah Wetmore. 
Edward Winslow. e 
Robert Ross. 

Moses Dickinson, Norwalk. 

William Gaylord. 

Robert Silliman. 

Jeremiah Learning, e 

Ebenezer Dibble, e Stamford. 

Benjamin Strong. 

Moses Mather. 

Noah Welles. 

Abraham Todd, Greenwich. 

Ebenezer White, Danbury. 

David Judson, Newtown. 

Thomas Brooks. 

Jonathan Ingersoll, Ridgefield. 

Elisha Kent, New Fairfield. 

Elijah Sill. 

James Taylor. 

New London County. 
David Jewett, N. London. 
Mather Byles. 
Mathew Graves, e 

Benjamin Lord, Norwich. 
Jabez Wight. 
Benjamin Throop. 
Peter Powers. 
John Ellis. 



Jared Eliot, Killingworth. 
William Seward. 
William Hart, Saybrook. 
Stephen Holmes. 
John Devotion. 
Simeon Stoddard. 
George Griswold, Lyme. 
George Beckwith. 
Stephen Johnson-. 



26 



MINISTERS IN MIDDLE STATES. 



[Aug. 



Jacob Johnson, Grotoh. 

Jonathan Barber. 

Valentine Wightman. 6 

Ebenezer Rosseter, Stonington 1 . 

Nathaniel Eells. 

Joseph Fish. 

Hezekiah Lord, Preston. 

Ashur Rosseter. 

Windham County. 
Samuel Mosely, Windham. 
Ebenezer Devotion. 
Stephen White. 
Solomon Williams, Lebanon. 
Jacob Eliot. 
Eleazar Wheelock. 
David Rowland, Plainfield. 
James Cogswell, Canterbury. 
Richard Salter, Mansfield. 
Daniel Welch. 
Nathan Strong, Coventry. 
Oliver Noble. 
Abel Stiles, Woodstock. 
Stephen Williams, Jr. 

David Ripley, Pomfret. 
Aaron Putnam. 
Aaron Brown, Killingly. 
Noadiah Russell. 



Eden Burroughs. 
Timothy Allen, Ashford'. 
Samuel Dorrance, p Voluntowm 
Ezra Horton, Union. 
Josiah Whitney, Mortlake. 

Litchfield County. 
Judah Champion, Litchfield. 
Solomon Palmer, e 
Anthony Stoddard, Woodbury. 
John Graham. 
Thomas Canfield. 
Daniel Brinsmade. 
Nathaniel Taylor, New Milford. 

Andrew Bartholomew, Harwintonu 
Jonathan Marsh, New Hartford. 
Jesse Ives, Norfolk. 
Daniel Farrand, Canaan. 
Jonathan Lee, Salisbury. 
Noah Wadham, Kent. 
Joel Bardwell. 
Sylvanus Osborn. 

Treadwell. 

Cotton M. Smith, Sharon. 
Hezekiah Gould, Cornwall. 
Abel Newell, Goshen. 
Nathaniel Roberts, Torringtoni 



Middle States in 1759. 

Presbyterians. — This body previously consisted of two synods, the New York and 
Philadelphia, but in May 1758, they were united into one, called the New York and 
Philadelphia synod. The following were the presbyteries. 

Hanover, Va. 14 ministers. Philadelphia, Pa. 12 ministers. 

Donnegal, Md. 11 " New Brunswick, N. J. 11 " 

Lewistown, Pa. 6 " New York, N. Y. 21 " 

Newcastle, Pa. 11 « Suffolk, L. I. 13 « 



Total, 8 presbyteries ; 100 ministers. . 
Dutch Reformed. — One coetus, or synod, 20 ministers. Lutherans, 



in New York, 2 
ministers ; in Philadelphia, about 4. French Protestants, 2 ministers in New York city. 
Independents on Long Island, 3. Baptists in New York, 3 ; in New Jersey, 5 ; in 
Pennsylvania, 4. Episcopalians in New York, 7 ; in New Jersey, 5 ; in Pennsylvania, 
4. Total, 159 clergymen. 



English Missionaries in America, 1762. 

The Society for Propagating the Gospel, employed the following number of missionaries. 



Newfoundland, 
Nova Scotia, 
Massachusetts, 
New Hampshire 
Connecticut, 
Rhode Island, 


2 
4 
8 
1 
16 
4 


New York, 
New Jersey, 
Pennsylvania, 
North Carolina, 
South Carolina, 
Georgia and Bahama, 


10 
8 
9 
5 
4 
2 


Total 


missionaries, . . 
Schoolmasters, . 


. . 73 
. . 12 





85 
The amount of salaries for 85 persons in service during the year, was £3,727 10s. 



Province of New York in 1771. 

The number of inhabitants in the colony was estimated at 150,000. — Dutch Reformed. 
There were 23 Dutch Reformed ministers who had congregations, all of which were 



1634.] 



IMPORTANT FOREIGN PUBLICATIONS. 27 



considerably large. Most of the ministers had two, and 6ome three churches. There 
were besides 24 vacant congregations, some of which were of respectable size, and well 
able to support the gospel, could they have obtained ministers. — Presbyterians. There 
were 45 Presbyterian clergymen in the province, most of whom had fixed charges, and 
three of whom had none. Many of the congregations were large. There were 15 
vacant congregations. Considerable numbers of Presbyterians were scattered in the 
new settlements, and were not collected into congregations. — Episcopalians. There 
were 21 clergymen in the colony, some of whom had large congregations. The then 
churches in the city, " as a corporation, had a very great estate in lands in and adjoining 
the city, granted them by lord Cornbury, the greatest part of which, however, some 
persons still claim as their right ; besides a large tract of land lying in Gloucester county, 
and which they have free of quit-rent. This tract consists of 25,000 acres, and was 
granted March 31, 1770." — Lutherans. There were 3 Lutheran ministers in the colony, 
and there were 10 vacant congregations.- — Anabaptists. There were 12 Anabaptist min- 
isters in the province, and 4 vacant congregations. There were 2 French Protestant 
congregations, 3 Moravian, 17 Quaker meeting-houses, one congregation of Jews, and a 
number of separate or lay preachers. There were no Roman Catholics, as the public 
exercise of .their religion was prohibited by law. Many people attended no place of 
worship. 



IMPORTANT WORKS PUBLISHED ON THE CONTINENT OF 
EUROPE IN 1833. 

Evangelical Church Journal of Hengstenberg. 12 Nos. 4to. Berlin, $4 44. 

Third Volume of the Compend of the Moral Theology of Stapf. 8vo. $2 24. 

Lucke's Commentary on the Gospel of John. 8vo. Bonn, $2 67. 

Wegscheider's Institutes of Dogmatic Theology. Seventh edition. 8vo. Halle. 

Grandpierre's Sermons. 8vo. Paris, $1 44. 

Rhenish Museum of Jurisprudence. 4 Nos. 8vo. Gb'ttingen, $4 44. 

Veder's History of the Philosophy of Ancient Law. 8vo. Leyden, $2 24. 

Hermann's Remarks on Ritter's Exhibition of Sacratic Philology. 8vo. $0 45. 

Michelet's Introduction to Hegel's Philosophy. &vo. $0 25. 

Opinions of Napoleon on various Political subjects. 8vo. Paris, $2 25. 

Poggendorf's Annals of Physics and Chemistry. 12 Nos. 8vo. Leipzig, $10 67. 

Annals of Chemistry and Physics. 12 Nos. 8vo. Paris, $6 67. 

John Plana's Theory of the Motions of the Moon. 3 vols. 4to. Turin, $46 45. 

Flora's Treatise on German Botany. Regensborg, $5 36. 

Biographic Gallery of the Polish Revolution, No. 6. 8vo. $1 56. 

Raumer's Fall of Poland. 12mo. Leipzig, $0 78. 

Heeren and Ukert's History of European States. 2 vols. $3 33. 

Stein's Treatise on Geography and Statistics. Leipzig, $6 44. 

Dupin on Revolution of July 1830. 8vo. Paris, $0 90. 

Mercey's Travels in Tyrol and North of Italy. 2 vols. 8vo. $4 44. 

Simondi's History of France, 16th vol. 8vo. $2 36. 

Historical Account of the Destruction of Janissaries of Mohammed, 8vo. $1 76. 

Hoffmann's Bibliographical Lexicon, vol. 1st. A — C. Leipzig, $3 40. 

Weber's Repertory of Greek Antiquities. 8vo. $2 24. 

Lassen's Documents on the Indian Philosophy, 4to. Bonn, $1 87. 

Schlegel's Reflections on the Study of the Asiat. Language. 8vo. Bonn, $1 64. 

New Asiatic Journal. 12 Nos. 8vo. Paris, $7 44. 

Journal des Savants. 12 Nos. 4to. Paris, $10 67. 

Rosenmueller's Commentaries on Ezekiel, (redacta.) 8vo. Leipzig, $4 00. 

Tholuck's Commentary on John. 8vo. Hamburg, $1 64. 

Religious Journal of Catholic Switzerland. 12 Nos. Mentz, $5 00. 

Schnabel's General Statistics of European States. 8vo. $4 18. 

Course of Pol.Econ. written in Spanish, by Estrada, and trans, into French. 3 volg. 8 vo. $6 20, 

B. Constant on Rom. Polytheism, in relation to Greek Myjthol. and Christi. 2 vols. 8 vo. §4 44. 

Berzelius's Manual of Chemistry. 8vo. Stuttgard, $6 67. 

Raspail's New System of Organic Chemistry. 8vo. $2 24. 

Pohl on Brazilian Mineralogy. 4to. Weimar, $1 33. 

Pohl on Brazilian Botany. Vols. I. II. 200. folio. $35 60. 

Goethe's Posthumous Works, 15 vols, boards. 12mo. Stuttgard, $6 67. 

Annals of the Academy at Leyden, 1831-2, with figures. 4to. $7 00. 

Malchus's Treatise on Mil. Geog. of Europe. 8vo. Heidelberg, $2 76. 

Kupffer's Voyage to Mt. Caucasus in 1829. 4to. $1 76. 

Montbel's Life and Death of Young Napoleon, from authentic documents. 2d edit. Svo. ?2 2*. 

Voyage to the Indian and China Seas in 1831-3, in the Favorite. Vol I. 8vo. $1 90. 

Songs of Goethe and Schiller, translated into Latin. Svo. Halle, $0 76. 

De Pradt on the real spirit of the French Clergy. Svo. Paris, $0 56. 

Tholuck's Commentary on the Sermon on the Mount. Svo. $2 67. 

Thirle's Commentary on the Epistle of James. Svo $1 97. 

Heinrich's Commentary on the Revelation of John. Svo. $0 33. 

Matthias's Remarks on Epistle to Galatians. Svo. $0 90. 

^ilbroth'a Commentaries on Epistles to Corinthians. 8vo. $1 97 



28 



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CHURCHES AND MINISTERS OF BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 



33 



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RICHMOND, or. about 
1765. 

Job Swift, D. D. 
David Perry 

E. W. Dwight 

LENOX, or. in 1769, 
9 m. 

Samuel Munson 
S. Shepard, D. D. 

WASHINGTON, or. as 

early as the beginning of 
1772. 23 m. 

W. G. Ballantine 
J. A. Hempsted 
Caleb Knight 

LEE, or. May 25, 1780. 

30 ml 
Elisha Parmalee 
A. Hyde, D. D. 
J. N. Danforth 

PITTSFIF-LD, or. Feb. 
7, 1764, 8 m. 

Thomas Allen 
W. Allen, D. D. 


CO 

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tot in I 2 fi |ii=| 




VOL. VII. 


5 

















34 CHURCHES AND MINISTERS OP BERKSHIRE COUNTY. [AUG. 

IN cjtfst* tj« co oo j> >-t cn rfna re-*© 

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1792359 

1834.] NOTES TO BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 35 

NOTES. 

1. Stockbridge church. This was originally a mission church, established and 
patronized among the Muhhekanew or Stockbridge Indians, (by the Board of Corn mi - 
sioners for Indian affairs in Boston,) a tribe consisting, while residing here, on an average, 
of about 400 souls. Not far from 100 of these, from first to last, became professors of 
religion. Individuals were united to the church from time to time from the English 
families which settled in the town, until at length the English professors became the 
most numerous. Not long after the revolutionary war, the Indians moved to New Stock- 
bridge, N. Y. ; the professors among them were formed into a new church and placed 
under the care of the Rev. John Sergeant, son of the first missionary. The tribe is now 
living at Statesburg, on the southern side of Fox river, which empties into the head of 
Green bay, on the western side of lake Michigan, and is still favored with the means of 
grace. Previously to coming to this town, Mr. Edwards, it is well known, was pastor of 
the first church in Northampton, from February 15, 1727, to June 22, 1750. He was dis- 
missed from this place that he might accept the presidency of Princeton college. Mr. 
Swift, after preaching at various places in and about Derby, Ct., was installed at North 
Killingworth in that State, December 11, 1833. — Mr. Field was pastor of the church in 
Haddam, Ct., from April 11, 1S04, to April 11, 1818. 

2. West Stockbridge was originally a part of Stockbridge. Mr. Ayers, after his dis- 
mission, was successively installed at Augusta, Richland, and Sandy Creek, N. Y. He 
died at Richland. Mr. Edwards resided some years in the western part of New York; 
more recently he has resided and preached at New Haven, in Ohio. Mr. Waters before 
he came here, was pastor of the church at New Concord, town of Chatham, N. Y., from 
May 26, 1803, to December 21, 1813. After his dismission he was pastor of the church 
at Paris, N. Y., and now resides at New Hartford, in the same vicinity. Mr. Gaylord had 
advanced in his collegiate course at Princeton into senior year, but was obliged by sick- 
ness to leave the institution. He was settled at Western, (now Warren,) Ms. from June 
12, 1816, to July 17, 1828. 

3. Sheffield. Mr. Judson was first settled at Chelsea, in Norwich, Ct. in 1774, and 
afterwards at Taunton, Mass. 

4. Egremont. The dismission of Mr. Steele was occasioned by divisions among the 
inhabitants, originating in what is called the Shay's war. He was afterwards settled 
at Paris, N. Y. July 15, 1795. The original church was considered as extinct in 1814. 
—Mr. Hayden is now pastor of the church at Sand Lake, N. Y. 

5. Great Barrington was at first a parish of Sheffield. Dr. Hopkins was resettled at 
Newport, R. 1., where he remained until death, except as he was driven from his labors 
by the revolutionary war. Mr. Foster was installed at Pittsgrove, N. J., in 1791, 
where he died. Mr. Wheeler was educated a physician, and practised physic at South 
Britain, Southbuiy, Ct. and Coxsackie, and South East, N. Y. about 13 years at all the 
places ; but experiencing the grace of God, and desiring to preach the gospel, he changed 
his profession. Mr. Burt was settled at Western, Ms. from March 12, 1806, to December 
31, 1811, and then in New Marlborough, south parish. 

6. Alford. This town was formed mostly from Great Barrington. The pastor was 
dismissed in consequence of troubles growing out of the Shay's w r ar, and the church, 
having languished for a time, became extinct. 

7. JVew Marlborough. Mr. Alexander of the north church, was installed at Men- 
don, Ms. April 12, 1786, where he remained until 1S03 ; about which time he removed 
to Fairfield, N. Y., where he instructed an academy. In 1S12 he founded and after- 
wards instructed the academy at Onondaga Hollow, where he died. He also assisted 
in the formation of many churches in the State of New York, and performed much min- 
isterial labor. Mr. Stearns of the south church, was pastor of the church at New Con- 
cord, N. Y., from 1781, to September 1792. Mr. Somers was settled at Spencertown, 
N. Y. from September 25, 1S05, to October 3, 1S24. Mr. Clapp was ordained colleague 
with the Rev. Jonathan Miller at Burlington, Ct. January 1, 1623, and dismissed in 1S29. 

8. Sandisfield. Mr. Jones never resettled, though he preached occasionally. He 
resided for a number of years at Rowe, in this State ; then removed to Skeenesborough, 
now Whitehall, N. Y., where he died at an advanced age. Mr. White now lives at 
Gull Prairie, Thalamazo county, Michigan Territory, and preaches to the people in that 
place and vicinity. 

9. Becket. Mr. Martin preached at Austerlitz, N. Y. from 17S0 to 17S9, then moved 
to Scipio or Sempronius. Mr. Hunn moved to the county of Ontario, N. Y., and per- 
formed useful labors among the early settlers of that region. His decease was at Ca- 
nandaigua. 

10. Otis comprises the former town of Loudon and district of Bethlehem. In Loudon, 
a church was formed February 2, 1779, with 7 members, and a church in Bethlehem, 
September 14, 1795, with 8 members. These received, including the members at the 



36 NOTES TO BERKSHIRE COUNTY. [AuG. 

formation, the first 101, and the second 33, prior to their union in the Otis church ; 
which, with those received since the union, as given in the table, make 312. Mr. 
Pomeroy was pastor of the church in Salisbury, Vt., from October 15, 1811, to November 
20, 1816, and of the church in Chester, Ms., from November 20, 1S19, to June 27, 1827. 

11. Richmond. Dr. Swift, after having preached in various places, was invited to 
settle in Bennington, Vt. where he remained pastor about 16 years. From Bennington 
he removed to Addison. His death took place at Enosburgh, while on a missionary tour. 
For his important labors among the early settlers, he has been styled the " apostle of 
Vermont." Mr. Perry was minister of Harwinton, Ct., from 1776 to 1784. 

12. Lenox, at first a part of Richmond. Mr. Munson removed first to Monroe, Ct, 
then to New Haven, then to Trumbull, and then again to Monroe, where he died. In 
Trumbull he supplied the desk about two years ; but he was generally too much of an 
invalid .after leaving Lenox, to be able to preach. For a considerable period before his 
death, his faculties were so much impaired, that he was lost on almost every subject ex- 
cepting religion. 

13. Washington. Mr. Knight was minister of the church in Franklin, N. Y., from 
August 20, 1817, to June 25, 1822. Mr. Hempsted was resettled at West Hartland, 
Ct., October 16, 1833. 

14. Lee, as a town, was taken mostly from Washington and Great Barrington. Mr. 
Parmalee died on a journey for his health, at the seat of Col. Abraham Bird, Shenandoah 
County, Virginia. 

15. Pittsfield. The second church in this town was formed from the first. To pre- 
pare the way for the reunion of these churches, Dr. Allen and Mr. Punderson were dis- 
missed. The former is now president of Bowdoin college, Maine, and the latter was 
installed pastor of the church in Huntington, Ct., November 10, 1818. Dr. Humphrey 
was pastor of the church in Fairfield, Ct., from 1807 until 1817. He was dismissed from 
Pittsfield that he might enter upon the duties of the presidency of Amherst college, 
where he was inaugurated October 15, 1823, and where he was installed pastor of the 
college church February 28, 1827. Mr. Bailey and Mr. Tappan were both dismissed on 
account of ill health. Mr. Bailey had been pastor for a time of a church in Norwich, 
Vt., where he was ordained November 24, 1819, and a professor in the " American 
literary, scientific, and military academy," then existing in that town. After his dis- 
mission from Pittsfield, he was some time preceptor of an academy at Rice's Creek, near 
Columbia, S. C. ; and he now preaches in South Carolina. Mr. Tappan is professor of 
intellectual and moral philosophy and belles lettres in the New York city university. 

16. Ballon. At first, the inhabitants of this town attended public worship at Pitts- 
field. Alter leaving Dalton, Mr. Thompson resided some years and probably preached 
in Sangersfield, N. Y. 

17. Lanesborough. Dr. De Witt was installed pastor of the second reformed Dutch 
church in Albany, N. Y., whence he was removed that he might become professor of 
biblical history, &c. in the theological school of the reformed Dutch church, and one of 
the professors in Rutgers college, N. J. Mr. Sheldon was dismissed by reason of ill 
health. He now instructs a school in Stockbiidge, and preaches occasionally. 

18. Williamstown. Mr. Welch went as chaplain with a regiment to Canada, in the 
winter preceding his death. He died of the small pox, near Quebec. Mr. King was 
pastor of the second church in Norwich, Ct, from May 1787, till 1811. The faculty and 
students of Williams college, have generally worshipped on the Sabbath with the people 
of the town. For a considerable period the presidents have regularly supplied the desk 
one third of the time, sometimes assisted by a professor, when the stated pastor has 
preached to a portion of his charge in the southern section of his parish. The Rev. 
Ebenezer Fitch, D. D. the first president, was a native of Canterbury, Ct., and was 
graduated at Yale college in 1777, where he was tutor at two different periods, to the 
amount in both of 8 years. He is said to have been a preacher when he came to this 
town, and opened the free school in 1791 ; which was incorporated as a college two 
years afterwards. He was ordained at Williamstown by the Berkshire Association, June 
17, 1795. Soon after his resignation in September 1815, he was installed pastor of the 
church in West Bloomfield, N. Y., where he died March 21, 1833, aged 78. The Rev. 
Zephaniah Swift Moore, D. D. the second president, a native of Palmer, Ms., graduate 
of Dartmouth College 1793, a theological student of Dr. Backus, of Somers, Ct. 5 was 
pastor of the church in Leicester, Ms., from 1798 to 1811, and preceptor during a part of 
the time of Leicester academy ; from 1811 to 1815, he was professor of languages in 
Dartmouth college. In addition to his services as president, he was professor of theology 
in Williams college, from 1815 to 1821, when he became president of the Collegiate 
Institution at Amherst, now Amherst college ; where he died June 30, 1823, aged 52. 
The Rev. Edward Dorr Griffin, D. D. has been president and professor of theology since 
1821. He is a native of East Haddam, Ct., graduate of Yale college, 1790. His theo- 



1834.] 



NOTES TO BERKSHIRE COUNTY. 37 



logical instructor was the Rev. Jonathan Edwards, D. D., then of New Haven. He 
was pastor of the church in New Hartford, Ct, from 17.95 to 1801, then pastor of the first 
Presbyterian church Newark, N. J., afterward* professor of pulpit eloquence in the 

Divinity college at Andover, pastor of Park street church, Boston, and of the second 
Presbyterian church in Newark. 

19. Adams. Fort Massachusetts was built within the limit'* of this town about 1711, 
and some English people may have resided in and about !be (bit from that lime onward, 
until more regular and extensive settlements were commenced about 1763 or 4. The 
first settlers were Congregationalists ; but in a few. years they sold their farms to persons 
of other denominations. In consequence of this, Mr. Todd was dismissed, and the 
church declined and expired. He had been minister in Northbury, (a parish of Water- 
bury,) now Plymouth, Ct., from about 1740 to 1760. From Adams he removed first to 
Northfield, Ms., and then to Orford, N. H., where he occasionally preached, and where 
he died. 

20. Windsor. Mr. Avery was dismissed that he might accept the office of chaplain 
in the army of the United States. He was settled in Bennington, Vt., from May 3, 1780, 
till June, 1783, and then at Wrentham, Ms. In the latter part of his life he removed to 
Chaplin, Ct. His death occurred while on a journey to Middlebury, Vt. Mr. Fish was 
installed at Gilsum, N. H. The second church was at first called the Savoy church, 
because a part of the members lived in that town, Mr. Poole has been settled at Brutus 
and at Ira, N. Y. 

21. Peru. This town was priginally called Partridgefield. Mr. Tracy was installed 
the first minister of Norwich, Ms., in May 1781, and dismissed February 13, 1799. He 
afterwards preached in vacant places, and went on missions. Mr. Leland pursued for 
some years before he studied theology, the business of farming. He was advanced to 
the rank of a captain in the militia, and commanded a company at the battle of Bunker 
Hill. Mr. Hawkes was resettled in the adjoining town of Cummington, April 20, 1825. 

22. Hinsdale was taken from Peru and Dalton, and incorporated as a parish in 1795. 

In addition to the 28 churches mentioned in the foregoing table, 3 of which are ex- 
tinct, and one is reunited to the church from which it was taken, there have been 5 
churches formed in the county which have never had pastors settled over them, viz., 
the Loudon and Bethlehem churches, spoken of in note 10, and the churches of Florida, 
Mount Washington, and West Stockbridge Village. The Florida church was organized 
May 4, 1814, with 11 members, and was dissolved December 25, 1831, having had in all 
from the beginning, IS members. Fifteen of these were added to the church in North 
Adams, and others to the church in the adjoining town of Charlemont, in Franklin 
county. The church in Mount Washington was organized in September 1831, with 22 
members. This had received 3 members prior to January 1, 1S34, and had then 24. The 
church in West Stockbridge Village was organized December 25, 1833, with 27 members. 

The number of Congregational churches now existing in the county is 27, and the 
total of members on the first of July last, was 5,095. There are 7 towns in which 
there is no church of this denomination, viz., Alford, Hancock, New Ashlord, Cheshire, 
Savoy, Florida, and Clarksburgh. 

Of the 83 different ministers settled in the county, almost all have been members of 
the Berkshire Association, formed in 1763. The few previously settled may have been 
connected with the " Old Hampshire Association." A few since settled, have been con- 
nected with the Mountain Association. All the pastors now, excepting one, belong to 
the County Association. Forty-three of the ministers were born in Connecticut, 30 in 
Massachusetts, 3 in New York, 2 in New Hampshire, 2 in Vermont, and one in each of the 
States of New Jersey, and Maine. The birth-place of one is not ascertained. Thirty- 
nine were educated at Yale college, 16 at Williams, 7 at Harvard, 6 at Dartmouth, 4 at 
Union, 3 at Princeton, 2 at Middlebury, and 1 at Amherst. Seven were not publicly ed- 
ucated. Most studied divinity before theological seminaries were established in the country ; 
a few studied at college after taking their degrees, or while acting as tutors, perhaps with- 
out any formal guidance except what they obtained from books ; most, however, studied 
with settled clergymen, with the Edwardses, Bellamy, Backus, West, Sec. Sixty-three 
first settled in this county; or had been previously settled elsewhere. Many have been 
dismissed, some from the infirmities of age, some from sickness, and some from other 
causes. None whose names are given in this paper, have been deposed for heresy or im- 
morality ; none have abandoned the ministry through disrelish for its services. Forty-two 
are dead ; of these, 34 whose ages are known, the average age was 61 years nearly. The 
congregations with which they have labored are very different in size, and have furnished 
distinct opportunities and facilities for usefulness. The great additions to some of the 
churches in more recent periods, are to be mostly ascribed to the precious revivals with 
which they have been favored. A very large proportion of those who have ever been 
admitted to the churches are now living. The Congregationalists are the most numerous 



33 MISSIONS OF THE UNITED BRETHREN. [AUG. 

denomination in the county, though there are a very considerable number of churches of 
the Baptist, Methodist and Episcopal denominations. The number of professors, and it is 
hoped of those who may be regarded as living and active Christians, in those denomina- 
tions, is such as to call for gratitude and praise to the Father of mercies. But how- 
many are there, alas ! in our population, who know not the Lord! and what need is there 
of fidelity, both in ministers and churches, that the cause of God may be preserved and 
advanced. 



MISSIONS OF THE UNITED BRETHREN. 

From the last number of the United Brethren's Missionary Intelligencer, we 
have derived the following facts, which constitute a centennial view of that 
mission. 

1. During the past century, the Christian faith has been generally introduced 
among the inhabitants of the western coast of Greenland, whose number is at 
present estimated at about 6,000. The portion of the coast referred to, extends 
from the neighborhood of Godhaab, on Baal's river, lat. 65, to Staatenhuk, lat. 
60, a distance of about 350 English miles. 

2. Four Christian congregations have been established, to which are attached 
about 1,800 Greenlanders of all ages, in various degrees of church connection. 
The members of these congregations, with the exception to be hereafter noticed, 
reside at the several settlements, under the immediate pastoral charge of the 
missionaries, and in the regular enjoyment of all the ordinances of a church of 
Christ. The stations referred to were founded in the following years : — New 
Herrnhut, in 1733 ; Litchtenfels, in 1758 ; Lichtenau, in 1774 ; Fredericksthal, 
in 1824. 

3. The work of education has meanwhile been proceeding in the most satis- 
factory manner. By means of schools, established at the different settlements, 
instruction has become nearly general ; there being few individuals belonging 
to the older congregations, who are not able both to read and to write. Litera- 
ture they have, indeed, none, but what is contained in the Holy Scriptures. 
The whole of the New Testament, and a considerable portion of the Old, have 
been translated into the vernacular tongue. The former was printed about ten 
years ago, by the kindness of the British and Foreign Bible Society, and is now 
in general circulation, to the great joy of the Greenland converts. 

4. From the earliest period of the mission, the employment of native assist- 
ants of both sexes, has been productive of the most beneficial results. Not a 
few of their number have been distinguished for gifts and grace, and have ap- 
proved themselves faithful servants and handmaids of Jesus, to whom the mis- 
sionaries could not hesitate to give the right hand of fellowship. At the present 
time their services are more than ever important ; the system adopted in 1777 
by the Danish authorities, with the design of improving the trade, having re- 
cently been followed up with renewed zeal, and, in some instances, with a 
degree of success which has given much anxiety to our brethren. Were it not 
for the employment of native assistants, those members of our congregation who 
are constrained to reside at the distance of many miles from their European 
instructors, would for the most part be destitute of the means of mutual edifi- 
cation. 

5. The effects of the preaching of the gospel upon the moral and social con- 
dition of the Greenlanders have been, in every respect, most cheering and ben- 
eficial. The national superstitions have almost entirely disappeared. The 
practice of sorcery is scarcely known among the dwellers on the western coast, 
and is becoming more and more disreputable among their countrymen to the 
eastward of Staatenhuk. Cruelty and licentiousness, with a whole train of at- 
tendant vices, have been successfully counteracted by the influence of Chris- 
tianity, and have given place to brotherly kindness, good order, decorum, and 
such a measure of civilization, as is compatible with their peculiar circum- 
stances. 



1834.] MISSIONS OP THE UNITED BRETHREN. 39 

According to the latest returns, which have reached this country, the number 
of Greenlanders, in connection with the Brethren's Church, is as follows : — 

At New-Herrnhut, . . . . 363 of whom about 190 are communicants. 

Liebtenfels, 365 " " '200 do. 

Lichienau, 661 " « 310 do. 

Fredericksthal, .... 419 " " ICO do. 

Total, (including children,) 1,808 of whom about 830 are communicants. 

These congregations are under the care of nine married and seven unmarried 
missionaries ; in all 25 brethren and sisters. 

During the past century there have been engaged in the service of the mis- 
sion, 64 brethren and 38 sisters ; in all 102 persons. Of this number, brother 
John Beck was employed for a period of 43 years, and his son, Jacob Beck, for 
52. John Sorensen, 47 ; John Fliegel, 41 ; John G. Gorcke, (still living at 
Herrnhut, in Saxony, in retirement,) 44; J. Grillich, (still in service,) 46 ; J. 
Conrad Kleinsehmidt, (still in service,) 40 years * Four persons have lost their 
lives by shipwreck, on their return to Europe — Daniel Schneider, in 1742 ; the 
widow sister Konigseer, and the single brother, Chr. Heinze, in 1786 ; and 
brother J. F. Kranich, in 1824. 

Missionary Stations of the United Brethren's Church, 

With the names of the Missionaries employed in them ; and the number of Converts 

belonging to each, towards the close of the year 1833. 

In this catalogue m. denotes married ; w. widowed ; s. single; cong. the congregation, including baptized 
children and catechumens. The numbers are derived from the latest returns to which the compiler has 
had access. 

GREENLAND, commenced 1733. 

New-Herrnhut (1773.) — m. Brn. Grillich, Tietzen ; s. Brn. Herbrich, Richter ; cong. 

363. Lichtenfels (1758). — m. Brn. Eberle, Mehlhose ; s. Brn. Caspar Kogel, Lund ; 

cong. 365. Lichtenau (1774).— m. Brn. Muller, J. Kogel ; s- Br. Baus ; cong. 651. 

Fredericksthal (1824). — m. Br. Ihrer ; s. Brn. de Fries, Ulbricht ; w. Sr. Klein- 
sehmidt ; cong. 419 ; Br. Lebraan and his wife on a visit in Europe. Total — 4 stations, 

24 missionaries, and 1,808 Greenland converts, including about S30 communicants. 

LABRADOR.— 1770. 

Nain (1770). — m. Brn. Lundberg, Henn, Beck ; s. Br. Fritsche ; cong. 252. Okkak 

(1776). — m. Brn. Knaus, Stitrman, Morhardt, Korner ; cong. 326. Hopedale (17S2). 

— m. Brn. Meisner, Kunath, Glitsch ; s. Br. Albrecht; cong. 194. Hebron (1S30). 

— tn. Brn. Stock, Mentzel ; s. Brn. Kruth, Freytag ; cong. 102 ; Br. Herzberg, visiting 

in Europe. Total — 4 stations, 29 missionaries, and S74 Esquimaux converts, of whom 

319 communicants. 

NORTH AMERICA.— 1734. 

Among the Delaware Indians in Upper Canada, New-Fairfield (1792). — m. Brn. 
Luckenbacb, Miksch, Vogler ; cong. 232. Among the Cherokees in Georgia and Ten- 
nessee, Spring-Place (1801). — m. Br. Clauder ; cong. 67. Oocheology at present 

without a missionary ; cong. 50. Total — 2 stations, 8 missionaries, and 349 Indian con- 
verts, of whom about 70 communicants. 

WEST INDIES. 
Danish Islands. — 1732. 

In St. Thomas. New-Herrnhut (1732). — m. Brn. Sybrecht, Damus, "Wied ; cong. 

706. Niesky (1753).— m. Brn. Boenhoff, Schmidt ; w. Br. Eder ; cong. 979. In 

St. Croix. Friedensthal (1751). — m. Brn. Muller, Freytag; to. Sr. Klingenberg ; 

cong. 2,022. Friedensberg (1771). — m. Brn. Sparmeyer, Jungbans ; cong. 1,966. 

Friedensfeld (1805).— m. Brn. Staude, Kleint, Popp ; cong. 2,400. In St. Jan. 

Bethany (1754).— m. Brn. Blitt, Keil; cong. 437. Emmaus (1782).— m. Brn. Schmitz, 

Meyer ; cong. 925 ; Br. Plattner and his wife visiting in Europe. Total — 7 settle- 
ments, 36 missionaries, 9,435 negroes, of whom about 4,000 communicants. 

* Since deceased. 



40 PERIODICAL PRESS IN BRITISH INDIA. [AUG. 

Jamaica.— 1754. 

New 'Eden, (1816).— m. Br. Renkewitz ; cong. 1,144. Irwin Hill (1815).— m. Br' 

Ricksecker; corc°\ 417. Fairfield (1823).— ro. Brn. Ellis, Collis ; cong. 2,029. 

New-Carmel (1827).— m. Brn. Scholefield, Pleiffer ; cong. 1,078. Mesopotamia (re- 
newed in 1831).— m. Br, Pemsel ; cong. 175. New Fulnec (1830). — m. Br. Zorn ; 

cong. 303. New Bethlehem (Malvern). — m. Br. Hainan. On their voyage thither, 

Br. and Sr. Robhins. Total— 7 settlements, 20 missionaries, 5,146 negroes, of whom 

1,478 communicants. 

Antigua. — 1756. 

St. John's (1761).— m. Brn. Harvey, Thraen, Zellner, Shick; cong. 6,478. Grace- 
hill (1773).— m. Brn. Mohne, Brunner ; cong. 3,025. Graeebay (1797).— m. Br. 

Coleman; cong. 1,160. Newfield (1817).— m. Brn. Mtintzer, Morrish ; cong. 1,324. 

Cedar Hall (1822). — m. Brn. Bayne, Zetzsche ; w. Br. Newby ; cong. 2,375. 

Total-— 5 settlements, 23 missionaries, 14,362 converts, of whom 5,442 communicants. 

St. Kitts.— 1775. 

Basseterre (1777). — m. Brn. Kochte, Bigler; cong. 2,968. Bethesda (1819).— m. 

Brn. Hoch, Simon; cong. 1,867. -Bethel (1832).— m, Br. Seitz ; cong. about 200. ~ 

Total — 3 settlements, 10 missionaries, 5,035 converts, including 1,137 communicants. 

Barbadoes. — 1765. 

Sharon (1767).— m. Brn. Taylor, Klose ; cong. 1,178. Mount Tabor (1825).— m. 

Br. Zippel ; cong. 196. Total — 2 settlements, 6 missionaries, 1,374 converts, of whom 

282 communicants. 

Tobago.— 1790 (renewed 1827.) 

Montgomery (1827). — m. Br. Coates ; on their voyage thither, Br. and Sr. Light.— 1 
settlement, 4 missionaries ; cong. 253. — 18 communicants. 

Surinam. — 1725. 

Paramaribo (1767). — w. Brn. Passavant, Graff, Bohmer, Hartman, Schmidt, Treu ; 
cong. 3,089, beside 264 living on plantations ; on a visit in Europe, Br. and Sr. Voigt ; on 

their voyage thither, Br. and Sr. Jacobs. Total — 1 settlement, 16 missionaries, 3,353 

converts, including about 1,200 communicants. 

SOUTH AFRICA 1736 (renewed 1792). 

Gnadenthal (1792). — m. Brn. Hallbeck, Stein, Nauhaus, Brauer, Sondermann; s. Br. 

Schopman ; w. Srs. Kohrhammer, Schultz ; cong. 1,319. Groenekloof (1808) — m. 

Brn. Clemens, Lemmertz, Lehman, Meyer ; cong. 608. Hemelen-Aarde (1823).— m. 

Br.Tietze; cong. 82. Elim (1824).— m. Brn. Teutsch, Luttring ; cong. 184. Enon 

(1818).— m. Brn. Genth, Halter, Hornig; cong. 450. Shiloh (1828).—?/?, Brn. 

Fritsch, Hoffman ; s. Br. Bonatz ; cong. 320. Total — 6 stations, 38 missionaries, 2,963 

converts of the Hottentot, Caffre, Tambookie, and other native tribes ; among whom 
1,043 communicants. 



General Summary.— 42 stations, 214 missionaries, and 44,952 converts, of whom 
about 15,800 are communicants. Of these 2,682 are Greenlanders and Esquimaux, 349 
Indians, 38,958 negroes and persons of color, and 2,963 Hottentots, and other natives of 
Southern Africa. 



THE PERIODICAL PRESS AND EDUCATION IN BRITISH INDIA. 

In 1814, there existed in Bengal, only the Calcutta Government Gazette. In 
1820, there were five periodicals. In 1830, thirty-three. At the present time, 
there are in Calcutta, eight daily English newspapers, two papers issued three 
times a week, one twice a week, nine weekly, six monthly, four quarterly, and 



1831.] PERIODICAL PRESS IN UHII'ISII INDIA. <1 I 

six annually, thirty-one in all. There is a large number in addition, In the 
provinces. In Calcutta, there are fourteen native newspapers, one of them pub- 
lished in Bengalee, Persian, and Ilindoostance. The Bengal Ilurkaru, one of 
the daily English newspapers, is as large as the London Morning Post, and 
circulates about 1,000 copies, has generally a page of well paying advertise- 
ments. Its cost, independent of postage, is 20 rupees a quarter. The post 
in India is carried by men who run at the rate of five miles an hour. The 
monthly publications are the Bengal Register, Sporting Magazine, Monthly 
Journal, Asiatic Society Journal, Calcutta Christian Observer, United Service 
Journal; the quarterly are the Bengal Army List, Calcutta Quarterly Review, 
and Quarterly Register; the annuals are the Bengal Souvenir, Orients] Pearl, 
Calcutta Directory, General Register, and Bengal Almanac. Two of the Eng- 
lish newspapers, the Reformer and the Inquirer, are the property of and con- 
ducted by natives themselves, with distinguished ability. The Madras and 
Bombay press is less extensive than that of Bengal. The English publications 
at Madras are eight; at Bombay ten; besides several native publications. 
There is no stamp duty or censorship on the periodical press in India. Lord 
William Bentinck has caused the following notice to be published in the several 
journals of the presidency. "The governor-general invites the communication 
of all suggestions tending to promote any branch of national industry, to im- 
prove commercial intercourse by land or water, to amend any defects in exist- 
ing establishments, to encourage the diffusion of general education and useful 
knowledge, and to advance the general prosperity and happiness of the British 
empire in India., This invitation is addressed to all native gentlemen, land- 
holders, merchants, and others ; to all Europeans, both in and out of the service, 
including that useful and respectable body of men, the indigo planters, who, from 
their uninterrupted residence in the mofussil (interior), have peculiar opportuni- 
ties of forming an opinion upon some of these subjects." 

Many of the printing offices in different parts of India are managed entirely 
by natives. Mr. Samuel Smith's subscription library and reading rooms are 
more numerous and valuable than any which can be found in London. There 
are several lithographic establishments in Calcutta, one at Cawnpoor, and one 
in Persia. 

It was stipulated at the last renewal but one of the East India Company's 
charter, that £10,000 should be annually devoted from the surplus territorial 
revenue of India, to the purpose of education. In some years the Company 
have doubled, and in some years trebled the amount laid down in the act. Sir 
Alexander Johnston, in his late able report to the Royal Asiatic Society, stated 
that in Madras, the proportion of inhabitants who have been taught reading, 
writing, and the rudiments of arithmetic, in their own language, amount to one 
infive. 

The Calcutta Madrissa, or Mohammedan College, was founded in 1781, by 
Warren Hastings, who provided a building for it at his own expense, but which 
was afterwards charged to the Company. The Bengal government also, at the 
recommendation of Mr. Hastings, assigned lands of the estimated value of 29,000 
rupees per annum, for the support of the institution, to promote the study of the 
Arabic and Persian languages, and of the Mohammedan law. In 1830, the 
number of students was 99. The Benares Hindoo Sanscrit College, established 
by Jonathan Duncan, Esq. in 1791, for the purpose of preserving and cultivat- 
ing the laws, literature, and religion of the Hindoos, had in 182-1, 271 students. 
The aid furnished by government up to that time, was 074,000 rupees. The 
Calcutta Hindoo Sanscrit College consists of 14 pundits, a librarian and servants, 
100 scholars on the foundation, and a secretary. In 1823, the Bengal govern- 
ment formed a General Committee of Public Instruction at Calcutta, for the 
promotion of education and of the improvement of the morals of the natives of 
India. The number of students in the Agfa College in 1830, was 203. In 1829, 
the number of students at the Delhi College' was 155. The Anglo-Indian Col- 
lege, at Calcutta, founded in 1810, by respectable native gentlemen, had in 1828, 
437 students, of whom 100 received gratuitous education. . This institution has 
decided superiority over any other, affording tuition to the natives in the English 

VOL. VII. 



42 HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY. [AUG. 

language. The foundation of the Bishop's College near Calcutta, was laid on 
the 15th of December, 1820, by bishop Middleton. Various societies in Eng- 
land, gave to the object £20,000. A general contribution produced £45,000 
more. The college consists of three piles of buildings in the gothic style. The 
college has now a fund of more than £50,000. There are on the establish- 
ment a principal, two professors, eight missionaries, two catechists, and a 
printer. There are various primary and elementary schools, viz. at Chinsurah, 
1,200 scholars; Ajmeer, 200; Boglipoor, 134; Cawnpoor, 75; Allahabad, 50 ; 
Dacca, 1,414 ; Cutwah, 40 ; Bareilly, 131 schools, 300 seminaries, with 3,000 
pupils ; and an established college with 50 students. In Delhi district there are 
about 300 elementary schools, in several of which the preceptors receive no 
pay, but teach " gratis, in hope of heaven." There are a great variety of other 
colleges and schools at Kidderpore, Burdwan, Moorshedebad, Hooghly, Nud- 
dea, Rajishaye, &c. 

Madras. There are endowed schools and teachers in the following districts 
in this presidency. Rajamundy, 69 teachers of the sciences, endowed with land, 
and 13 receiving allowances in money. Nellore, several brahmins and mus- 
sulmans, receiving 1,467 rupees per annum for teaching the Vedas, Arabic, and 
Persian. Arcot, 28 colleges and 6 Persian schools. Salem, 20 teachers of 
theology, and 1 mussulman school. Tanjore, 77 colleges and 44 schools, sup- 
ported by the rajah. Trichinopoly, 7 schools. Malabar, 1 college. A com- 
mittee of public instruction has been formed at Madras, similar to the one in 
Bengal, and much good has been effected by them. 

Bombay. The committee of the Native Education Society, voluntarily formed 
in 1815, and composed in nearly equal proportions of Europeans and natives, 
at a meeting 12th of April, 1831, stated that its aggregate receipts and disburse- 
ments within the year amounted to between 70 and 80,000 rupees ; that it has 
constantly on sale more than 40 publications in the native languages, many of 
them the product of the Bombay lithographic and other presses. At present 
there are 56 of the Society's schools, each containing about 60 boys, amounting 
in the whole to 3,000 boys under a course of education. There is a Hindoo 
college at Poona, at which premiums are awarded to the most deserving stu- 
dents. An admirable engineer college has been formed in Bombay, at which, 
according to the latest return, there were 86 students. The whole number of 
schools in the Deccan, Guzerat, and Concan, is 1,705, scholars 35,153. 

The English language is now making rapid progress in every part of India. 
With the view of encouraging the study of it, Lord Bentinck has adopted it in 
his correspondence with Fyz Mohammed Khan, one of the native chiefs in the 
west, which has created considerable sensation in Delhi. A demand for Eng- 
lish tutors and secretaries is already perceptible. The Bombay Durpun says 
that the English language is much more sought among the native population of 
that presidency than at any former period. The king of Oude has recently 
established an English school at Lucknow, and placed it under the control of 
Major Low. 



HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY. 

Harvard University, in Massachusetts, was founded in 1638; William 
and Mary College, in Virginia, in 1691 ; and Yale, in Connecticut, in 1701. In 
the British provinces lying between Connecticut and Virginia, that is, in New 
York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, the lower counties on the Delaware, and 
Maryland, there was not till 1746, any literary institution which was authorized 
to confer degrees in the arts. Several academies or grammar schools had been 
formed, but there was no institution in which a full course of liberal education 



IS34.] HISTORY OP THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY. 43 

could bo pursued. In this state of things, many individuals would he naturally 
desirous to have a college nearer to them than any which had been previously 
established. But besides the difficulty of procuring- funds and teachers, a char- 
ter for such an establishment was not then easily obtained. The views of the 
court of England were to be consulted, and they often militated with the in- 
terests and wishes of the colonies. The operation of these causes appears to 
have prevented the founding of any college in the provinces alluded to for forty 
or fifty years. Various and warm political controversies existed in the province 
of New Jersey, on account of which the general good was often overlooked or 
forgotten. 

In 1741, the synod of Philadelphia, representing the whole Presbyterian 
church in the British provinces, after a violent controversy among its members, 
was rent asunder, and two rival synods were formed — namely, New York and 
Philadelphia. The members of the former were almost unanimously the warm 
friends and coadjutors of the Rev. George Whitefield, while the members of 
the synod of Philadelphia were generally, if not universally, his decided oppo- 
sers. The members of these rival bodies were by their local residence, mingled 
in some measure with each other. In Pennsylvania, though geographically 
separated, there was perhaps nearly an equal number of the members of each 
synod. In New Jersey, there was not a single clergyman who belonged to 
the synod of Philadelphia. The whole Presbyterian population of the province 
was zealously attached to the interests of the New York synod. Both synods, 
from the time of their separation, made strenuous exertions to educate their 
youth for the Christian ministry, from the desire in part of extending each 
its own party. New Jersey was the undisputed territory of the synod of New 
York, and in this province resided the ablest champions of their cause, partic- 
ularly the Rev. Jonathan Dickinson of Elizabethtown. 

Urged on by such considerations, the members of the synod of New York 
resolved to make a strenuous and united effort to found a college in New Jersey. 
The object, however, was not easily attained. A large proportion of the pop- 
ulation of the province, consisted of other denominations, who took no interest 
in the views and feelings of Presbyterians. Yet unanimity, zeal, and perseve- 
rance, ultimately prevailed. Under the administration of John Hamilton, 
a charter was procured, but it was not recorded until Oct. 4, 1750. It is 
supposed that the founders of the college under the first charter forbore to 
record this instrument, because they hoped to obtain a more liberal one. No 
copy of it can now be found. It was, however, only under this first charter, 
that Mr. Dickinson acted as president of the college ; for he died, within a 
year after it was granted ; and nearly a year before the present charter, dated 
Sept. 14, 1748, was obtained. Governor Belcher came into office in 1747, and 
the present charter was obtained, in September 1748. In their first address to 
the governor, the trustees say, "We have often adored that wise and gra- 
cious Providence, which has placed your excellency in the chief seat of 
government in this province, and have taken our part, with multitudes, in 
congratulating New Jersey upon that occasion." " No event in Providence 
could have more entirely corresponded," remarks Dr. Green, " with the wishes 
and prayers of these excellent men, than the appointment of governor Belcher, 
at the time it took place. His sentiments and views accorded in all respects 
with their own. He was a man of fervent piety, an avowed friend and patron 
of Mr. Whitefield, an ardent lover of learning, and therefore an advocate for a 
learned as well as a pious ministry, a decided whig both in principle and action, 
and, to crown all, he was as zealously disposed to establish a college in the 
province as any of those, who had been so long laboring to effect it. He also 
happened to be high in the favor and confidence of the reigning family of 
Great Britain ; from whom, he had early received tokens of particular regard, 
and recently the appointment of governor of the province." 

Who were the trustees named under the first charter, when or where they 
met, or at what time or in what manner Mr. Dickinson was appointed presi- 
dent, cannot now be known. It is probable that he had long been accustomed 
to receive youth for instruction in classical literature. At that time, it was 
chiefly in this manner that preparation was or could be made for entering on 






44 HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY. [AlJG. 

the study of either of the professions. For this employment, Mr. Dickinson 
was better qualified than most of his brethren. It is certain that he was 
employed for the short period which intervened between the obtaining of the 
first charter and his death. About a year after his decease, it appears that six 
individuals received their bachelor's degree. The whole number of students 
under his care did not probably exceed twenty. Some of them boarded with 
him, and others in families near to his dwelling in Elizabeth-town. No public 
buildings had then been erected. It is presumed that an usher or tutor was 
employed to assist him. 

Rev. Jonathan Dickinson was a native of Hatfield Mass., son of Hezekiah and 
Abigail Dickinson, and was born April 22, 1688. Rev. Dr, Lyman says that 
the tradition is that his mother was left a widow, married and removed to- 
Springfield, with her children ; and that she educated her sons by the assistance- 
of her second husband's estate. Her son Moses was pastor of a Congregational 
church in Norwalk, Ct, from 1727 to 1778. Jonathan was graduated in Yale 
college, in 1706, and within one or two years was settled as minister of the 
first Presbyterian church in Elizabethtown. Of this church he was pastor nearly 
forty years. He possessed a clear and discriminating mind, and his general 
usefulness as a writer was by no means inconsiderable. His "Familiar Letters, 
upon important subjects in Religion," has lately been republished. He had 
studied divinity with the Rev. Abraham Pierson, the first president of Yale 
college. He died Oct. 7, 1747, aged 60. 

The pupils who had been the charge of Mr. Dickinson at Elizabethtown,, 
were, after his death, removed to Newark, about six miles, and placed under the- 
care of the Rev. Aaron Burr. He therefore was considered as the successor 
of Mr. Dickinson, even under the first charter. Whether there was any formal 
appointment to that effect is unknown. But it seems that he had charge of the 
youth, Avho had been collected at Elizabethtown for about a year before the- 
second charter was obtained. 

The first entry, in the first volume of the minutes of the trustees of the col- 
lege of New Jersey, is a copy of the charter granted by governor Belcher- 
The next entry is the following, "On Thursday, October 13, 1748, convened 
at New Brunswick, James Hude, Andrew Johnston, Thomas Leonard, Esquires,. 
Mr. William P. Smith, and Rev. Messrs. John Pierson, Ebenezer Pemberton,. 
Joseph Lamb, William Tennent, Richard Treat, David Cowell, Aaron Burr, 
Timothy Jones, and Thomas Arthur ; thirteen of those nominated in the charter 
to be trustees of the college ; who having accepted the charter, were qualified 
and incorporated according to the directions thereof. Thomas Arthur was 
chosen clerk. Voted, that an address be made to the governor to thank his ex- 
cellency for the grant of the charter. An address being drawn up by the Rev. 
Mr. Burr, was read and approved. Mr. Cowell communicated it to his excel- 
lency." November 9th, in addition to the preceding trustees, governor Belcher,, 
William Smith, Esq. Messrs. Peter Van Brugh Livingston, Samuel Hazard, and 
Rev. Messrs. Samuel Blair and Jacob Green, were qualified as trustees. Mr. 
Burr was unanimously chosen president, which appointment " he was pleased 
modestly to accept." The first commencement was holden on the same day. 
The president commenced the exercises in the forenoon with prayer and with 
publicly reading the charter. In the afternoon, he delivered "a handsome and 
elegant Latin oration." After the customary "scholastic disputations," the 
following gentlemen were admitted to the degree of bachelor of arts: Enos 
Ayres, Israel Read, Benjamin Chesnut, Richard Stockton, Hugh Henry, and 
Daniel Thane. The honorary degree of A. M. was then conferred upon 
governor Belcher. This was succeeded by a salutatory from Mr. Thane, and 
the whole was concluded with prayer by the president. 

"Thus were the trustees," says president Finley, "possessed of a naked 
charter, without any fund at all to accomplish the undertaking. After various, 
solicitations in America, the contributions, though often generous and worthy of 
grateful acknowledgment, were by no means adequate to the execution of so, 
extensive a design. Therefore in the year 1753, two agents were sent to Great 
Britain to solicit additional benefactions. There the institution was honored 
beyond the most sanguine expectations." 



1834.] HISTORY OF TITE O0LLE6E OF NF.W JERSEY. 45 

The students in the mean time were scattered in private families in Newark, 
the public academical exercises being generally performed in the county court 
house. The great difficulties, both in respect to the moral and literary improve- 
ment of the young men, were successfully met by the vigilant and indefati- 
gable Burr. 

As governor Belcher was the founder of the college, so lie was the first 
who advised and urged the erection of the college edifice, when Ihe fimd- 
of the institution were so scanty, that had it not been for his advice and 
aid, the enterprise would have been deemed impracticahle. At a meeting at 
Newark, September 27, 175*2, governor Belcher advised the trustees to proceed 
immediately to determine upon a location for the college. The people of New 
Brunswick not having complied with the terms proposed to them for fixing the 
college in that place, it was voted that it should be established in Princeton, upon 
condition that the inhabitants of said place secure to the trustees two hundred 
acres of wood land, ten acres of cleared land, and £1,000 of proclamation 
money, all which is to be complied with in three months. On the 24th of 
January, 1753, it was announced that the conditions were fulfilled. The Rev. 
Gilbert Tennent of Philadelphia, and the Rev. Samuel Davies of Hanover, Va., 
the agents of the board in Great Britain, having procured liberal contributions 
in that country, it was determined forthwith to erect a college edifice, and a 
house for the president. From the same source, a small fund was afterwards 
formed to assist in paying the salaries of the officers of college. The college 
edifice was erected of stone, and the president's house of brick, both of which 
are now standing. The college building was for some years the largest college 
structure in the United States. It was first named Belcher Hall, but the worthy 
governor declined the honor, and suggested that it should be called Nassau- 
Hall, in honor of him of " glorious memory," William III., prince of Orange 
and Nassau.* It accommodated about 147 students, reckoning three to a cham- 
ber. The chambers are 20 feet square, having two large closets, with a window 
in each, for retirement. A hall of 40 feet was provided, ornamented with an 
organ, a portrait of king William, and of governor Belcher. In the year 1756, 
the students, to about the number of 70, removed from Newark to Princeton, the 
college building being so far completed as to be ready for their reception. 
The people of the country becoming more and more convinced of the impor- 
tance of learning, the number of the students rapidly increased. The labor of 
teaching fell principally on the president. He sometimes had but one tutor to 
assist him, and never more than two, while the college remained at Newark. 
He also had the charge of a grammar school during the whole time he was in 
office, in which pupils were prepared for college. This was considered as a per- 
sonal concern of the president. After his death, the trustees took the grammar 
school under their care. The tutors in the college from 1749 to 1758, were 
John Maltby, Samuel Sherwood, Jonathan Badger, Alexander Gordon, George 
Duffield, William Thompson, Benjamin Y. Prince, John Ewing, Isaac Smith, 
Jeremiah Halsey, and Joseph Treat. The public commencements, with one 
exception, during the presidency of Mr. Burr, took place at Newark. The 
second commencement was held at New Brunswick, where it was then probable 
that the institution might be established. Mr. Burr did not live to preside at 
the commencement at Princeton in 1757, having died two days previously. The 
disease of which he died, Avas greatly aggravated, if not entirely produced, by 
the exertions which he made in a state of great exhaustion and debility, to. 
prepare and preach the funeral sermon of governor Belcher. These eminent 
men and endeared friends expired within a month of each other ; the governor 
on the 31st of August, the president on the 24th of September, 1757. 

Aaron Burr was a native of Fairfield, Ct., and was born in 1716. He was a 
descendant, as it is supposed, of the Rev. Jonathan Burr, of Dorchester, Ms. 
He graduated at Yale college in 1735. In 1738, he was invited to take the 
pastoral charge of the Presbyterian church in Newark, N. J. In 1754, he ac- 
companied Mr. W 7 hitefield to Boston, having a high esteem for that eloquent 
preacher. Until 1755, he discharged the duties both of president and pastor of 

* The college has been sometimes called Nassau Hall, but not appropriately. Nassau Hc.ll is simply 
the name of the building. 



46 HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY. [AUG. 

the church. At that time, his pastoral relation was dissolved. " No clergyman 
in the State of New Jersey," says Dr. Green, "was prohably ever more 
beloved, respected, and influential, than president Burr. To the church of 
which he was minister, and to the college of which he was president, the loss 
and the regret which his death occasioned, cannot now be easily estimated." 
He was firm in his principles, ardent in emotion, and kept his eye fixed on the 
high destiny of man. At the approach of death, the gospel gave him support, 
and cheered him with lively consolation. He married, in 1752, Miss Esther 
Edwards of Northampton, daughter of Jonathan Edwards, his successor in the 
presidency. She died in 1758, the year after the death of her husband, in the 
27th year of her age ; leaving two children, one of whom was Aaron Burr, late 
vice president of the United States, and the other a daughter, who was married 
to judge Tapping Reeve, of Litchfield, Ct. " Mrs. Burr," says Dr. Green, " was 
in every respect an ornament to her sex, being equally distinguished for the 
suavity of her manners, her literary accomplishments, and her unfeigned regard 
for religion." 

The meeting of the board of trustees, which occurred immediately after the 
decease of president Burr, was not adjourned till the choice of his successor. 
The record is as follows. " A choice of a president of the college being pro- 
posed to the Board, it was ordered to be put to vote, whether the said president 
be now chosen or not ; which being voted accordingly, was carried in the 
affirmative. Whereupon, after prayer, particularly on this occasion, and the 
number of trustees present being twenty, the Rev. Mr. Jonathan Edwards of 
Stockbridge, was chosen by a majority of 17." During the interval between 
the death of president Burr and the arrival of president Edwards, the tuition 
was confided to the tutors, and the government to Messrs. William Tennent 
and David Cowell. " Such was the humility of president Edwards, that he 
looked on himself, in many respects, so unqualified for the business, that he 
wondered that gentlemen of such good judgment, and so well acquainted with 
him as he knew some of the trustees were, should think of him for that place. 
He addressed a letter to the Board, in which he labored to satisfy them that 
their choice had not been properly made. He thought it right, however, to 
submit to the decision of some judicious friends, and on their advising him to 
accept the presidency, he left his family in Stockbridge, and in January 1758, 
arrived in Princeton. While at Princeton, he preached in the college chapel 
several Sabbaths, to the great acceptance of the hearers ; but did nothing in 
the way of instruction, except to give out some questions in divinity to the 
senior class. The exercises, when they returned their answers, were repre- 
sented as very interesting and instructive. The small pox was at this time in 
Princeton, and likely to spread. Mr. Edwards had never had it, and by the 
advice of his physicians was innoculated. He appeared to have it favorably, 
and it was thought the danger was over. But a secondary fever set in, and the 
obstruction in his throat was such, that the medicines necessary to check the 
fever, could not be administered. It raged till it put an end to his life, March 
22, 1758. He was in the fifty-fifth year of his age. His last words were, 
"Trust in God and ye need not fear." He had the uninterrupted use of fiis 
reason, and died in perfect calmness and composure. Mrs. Edwards died on 
the 2d of October, in the same year. Thus the father and mother, the son and 
the daughter, were laid together in the grave, side by side, at Princeton, in the 
space of a little more than a year, though a few months previously, their dwel- 
lings had been more than 150 miles apart. 

The college derived reputation from the election of Mr. Edwards, but his ad- 
ministration was too short to permit him to do it much service, by his instruc- 
tions or his counsel. He was not inaugurated till five weeks before his death. 
Of the short time that he spent at the college, the largest part was passed 
under the influence of the disease which terminated his life. 

The trustees met on the 19th of April, and voted to pay to the executors of 
Mr. Edwards £100, being a half year's salary. They also chose Rev. James 
Lockwood of Wethersfield, Ct., president of the college. Mr. Lockwood de- 
clined the appointment. The reasons which induced him to decline, are not 
known. He was a man of great worth and of fcigh reputation, Perhaps it was 



1834.] history of the collect; of new jehsey. 47 

owing to the want of unanimity in his election hy the trustees, they h< 
divided between him, and Messrs. Davics and Finley* 

In the mean time it appears that the "former flourishing state of the college 
was greatly affected, by its being so long destitute of a fixed president. Toe 
college on its removal to Princeton consisted of about seventy pupils. This 
number was but little increased before the death of Mr. Burr, and was con- 
siderably diminished before the accession of Mr. Davics." The trustees, who, at 
different times, acted as presidents, and one for more than half a year as vice 
president of the college, always preached to the students, and probably gave 
them some religious instruction of a more private kind. Besides this, Messrs. 
Finley, Smith, and Green, were employed as teachers in the languages and 
science.* 

On the lGth of August, 1758, the Rev. Samuel Davies of Virginia, was elect- 
ed president. At the same time, £40 of books were ordered from England. 
About this time, it was ascertained that there were in the hands of the treas- 
urer of the college about £500, as a fund for the use of poor students, principally 
collected by Messrs. Tennent and Davies in England. This fund was now 
transferred from the care of the synod of New York, to that of New York and 
Philadelphia, the two having become again united, in 1757. At the commence- 
ment in September, 18 individuals received the bachelor's degree. On Mr. 
Davies's declining his appointment, the Rev. Jacob Green was appointed vice 
president. Mr. Davies was, however, elected again, May 9, 1759. He was 
settled in the ministry at Hanover, Va., about twelve miles from Richmond. 
His sphere of influence was wide, and his usefulness great. He thought his 
duty forbade him to leave his people. The trustees were divided in opinion 
in regard to the propriety of his second election. He and Dr. Finley were 
both admitted as candidates. Davies was the more popular and eloquent man ; 
Finley the more accurate scholar, as well as already practised in the business, 
of teaching. Neither of them coveted the office, and both eventually held it. 
When Mr. Davies was elected the second time, by advice of the synod, he 
accepted the appointment. He was inaugurated on the 26th of July, 1759. It 
was voted by the trustees, " that for the future, the president or tutors, who 
shall at that time officiate, have liberty to appoint any of the students to read 
a portion of the sacred Scripures, out of the original language, at evening 
prayers ; and that when they think proper, they may substitute psalmody for 
reading the Scriptures at evening prayers." 

The reputation, talents, and services of president Davies, were of incalcu- 
lable benefit to the institution. He was highly respected by all denominations. 
He was personally well known to the friends of the college, in Britain as 
well as in America. He was in the full vigor of life, with a mind capacious and 
ardent, and with habits of energy fully established. He introduced the practice 
into the college, of strict periodical examinations of the students, and also of 
the delivery by the members of the senior class of monthly orations. A poet 
and orator himself, he turned the attention of his pupils to the cultivation of 
English composition and eloquence. The number of students under his ad- 
ministration cannot be exactly ascertained, though it was probably about 100. 
His popularity as a preacher was great, wherever he went, or among whom- 
soever employed. 

Towards the close of January 1761, he was seized with a severe cold, for which 
he was bled. On the following Monday, he was attacked with a violent inflam- 
matory fever, which terminated in his death, Feb. 4, 1762, having remained in 
office but a little more than eighteen months. He was of WelcJi descent, and 
was born in the county of Newcastle, Delaware, Nov. 3, 1724. .^He early became 
pious,, very much in consequence of the prayers and instructions of his excellent 
mother. He acquired the greater part of his academical and theological educa- 
tion under the care of the Rev. Samuel Blair of Fog's Manor, Chester county, 
Pa. He was licensed to preach the gospel, when not quite twenty-three years 
of age. His pastoral labors were mostly performed in Hanover, and the adjoin- 

* We shall in some future number of this work gire a particular account of the revivals of religion which 
occurred in thia and in other colleges. 



48 HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE OP NEW JERSEY. [AUG. 

ing counties in Virginia. His death was regarded as no ordinary instance of 
mortality, but as causing a loss almost irreparable to the great interests of the 
church and the community.* Dr. Green says that he was probably the most 
eloquent and accomplished pulpit orator ever produced in this country. He used 
to say that every discourse of his, which he thought Avorthy of the name of a 
sermon, cost him four days' hard study in the preparation. Sometimes when 
pressed to speak extemporaneously, he said, " It is a dreadful thing to talk 
nonsense in the name of the Lord." His sermons have been published, and are 
extensively circulated and greatly admired. 

The Board did not meet after the death of president Davies till the May fol- 
lowing. The college duties were discharged by the tutors, Jeremiah Halsey, 
Jacob Ker, and Samuel Blair, who Avere " eminently qualified for their situation." 
On the first of June, 1761, the Rev. Samuel Finley Avas unanimously chosen 
president. It AA'as ordered that he have the usual salary, £200 proclamation 
money, with the usual privileges and perquisites. His salary was soon increased 
to £250. The privileges Avere the profits of the grammar school connected 
with the college, and the opportunity to educate his sons gratuitously. Till 
April 1762, there had been no house for public Avorship in the village of Prince- 
ton. Worship was celebrated in the college chapel, Avhere the inhabitants of 
the village used to meet with the students. The college trustees gave the land 
requisite for the purpose of erecting an edifice. A refectory for commons was 
built about the same time. In 1662, permission was granted by the legislature of 
the State to raise a lottery for the benefit of the institution. The sum to be 
raised was £3,000 proclamation money. This Avas the first assistance Avhich 
the college had received from the government of the State. In 1763, the pres- 
ident's salary Avas increased to £300. £75 Avas given to the senior tutor, and 
£50 each to the two junior tutors. The president's salary, probably on account 
of the depreciation in the value of money, Avas, in 1765, increased to £400, 
though it Avas soon diminished. In 1766 a donation of £100 Avas given to the 
college by Mr. John Williamson of Virginia, as a foundation in part for a pro- 
fessorship of divinity. The Rev. John Blair had been appointed a professor 
about a year before this donation was given. He continued in office till the 
accession of Dr. Witherspoon, who assumed the duties both of president and 
professor. The annual charge of education, Avas on an average as follows : 
tuition, £4; board, £15; rent, £1; Avashing, £3; Avood and lights, £2; contin- 
gencies, Gs ; — Total, £25 6s. About this time, Col. Alford of Chariestown, Mass. 
gave £500 to the college. A lottery, Avhich was commenced by some gentle- 
men of Philadelphia, yielded about £1,500, and the lottery granted by the State, 
£2,200 more. This accession of funds enabled the trustees to make some 
addition to the annual allowances of the college officers, though it was not 
sufficient to retain the tutors, three in number, in the character of professors. 
The college flourished under the care of Dr. Finley. He was known in Europe, 
and corresponded Avith some eminent men in that quarter of the Avorld. So 
high was the opinion of his Avorth in Scotland, that he received from the univer- 
sity of GlasgoAv, the unsolicited diploma of doctor in divinity. The Rev. Dr. 
John Woodhull, of Monmouth, thus describes him. "Dr. Finley was a man of 
small stature, and of a round and ruddy countenance. In the pulpit he was 
always solemn and sensible, and sometimes glowing Avith fervor. His learning 
was very extensive. Every branch of study taught in the college appeared to 
be familiar to him. Among other things, he taught Latin, Greek, and Hebrew 
in the senior year. The number of students Avas about 100. Thirty-one com- 
menced in the class before mine, and the same number in the class to Avhich I 
belonged. These Avere the largest classes that had commenced at that time. 
There Avere about 50 boys in the grammar school. Most of them boarded in 
college, and ate in the dining room. The trustees appointed and paid the 
teachers. They Avere excellent ones in Dr. Finley's time, namely Joseph 
Periam and Tapping Reeve." 

* An excellent biography of president Davies may be found in the Richmond Virginia Literary and Evan- 
gelical Magazine, from the pen of Dr. Rice. He left a widow, three sons— Col. William Davies, John 
Rodgers Davies, Esq. and Samuel Davies, and one daughter. Mrs. Martha Davies, his mother, after his 
death, was taken into the family of the Rev. Dr. John Rodgers of New York. 



1834.] HISTORY OV THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY. 49 

Unremitted attention to the duties of his station very sensibly affected J)r. 
Finley's health, and caused an obstruction in his liver, which put a period to his 
life, July 17, 17GG, in the 51st year of his age. He died in Philadelphia, when 
he was buried. He emphatically died in the Lord, triumphantly rejoicing in his 
great salvation." "My very soul," he said, "thirsts for eternal rest. 1 see the 
eternal love and goodness of God. I see the fullness of the Mediator. T see 
the love of Jesus. O, to be dissolved and be with him ! 1 long to be clothed 
with the complete righteousness of Christ. A Christian's death is the best 
part of his existence." During his whole sickness, he was never heard to utter 
a repining word ; and in all his farewells, he was never seen to shed a single 
tear, or exhibit any mark of sorrow.* 

On the 19th of November, 1766, the trustees of the college made a unani- 
mous choice of the Rev. John Witherspoon, D. D., LL. D., of Paisley, in Scot- 
land, as successor to Dr. Finley. Rev. William Tennent was appointed president 
pro tempore. On the 1st of October, 1767, it was announced that Dr. Wither- 
spoon had declined the appointment. His refusal was not occasioned by the 
discouraging accounts which had been transmitted to Scotland in relation to 
the state of the institution, by a party in Philadelphia, who wished to procure a 
decided preponderance of old school influence in the government of the college. 
The former party lines of the two synods were not yet obliterated. The re- 
luctance of Mrs. Witherspoon to leave her native country, was the chief, if not 
the sole cause of Dr. Witherspoon's refusal at this time. She was afterwards 
perfectly reconciled to the idea of his removal, and with the affection and piety 
for which she was eminently distinguished, cheerfully accompanied her husband 
to a foreign country, with no expectation of ever returning to Scotland. At 
this meeting of the trustees, the Rev. John Blair, of Fog's Manor, Pa., and a 
member of the Board, was chosen professor of divinity and moral philosophy ; 
Dr. Hugh Williamson, of Philadelphia, professor of mathematics and natural 
philosophy ; Mr. Jonathan Edwards, a tutor in the college, professor of lan- 
guages and logic ; and Rev. Samuel Blair, of Boston, president and professor 
of rhetoric and metaphysics. The following sums were fixed as salaries : — 
president, £200 ; professor of divinity, £175 ; professor of mathematics, £150 ; 
professor of languages, £125. Funds, however, being wanting to pay the 
salaries of the professors, it was voted that the former arrangement of a vice 
president and three tutors, be continued for one year. Mr. John Blair alone 
accepted his appointment. The other part, of the arrangement never took effect, 
it being proposed as a conciliatory measure, in respect to the old school party. 
Rev. Samuel Blair, now chosen president, the son of the Rev. Samuel Blair, of 
Fog's Manor, and nephew of Rev. John Blair, was at this time colleague pastor 
with the Rev. Dr. Joseph Sewall, of the Old South church in Boston. He was 
only twenty-eight years of age, but a youth of higher promise, says Dr. Green, 
was not to be found in the American church. Mr. Blair declined the office, 
because he understood that a re-election would secure the services of Dr. 
Witherspoon ; — a disinterestedness highly creditable to Mr. Blair. Dr. With- 
erspoon was unanimously re-elected. He did not arrive in the country till 
November, 1768. On the 15th of that month, he was inaugurated, x^bout this 
time, the synod of New York and Philadelphia ordered that a contribution be 
made in all the congregations under their care, for the support of a professor of 
divinity in the college. £50 were immediately realized.f 

As president of the college, Dr. Witherspoon rendered literary inquiries 
more liberal, extensive, and profound ; and was the means of producing an im- 

* Dr. Finley was born in the year 1715, in tlie county of Armagh, Ireland. He left his native country 
in 1734. In 1744, he was settled in the ministry in Nottingham, Bid., where he remained 17 years. He 
was twice married. His first wife was Miss Sarah Hall, a. lady of amiable character, by whom he had 
eight children. She died in 17bU In 1761, he married Miss Ann Clarkson, daughter "of Mr. Matthew 
Clarkson, an eminent, merchant of New York. She survived her husband more than forty-one years, and 
died in January, 1808. She left no children. Dr. Ebenezer Finley, the last surviving child of president 
Finley, died in Charleston, S. C. A daughter married Samuel Breeze, Esq. whose^onlv daughter was 
married to the Rev. Dr. Jedidiah Morse. 

t Thus far, tho writer of this article has been mainly indebted to the copious and well disested notes, 
appended by the Rev. Dr. Ashbel Green, to his baccalaureate addresses, published by E. Littell, Phila- 
delphia, 1822. 

VOL, VII. 7 



50 HISTORY OF THE COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY. [AUG. 

portant change in the system of education. He extended the study of mathe- 
matical science, and it is believed he was the first man who taught in America, 
the system of philosophy, which Dr. Reid afterwards developed. Scarcely any 
man of the age, had a more vigorous mind, or a more sound understanding. 
His name brought a great accession of students, and by his exertions, its funds 
were much augmented. 

Soon after the commencement of the war, New Jersey was overrun with 
British troops. In 1776-7, it became the theatre of hostilities. In January, 
1777, Princeton was occupied by a portion of the British army, which was 
attacked by general Washington. A part of one British regiment took post in 
the college, and made some attempt at resistance, but after a few discharges of 
artillery from Washington's army, the college was abandoned, and the greater 
part of the regiment were made prisoners. More than 100 of the British were 
killed, and 300 taken prisoners. The war of course prostrated every literary 
effort. The functions of the president were suspended, and he was immediately 
introduced to a new field of labor, being appointed a member of the convention, 
which formed the constitution of New Jersey. From the revolutionary com- 
mittees and conventions of the State, he was sent in 1776 a representative to 
congress. He was for seven years a member of that illustrious body, and he 
was always collected, firm and wise, amidst the embarrassing circumstances by 
which he was surrounded. His name is affixed to the declaration of inde- 
pendence. 

As soon as the state of the country would permit, the college was re-estab- 
lished, and its instruction was re-commenced under the immediate care of its 
vice president, Dr. Smith. Dr. Witherspoon was induced from his attachment 
to the college, to cross the Atlantic that he might promote its benefit. After 
his return, he devoted himself exclusively to his duties as president and a 
minister of the gospel.* Dr. Witherspoon died Nov. 15, 1794, aged 72; and 
was succeeded by the Rev. Dr. Samuel Stanhope Smith.f 

Dr. Smith was born at Pequea, Lancaster Co., Pa., March 16, 1750. He was 
the son of Rev. Robert Smith, D. D. He graduated in 1769, at the college of 
New Jersey, where he was afterwards for two years tutor. He was for a few 
years a preacher in Virginia, and president of the Hampden Sidney college. 
In 1779, he was appointed professor of moral philosophy at Princeton, and was 
succeeded in Virginia by his brother, John Smith. In the absence of Dr. 
Witherspoon, as member of congress, much of the care of college devolved 
on him. He was elected president in 1794, and on account of bodily infirmity, 
resigned in 1812. He died August 21, 1819, aged 79. 

Dr. Green thus describes the religious state of college during Dr. Smith's 
incumbency. " There were some instances, not known to me, although a 
trustee of the institution, of young men, who became pious, while they were 
members of college ; and there were always a number of religious students on 
the charitable funds, appropriated by the donors to the education of poor and 
pious youth, for the ministry ; and some also who had become pious before 
they entered college, who there supported themselves on their own funds. But 
there was certainly nothing that so much as approximated to a revival of 
religion ; and Dr. Smith's infirm state of health, in the latter part of his time as 
president, disqualified him for all vigorous action, in sustaining the government 
of the college ; and this favored that tendency to dissipation and dissolute 

* The exercises of the college were totally suspended for more than three years ; and the edifice was a 
barrack, in turn both far the British and American troops ; and the interior of it was completely defaced, 
exhibiting nothing but filth and dilapidation. In the spring of 1732, about two years after the re-com- 
mencemeut of the collegiate exercises, the walls of the building were still perforated in a number of 
places, the effect of the cannon balls, which had passed through them, from the artillery of the American 
army. Only two of the entries were in a habitable state. The morals of many of the students were 
greatly corrupted. Profane language was common among them. They had formed themselves into a 
military company, chose their officers, furnished themselves with muskets, learned the manual exercise 
and could not be kept from practising their evolutions, even during the hours of study, and in the college 
edifice. 

t Dr. Witherspoon was born in Yester, near Edinburgh, Scotland, February 5, 1722, aad was a lineal 
descendant of John Knox. He studied at the university of Edinburgh seven years, and at the age of 21, 
was licensed to preach the gospel. He was soon ordained at Beith, and from thence removed to Paisley. 
His works are very various in their subjects, and highly esteemed. They were published in four volumes; 
with an amount of his life, by Dr. Badgers, in 1802. 



1834.] LEICESTER ACADEMY. ">1 

morals, which had long prevailed, and which, aided by some other concurring 
causes, had risen to a most fearful height, when I was called to the presidency 
in the autumn of 1812." 

Among the instructors, who assisted Dr. Smith, were Dr. Green, bishop 
Hobart, Drs. R. Finley, Kollock, Neill, Linsley, Weeks, Mills, John Smith, Minto, 
Maclean, Caldwell, &c. 

The number of graduates during Dr. Smith's administration amounted to 527, 
about 29 on an average yearly.* 

The Rev. Dr. Aslibel Green, son of the Rev. Jacob Green, was president of the 
college from 1812 to 1822, when he resigned. lie now resides in Philadelphia, 
and edits the Christian Advocate. Soon after Dr. Green's inauguration, the 
college was blessed with a revival of religion, which was followed with very 
happy effects. At the commencement of it, the deficiency of Bibles was so 
great in college, that the shops in town could not supply it. This destitution 
of the means of grace was owing in a great measure to the baleful moral in- 
fluence of the American and French revolutions. About 40 individuals were, 
as it was thought, permanently interested in this work of grace. 

In 1822, the Rev. James Carnahan, D. D., a Presbyterian minister of Utica, 
N. Y., was chosen president of the college. He still remains in the office. 
He graduated at the college in 1800, and was afterwards a tutor for two years. 

The college of New Jersey is now considered to be in a very flourishing 
condition. The number of undergraduates, is about 150. The faculty consists 
of a president, seven professors, and three tutors. Provision is made for im- 
parting instruction in the Greek, Latin, French, German, Italian, Spanish, and 
English languages ; in mathematics, natural philosophy, chemistry, natural 
history, belles lettres, mental and moral philosophy, logic, political economy, 
natural and revealed religion, anatomy, physiology, &c. The libraries of the 
college and of the literary societies connected with it, contain 12,000 volumes. 
The college has a very valuable philosophical and chemical apparatus, a mu- 
seum of natural history, a small anatomical museum, and a mineralogical cab- 
inet. The principal edifice, Nassau hall, has been already described. In 
1833, another college building, 112 feet long, and four stories high, was erected. 
There are two other buildings, each 66 feet in length, 36 in breadth, and three 
stories in height, one used for a library and recitation rooms ; the other for 
a refectory, museum, apparatus, &c.f 

The principal benefactors of the college of New Jersey, have been governor 
Belcher, the family of lieutenant governor Phillips, of Boston, (s2,000,) John 
Williamson, Mr. Hugh Hodges, and Mr. James Leslie, of New York, (fund for 
poor and pious students,) colonel Alford, colonel Rutger's family, of New York, 
($6,500,) Dr. Elias Boudino^ ($8,000, and 4,000 acres of land,) Charles F. Mer- 
cer, Joseph Pitcairn, Dr. David Hosack, (1,000 valuable mineralogical specimens,) 
Jonathan B. Smith, and Samuel Bayard.J 



HISTORY OF LEICESTER ACADEMY. 

As this is one of the oldest and most respectable academies in Massachusetts, 
we are induced to place on our pages a brief account of its origin and progress, 
derived principally from an appendix to an address recently delivered by Mr. 

* Dr. Smith's wife was a daughter of Dr. Withcrspoon. His daughter married J. M. Pinturd, consul at 
Madeira. His published works are va-Iuabie. Among them, Lectures on Moral and Political Philosophy; 
Essays on the causes of the variety in the complexion and figure of the Human Species; Sermons; Lec- 
tures on the Evidences of Christianity ; Continuation of Ramsay's History of the United States, from 
1808 to 1817, &c. 

t See the History and Gazetteer of New Jersey, page 85, by Thomas F. Gordon, 1834, printed at Trenton. 

X The literary institutions of Princeton, are a college, theological seminary, three classical schools, two 
young ladies' schools, and three or four common schools. Princeton is a borough, partly in Somerset and 
partly in Middlesex counties, 50 miles from New York, and 40 from Philadelphia, on the main road between 
the two cities. It contains 185 dwelling-houses, and 1,100 inhabitants exclusive of 350 youths at the 
seminaries, ono Presbyterian church, and one Episcopal church. 



52 LEICESTER ACADEMY. [AUG. 

Luther Wright, preceptor of the academy. Leicester is a pleasant town of 
about 1,800 inhabitants in the western part of the county of Worcester, Ms., about 
midway between Boston and Northampton, and six miles west of the town of 
Worcester. The principal village has a commanding situation on the height of 
land, between the waters of the Atlantic at Boston, and those of the Connec- 
ticut river. The academy, (the second incorporated in the State, the first being 
Phillips academy, at Andover,) received an act of incorporation March 23, 1784, 
for the purpose of promoting "true piety and virtue, and for the education of 
youth in the English, Latin, Greek, and French languages, together with wri- 
ting, arithmetic, and the art of speaking ; also, practical geometry, logic, phi- 
losophy, and geography ; and such other of the liberal arts and sciences as 
opportunity may hereafter permit, and the trustees hereinafter provided shall 
direct." The trustees named in the act, were Lieut. Gov. Gill, of Princeton, 
Hon. Levi Lincoln, of Worcester, Hon. Timothy Danielson, of Brimfield, Rev. 
Messrs. Thaddeus Maccarty, of Worcester, Benjamin Conklin, of Leicester, 
Joseph Pope, of Spencer, Joseph Sumner, D. D., of Shrewsbury, Archibald 
Campbell, of Charlton, Joshua Paine, of Sturbridge, and Messrs. Ebenezer 
Crafts, of Sturbridge, Jacob Davis, of Charlton, Samuel Baker, of Bolton, Joseph 
Allen, of Worcester, Seth Washburn, of Leicester, and Rufus Putnam, of Rut- 
land. Messrs. Crafts and Davis, gave to the academy before its incorporation, 
lands, a large mansion house, and other appurtenances. For a fund to support 
the academy, £1,000 had been subscribed. Considering the depressed state of 
the country at the close of the war of the revolution, the efforts made to estab- 
lish the institution are worthy of much commendation. The mansion house 
above referred to was used as an academy-building till 1806. On the 4th of 
July of that year, a new building was dedicated. An address was delivered by 
the Rev. Dr. Sumner, and an oration by Rev. Dr. Bancroft, both members 
of the board of trustees. The building was neat, well proportioned, three 
stories high, and contained a dining hall, library, school-room, chapel, and six- 
teen lodging-rooms or parlors. It cost between $8,000 and $9,000. Unfortu- 
nately, the foundation was not sufficiently firm, and in consequence, many parts 
of the building settled, and became much injured. Considerable sums of money 
were expended in repairs, but to little purpose. On the 12th of June, 1832, the 
trustees voted to erect a new edifice on the site of the old one. This building 
being completed, was dedicated on the 25th of December, 1833, with prayer 
from the Rev. Micah Stone, vice president of the academy, and with addresses 
from the Rev. George Allen, one of the trustees, and Mr. Wright, the principal. 
The central part is 42 feet long and 40 broad, and each wing 30 feet square, 
making the whole length of the building 102 feet. The lower story is occupied 
with school-rooms, and accommodations for the families of the principal and 
steward. The second and third stories embrace 28 rooms for assistant instruc- 
tors and students. The Avhole cost of the edifice was $10,000. "School-rooms 
more convenient and pleasant, and combining more advantages for the accom- 
modation of instructors and students, it is believed, are not to be found in any 
academic building in the commonwealth." "The institution has already," say 
the trustees, "imparted to thousands the first rudiments of the arts and sciences, 
prepared many to be instructors of others, and fitted numbers, from year to year, 
to enter our colleges and universities, many of whom now fill important stations 
in church and state." 

The following are among the donations to the academy. 



Donation of Messrs. Davis & Crafts, $1,716 67 

Dr. Austin Flint, land, 100 00 

Lottery granted by General Court, . 1,419 22 
Donations in 1736, in Leicester, . . 2,896 90 
From other places at same time, . . 1,526 68 

" Hon. JVloses Gill, books, ... 260 00 
Township of land in Maine, . . . .9,200 00 

T. Newhall, legacy, 1,000 00 

Other individuals 1814—1822, ... 680 00 
Land in Paxton, by State, .... 40000 

Of which, including lottery, the State have given about #11,000 



Individuals in Leicester for philosoph- 
ical apparatus, 500 00 

Israel Waters of Charlton, bequest in 
1823 tosupport instructor of Cong. 
Calvinistic order, 8,000 00 

Isaiah Thomas, by will, 4,686 00 

N. Maccarty, 250 00 

Total, #32,654 47 



] 834.} CHURCHES IN BOSTON. 53 

The presidents of the Board of Trustees have been, 

Hon. Moses Gill, Princeton, . . . 1784— ISOOIRev. A. Bancroft, D. D. Worcester, 1818—110] 
Hon. Levi Lincoln, Worcester, • • 1800 — 1802 Hon. Levi Lincoln. do. IciJI 

Rev. J. Sumner, D. D. Shrewsbury, 1802—18181 

The principal preceptors have been, 

Benjamin Stone, 1784— 1788iSimeon Colton, 1807—1809 

Am'osCrosby, 1788— 1788 Luther Wilson, 1809—1812 

Samuel Sumner, 1788— 1790 1 Josiah Clark, 1812—1819 

David Smith, 1790— 1792J Bradford Sumner, 1819—1819 

Ebenezer Adams, 1792— 1806 John Richardson, 18I9— 1833 

Z. S. Moore, D. D 1806— 1807 1 Luther Wright, 1833 

Mr. S. Sumner was afterwards judge in the supreme court ; Dr. Moore, profes- 
sor at Dartmouth, and president of Williams and Amherst colleges. Mr. Adams, 
professor at Dartmouth. Among- the assistant instructors, have been Hon. Timo- 
thy Boutelle, of Maine, Hon. Timothy Fuller, of Groton, chief justice Richard- 
son, of New Hampshire, and Drs. Jackson and Shattuck, of Boston. Mr. Joseph 
L. Partridge, of Hatfield, lately tutor in Williams college, is associate principal. 
Mr. Wright is a native of Easthampton, educated at Yale college, where he 
was afterwards tutor a number of years, and subsequently connected with the 
Hon. John Hall, in the Ellington school, Conn. Hon. Abijah Bigelow, of Wor- 
cester, is treasurer of the academy, and Rev. John Nelson, of Leicester, sec- 
retary of the trustees. 



CHURCHES IN BOSTON. 

Baptist. 

First Baptist Church. 



Ministers. 


Settlement. 


Exit. 


Afinistera. 


Settlement. 


Thomas Gould, 


1665 


Oct. 1675 


Jeremiah Coady, 


Feb. 14, 1739 


John Miles. 






Samuel Stillman, D. D. 


Jan. 9, 1765 


John Russell, 


July 28, 1679 


Dec. 24, 1680 


Joseph Clay, 


Aug. 19, 1807 


Isaac Hull. 






James M. Winchell, 


Mar. 13, 1814 


John Emblen, 


1684 


Dec. 9, 1702 


F. Wayland, Jr. D. D. 


Aug. 22, 1821 


Ellis Callender, 


1708 


1728 ? Cvrus "Pitt Grosvenor, 


Jan. 24, 1827 


Elisha Callender, 


May 21, 1718 


Mar. 31, 1738 


William Hague, 


Feb. 4, 1831 



This church was constituted May 28, 1665. 

Exit. 

Aug. 1764 
Mar. 12, 1807 
Oct. 27, 1809 
Feb. 22, 182Q 
Sept. 10, 1826 
Sept. 24, 1830 

Thomas Gould was one of the original founders of this church. He died in Boston., 
where he was probably born. The individuals who founded this church, had held meet- 
ings for religious worship on Sabbath days for several years preceding. For thus devi- 
ating from the order of the churches they were treated with great severity. They held 
their meetings for some time on Noddle's island. Mr. Gould was imprisoned for nearly 
three years. — Mr. Miles was an Englishman, and was first settled at Uston, near Swan- 
zea in South Wales, from 1649 till his ejectment in 1662. He came to this country and 
formed a church in Rehoboth, Bristol county, in 1663. The legislature of Plymouth, 
granted to these Baptists the town of Svvanzea, to which they removed in 1667. — Mr. 
Russell was probably the son of James Russell, and grandson of the Hon. Richard Rus- 
sell of the same town. — Nothing definite is known of Mr. Hull and of Mr. Emblen. — 
Ellis Callender was a member of the church as early as 1669. — Elisha Callender, the son 
of Ellis, graduated at Harvard college in 1710. At his ordination, Increase and Cotton 
Mather, and Mr. Webb assisted. He was very faithful and successful in the pastoral 
office. His life was pure, and his conversation dignified. — Mr. Condy graduated at Har- 
vard in 1726. — Dr. Stillman was born in Philadelphia, Feb. 27, 1737. When he was 
eleven years of age, his parents removed to Charleston, S. C, and in that city he received 
the rudiments of an English education. He was first settled in the ministry at James's 
island, S. C, then in 1760 at Bordentown, N. J., where he remained two years. In Bos- 



54 CHURCHES IN BOSTON. [AUG. 

ton, he continued his benevolent labors from 1762 till his death. He was a very useful and 
popular minister, highly esteemed by persons of all denominations. A volume of his 
sermons has been published since his death. — Mr. Clay was born at Savannah, Ga., in 
1764, and graduated at Princeton in 1784. He was a judge of the district court of 
Georgia, from 1796 to 1801. He soon after became a minister, and was ordained as col- 
league of Mr. Holecombe, of the Baptist church in Savannah. He was afterwards in- 
stalled as colleague with Dr. Stillman. He was greatly respected for his learning and 
piety.— Mr. Winchell was the son of Col. Martin E. Winchell, and was born in Duchess 
county, New York, in 1791, graduated at Brown university, in 1812. He died of the 
consumption. He published an edition of Watts's Hymns, and a history of his church. — 
Dr. Wayland is a graduate of Union college, and is now president of Brown university. — 
Mr. Grosvenor is settled in Salem, Ms. — The present meeting-house, the third belonging 
to the church, was built in 1828, at the corner of Union and Hanover streets. The cost 
of the house and land was §44,000. Merchant shops, occupying a part of the basement, 
rent for $1,500 per annum. 

Second Baptist Church. 
This church was constituted July 27, 1743. 

Ministers. Settlement. Exit. I Ministers. Settlement. Exit. 

Ephraim Bownd, Sept. 7, 1743 June 18, 1765 Thos. Baldwin, D. D. Nov. 11, 1790 Aug. 29, 1825 

John Davis, Sept. 9, 1770 July, 1772 James D. Knovvles, Dec. 28, 1825 Oct. 7,1832 



Settlement. 


Exit. Ministers. 


Sept. 7, 1743 

Sept. 9, 1770 

Oct. 3, 1773 

April 23, 1788 


June 18, 1765 Thos. Baldwin, D. D. 
July, 1772' James D. Knovvles, 
Oct. 7, 1787 Baron Stow, 
April 27,1790| 



Isaac Skillman, D. D. Oct. 3, 1773 Oct. 7, 1787 Baron Stow, Nov. 15, 1832 

Thomas Gair, April 23, 1788 April 27,1790| 

The second Baptist. church was originally formed July 27, 1743, by three brethren of 
the first Baptist church, who seceded in consequence of disliking some of the opinions 
,of Rev. Mr. Condy. They held their first meeting at the dwelling-house of Mr. Isaac 
Bownd, in Sheafe street, near Copp's hill. The first meeting-house was built in 1746. 
The present in 1810. Dr. Baldwin was born in Norwich, Conn., Dec. 23, 1753. He was 
ordained an evangelist, June 11, 1783. He never received a public education. Remain- 
ing in Canaan, N. H. till 1790, he rendered himself very useful, in that town, and in the 
neighboring destitute regions. He died very suddenly, at Waterville, Me. where he 
had gone to attend a commencement. Of his own denomination in New England, he 
was the head, and to him all his brethren looked for advice. — Mr. Knowles is now a pro- 
fessor ki the Newton Theological Seminary. — Mr. Stow was formerly editor of a reli- 
gious newspaper published at Washington, D. C. and subsequently pastor of a Baptist 
phurch in Portsmouth, N. H. 

African Baptist Church. 

A church was gathered from among the colored people in 1805. A house was erected 
dn 1806, in Belknap street, 48 feet long, 40 broad, and three stories high. Rev. Thomas 
Paul, a colored man was installed minister, Dec. 4, 1806. He remained pastor till his 
death, April 13, 1831, aged 54. — Thomas Richie was settled over the church in Oct. 1832. 
The meeting-house and lot cost about $8,000. A respectable member of Dr. Stillman's 
church, named Cato Gardner, took the lead in building the church. 

Third or Charles Street Baptist Church. 

This church was constituted Aug. 5, 1807, by 5 members from the first, and 19 from 
the second Baptist church. Rev. Caleb Blood was minister from Oct. 5, 1807, till June 
5, 1810. Rev. Daniel Sharp, D. D. the present minister, was settled April 29, 1812. 
The edifice is of brick, 75 feet square, and is erected on ground which was formerly 
covered by Charles river. 

Federal Street Baptist Church. 

This church was instituted July 18, 1827. Rev. Howard Malcom, the present minis- 
ter, was installed Nov. 1828. The meeting-house was opened for religious worship, July 
18, 1827. It is a brick edifice, situated on Federal street, near Milk, and is 86 feet long, 
and 74 wide. The land on which the building stands, cost $16,000. It formed orig- 
inally a part of the garden of the Hon. R. T. Paine. 

There is a branch of the second Baptist society, established at South Boston, who have 
a very neat house of worship, for some time under the care of the Rev. Mr. Neal, now 
of Rev. T. R. Cressy, late of Hingham. 



1834.] 



cnuRcnEs in boston. 55 



Protestant Episcopal.' 

King's Chapel, School Street. 

This Episcopal society was formed June 15, 1686. 



Ministers. 


Settlement. 




Exit. 


Ministers. 


Settlement. 


Exit. 


Robert RatclifTe, 


1686 






Thomas llarvvard, 


April, 1731 


April 15,1736 


Robert Clarke, 


1686 






Addirigton Davenport, 


April 15, 1737 


Muy 8, 1740 


Samuel Myles, 


June 29, 1689 


Mar 


1, 1728 


Stephen Roe, 


1741 


1774 


George Ilatton, 


1693 


July, 


1690 


Henry. Caner, D. D. 


April 11, 1747 


Mar. 17, L776 


Christ. Bridge, 


Mar. 5, 1699 


Oct. 


1. 3706 


Chai lea Brock well, 


J717 


Aug. 20, 1755 


Jlenry Harris, 
Roger Prince, 


April, 1709 


Oct. 


f>; 1729 


John Trout beck, 


1755 


Nov. 1755 


June 25, 1729 


Nov. 


21, 1740 












After the revolution the remaining proprietors of the chapel adopted a Unitarian liturgy 
which they continue to use, while they adopt some of the forms of the church of Eng- 
land. Their ministers have been, 

Ministers. Settlement. Exit. Ministers. Settlement. Exit. 

James Freeman, D. D. Oct. 20, 1782 F. W. P. Greenwood, Aug. 29, 1824 

Samuel Gary, Jan. 1, 1809 Oct. 22, 1S151 

Dr. Freeman is the oldest surviving clergyman of the city. The present chapel is of 
plain unhammered stone, and was opened lor divine service in 1754. It is the only house 
in Boston, in which the old fashion of square pews is retained. 

Christ Church. 
This Episcopal society was formed Sept. 5, 1722. 

Rectors. Settlement. Exit. Rectors. Settlement. Exit. 

Timothy Cutler, D. D. Dec. 29, 1723 Aug. 17, 1765 William Walter, D. D. May 19, 1792 Dec. 5, 1800 

James Greaton, 1759 Aug. 51, 1767.Samuel Haskell, May, 1801 Sept. 1803 

Math. Bvles. Jr. D. D. April 22, 1768 April, 1775 Asa Eaton, D. D. Oct. 23, 1803 May, 1829 

Stephen 'Lewis, Aug. 1778 1785 William Cros well, June 24, 1829 

William Montague, April, 1786 May, 1792 1 

This church is situated in Salem street, near Copp's hill. The edifice is 70 feet long, 
50 wide, 30 high. The spire is 175 feet high. The house is furnished with the only 
peal of bells in the city. The doctrines of the church of England are preached without 
alteration. 

Trinity Church. 
This society commenced in April, 172S. 

Rectors. Settlement. Exit. | Rectors. Settlement. Exit. 

Addington Davenport, May 8, 1740 Sept. 8, 1746! J. S. J. Gardiner, D. D. April 22, 1792 July 29, 1S3G' 

William Hooper, An?. 28, 1747 April 14,1767 George W. Doane, April 7, 1828 1839 

William Walter, D. D. Jufy 22, 1764 Mar. 17, 1776 J. M. Wainwright, D. D. 1833 

Samuel Parker, D. D. May 19, 1774 Dec. 6, 1804| 

" The reason assigned for the erection of Christ church was that the King's chapel 
was not large enough to contain all that would come to it ; and the first steps taken- 
towards the foundation of Trinity church, were taken by reason that the chapel was full, 
and no pews to be bought by new comers." The first building, erected in 1735, stood 
till 1828. The materials of the present building, corner of Summer and Hawley streets, 
are of Quincy granite, and the whole structure presents a massive and very imposing 
appearance. 

St. Matthew's Church, South Boston. 

The first meeting was held March 31, 1816. The church was consecrated by bishop 
Griswold, on the 24th of June, 1818. Rev. John L. Blake was instituted rector in June, 
1824. The late Mrs. Elizabeth Bowdoin Winthrop was a very liberal benefactor to this 
church. The expenses of its erection were chiefly defrayed by members of Christ and 
Trinity churches. 

St. Paul's Church. 
This church originated in 1818. The building was consecrated June 30, 1S20. 

Rectors. Settlement. Exit. i Rectors. Settlement. Exit 

Samuel F. Jarvis, D. D. July 7, 1820 Aug. 22, 1825 John S. Stone, June 19, 1833 

Alonzo Potter, Aug. 29, 1826 Aug. 27, 1831 1 

The edifice is on Treraont street, between West and Winter streets, and is built of grey- 
granite, and is an imitation of a Grecian model of the Ionic order. The body of the 
church is about 112 feet long,.- 72 wide, and 40 high. 



56 



CHURCHES IN BOSTON, 
Grace Church. 



[Aug, 



This church, formed May, 1829, have had for ministers, Jame3 Sabine, George F. Has- 
kins, S. M'Burney, and Zachariah Mead. They now meet in Boylston hall. 



Methodist Episcopal. 

As early as the year 1768, when the British regiments were quartered in Boston, 
there were some of the soldiers who were Methodists, and soon gathered meetings. The 
Rev. William Black, who arrived in 1784, was the first regular preacher of this denomi- 
nation in Boston, unless Mr. Whitefield should be considered such. The first regular 
society was formed in Boston, in August, 1792. They erected a chapel in North Boston, 
in 1796. In 1828, a new chapel was erected in North Bennett street. In 1806, the 
second Methodist church was built in Bromfield street. It is of brick, 84 feet long, and 
54 feet wide. The South Boston Methodist society was incorporated Feb. 5, 1825. 
July 4, 1834, a new society commenced meeting in the church in Piedmont street, in 
the south part of the city, formerly occupied by Rev. James Sabine, a Presbyterian and 
subsequently an Episcopalian. The following is the list of ministers, who have officia- 
ted at the Boston stations. They are usually stationed only for two successive years. 

1811. Elijah Hedding, Erastus Otis. 

1812. William Hinman, William Stephens. 

1813. Daniel Webb, Elijah Hedding. 

1814. George Pickering, Joseph A. Merrill. 
1815-16. Elijah Hedding, Daniel Filmore. 
18)7-18. Timothy Merritt, Enoch Mudge. 

1819. B. R. Hoyt, V. R. Osborn. 

1820. B. R. Hoyt, D. Kilburn. 

1821. S.W.Willson,- E.Wiley. 

1822. E. Hedding, E.Wiley. 

1823. E. Hedding, John Lindsey. 

1824. Solomon Sias, Isaac Bonney. 

1825. T. Merritt, I. Bonney, A. D. Sargent. 

1826. T. Merritt, J. A. Merrill, J. Foster. 

1827. J. A. Merrill, J. N. Maffitt, D. Webb. 

1828. S. Martindale, E. Wilev. 

1829. S. Martindale, E. T. Taylor, to 1834, 
E. Wiley. 

1830. I. Bonney, J. N. Maffitt. 

1831. I. Bonney, A. D. Merrill. 

1832. J. Sanborn, J. Lindsey, S. W. Willson. 



1790. Jesse Lee. 

1791. Daniel Smith. 

1792. Jeremiah Cosden. 

1793. Amos G. Thompson. 

1794. Christopher Spry. 

1795. Evan Rogers, John Harper. 

1796. George Pickering. 

1797. Elias Hull. Daniel Ostander. 

1798. William Beauchamp. 

1799. Joshua Wells. 

1800. Thomas F. Sargent. 

1801. George Pickering. 

1802. Thomas Lyall. 

1803. T. Lyall, E. Kibby. 

1804. E. Kibby. 

1805. P. Jayne, R. Hubbard. 

1806. P. Jayne, S. Merwin. 

1807. G. Pickering, D. Webb. 

1808. D. Webb, M. Rutter. 

1809. E. R. Sabin, P. Munger. 

1810. E. R. Sabin, G. Norris. 



There is an African Methodist society in the western part of the city, with a brick 
church, 40 feet by 25. 

There is an Asbury, or Independent African Methodist church in West Centre street, 
of which Rev. Stephen Dutton has eharge. It is called the Ebenezer church, and was 
begun in 1826. 

Seamen's Meetings. 

There is a seaman's church, (Congregational,) under charge of the Boston Seaman's 
Friend Society, on Fort hill, built in 1830, 60 feet long, and 46 broad, with an appro- 
priate tower. Rev. Daniel M. Lord, is now the officiating minister. 

Another Bethel church for seamen, (Methodist,) was built in North square, in 1832, 
under the direction of the Boston Port Society, of which Rev. E. T. Taylor is the min- 
ister. It is of brick, 78 feet long and 53 broad. 



Other Denominations. 

In 1823, a Free Will Baptist Society, was commenced in Sea street. It was at first 
composed of persons who seceded from the other Baptist churches in town. They have 
since been known under the name of Christians. December 27, 1825, they dedicated 
a new brick church, corner of Sea and Summer streets. Rev. Joshua V. Himes is now 
their preacher. 

Universalists. The first Universalist church was organized in 1785. John Murray, 
Edward Mitchell, Paul Dean, and Sebastian Streeter, have been the ministers. They 
purchased in 1785, Dr. Samuel Mather's meeting-house. The second Universalist 
church is in School street, erected in 1817, 75 feet long and 67 broad. Rev. Hosea 



1834.] PAPACY IN TIIK UNITED STATES. 57 

Ballou, minister. The Central Univcrsalist church was formed in 1822. The meeting- 
house erected in 1822, in Bulfinch street, is of brick, 74 feet long;, and 70 broad. The 
Society belong to that sect of Universalists who believe in a limited future punishment. 

At South Boston is a Society of Univcrsalists, who have erected a church, supplied by 
Rev. B. Wliittcmore. 

A New Jerusalem or Swedenborgian Church, was organized August 15, 1828. Rev. 
Thomas Worcester is minister. In 1831, they rented a part of a building erected by 
Mr. T. H. Carter, in Phillips place, Tremont street. 

The Roman Catholic Society was commenced in 1788. The number of ministers 
has been 14. The Church of the Holy Cross, in Franklin place, was elected in 1803, 
115 feet long and 72 wide. The number of Catholics in Boston is 10 or 12,000. They 
have a convent of nuns on Mt. Benedict, in Charlestown, and a church in South Boston, 
called St. Augustine's church. They are also taking up contributions to erect two new 
churches. 

Religious meetings of various denominations, are held in Butolph street, in Friend 
street, in Franklin avenue, in Milton place, in a school-house on the Mill Dain^; in the 
ward-room in Hanover street, and other places, making the whole number of houses 
of religious worship about 60. 



PAPACY IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Some intelligent and excellent men, in our country, have regarded, 
with entire indifference, the efforts of the Romish church, to propagate 
their faith in the United States. They have looked upon the measures 
which a portion of the protestant community have taken to direct public 
attention to this subject, as inexpedient and unnecessary — as a groundless 
excitement, sounding the trumpet when there was no danger. 

At first view, it might appear, indeed, that there is little ground for 
apprehension. 

The number of the Romish population is yet comparatively small, not 
exceeding a twenty-third part of the people of this country — apparently 
too insignificant to awaken any alarm. The moral condition, too, of the 
great majority is such as to lull us into security. If knowledge constitutes 
the only power, they have very little of it. If a thoroughly ignorant 
population is a harmless population, then the less excitement in regard to 
this subject the better. 

We are accustomed, moreover, to talk about the energy of our free 
institutions — the universal diffusion of education — the distinguished privi- 
leges, which we of this country, and we of the 19th century, enjoy. We 
look upon papacy as one of the exploded errors of past times, as a thing 
buried under the rubbish of the dark ages, or if now alive, strugo-lmcr for 
existence. We have so long looked upon the United States, as the home 
of protestantism, as the dwelling-place of light and freedom, that we have 
become altogether skeptical in regard to the intrusion and propagation of 
error, especially of an error so flagrant as that of the Romish system. The 
manner, also, in which the papal church has been assailed in some 
quarters, the unjustifiable spirit of denunciation which has been employed, 
has led some protestants to deprecate intermeddling with the subject at 
all, and has led them to feel that the spirit of controversy is as far from 
the spirit of the gospel as that of error itself. 

We do not wish, by any means, to excite unnecessary disquiet in this 
country. We do not wish to bring into public notice a single error, 
which would die of itself, or remain stationary, in a negative sort of 
vol. vn. 8 



58 PAPACY IN THE UNITED STATES. [AUG. 

existence. The public mind is already feverish and fretful enough without 
adding any fuel. There is also a sufficient number of important objects, 
which legitimately and powerfully claim the public sympathy and atten- 
tion. 

Neither do we desire to lay upon the papists any civil pains and disa- 
bilities. We do not wish to deprive them of the right of voting, or the 
right of maintaining their own religious opinions, or of propagating them 
in a peaceable manner. The whole protestant population of this country, 
rejoiced with their whole hearts at the success of the Catholic emanci- 
pation bill in England. 

Neither would we reverse an article of their creed, and say that out of 
the protestant church there is no salvation. We are willing to believe that 
some papists are finding their way to heaven under all the superincumbent 
mass of error and absurdity which belongs to the system ; that some do 
cast the eye of faith, through and beyond all the host of pretended media- 
tors, till it rests on the atoning sacrifice of the Lord Jesus Christ. We 
remember that they have had a Pascal, who counted all things loss for the 
hope of salvation ; a Massillon, who proclaimed in the ear of kings, 
the faithful message of the gospel, and adorned that gospel with a con- 
sistent life ; an amiable Fenelon, who cultivated all the graces of the 
Spirit in their fairest beauty ; a Charles Butler, who exhibited a temper, 
which all protestants might well imitate ; and a Leander Van Ess, 
who has himself distributed half a million of Bibles. We do not wish to 
cherish towards Roman Catholics any feelings but those of the sincerest 
good will. We cannot, indeed, look on such a multitude of human beings, 
on 120,000,000 members of the great family of man, bone of our bone 
and flesh of our flesh, covered in midnight darkness, led away by the 
energy of all evil ; we cannot look on them with any other feelings than 
those of the deepest compassion. In mere pity we would rend away that 
veil, which covers them from the light of heaven. In mere pity we would 
heave off that enormous load of darkness and absurdity, which is crushing 
the struggling soul underneath. Who can think, without the most pro- 
found regret, of more than 120,000,000 of immortal spirits for whom 
Christ died, entangled in fatal error, in darkness here, and the great mass 
of them soon, as there is every reason to fear, to plunge into the blackness 
of darkness forever. 

Nevertheless, it is our duty to look at this subject in the light of past 
undoubted testimony, and of present acknowledged truth. - If there be 
that in the doctrines of the Romish church, which is eminently dangerous, 
if those doctrines are taking root among us, if our country holds out 
singular inducements for the propagation of error, surely we ought to 
know it, and to be on our guard. Such is the condition of this country, 
such are the circumstances under which we are placed in the providence 
of God, that we are bound to pray always and to watch. What the 
Saviour says to his disciples all over the world, he says most emphatically 

tO US, WATCH. 

In the following remarks, we wish to point out some of the grounds of 
apprehension in regard to the efforts of the papists ; some reasons for 
anxiety, and for vigorous efforts to counteract the mystery of iniquity, 
which is already beginning to work. 

The first cause of apprehension, which we shall mention, is the de- 
plorable ignorance of a part of the population of this country. 

Including foreigners and emigrants, there are at least half a million of 
adult white inhabitants, who can neither read nor write, having under 



J 834.] PAPACY IN THE UNITED STATES. 59 

their care twice that number of children and youth ; thus a million 
and a half are growing up, in entire ignorance of the simplest* ele- 
ments of knowledge. There arc at least another half million, who have 
been taught to read and write, but who are very little* elevated above 
those who cannot read in point of intelligence and the possession of moral 
principle. These may be supposed to have under their influence a million 
of children and youth; so that of the free white population of this country, 
there are at least three millions, who are in a state of degraded, stupid 
ignorance, leading to all intents and purposes an animal life, a life of 
sensation, without any valuable reflection or forethought. Here is a soil 
very favorable to the luxuriant growth of the papal error — a field, which 
can be sown over in broad cast, with the promise of a most abundant 
harvest. The whole ceremonial of the Romish church, the doctrine and 
the gorgeous ritual, are adapted precisely and admirably to meet the 
inclinations and circumstances of all the ignorant men and women in our 
land. The splendid painting, the image almost " instinct with life," the 
dim taper burning in early morning or in the shadows of evening, the 
superb vestments of the priesthood, and a thousand other circumstances, 
are calculated most wonderfully, to captivate an ignorant, unthinking 
population. The Roman Catholic bishop of Kentucky, writing to his 
friend in Europe, says, " that the protestants come to our church attracted 
by the music and preaching. There reigns in our churches a silence and 
a tranquillity, which are astonishing, when observed for the first time. 
The protestants themselves rejoice at the sight of these temples erected 
to the true God, and feel a peculiar attachment to the Catholic worship, 
whose pomp and splendor form so striking a contrast with the barrenness 
and nudity of protestant worship." It has always been the maxim of the 
Romish church, the more darkness the more piety, the more ignorance the 
more devotion. So far then as there is ignorance in our country, there is 
strong ground for apprehension. 

Another reason for solicitude on this subject, is the condition of the 
newly settled portions of this country. 

There is not much probability that the Roman Catholics will gain a 
footing in New England, and in some parts of the Middle States, because 
the people have the pure gospel preached to them. They have the Sabbath 
with its heavenly light ; the Bible, which is perfect, converting the soul ; 
arid the influence of the Divine Spirit, rendering effectual the means of 
grace. But it is not so in many portions of our land. Whole vast territories, 
with a rapidly increasing population, are nearly destitute of the ordinances 
of religion. The people perish, for lack of vision, by thousands. The 
States of Mississippi and Louisiana, extending from the gulf of Mexico 
to Arkansas, and from Alabama to Texas, containing 99,000 square 
miles, and increasing with great rapidity, not long since were enjoying 
the labors of only twenty Presbyterian and Episcopal ministers, to- 
gether with a small number of Methodists and Baptists. Supposing the 
latter to have five times as many ministers as the Presbyterians and 
Episcopalians, and allowing one minister to 1,000 souls, 100,000 of the 
population may be considered as supplied, while 400,000 are destitute. 
This is but an epitome of many other great territories. Some districts in 
the western country double their number short of ten years, outstripping, 
with fearful rapidity, all the means of religious instruction, which have 
been hitherto employed. 

It will be recollected that the State of Louisiana, which is the outlet of 
the western country, and in some respects having a more commanding 



60 PAPACY IN THE UNITED STATES. [AuG. 

influence than any other State, was settled by the French, and is almost 
entirely given to Romanism. There are not more than half a dozen 
protestant churches in the State, with a population of more than 300,000. 
Numerous Catholic convents and nunneries are established in various parts 
of the State. In the two dioceses of St. Louis and New Orleans, not long 
ago, the number of priests was more than 100. They have one thec^ 
logical seminary, two colleges, several schools for boys, and ten convents 
in which are 600 pupils. Now these are the regions, which the Catholics 
consider as their appropriate missionary ground. In the five years before 
1829, one association in Europe sent 61,000 dollars, principally to aid the 
Romish missions in the Valley of the Mississippi. One of their bishops, 
writing to Europe, has the following language. " The missions of 
America are of high importance to the church. The superabundant 
population of ancient Europe is flowing towards the United States. Each 
one arrives, not with his religion, but with his indifference. We must 
make haste. The moments are precious. America may one day become 
the centre of civilization ; and shall truth or error there establish its 
empire 1 If the protestant sects are beforehand with us, it will be difficult 
to destroy their influence. Numerous conversions have already crowned 
the efforts of our bishop. He has established a convent, all the nuns of 
which are protestants, who have abjured their former faith." 

This leads us to mention in the third place, that the sympathy and 
assistance which some protestants show the papists is a ground of appre- 
hension. 

There are, doubtless, several hundred thousand merely nominal protes- 
tants in this country, whose minds are not settled in the great principles of 
Christian, protestant liberty. They change with the wind. Some of them 
inconsiderately assist the papists. They know not what they do. Others 
are disturbed by the active friends of evangelical truth, and to escape from 
the annoyance, go over to the papists. A third class show them counte- 
nance from political motives. The Roman Catholic bishop of Charleston, 
in South Carolina, can command several hundred votes, which is an object 
of no small importance. 

The fourth reason for apprehension, which we shall mention, is the 
present condition of Europe. 

What will be the result of the late astonishing revolutions in Europe, 
is known only to God ; but we may safely calculate, that the emigration to 
this country will be greatly increased. The Catholic religion has ceased 
to be the exclusive religion of France. This will doubtless throw many of 
their priests out of employment. To our shores they will look as a resting 
place from their toils, where they can repair their shattered fortunes, and 
reinstate themselves in their former influence and glory. The government 
of the United States adopts a complete indifference towards all reli- 
gions. Here they have no persecution to fear. Here are vast tracts of 
unoccupied, fertile land, strongly inviting them to leave their famished 
brethren in the crowded districts of Europe. In a few months of one 
year, 30,000 individuals arrived at New York, from Europe, most of whom 
were Catholics. So we have not only to provide for our own people 
increasing beyond all former parallel, but we have to guard against the 
nameless evils of an ignorant, bigoted population, flowing in a strong 
current from the old world. 

Another source of apprehension arises, from the fact that nearly all the 
knowledge in the Catholic church is in the hands of the priests. 

Diffusion of knowledge among all the people is the glory of protes- 



1834.] PAPACY IN THE UNITED STATES. 61 

tantism. There is no privileged order among protestants. The Wbole 
body of enlightened clergy would rejoice to see the streams of knowledge 
flowing to every man's door. They would give to every human being a 
Bible, and ha*e him think for himself seriously, conscientiously and inde- 
pendently, on the great subjects of his duty and his destiny. They would 
have no such thing as a monopoly of knowledge of' any kind. Let it be 
free as the air and light of heaven. But it is not so with the popish 
priesthood. They would monopolize all the intellectual and moral light. 
They have denied to the laity all participation in church government. 
They have for centuries forbid the circulation of the Bible among the 
common people. They have refused to the laity the use of the wine, in 
celebrating the sacrament of the Lord's supper, pretending that it was 
designed only for the priests. They have arrogated to themselves the 
power to forgive sins, thus gaining possession of 'the consciences of the 
people. 

Thus it is for the interest of the priests to spread their faith as widely as 
possible, and with as much concealment as possible. Their influence — 
their very existence is depending on the deep and unbroken ignorance of 
the people. And to accomplish this design they have consummate ability — 
the accumulated wisdom of several hundred years. 

Another ground of apprehension, is the nature and pretensions of the 
papal church. 

They are one and indivisible throughout the world, a compact mass, 
held together by a belief, that out of their church is no salvation, by a vivid 
recollection of former and departed glory, by a strong sense that they are 
now a persecuted community. If one member of their church suffers, 
another suffers with it. If there are not papists enough in this country 
now, there are enough in Europe. If there are not cathedrals sufficient, 
there are funds sufficient in Europe to build them. In the upper circles of 
Italy, the conversion of the United States has been a frequent subject of 
conversation. The Catholic bishop of Cincinnati, in a late communication 
says, " that we shall see the truth triumph ; the temples of idols will be 
overthrown, and the seat of falsehood will be brought to silence. This is the 
reason that we conjure all the Christians of Europe to unite, in order to ask 
of God the conversion of these unhappy infidels or heretics. What a hap- 
piness, if, by our feeble labors, and our vows, we shall so merit as to see 
the savages of this diocese civilized, and all the United States embraced in 
the same unity of that Catholic church in which dwells truth, and temporal 
happiness." 

A further reason for solicitude on this subject, is the fact that the 
Catholics depend for success very much on the instruction of the young. 

They are directing their principal attention to the establishment of 
schools, convents, colleges, asylums, and theological seminaries. The 
schools in Maryland, are frequented not only by the Catholic, but also by 
protestant children, many of whom embrace the Romish religion, or at 
least receive impressions in its favor, which they carry into the bosom of 
their families. They also say " that the establishment of convents of nuns 
devoted to the education of females does great good. Catholics and pro- 
testants are admitted indiscriminately. The latter after having finished 
their education return to their homes, full of esteem and veneration for 
their instructresses. They are ever ready to refute the calumnies, which 
the jealousy of heretics loves to spread against the religious communities, 
and often where they have no longer the opposition of their relations to 
fear, they embrace the Catholic religion." 



62 JEAN BAPTISTE SAY. [AUG. 

The last cause for apprehension which we shall mention is, that the doc* 
trines of the Romish church remain in substance the same, unchanged. 

V The refinement of modern manners, the withholding of objectionable 
articles of faith, in soothing conversations maintained with inquirers, the 
specious glosses put on expressions, startling to the lover of scriptural sim- 
plicity, might seem to say that Rome is changed." But such is not the 
fact. The late Pope, Pius VII., in 1805, declared " that according to the 
laws of the church, not only could not heretics, that is protestants, possess 
ecclesiastical property, but that, also, they could not possess any property 
whatever, since the crime of heresy ought to be punished with the confisca- 
tion of goods. The subjects of a prince who is a heretic should be released 
from every duty to him, freed from all obligation, all homage." The same 
pontiff in 1808, professes this doctrine, that " the laws of the church do not 
recognize any civil privileges as belonging to persons not Catholics ; that 
their marriages are not valid; that the Catholics themselves are not validly 
married, except according to the rules prescribed by the court of Rome ; 
and that if united in this manner, the marriage is valid, had they in other 
respects violated all the laws of their country." These are an exact trans- 
lation of the words used by the late head of the church, a man of enlight- 
ened views on many subjects, and of distinguished celebrity. 

Men, maintaining such doctrines in any degree, are dangerous any 
where. There is ground for alarm wherever they may happen to live. 
So long as they deny, on any pretext whatsoever, the right and the privi- 
lege of the full and of the free circulation of the Scriptures, among all the 
people, they are not even a corrupt part of the Christian church, they do 
not belong to it. This is a fundamental article, not of protestantism only, 
but of civil freedom ; the light and hope of the world. The Bible contains 
glad tidings of great joy for all people. Where is the individual or the 
church, which has the right to lock up this heavenly treasure, or do any 
thing to prevent its universal diffusion 1 



JEAN BAPTISTE SAY. 



This celebrated political economist was born in 1767 at Lyons, where 
his father was a respectable merchant, who afterwards removed to Paris 
about the commencement of the revolution. He himself was educated for 
commercial pursuits, and was in business for some time, but soon relin- 
quished it with a view to devote himself entirely to literary pursuits. At 
the most stormy period of the revolution, he established in connection with 
Chamfort and Ginguene, a literary periodical. When Buonaparte was 
about to depart for Egypt, he employed M. Say to collect all the works 
which the nature of that expedition was likely to render necessary to him. 
In 1802, he published his " Treatise on Political Economy, or a plain 
Exposition of the Formation, Distribution, and Consumption of Wealth." 
This is the most important of his works, and the one which has contributed 
to make his name known throughout Europe. Though Adam Smith's 
work had been translated, yet it was little read or comprehended. There 
were even strong prejudices against the study among all the leading men 
of France, headed by Buonaparte himself. M; Say's work produced an 



1834.] STUDY OF HEBREW. G'i 

entire change in public opinion. In addition to its great and unques- 
tionable merit, from its clear and logical arrangement, from the felicity of 
many of its illustrations, it is enriched with several accurate, original, and 
profound discussions. Besides five editions of the original, enlarged aiNJ 
improved in each, it has been translated into almost all the languages of 
Europe. Say kept aloof from public life, but was the friend of some of its 
brightest ornaments. He died in Paris about the middle of November, 
18:32, aged 67. 



STUDY OF HEBREW AT OUR LITERARY INSTITUTIONS. 

The reasons for the incorporation of the study of Hebrew into our literary 
courses are very obvious. All the required helps for the thorough study 
of the original Hebrew are now easily accessible. The Hebrew literature 
contains the only records of the history of our race for a long period after 
the creation. It exhibits full historical annals of a most interesting people. 
The language is probably the parent of the most important languages of 
the East. The literature is pre-eminently original — the effusions of truth 
and nature — the overflowings of genuine feeling — the utterance of undis- 
guised sentiments. The literature has great variety. It is simple history ; 
it is close epigrammatic proverb ; it is taunting irony : the solemn, elaborate 
composition of the courts of Susa and Babylon ; the tenderness of sweet 
pastorals. It is the revelation of visions such as mortal eye never saw. It 
is serious and animated ; simple and vehement, now flowing in harmonious 
cadence; and now abrupt, elliptical, and disjointed. 

Above all, it is essential truth without any mixture of error : the thoughts 
of heaven — refining the taste, enlarging the intellect, winging the imagina- 
tion, illuminating the inmost soul. If we had only a few of the closing 
chapters in the book of Deuteronomy, we might value them as a treasure 
above all price. Did you never mark the repetition — the energy — the 
pathos — the noble disinterestedness — the unequalled and glorious poetry of 
the dying prophet and legislator, with which these chapters are instinct? 

The objections to the introduction of the study of Hebrew, as it seems 
to us, can be very easily disposed of. It is said that the minds of a 
majority of young men are averse to studies so sacred, and that in fact it 
would be converting a college into a theological seminary. Not at all, it 
may be replied. There is no system of theology in the story of Joseph, or 
in the history of Ruth. Ridgely never thought of constructing a corpus of 
theology out of the wanderings of the children of Israel; nor Turretine 
from the wars of Canaan. It is teaching simple, impartial history. It is 
studying well-conceived, well-expressed, beautiful poetry. Who is the 
student, that has such a pagan mind as to be unwilling to study what 
Homer never reached, what Milton was glad to copy, what Chatham con- 
fessed that he had taken as the model of his eloquence, what Sir William 
Jones declared to be (considered as mere human compositions) the highest 
efforts of genius. 

Another objection is, that the literature of the Hebrews is very confined, 
being entirely included in the books of the Old Testament. This objection 
would have some weight, if any man, or college of men, had mastered what 



64 MANUAL LABOR. [AUG. 

the Hebrew Scriptures do contain. The individual, who has paid more 
attention to them than any other man in this country, confesses that there 
are many unexplored regions still before him — that there are several entire 
compositions yet untouched. 

Another difficulty, which has been suggested is, that there is no place 
for it — the circle of studies in every college is now too large. To this it 
may be answered, if the Hebrew Scriptures, considered as a mere philo- 
logical work, are not as important as any other book, we would not plead 
for j their introduction. But it is a well-known fact that our courses of 
collegiate study are gradually enlarging — the preparatory schools are taking 
higher ground, and allowing the colleges to add to the number of studies. 
Here then is an opening. Admitting that no book in the present list of 
studies could be dispensed with, when a new one is called for, David and 
Habakkuk and Isaiah may be admitted. We think that they ought to 
make a part of the assigned course of study, in every college in this land. 
It should not be left to the students to study, at their option, Greek, or 
Hebrew, or fluxions. Hebrew should be placed on the same ground as 
astronomy, navigation, or Livy, — not to be neglected by any part of a 
class. 

The ultimate effects of such a measure, I am persuaded, would be most 
grateful. Our young men would be trained and nurtured in connection 
and in contact with those principles,' which are the only safe guide of 
human conduct. We should do something towards taking away that root 
of practical infidelity and indifference to religion, which is every where 
and mournfully visible. We should be the first Christian nation who set 
the high example. While Leyden and Oxford are employed in the logic 
of Aristotle, we should be reading the noble drama of him, who was the 
wisest of all the children of the East, or the elegies of him who survived 
the ruins of his native land, and who invests himself in a far more affecting 
light than Mariu^does among the desolations of Carthage, or than Cicero 
at the tomb of the Syracusan philosopher. An aspect of unknown loveli- 
ness and beauty would be diffused over our literature, and fresh charms 
would adorn the whole face of society. 



MANUAL LABOR. 

[Communicated by a Clergyman of New Hampshire.] 

Manual labor schools, properly regulated, are of immense importance. 
They promote the health and mental vigor of the students. And at the present 
day there is a heavy draught made upon both these in the learned professions — 
especially in divinity : and every one who is in this profession, or who aims at 
it, is bound, with conscientious fidelity, to cultivate and husband them well. 
Physical education hitherto has been greatly neglected. Its importance in 
reference to professional life has been very much overlooked. Every thoroughly 
bred physician will say so — every close observer, who has noticed the beneficial 
effects of exercise upon the body and the mind, will say so. These manual labor 
establishments, it is true, have not always succeeded. And what has? The 
fault may not be in the system itself. Their friends .and patrons may have 
expected too much. They will not yield great pecuniary consideration ; at least 
in their present state : but under almost any organization they will yield health 
and intellectual vigor. 



1834.] MANUAL LABOR. 01 

But it is not our object to speak of manual labor in the organized form in 
"which it is annexed to some of our seminaries. Those only can give mi opinion 
with much confidence on this point who have had opportunity of applying the 

theory to its practical test. What we wish particularly to say is, that whore the 
manual labor system can go into no organized operation, the principle may still 
be recognized. The manual labor principle (if we may so call it) in connection 
•with study is of fundamental importance. It can be carried out to some 
extent under all circumstances: manual labor can be done, and the objects for 
which the student resorts to it may be attained. These objects are physical 
and mental power. What we very much need is to have the principles — the 
spirit — of the manual labor system deeply imbedded in the minds of our teachers 
and their pupils. While there is so much enthusiasm on almost every thing 
else, let there be a little on this. Not an enthusiasm which acts by fits and 
starts ; but which brings the bodily functions into exercise with as much regu- 
larity as may be. An enthusiasm, at least, which will draw the most indolent 
from their studies, and induce them to take hold of the spade, the hoe, the axe, 
the saw, or whatever else comes to hand that may invigorate the frame. We 
have known the love and veneration of pupils greatly increase as their instructor 
led them out to some manual labor enterprise. Let our men of literary occupa- 
tions see clearly the importance of exercise, and have their minds deeply imbued 
with the principles of the manual labor scheme, and there will be little difficulty 
in bringing them into some measure of practical operation. There is work 
enough to do every where. Let no student suppose, because he is not con- 
nected with a manual labor institution, he is therefore necessarily cut off from 
the benefits of the system. Let him have a manual labor school of his own ; 
one of which he himself shall be the inventor, the supervisor, and the practical 
operator. This mode of getting up one's exercise for himself has certainly 
some things to recommend it. 

It excites a feeling of independence. The plan of exercise is of his own 
devising, and the student can arrange it to his own liking; and if any pecuniary 
benefits accrue they are his own ; and if evil arise he alone is the sufferer. 
There is an inducement from this source to exercise ; and the very stimulus 
invigorates the mind. If the student receives no pecuniary compensation, he 
has the satisfaction of reflecting that his labor has benefited others. If he re- 
ceives compensation, then he has the satisfaction of doing something to sustain 
himself in his studies, or promote the cause of charity, and of seeing definitely 
what it is. There are many who cannot be satisfied with the common range of 
athletic exercises. They want something which will be of real utility to some- 
body; and there is a pleasant kind of independence in planning and executing 
some useful piece of manual labor. The student may not, indeed, be always 
able to reduce his exercise to the most perfect system. He can, however, do 
much towards this by securing work which can be done at any time: such, for 
instance, as preparing wood for the fire. It is undoubtedly best to devote 
certain hours regularly to exercise, and yet, unquestionably, the student may 
depart from this method occasionally not only without injury, but with real 
advantage both to his health and his mental improvement. For instance, at 
one time his powers are dormant and inactive, and he cannot, with the utmost 
exertion, rally them to any successful effort. A little exercise might shake off 
this drowsiness, and enable him to prosecute his studies with energy ; but the 
hour has not come, and if he be very rigidly fettered by his system, he dozes 
along till it arrives. So at another time his intellect is bright, his powers all 
awake, and the subject, or the train of thought, is pursued with great pleasure 
and success. But the hour of exercise comes and interrupts a train of thought 
which he may never be able to resume under so favorable circumstances, and 
robs him of one of his very best hours of study. With his exercise all under 
his own control, he can vary to suit his own health and progress in study 
to the injury of no one. We are aware that this feeling of independence may 
lead some students to neglect exercise altogether, or take it very irregularly. 
But we are not speaking of such. Our eye is upon those who are struggling 
for an education from the love of learning, or under the influence of high moral 
principle : who are ready for self-deniahTand efforts to gain their object. Such, 

VOL. VII. 9 



66 MANUAL LABOR. [AUG. 

particularly, deserve to be encouraged. They feel the importance of exercise, 
and not, perhaps, connected with any manual labor institution, they may suppose 
themselves shut out from the benefits of the system. It is not so. Wherever 
they are they may have a manual labor system of their own, and one in some 
respects superior to all others ; one for which they will be under obligations to 
no one ; one for which they will be dependent upon no one. It is in looking 
up work around them and doing it. 

This mode of exercise furnishes variety. The physical system needs various 
sorts of exercise. In the different kinds of business which the student looks up, 
he will find this variety. Sometimes he will saw or cut wood ; then use the hoe 
or rake. Now he walks, and lets the stage-coach go on ; then he rides horse- 
back instead of taking a chaise. If he is very nice in respect to what kind 
of business he does, it is true this system will not fit him. If he is afraid to tan 
his face, defile his hands, take off his coat, or put on a frock, it will not fit him. 
But if he is willing to do almost any thing, and do it well, he will find various 
kinds of employments. 

This mode of exercise effectually relaxes the mind. To have exercise the 
most beneficial, the mind must also unbend, or rather be bent another way. It 
must be turned off to totally different objects. And the student who is thor- 
oughly awake to the importance of exercise, and has to make as well as execute 
the system himself, will find it necessary to look about him if he would keep his 
little manual labor school all the time in operation. This gives exercise to the 
mind, and very different exercise from his studies. In the new direction which 
is thus given to the mind, it is effectually drawn from its accustomed track — 
invigorated and prepared to return with a keener relish. 

This method of taking exercise quickens the invention. Men of enterprise, 
especially if they manage various kinds of business, often acquire a remarkable 
acuteness, activity, and shrewdness. Their inventive powers are called for by 
their business, and invigorated by exercise. The student may acquire some- 
what of the same mental training by casting about for exercise, and turning his 
hand to different kinds of employment. Neither the mind or the time of the 
student, however, should be so occupied with these matters as to interfere with 
his studies. But his success in study does not depend upon the time he spends 
over his books. It depends rather upon the manner in which he applies himself 
when he pretends to study. It is a miserable habit to doze over a book or over a 
subject ; and if more time was spent in exercise, and the mind more frequently 
entirely diverted from its accustomed range of thought, it would probably have 
more elasticity. At the hour of study, all the powers of the mind should be 
rallied, like the different parts of an army at the time of battle. The judicious 
student, therefore, who takes exercise to refresh his body and his mind, and 
thus prepare himself to study with more effect, will be no loser in appropriating 
considerable time to this object. He will be an immense gainer, not merely in 
point of health, intellectual vigor and useful habits, but in the spring and excite- 
ment given to the mind in the part it takes in seeking out and conducting the 
exercise. 

This mode of exercise serves to form business habits. The student is not 
always to be immersed in his study. He is there principally to prepare himself 
to become a citizen of the world — to transact the business of future life. It is 
of no small importance, therefore, that his hours of exercise and relaxation 
should, as far as possible, be made tributary to this preparation. That kind of 
manual labor which can most effectually subserve this object, is to be sought. 
But a business habit is promoted not only in doing a piece of work which is 
already laid out, but in looking up the work and planning it. To do this the 
student must bring his calculating powers into exercise. In this way he becomes 
acquainted with men and things, and with different kinds of business ; and of 
however little avail, in a pecuniary point of light, it turns to valuable account in 
the habits formed and knowledge gained. 

In reference to the foregoing remarks, we would only say, in conclusion, that 
we have some experience on this subject. "We speak that we do know, and 
testify that we have seen." Now if any student "will receive our witness" we 
advise him forthwith to have his manual labor school in the way here recom- 



1834.] 



NOTICES OP NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



07 



mended. He is to set it up himself. And if the above suggestions commend 
themselves to the patrons of piety and promise in those indigent young men 
who arc aiming- at the ministry, let them furnish every facility to them in ob- 
taining labor which may invigorate their bodies and their minds, and better fit 
them for laborers in those fields which are already white for the harvest. 



NOTICES OF NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



Sketches in Verse, from the Historical 

Books of the Old Testament. By J. Bret tell. 
London: 12mo. pp.183. 

This is a very pleasing book, written by 
a Unitarian clergyman, who officiates at or 
near Rotheram, in England. In his preface, 
he says he " has long regretted that the 
poetry of the present age has not been more 
frequently employed in illustration of the 
Scriptures. The historical details, though 
most interesting in themselves, most abound- 
ing in incidents suited to the purposes of 
poetry, and most important as connected 
with the Jewish and Christian revelations, 
have been strangely neglected by those 
whose commanding talents would have en- 
sured success in the attempt to adorn and 
illustrate them. With the exception of a 
Milton and a Montgomery — the most en- 
during monuments of whose genius have 
been built on the basis of the Bible— our 
poets have sought materials for verse in the 
fictions of imagination, or the realities of 
profane history. The author trusts that 
some more gifted individual [than himself] 
will, sooner or later, arise, who shall acquire 
immortal celebrity by throwing over the 
naked form of divine truth, the most splen- 
did garb of metrical ornament. In the 
mean time, happy will he deem himself, if 
his humble attempt to call the attention of 
young readers, (for whose perusal these 
sketches are more particularly designed,) to 
the sacred volume, and to excite their inter- 
est in its contents, should prove in any de- 
gree successful." 

The contents of this volume are " Pharaoh 
and Moses ; or the departure of the Israelites 
from Egypt." Exodus xiv. 5 — 31 ; xv. 1 — 
21. " Balak and Balaam ; or the encamp- 
ment of the Israelites in the plains of Mo- 
ab." Numbers xxii — xxiv. " The Bless- 
ings and Curses ; or Joshua and the Israel- 
ites, in the valley of Shechem." Deut. 
xxvii., xxviii. ; Joshua viii. 30 — 35. " The 
withered hand ; or Jeroboam's idolatrous 
sacrifice at Bethel." 1 Kings xii. 32, 33 ; 
xiii. 1—10. «« The Death of Abijah ; or the 
Queen of Israel's visit to the prophet Abi- 
jah." 1 Kings xi. 28—40; xiv. 1—16.— 
There are many " Notes," at the conclu- 
sion of the book, which evince much bibli- 
cal and other learning, and illustrate the 



passages in the poetry to which they refer. 
We quote a single one, as a specimen. In 
" Balak and Balaam," the author thus para- 
phrases Numb. xxiv. 5, 6. 

How lovely, Jacob, thy tents where they stand, 
Spread forth as the measureless vales of the land: 
As gardens, by rivers whose waters are clear, 
When covered with blossoms, thy dwellings appear; 
Like sweet flowering aloes in beauty they rise, 
Like cedars that lift their green heads to the skies. 

The note appended is this. — " It is a cus- 
tom, in the East, to cover their tents with 
the boughs ot trees and shrubs, in order to 
shade them from the hot sunbeams; the 
image of the prophet, comparing the tents 
to ' trees of lign-aloes,' and to ' cedar trees 
beside the waters,' seems to have been sug- 
gested by some such custom. Supposing 
the tents of the Israelites to have been thus 
shaded, when, from the summit of Peor, 
Balaam saw them spread along the vallies, 
the epithet of green, applied to them, will 
not be inappropriate." 

There is a variety in the measure which 
Mr. Brettell has used in the different sketch- 
es ; and even in different parts of the same 
sketch. 

" Bless'd be the man, who in no place doth pray 
To an idol of wood, or an image of clay. 
Whether graven or molten, of silver or gold, 
Bless'd be that man by the young and the old. 
Who performing with joy, and revering with awe, 
The commands of thy voice, and the words of thy law, 
O Jehovah ! ne'er turns from thy hallowed shrine, 
Himself shall be bless'd, and bless'd all his line — 
Belov'd of his God, and a child of His grace, 
Be the blessing forever on him and his race." 

Distinctly clear, these accents first 
From the front-band of Levites burst, 
Who, in their flowing robes of white, 
Stood on the mountain's loftiest height: 
Responses then, successive, pass'd, 
From rank to rank, e'en to the last, 
Through all the tribes' extending lines, 
Far as Gerizim's summit shines, 
Increasing, widening, swelling, till, 
From all that thickly crowded hill, 
One general cry of glad assent 
Down to the listening valley went: 
Back from the plain that joyful cry 
Was hurl'd in rapture to the sky, 
By myriad voices loudly sent 
Up to the highest firmament, 
Whilst heaven, as if approving, smiles 
O'er that bright mount's exulting files, 
Diffusing round its glowing height 
A broader, brighter, blaze of light. 
But now the fatal signal turns 
From that bless'd mountain's beaming head, 



68 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



[Aug. 



To where yon altar dimly burns, 

And ominous clouds are o'er it spread. 
Like gloomy forests of dark trees, 
Bent by the tempest's rushing breeze, 
The fearful tribes, on Ebal's brow, 
At that dread sign submissive bow : 
And from the bare peak, rough and high, 

The ban in mournful cadence rose, 
Whilst thunder murmur'd through the sky, 
Prophetic of their future woes. 
"Curs'd be the man, who in worship doth pray 
To an idol of wood, or an image of clay, 
Whether graven or molten, of silver or gold, 
Curs'd be that man by the young and the old. 
Who performs not. with joy, and reveres not with awe, 
The commands of thy voice, and the words of thy law, 
O Jehovah! but turns from thy hallow'd shrine, 
Himself shall be curs'd, and curs'd all his line — 
Abhorred of God, and rejected from grace, 
The curse be forever on him and his race." 

The Blessings and Curses, pp. 99 — 101. 

We trust to be pardoned for giving this 
extract when we say that we know of only- 
one copy of the book in this country ; and 
that belonging to a young gentleman who 
was formerly a pupil of the author. It is 
wholly improbable that the work will be re- 
printed here. For though the veriest trash 
of the British press finds a prompt market in 
the United States, yet its useful issues, (if 
unpretending, and without patronage and a 
celebrated name,) are less sought and repub- 
lished, than our own honor and advantage 
clearly warrant, if not require. 

In our humble judgment, Mr. BrettelPs 
" Sketches," deserve republication. We 
think they would help to excite an interest 
in the contents of the Bible ; and as he says 
in his preface, " it is to be regretted that the 
Bible is so little read by the rising genera- 
tion." All proper means of making it more 
generally read, commend themselves to the 
Christian public. 

Miscellaneous Discourses and Reviews. 

By Heman Humphrey, D. D. president of Am- 
herst college. Amherst : J. S. &. C. Adams. 1834. 
pp. 415. 

The first article in this volume, entitled 
" Union is strength," was preached at New 
Haven, before the Moral Society of Con- 
necticut, in 1815 ; the second, on " doing 
good to the poor," at Pittsfield, April 4, 
1818 ; the third, " pilgrim fathers," at Pitts- 
field, Dec. 22, 1820 ; the fourth, "the way 
to bless and save our country," before the 
American Sunday School Union, May 3, 
1831 ; the fifth, " the good Arimathean," at 
the funeral of Nathaniel Smith, of Sunder- 
land, Ms., Feb. 28, 1833; the sixth, "the 
kingdom of Christ," before the convention 
of the Congregational ministers of Massa- 
chusetts, May 29, 1830 ; the seventh, " the 
Christian Pastor," before the Pastoral Asso- 
ciation of Massachusetts, May 31, 1826; 
the eighth," an inaugural discourse," at Am- 
herst college, in 1823 ; the ninth, " the 
Lord our help," at the dedication of the 
college chapel, in Amherst, P^eb. 28, 1827; 
the tenth, " Indian rights and our duties," 
at Amherst, Hartford, &c, December, 1829; 
the eleventh, " extracts from an address on 
temperance," in 1812 ; the remainder, on 



"the writings and character of Dr. Dwight," 
"re view of eulogies on Adams and Jefferson," 
" the literary and religious character of the 
age," and "poetry," were originally inserted 
in various periodical publications. Our read- 
ers need not be informed by us of the high 
practical value of Dr. Humphrey's writings. 
For good sound sense, lively and perspicuous 
style, comprehensive and philosophical views 
of various great questions, which agitate 
society, as well as for a pervading religious 
spirit, this volume is worthy of unqualified 
commendation. We are under obligations 
to the publishers for collecting these scat- 
tered discourses into a convenient volume. 
It would not injure the political econo- 
mist to read the article on doing good to 
the poor ; nor the orator and statesman to 
look over the review of the eulogies on 
Adams and Jefferson. 

Hints designed to regulate the Inter- 
course of Christians. By Wm. B.Spragce,D. D. 
pastor of the second Presbyterian church in Al- 
bany. Albany: Packard & Van Benthuysen. 
1834. pp. 269. 

The subjects of the chapters in the first 
part of this interesting volume, are the 
object, grounds, hindrances, mode, occa- 
sions, opportunities, of Christian intercourse ; 
Christian intercourse in the family ; Chris- 
tian intercourse of youth ; Christian inter- 
course between the higher and lower class- 
es ; epistolary intercourse; perversion of 
Christian intercourse ; obligations to Chris- 
tian intercourse from the character of the 
age. The second part discusses the various 
duties of Christians in respect to intercourse 
with the world. The book is a useful addi- 
tion to our religious literature. 

Observations on the History and Evi- 
dences of the Resurrection of Jesus Christ. By 
Gilbert West, Esq. clerk extraordinary of his 
majesty's most honorable privy council, with a 
brief Memoir of the Author.- Boston: James 
Loring. 1834. pp. 256. 

This is a very neat reprint of a valuable 
standard treatise on the proofs of one of the 
cardinal doctrines of Christianity. The 
author in the first place lays down in order 
the several incidents related by the evan- 
gelists ; secondly, makes some observations 
on the manner in which the proofs of this 
event were laid before the minds of the 
apostles; and thirdly, gives an exact and rig- 
orous examination of the proofs themselves. 

Gospel Seeds ; or, Unpublished Pieces 

on the Revealed Truths in the Word of God, and 
the Practice it enjoins on Christians. By the 
Rev. Caesar Malan, D. D. of Geneva. Trans- 
lated for the author. New York: D. Appleton 
& Co. 1834. pp. 230. 

Dr. Malan received the affectionate con- 
fidence of evangelical Christians of various 
denominations, till about the year 1823, 
when he published sentiments in relation to 
the atonement, and particularly faith in 
Christ, and assurance of pardon, which 
caused alarm to many of his warm friends 



1834.] 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



09 



and admirers. From a note in the present 
work, it appears that he has seen the error 
of his former views, and now, with his 
characteristic frankness, freely confesses his 
wrong, and is laboring to efface the injury 
he has done. " The present volume," says 
the translator, " is a happy sample of the 
author's simple, touching eloquence, and 
deep and fervent piety." 

The Musical Cyclopedia; or, the Prin- 
ciples of Music considered as a Science and an 
Art: embracing a complete Musical Dictionary, 
and the outlines of a Musical Grammar, and of 
the theory of Sounds and Laws of Harmony; 
with Directions for the Practice of Vocal and 
Instrumental Music, and a Description of Musi- 
cal Instruments. By VVm. S. Porter. Boston: 
James Loring. 1834. pp. 432. 

In an introductory note, Mr. Lowell 
Mason says, " I have examined the Cyclo- 
pedia, as it has advanced, and have occa- 
sionally made such alterations and additions 
as have occurred to me. In the preparation 
of the work, which has cost him great labor 
and research, Mr. Porter has ever mani- 
fested correct science, taste, and judgment. 
The book contains a mass of information 
no where to be found in the same compass ; 
and which could not otherwise be obtained 
but at great expense." 

Topographical Description and Histori- 
cal Sketch of Plainfield, Hampshire county, Ms. 
By Jacob Porter. Greenfield: Prince & Rog- 
ers. 1834. pp. 44. 

This is a very full and accurate specimen 
of local history. We shall probably have 
occasion to advert to it hereafter. 

An Address, delivered at Leicester, 

Mass. Dec. 25, 1833, at the Dedication of the 
New Academy Edifice. By Luther Wright, 
principal instructor. Worcester: S. H. Colton 
& Co. 1834. pp. 35. 

We quote from this sensible and well 
written address, the following orthodox sen- 
timent in respect to the study of the ancient 
languages. 

" Had we time, we might dwell on the vari- 
ous considerations, which show that the study of 
the ancient classics ought to be regarded, as 
belonging strictly to a system of practical edu- 
cation. It is truly a practical study, whether 
considered in its influence on the taste and the 
imagination, or, in the discipline it gives to 
every faculty of the mind. A thorough course 
of classical study, cannot fail to strengthen the 
judgment and memory, the powers of reasoning, 
comparison, and discrimination, and a habit of 
patient research — one of vast importance to the 
student. Such a course of study may be a 
better mental discipline, than even a course of 
rigid demonstration in the mathematics. The 
study of the classics then is, in a most important 
sense, practical. In this respect, it is believed, 
nothing could be substituted, in a system of 
thorough education, of equal value. It is well 
known, that the literature of France, Spain, and 
modern Italy, is based on that of ancient times. 
A thorough and critical knowledge of their lan- 
guages, would lead the student to the elements of 
the ancient languages ; and, if he aim to be a 
thorough and critical student, he will not be con- 



tented with a view, merely, of the superstructure, 
he will dig deep to examine the foundation. I la 
will wish to be familiar with some of the earliest 
channels, in which intelligence and thought were 
conveyed." 

An Address, delivered before the New 

Hampshire BtSte Lyceum, in the Representatives' 
Hall, at their Second Annual Meeting, June 5, 
1834. By Jarvis Greco, tutor in Dartmouth 
college. Concord: Marsh, Capen & Lyon. 1834. 
pp. 32. 

The nerve and spirit of this address may 
be gathered from the following paragraphs. 

" What is the appropriate food of the spirit ? 
What is the best means of that training which 
the moral powers demand ? To these questions 
unhesitatingly and boldly I answer, The gos- 
pel of Jesus Christ. In the great historical 
picture of the human mind, two figures stand 
out in bold relief: Science in the struggle to 
free herself from superstition, tearing herself 
rudely away from the embrace of her sister Re- 
ligion ; — and Religion, disdaining her natural 
alliance with Science ; — the one mad impiety, 
the other weak and puling bigotry. 

" How true a picture is the former emblem of 
the present state of the public mind ! How very 
general is the impression, that institutions of 
learning, literary and scientific associations, 
journals, reviews, <fcc. should either carefully 
avoid all connection with religion, or recognize 
it only in such barren generalities, as leave it 
scarcely more subsistence than an empty shade 
from Erebus, ' vox et prceterea nihil.' In nothing 
is this unreligious, not to say anti-religious ten- 
dency more apparent than in the operations of 
the societies for the diffusion of useful knowledge 
and other kindred institutions. How careful 
have they been to exclude from their publica- 
tions every thing of a religious character ! — 
Among their millions of books and tracts, what 
single treatise has the parent society in England 
put forth, (if we except a brief history of the 
church, a mere soulless skeleton of facts.) which 
even recognizes the Christian religion as an ele- 
ment of individual or social character 1 It is no 
apology to say that public opinion demanded 
such an exclusion. It is the office of reformers 
to guide and control public opinion. He has 
but a partial knowledge of human nature, and 
has read the history of our race to little purpose, 
who does not recognize in the New Testament 
the grand specific for every human ill 3 — a moral 
medicine, which while it quickens the under- 
standing, purifies also the heart; while it clears 
the vision to perceive truth and right, pre- 
pares the affections to embrace them. The 
author and governor of the human mind must 
be admitted to know best the discipline its pow- 
ers demand. What madness then to neglect 
the means of culture, which he has furnished, 
and attempt to substitute for it expedients of our 
own. We might as well blot out, if we could, 
the sun from heaven, and think to bring back 
the day by encompassing ourselves about with 
sparks of our own kindling." 

Fifteenth Annual Report of the Direc- 
tors of the New York Institution for the Instruc- 
tion of the Deaf and Dumb, to the Lesislature of 
the State of New York, for the year 1833, New 
York : Mahlon Day. 1S34. 

This document is of great value, and con- 
tains very full details in respect to the 



■0 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



history and prospects of the New York 
institution for the deaf and dumb. The num- 
ber of pupils in the seminary is 134. Mr. 
Harvey P. Peet is the principal. The in- 
structors are Leon Vayssc, David E. Bart- 
lett, Frederick A. P. Barnard, Samuel R. 
Brown, Josiah A. Cary, Barnabas M. Fay, 
and George E. Day. 

An Address, delivered before a Literary 

Society of Washington county, Indiana, seminary, 
March 14, 1834. By Rev. B. C. Ckessy. Salem, 
Ind. : J. G. & W. H. May. 1834. pp. 22. 

We quote one paragraph from this ad- 
dress. 

"Among the subjects of interest around us, 
none hold a higher place, than the facilities now 
afforded for the education of our youth. What 
citizen of Salem, or of this county, does not feel 
an honest pride, in view of what has already 
been effected ; and the prospective good, which 
may be accomplished by the Washington coun- 
ty seminary. Who, that has attended the 
recent examination ; and witnessed the rapid 
improvement of the students generally ; and 
been instructed and edified, especially, by the 
exhibitions of the class in natural philosophy, 
has not been deeply impressed with the impor- 
tance of contributing the full weight of his 
influence, in promoting the cause of education. 
Who, in this assembly, acquainted with the 
history of this institution, cannot point to yonder 
unassuming temple of science, and adopt the 
sentiment of the speaker, in pronouncing it the 
fairest ornament of our county. If my estima- 
tion be correct, few, if any academies in the 
State, have been the means of accomplishing 
an equal amount of good, in imparting instruc- 
tion to the rising generation. Many have 
already gone forth from this institution, as 
teachers, who are exerting a powerful influence 
in elevating the character of this infant, but rising 
community; while others, who have here been 
educated, are occupying stations of usefulness 
and responsibility. Then, with enlarged and 
liberal views of the vital importance of educa- 
tion, in every department of society, let the 
indefatigable efforts of the preceptor of this sem- 
inary, receive the hearty co-operation of those 
around him. 77 

City Missions. Seventeenth Annual 

Report of the Board of Directors of the Boston 
Society for the Moral and Religious Instruction 
of the Poor, presented May, 1834. With an Ap- 
pendix. Boston: Perkins, Marvin, &. Co. 1834. 
pp. 48. 

We recommend this pamphlet as one of 
great value. The appendix contains a series 
of articles on the true mode of city missions, 
which is full of important arguments and 
facts. We quote three sentences, which 
embrace some statistics. 

u Salem. The population of this ancient town 
in 1830, was 13,900. The present popula- 
tion is estimated at 14,000. In this town there 
are nine churches in which salvation for lost 
men is taught through 'Jesus Christ and him 
crucified; 7 that is, there is this number the in- 
fluence of which is essentially evangelical. Giv- 
ing, then, as before, one thousand souls to each 
of these churches as connected with it, there will 



[Aug. 



be 9,000 provided for, leaving 5,000 yet to be 
brought under evangelical instruction. 

"Providence. Population in 1830, was 16,800. 
Estimated at present at 18 ; 000. Churches pro- 
fessedly evangelical, ten. The average number 
connected with these congregations, and under 
their influence, is estimated at 800 ; so that 8,000 
of this population is supplied with evangelical 
preaching, leaving 10,000 under ministrations of 
an opposite character, or no ministrations at 
all. 

"New York. Population in 1830, was 203,000. 
Present population estimated at 225,000. I am 
indebted to a friend in that city for a little book 
entitled « New York as it is in 1833/ from 
which I learn, that for the supply of this popula- 
tion there are, Presbyterian churches 28, — 
Dutch Reformed 15,— Episcopalian 24.— Bap- 
tist 16,— Methodist 19,— Friends 4,— Lutheran 
2,— Independent 2,— Moravian 1,— Mariner's 1, 
— to say nothing about Catholics, Jews, Uni- 
versalists, &c. Total of those included 112. 
How many of these ought injustice to be thrown 
out of the estimate as anti-evangelical in their 
character and influence, I have no means of 
judging. I hope not many. Admitting, then, 
that these 112 churches teach what is essential 
to salvation, and giving to each 800 souls as 
under its influence, it follows, that 89,600 are 
adequately supplied, leaving a fearful balance 
of 135,400 yet to be gathered under evangelical 
ministrations. 77 



Comprehensive Commentary, conduct- 
ed by Rev. William Jenks, D. D. Brattle- 
boro', Vt. : Fessenden & Co. 1834. Vol. I. pp. 838. 

This volume contains the four gospels. 
The next, which will be published near the 
close of the year, will embrace the first 
portions of the Old Testament. All which 
is valuable in Henry's Commentary, is in- 
serted without alteration ; also the marginal 
references and practical observations of Dr. 
Scott. A great variety of critical and ex- 
planatory notes from Doddridge, Rosenmu- 
eller, Scott, Lowth, Calmet, Pool, Bloom- 
field, and others are inserted. The work 
appears to have been executed judiciously 
and faithfully, and well deserves a wide 
circulation. 

A Guide to the Study of Moral Evi- 
dence, or of that Species of Reasoning which re- 
lates to Matters of Fact and Practice. By Rev. 
James Edward Gambier, England. With Illus- 
trative Notes. Being an Application of the Prin- 
ciples of the Science to the Divine Origin of the 
Christian Religion. By Rev. Joseph A. Wj»rne, 
of Brookline, Ms., to which is prefixed an Intro- 
ductory Essay on Moral Reasoning, by Rev. Wm. 
Hague, Boston. Boston: James Loring. 1834. 
pp. 246. 

The great object of this book is to facili- 
tate the acquirement of that skill, which is 
necessary to make a proper use of the mate- 
rials of our knowledge, by showing how 
our observations are to be conducted in 
attaining a knowledge of things ; and how 
experience is to be employed in determining 
the probability of events, and in regulating 
our credit in the testimony and observations 
of others. 



1834.] 



ORDINATIONS AND INSTALLATIONS. 



71 






Lectures to Children, familiarly illus- 
trating Important Truth. By John Todd, pastor 
of tlio Edwards church, Northampton. North- 
ampton: J. II. Butler. 1«34. pp.218. 

The lectures in this little volume are 
twelve in number, and on the following 
topics : How do we know there is any God ? 
Repentance for sin ; Angels' joy when sin- 
ners repent ; what faith is, and what its use 
is; God will take care of us; Jesus Christ 
tasting death ; Christ interceding for us ; 
giving account to God ; great events hang 
on little things ; fragments all to be saved ; 
the Sabbath to be kept holy ; the grave 
losing its victory. Perhaps the phraseology 
with which these subjects are stated, will 
give a general idea of the style of the 
volume. Persons who are much better 
judges than ourselves of the ri^ht kind of 
preaching and instruction for children, have 
given a hearty commendation to these lec- 
tures of Mr. Todd. We think the truths 
brought forward are illustrated by an un- 
usual variety of new and striking incidents. 



QUARTERLY LIST 

OF 

ORDINATIONS AND INSTALLATIONS. 






MARTYN CUSHMAN, ord. pastor, Cong. Acton, Maine, 

April 9, 1834. 
W. A. WHITWELL, inst. pastor, Unit. Calais, Me. April 

WILLIAM GOODING, ord. evang. Baptist, Lubec, Me. 

April 30. 
CHARLES R. FISK, inst. pastor, Cong. Poland, Me. May 

28. 
EDWIN R. WARREN, ord. pastor, Baptist, Alna, Me. June 3. 

DARWIN ADAMS, inst. pastor, Cong. Alstead, New Hamp- 
shire, April 23, 1834. 

MOSES KIMBALL, inst. pastor, Cong. Hopkinton, N. H. 
May 7. 

JOEL WRIGHT, inst. pastor, Cong. Sullivan, N. H. May 22. 

REUBEN BATES, ord. pastor, Unit. New Ipswich, N. H. 
June 1. 

ELI W. TAYLOR, inst. coll. Cong. Croyden, N. H. June 11. 

TERT1US D. SOUTHWORTH, inst. pastor, Cong. Clare- 
mont, N. H. June 18. 



JOSIAH F. GOODHUE, inst. pastor, Cong. Shoreham, Ver- 
mont, Feb. 12, 1834. 

JOSHUA B. GRAVES, ord. evang. Cong. Bridport, Vt. 
May 22. 



HENRY F. EDES, inst. past. Univer. Nantucket, Massachu- 
setts, March 26. 

HOSE A HOWARD, ord. miss. Cong. West Springfield, Mass. 
April 3. 

JOSIAH MOORE, inst. pastor, Cong. Duxbury, Mass. April 

FRANCIS CUNNINGHAM, ord. pastor, Unit. Dorchester, 

Mass. April 21. 
GEORGE DALAND, ord. pastor, Baptist, Peterborough, Ms. 

April 23. 
O. A. BUOWNSON, inst. pastor, Unit. Canton, Mass. May 

14. 
TYLER THACHER, inst. col!. Cong. Hawlev, Mass. Mar 14. 
THOMAS BOUTELLE, ord. pastor, Cong.Plvmouth, Mass. 

May 21. 
JAMES W. WARD, inst. pastor, Cong. Abington, Mass. 

May 21. 
PHILEMON R. RUSSELL, ord. pastor, Unit. West Boyl- 

ston, Mass. May 21. 
TIMOTHY R. CRESSY, inst. pastor, Baptist, Boston, Mass. 

May 25. 
SAUL CLARK, inst. pastor, Cong. Esrrcmont, Mass. May 29. 
JAMES D. LEWIS, ord. pastor, 'Cong. Reading, Mass. 

June 4. 
CHARLES FORBUSH, ord. pastor, Cong. Northbridge, Mass. 

June 4. 
SAMUEL K. LOTHROP, inst. pastor, Unit. Boston. Mass. 

June 18. * ' 



MELANCTIION C. WHEELER, init. pastor, Conif. Con- 

way, Mom. Jane 18. 
WILLIAM MORSE, innt. piulor, Cong. Marlboro', Mail. 

June 35. 
HENRY CLARK, ord. pastor, Baptist, Seckonk, Mais. June 

26. 
STEPHEN C. MILLET, ord. priest, Epis. Salem, Man. 

June 36. 
JOHN A. VAUGHAN, ord. priest, and inst'd. rector, Epis. 

Salem, Maes. June 26. 



PARKER, ord. deacon, Epis. Salem, Mass. 
pastor, Cong. Petersham, Mass. 
Mass. 



ord. pastor, Baptist, Meriden, Ct. 



SAMUEL P 

June 26. 
CALEB B. TRACY, inst 

June 26. 
NATHANIEL GAGE, inst. pastor, Unit. Haverhill 

July 2. 

TERTIUS S. CLARK, inst. pastor, Cong. Haddam, Connecti- 
cut, April 16, 1834. 

WILLIAM W. ANDREWS, ord. pastor, Cong. Kent, Ct. 
May 21. 

ANDREW M. SMITH, inst. pastor, Baptist, North Lyme, 

ROLI.iN II. NEALE, inst. pastor, Baptist, New Haven, Ct. 
LOPER, inst. pastor,. Cong. Middle Hadd.un, Ct. June 

CHANDLER CURTIS, 

June 16. 

W. STRONG, ord. pastor, Baptist, Wilton, Ct. June 24. 
CHARLES FITCH, inst. pastor, Cong. Hartford, Ct. June 26. 

EDWARD MURDOCK, ord. pastor, Baptist, Harpersfield, 

New York, March 10, 1834. 
JOSHUA B. AMBROSE, ord. miss. Baptist, Wyoming, N. 

Y. March 12. 
NANNING BOGARDUS, inst. pastor, Reformed Dutch. Fort 

Plain, N. Y. April 15. 
HENRY A. ROWLAND, inst. pastor, Pres. New York, N. 

Y. April 17. 
AUGUSTUS LITTLEJOHN, ord. evang. Pres. Hai°-ht Cen- 
tre, N. Y. April 17. 
G. K. CLARK, inst. pastor, Pres. Preble, N. Y. April 23. 
JAMES DEWING, inst. pastor, Pres. Greenbush and Nyack, 

N. Y. April 24. 
ISAAC A. WILLMARTH, ord. miss. Baptist, New York, 

N. Y. April 30. 
WILLIAM BRUSH, ord. pastor, Reformed Dutch, Guilford. 

Ulster Co. N. Y. April 30. 
WILLIAM CAHOONE, inst. pastor, Reformed Dutch, Cox- 

sackie, N. Y. 
THEODORE SPENCER, ord. Cong. Mendon, Munroe Co. 

N.Y.June 3. 
WILLIAM U. BENEDICT, ord. pastor, Pres. Ira, N. Y. 

June 10. 
JOHN M. ROWLAND, inst. pastor, Pres. Union, Brown Co. 

N. Y. June 10. 
JOHN JAY SLOCUM, inst. pastor, Pres. New York, N. Y. 

June 15. 
WILLIAM PAGE, inst. pastor, Pres. New York, N. Y. 

June 22. 
JACOB VAN ARSDALE, ord. pastor, Dutch Reformed, Berne, 

N. Y. June 26. 
NATHANIEL E. CORNWALL, ord. deacon, Epis. New 

York, N. Y. June 29. 
AUGUSTUS F. LYNDE, ord. deacon, Epis. New York, N. 

Y. June 29. 
PETER S. CHAUNCEY, ord. deacon, Epis. New York, N. 

Y. June 29. 
EDMUND EMBURY, ord. deacon, Epis. New York, N. Y. 

June 29. 
HENRY LOCKWOOD, ord. deacon, Epis. New York, N. Y. 

June 29. 
EDWARD N. MEAD, ord. deacon, Epis. New York, N. Y. 

June 29. 
JOHN F. MESSENGER, ord. deacon, Epis. New York, N. 

Y. June 29. 
NATHAN W. MUNROE, ord. deacon, Epis. New York, N. 

Y. June 29. 
HENRY TULLIDGE, ord. deacon, Epis. New York, N. Y. 

June 29. 
MARSHALL W r HITING, ord. deacon, Epis. New York, N. 

Y. June 29. 
ROBERT !,. GOLDSBOROUGH, ord. deacon, Epis. New- 
York, N. Y. June 29. 
JOHN DOWDNEY, ord. priest, Epis. New York, N. Y. 

June 29. 

EBENEZER CHEEVER, inst. pastor, Pres. Newark, New 

Jersey, April 23, 1S34. 
GARRET C. SCHEXCK, ord. pastor, Reformed Dutch, Wal- 

pack, N. J. May 5. 
JOHN KENNEDY, inst. pastor, Pres. Bridgeton, N. J. May 

8. 
JOHN C. VANDERVOORT, inst. pastor, Reformed Dutch, 

Paterson, N. J. June 10. 
DAVID ABEL, ord. pastor, Pres. Frankfort and Wantage, 

N. J. June 12. 



NELSON GAGE, ord. pastor, Baptist, Pine<rrove, Pennsylva- 
nia March IS, 1834. 

JOHN W. SCOTT, inst. pastor, Pres. Beaver Co. Pa. April 3. 

WILLIAM W. N1LES, ord. deacon, Epis. Philadelphia, Pa. 
April 13. 

THOMAS WEST, ord. deacon, Epis. Philadelphia, Pa. April 
13. 



72 



DEATHS OF MINISTERS. 



[Aug. 



STEPHEN McHUGH, ord. deacon, Epis. Philadelphia, Pa. 
April 13. 

THOMAS S. BRITTAN, ord. priest, Epis. Philadelphia, Pa. 
April 13. 

DANIEL, TRITES, ord. evang. Baptist, Ridley, Pa. April 21. 

CORRY CHAMBERS, inst. rector, Epis. Lewistown, Pa. 
April 23. 

PETER PARKER, M. D. ord. miss. Cong-, to Canton, Phila- 
delphia, Pa. May 16. 

N. G. WHITE, ord. pastor, Pres. McConnelsburg, Pa. June 

JAMES JOHNSON GRAFF, ord. evang. Pres. Bladensburg, 
Maryland, April 2, 1831. 

ARCHIBALD A. BALDWIN, ord. pastor, Baptist, Prince 

Edward Co. Virginia, March 29, 1834. 
ROBERT DOUGLAS, ord. evang. Dutch Reformed, Shep- 

ardstown, Va. April 9. 
WILLIAM M. ATKINSON, ord. evang. Pres. King Wil- 

liam Co. Va. April 26. 
TIMOTHY W. HOWE, ord. pastor, Pres. Amelia, Va. May 

24. 
JOHN STEELE, inst. pastor, Pres. Staunton, Va. June 20. 
SAMUEL R. HOUSTON, ord. miss. Pres. Staunton, Va. 

June 20. 
ARCHER B. SMITH, ord. pastor, Baptist, Lynchburg, Va. 

WILLIAM M. M'ELROY, ord. pastor, Pres. Danville, North 

Carolina, June 3, 1834. 
DRURY LACY, ord. pastor, Pres. Newbern, N. C. June 5. 

JOHN B. ADGER, ord. miss. Pres. Charleston, S. C. April 

15. 
JAMES L. MERRICK, ord. miss. Pres. Charleston, S. C. 

April 15. 
JAMES LEWERS, ord. pastor, Pres. Wappetau, S. C. April 

20. 

BEDFORD RYLAND, ord. evang. Pres. Maryville, Tennes- 
see, April. 

RALPH E. TEDFORD, ord. evang. Pres. Maryville, Ten. 
April. 

JAMES S. REA, ord. evang. Pres. Maryville, Ten. April. 

ADRIAN ATEN, inst. pastor, Pres. Springfield, Ohio, April 

11, 1834. 
LUDWELL G. GAINES, inst. pastor, Pres. Lower Bethel, 

Ohio, April 30. 

ADDISON SEARLE, inst. rector, Epis. Detroit, Michigan 
Territory, April 19, 1834. 

JOHN S. WEAVER, inst. pastor, Pres. Sandcreek, Indiana, 

April 5, 1834. 
ELIPHALET KENT, inst. pastor, Pres. Greenfield, Ind. 

May 10. 
THOMAS BARR, inst. pastor, Pres. Rushfield, Ind. Mav 31. 
HENDERSON, ord. pastor, Pres. Carmel, Ind. June. 

ROBERT P. GENTRY, ord. Baptist, Drewry Creek, Illinois, 
May. 

EDWIN F. HATFIELD, inst. pastor, Pres. St. Louis, Mis- 
souri. 
ELIJAH P. LOVEJOY, ord. evang. Pres. St. Louis, Mo. 
THADDEUS P. HURLBUT, ord. evang. Pres. St. Louis, Mo. 

Whole number in the above list, 114. 



Ordinations 


.. 68 




... 6 






Institutions 


.. 2 
... 114 




... 23 




... 8 




New York 


... 27 




.. 72 


... 6 


OFFICES. 


Pennsy lvania 

Maryland 


.. 10 




.. 12 


.. 7 




4 


North Carolina 




Rectors 

Deacons 


.. 2 
.. 15 






.. 3 


Ohio 




Not specified 


.. 2 


Michigan Territory.... 
Indiana 


.. 1 

.. 4 








.. 3 



DENOMINATIONS. 
Congregational.. 

Presbyterian 

Episcopalian 

Baptist 

Unitarian 

Universalist 

Reformed Dutch. 



21 DATES. 

17 1834. Febrvary 1 

7 March 5 

1 
7 



Total. 



April 

May 

June 

July 

Not specified. 



Maine. 



QUARTERLY LIST 

OF 

DEATHS 

of Clergymen and Students in Theology. 



SAMUEL BEEDE, Free Will Baptist, Dover, New Hamp- 
shire, March 28, 1834. 

CALVIN NOBLE, at. 57, Cong. Chelsea, Vermont, April 20, 
1834. 

GEORGE CHAPMAN, at. 25, Unit. Framingham, Massa- 
chusetts, June 2, 1834. 
ELIJAH GRIDLEY, an. 74, Cong. Granby, Mass. June 10. 

LUTHER HART, at. 51, Cong. Plymouth, Connecticut, April 
25, 1834. 

THOMAS GRIER, at. 55, Pres. Cold Spring, New York, 
May 19, 1834. 

JOSEPH MAYLIN, Baptist, Medford, New Jersey, April 18, 
1834. * ' 

FRANCIS A. LATTA, at. 67, Pres. Monson, Pennsylvania, 

April 21, 1834. 
JOHN COELTER, at. 60, Pres. Tuscarora Valley, Pa. June 

22. 

UHLHORN, Ger. Evansr. Luth. Church, Baltimore, Ma- 
ryland, died in Germany, "March 23, 1834. 

JAMES D. McALLISTER, Baptist, Sydnorsville, Virginia, 
March 24, 1834. 

DANIEL GOULD, at. 44, Cong. Statesville, North Carolina, 

April 29, 1834. 
ROBERT MILLER, at. 75, Epis. Mary's Grove, N. C. 

WILLIAM S. WILSON, at. 33, Epis. Charleston, South 
Carolina, May 10, 1834. 

ROBERT FLOURNOY, Meth. Epis. Perry, Houston Co. 

Georgia, April 6, 1834. 
JOHN BAKER, Pres. Columbus, Ga. June 15. 

WALTER MONTEITH, Mobile, Alabama, May 6, 1834. 

LEWIS D. VON SCHWEINITZ, at. 52, Meth. Bethlehem, 

Kentucky, March 29, 1834. 
GEORGE W. ASHBRIDGE, at. 32, Pres. Louisville, Ky. 

May 4. 
JAMES L. MARSHALL, Pres. Shelby Co. Ky. May. 

MATTHEW HARRISON, at. 71, Pres. Preble, Cortlandt Co. 
Ohio, April 2, 1834. 

Whole number in the above list, 21. 



SUMMARY. 



AGES. 



From20to30 1 

30 40 2 

40 50 1 

50 60 4 

60 70 2 

70 80 3 

Not specified 8 

Total 21 

Sum of all the ages speci- 
fied 696 

Average age 53 1-2 

DENOMINATIONS. 

Congregational 4 

Presbyterian 7 

Baptist 2 

Methodist 1 

Episcopal 2 

Free Will Baptist 1 

Methodist Episcopal 1 

German Evang. Luth 1 

Unitarian 1 

IS ot specified 1 



New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts... 

Connecticut 

New York 

New Jersey 

Pennsylvania.... 

Maryland 

Virginia 

North Carolina.. 
South Carolina.. 

Georgia 

Alabama 

Kentucky 

Ohio 



Total. 



DATES. 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Not specified. 



5 Total 114 Total .....21 Total 21 



1834.] 



AMERICAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 



73 



JOURNAL 



OF 



THE AMERICAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

AUGUST, 1834. 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL MEETING OF THE AMERICAN EDUCA- 
TION SOCIETY. 



The Society held its Eighteenth Annual 
Meeting in the Tract Society's House, New- 
York, on Thursday, May 8th, at 4 o'clock, 
P. M. 

A letter from the Hon. Samuel Hubbard, 
LL. D., President of the Society, assigning 
the reasons for his absence, and expressing 
his regret at not being present on the occa- 
sion, was communicated. The Rev. John 
Codman, D. D. was appointed Chairman of 
the Meeting. 

The Rev. Dr. Tucker, of Troy, New 
York, led in prayer. The Rev. John J. 
Owen, Assistant Secretary of the Presby- 
terian Education Society, was requested to 
act as Clerk. 

The minutes of the last Annual Meeting 
were read by the Secretary. 

The Treasurer not being present, his An- 
nual Report, certified by the Hon. Pliny 
Cutler, as Auditor, was read by Oliver Will- 
cox, Esq. Treasurer of the Presbyterian 
Education Society, and the same was ac- 
cepted and adopted. 

The reading of the Report of the Direc- 
tors was postponed to the time of the public 
meeting, to be held in the evening. 

The officers of the Society for "the ensu- 
ing year were chosen. 

On motion of Rev. William Patton, of 
New York, seconded by Rev. Ansel D. 
Eddy, of Canandaigua, New York, the 
following preamble and resolutions were 
adopted. 

Whereas the dependence of the Christian 
Ministry upon the Great Head of the church 
is entire and constant, and his blessing abso- 
lutely necessary to its success; and whereas 
the last Thursday of February has been 
annually set apart, by many of the friends 
of the Redeemer, as a season of united 
prayer, for a blessing on the young men of 
this country, and especially on those in a 
course of education at our colleges and 
academies ; therefore, 

Resolved, That it be earnestly recom- 
mended to all the young men, under the 
patronage of this Society, to observe the 
last Thursday of February as a day of 
fasting and prayer, with special reference 
VOL. VII. 



to the more copious effusions of the Holy 
Spirit on the young men of this land gen- 
erally ; but more especially on our literary 
institutions, that the youth who resort thither 
for an education, may be sanctified and led 
to consecrate themselves to the work of the 
ministry. 

Resolved, That the churches of Christ, 
and all the friends of this Society, and of 
the Redeemer, be affectionately requested 
to observe this Annual Concert of Prayer. 

On motion of Rev. Eliakim Phelps, of 
Geneva, N. Y., seconded by Rev. Sylvester 
Holmes, of New Bedford, Mass. the follow- 
ing preamble and resolution were adopted: 

Whereas ' the harvest is plenteous, but 
the laborers are few,' and the Great Head 
of the church has enjoined it upon his dis- 
ciples, ' Pray ye, therefore, the Lord of the 
harvest that he would send forth -laborers 
into his harvest;' and whereas the Tuesday 
immediately succeeding the first Monday of 
the month is regarded by the beneficiaries 
of the American Education Society, and by 
many of the friends of the Redeemer, as a 
day set apart for united prayer that multi- 
tudes of young men may be raised up and 
qualified to preach the gospel, therefore, 

Resolved, That it be earnestly recom- 
mended to all the young men under the 
patronage of this Society, to observe some 
part of the Tuesday immediately succeeding 
the first Monday of the month as a special 
season of prayer, that God would convert 
young men and lead multitudes of them to 
consecrate themselves to the work of the 
ministry. 

The Society adjourned, to meet at half past 
7 o'clock, P. M. in Chatham Street Chapel. 

The Society met agreeably to adjourn- 
ment. The Hon. John C. Smith, LL..D., 
of Connecticut, one of the Yice Presidents, 
took the chair. 

The services were commenced with 
prayer by Rev. Ichabod S. Spencer, of 
Brooklyn, New York. 

An abstract of the Report was read by 
the Rev. Dr. Cogswell, Secretary of the 
Society. 

10 



74 



AMERICAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 



[Aug. 



On motion of Rev. T. T. Waterman, of 
Providence, Rhode Island, seconded by the 
Rev. Sylvester Eaton, of Buffalo, New York, 

Resolved, That this Society regard with 
unfeigned gratitude, the prosperity which 
has hitherto attended it, and that the Report 
of the Directors, an abstract of which has 
now been read, be adopted and published 
under the direction of the Executive Com- 
mittee. 

On motion of the Rev. James Matheson, 
of Durham, England, seconded by the Rev. 
Dr. Codman, of Dorchester, 

Resolved, That as Education Societies ex- 
ert an extensive and beneficial influence on 
other benevolent institutions, as well as on 
the churches, it is of the highest impor- 
tance, that this Society should persevere in 
its purpose of training up a thoroughly 
educated ministry. 

On motion of Rev. Daniel L. Carroll, of 
Brooklyn, New York, seconded by Rev. 
William Patton, of New York, 

Resolved, That in view of the urgent 
call for ministers to supply this and other 
lands, it is the imperious duty of all young 
men of suitable piety and talents, prayer- 
fully, and at once, to decide whether they 
are not required of God to devote them- 
selves to the ministry of Christ. 

On motion of Rev. Miron Winslow, of 
Ceylon, seconded by Rev. William S. 
Plumer, of Petersburg, Virginia, 

Resolved, That since it is the revealed 
will of God that the world is to be converted 
through the instrumentality of the preached 
Gospel,*the American Education Society is 
laid under the most solemn obligations to 
prosecute those measures it has adopted, to 
raise up an able and efficient ministry. 

Addresses were delivered by the Rev. 
Messrs. Waterman, Matheson, Carroll, Wins- 
low, Plumer, and the Rev. Dr. Codman. 

The services were closed with the bene- 
diction by the Rev. Dr. McAuley, of New 
York. 



Abstract of the Eighteenth Annual 
Report. 

Number of young men assisted during 
the year. 

Soon after the last annual meeting, spe- 
cial efforts were made to seek out young 
men of talents, piety, and good promise, and 
induce them to prepare for the ministry of 
Christ. 

A larger number of converted youth than 
usual, have commenced preparation for the 
ministry. During the year, assistance has 
been rendered to 113 young men in 14 
theological seminaries ; 433 young men in 
34 colleges; 366 young men in 111 acade- 
mies and public schools. Total, 912 young 
men in 159 different institutions. 



New Beneficiaries. 
The number of new applicants the past 
year, has been 15 in theological seminaries ; 
S8 in colleges; 177 in academies. Total, 
280 in different institutions. 

Number licensed to preach. 
It is supposed, that about sixty beneficia- 
ries have the last year obtained licensure 
to preach, and commenced the work in 
which they have so long desired to engage. 

Deaths. 

Three of those who have been pursuing 
their studies for the ministry, under the 
patronage of the Society, with fair prospects 
of future usefulness, have been unexpect- 
edly seized during the past year by the 
arrests of death, and remanded to the world 
of spirits. 

Patronage withheld. 

In withholding patronage from young 
men who have received it, the Directors 
are actuated by a sacred regard to the 
interests of the Redeemer's kingdom, the 
American Education Society, the benefit 
of the young men under their care, and 
those especially who are the subjects of 
this censure. Patronage is withheld when 
there are such improprieties of conduct as 
discredit Christian profession, or as bring re- 
proach upon religion or the Society, or where 
there is a destitution of suitable natural or ac- 
quired qualifications. From ten beneficiaries, 
patronage has been withheld the last year. 

Dismissions. 
In conformity with the rules of the So- 
ciety, fourteen beneficiaries, not needing 
further assistance, have requested and ob- 
tained an honorable dismission. In all these 
instances a due sense of gratitude has been 
expressed, and an intention to refund when- 
ever it shall be in their power. 

Promotion of personal holiness. 
The object of this Society is to raise up a 
succession of holy and devoted ministers of 
Jesus Christ. As one means of accomplish- 
ing this, the Board of Directors instituted 
the plan of Pastoral supervision. The 
Secretary of the Parent Society has, du- 
ring the year, visited between four and five 
hundred beneficiaries, and the remainder 
have been visited by other permanent Sec- 
retaries and Officers. By the Trustees of 
Phillips Academy, five hundred copies of 
the Memoir of the Rev. Elias Cornelius 
have been given to the Society for distri- 
bution. And they all have been, or soon 
will be distributed. A Communication on 
some important topic of moral and religious 
duty, designed to produce in them the fruits 
of righteousness unto salvation, is sent to 
them quarterly. All intercourse with them, 
in person or by correspondence, is both 
paternal and pastoral, and is designed to 
prevent an unfaithful, time-serving, and 



AMERICAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 



1834.] 

graceless ministry, and to bring forward 
a holy, consistent and consecrated host of 
ambassadors of the cross. Eternity alone 
will fully disclose its results. 

Receipts. 

From the Treasurer's Report, it appears 
that the receipts of the Society the past year 
have been $57,818 20 : more than $11,000 
greater than in any preceding year. Of 
this sum, $6,680, a bequest of Oliver D. 
Cooke, Esq. of Hartford, Conn, have been 
received on account of permanent scholar- 
ships, and 51,138 20 for current uses of the 
Society. There have been paid into the 
Treasury by beneficiaries, who have refund- 
ed in whole or in part what they received 
from the Society, $1,947 78, which sum is 
included in the above receipts. Of the 
$57,818 20, there have been raised within 
the bounds of the Presbyterian Church 
$19,277. 

Expenditures. 

The expenditures of the Society, during 
the year, have been $56,363 91. Add to 
this sum the debt of the Society the last 
year, $193 35, and the amount will be 
$56,557 26. From this sum subtract the 
amount of receipts for current use, and the 
Society will be found $5,225 71 in debt. 
A large portion of the funds of the Parent 
Society have been paid over to Branches, 
and Societies connected with it. Though 
the Society is in debt, yet it is not because 
funds as large as usual have not been re- 
ceived ; but because the number of benefi- 
ciaries has been rapidly multiplied. The 
amount of appropriations now, is double to 
what it was four years ago. 

Amount of earnings. 
While pursuing their studies, the benefi- 
ciaries of the Society have earned during 
the year by manual labor, school teaching 
and other services, the sum of $26,268 23. 
This is truly creditable to them, and evinces 
what industrious application can accomplish. 

Obligations cancelled. 
During the year, the notes of ten indi- 
viduals, at their request, have been can- 
celled in whole or in part, or placed in such 
a condition as will prevent embarrassment. 
Four of these were Foreign Missionaries, 
three were Home Missionaries, and three 
were settled Pastors in peculiarly depressed 
circumstances. 

Quarterly Register and Journal. 
This work, established for the benefit of 
the cause of Christ, has been continued 
with high reputation, and is accomplishing 
much on behalf of literature, religion and 
benevolent enterprises. Its bearing upon 
the operations of the Society, upon the 
young men connected with it, and upon the 
ministry generally, is most happy. By the 
historian and antiquarian, it is viewed as a 
work of peculiar merit. Its original dis- 



75 



cussion9 in respect to sacred learning, and 
the Christian ministry ; its statistic i of liter- 
ary, religious and benevolent societies; of 
academical, theological and ecclesiastical in- 
stitutions, arc of great utility. That part of 
the work called the Journal, containing an 
account of the proceedings of the American 
Education Society, is very important to the 
interests of the Institution, and should be 
widely distributed. 

Agents. 
No benevolent society will flourish with- 
out Agents to execute its plans of operation. 
This point has been fully settled by the 
experience of years. But, provided these 
institutions coufd be sustained without the 
labors of Agents, it is doubtful whether it 
would be best for the church, that they 
should be. Judicious and faithful Agents 
will be the means of rousing the attention, 
and calling forth the energies of the com- 
munity, by presenting the claims of different 
religious enterprises, and thus be the means 
of grace to Christians, by enlarging their 
views and expanding their benevolence. 
During the year a number of agencies have 
been performed. 

Branches and Auxiliaries. 
There are branches or auxiliaries in most 
of the States of the Union, in successful ope- 
rations and preparing for extended efforts. 

Presbyterian Education Society. 
This Society extends its operations over a 
very 'large portion of the Middle, Western 
and Southern States. It had under its care 
the last year 436 beneficiaries, and it con- 
tributed towards their support $19,277. 

General results. 
The results whicb have been produced 
by the instrumentality of the American 
Education Society, have been most ani- 
mating and encouraging. There have been 
assisted by it 1,964 young men in a course of 
preparation for the ministry. The first 
year only 7 were aided, and the last year 
912. About 600 of its beneficiaries have 
passed through their course of education, 
and are now actively employed in promot- 
ing the cause of Christ. There are 40 
preaching the gospel among the heathen as 
Foreign Missionaries. Between 200 and 
300 have been employed at times in dis- 
pensing the words of eternal truth amid the 
waste places of Zion, or among the new 
settlements of our country, in the service 
of Home Missionary Societies. About 20 
are laboring as secretaries or agents of 
different benevolent societies. More than 
50 are engaged as editors of literary and 
religious publications, or as instructors in 
institutions of literature and theology, and 
the remainder are settled as pastors of 
churches, or are candidates for settlement. 
One sixth of all the ordinations and instal- 
lations of ministers in the United States, the 



76 



AMERICAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 



year past, as published in the different 
periodicals of the day, were beneficiaries of 
this Society. Through its instrumentality 
towards $500,000 have been raised for char- 
itable ministerial education. More than 
$11,000 have been refunded by former 
beneficiaries. During the last 8 years, the 
young men connected with it have earned 
by manual labor, school teaching, and other 
services, $100,000. Making the returns 
which the Directors have received from a 
large number of beneficiaries the basis of 
calculation, it appears that the whole num- 
ber of ministers educated by the Society, 
have since they commenced a course of 
education, taught academies and common 
schools more than 1,000 years; instructed 
about 135,000 children and youth ; have 
been instrumental of 915 revivals of religion, 
and of the hopeful conversion of upwards 
50,000 individuals. There are now instructed 
in Sabbath schools and Bible classes under 
their care, at least 60,000 persons. About 
$65,000 are annually contributed in their 
parishes for various benevolent purposes ; 
and they preach statedly from Sabbath to 
Sabbath, to as many as 150,000 people. 
The indirect influence of the Institution is 
great in respect to society, the sciences and 
arts, and every thing that renders life de- 
sirable and happy. Perhaps it is as great 
as the direct. By its publications and 
agents and efforts generally, it has probably 
induced as many young men to enter the 
ministry, who were able to educate them- 
selves, as would have educated themselves 
from among those, who have gone forth as 
heralds of salvation, by the aid imparted to 
them. And there can be no doubt that this 
Institution has excited to the formation of 
other similar Education Societies. In view 
of what has been accomplished by the So- 
ciety, the Directors would make the most 
grateful acknowledgment of the Divine in- 
terposition in its behalf. " Thine O Lord is 
the greatness, and the power, and the glory, 
and the victory, and the majesty. No*?, 
therefore, our God, we, thank thee, and 
praise thy glorious name." 

The work to be performed. 
" The field is the world," and Christians 
in the nineteenth century, filled with the 
faith of God, anticipate its immediate cul- 
tivation. If they speak of multiplying the 
copies of the Sacred Scriptures, it is for the 
supply of all the families of the earth ; if 
they speak of sending out missionaries of 
the cross, it is to every inhabited part of the 
globe ; if they speak of raising up spiritual 
laborers, it is for gathering in the moral, 
harvest of the world. And so it should be.' 
Jesus Christ died for the world, and his re- 
deemed people should aim at nothing less, 
than bringing it back from its revolt to his 
allegiance. For the accomplishment of this 
object, the Christian ministry is the great 
and standing ordinance of Heaven. A host 



[Aug. 



of young men must be raised up and quali- 
fied for this blessed work. And in the 
providence of God, the American Education 
Society seems destined to be a grand instru- 
ment for the completion of this glorious 
work. 

Means to be used. 

Prayer is one important means to be emr 
ployed for the advancement of this cause. 
After stating that " the harvest is plenteous 
but the laborers few," the Great Head of 
the church enjoined upon his disciples this 
duty, " Pray ye, therefore, the Lord of the 
harvest, that he will send forth laborers into 
his harvest." Every step in this work 
should be taken in prayer — prayer in faith 
— in importunity — in agony. 

In the year 1831 there was a revival in 
fourteen different colleges, and between 300 
and 400 young men in our institutions of 
learning, were hopefully converted to Christ. 
The present year too has been signalized 
by the dispensations of his grace* Revivals 
have been enjoyed in a number of colleges, 
and many students have been brought to a 
knowledge of the truth as it is in Jesus. 
There are now 5,400 young men at the 
different colleges in the United States. 
How important that they should be sancti* 
fied and consecrated to Christ and the 
church. 

Another means to be used is the diffusion of 
information in respect to the want of ministers. 
Parents should acquaint themselves, that 
they may know their duty in reference to 
the consecration of their sons to the ministry. 
Pious young men are bound to be informed, 
in regard to the deficiency of ministers, 
that they may see the necessity of setting 
themselves apart to the work of preaching 
the gospel. All people should have full 
statistical information on the subject. Until 
this is the case, they will never perform 
their duty, 

Agents should be sent forth to spread 
before the community the woes and wants 
of perishing men, and excite to benevolent 
efforts. A knowledge of the true condition 
of the world, and the means of its mental 
and moral improvement, must be highly 
interesting to the philosopher, patriot and 
Christian. The evil must be known before 
an adequate remedy can and will be ap- 
plied. — Efforts should be made, to induce 
pious young men of proper natural qualifi- 
cations to enter the ministry . Parents should 
consecrate their sons, if pious and of good 
promise, to this blessed work, and encourage 
them to seek suitable preparation for it. A 
child must not be withheld from this em- 
ployment, because he is the youngest son, 
or an only son. He must be given up, for 
the Lord hath need of him. Abraham could 
sacrifice his youngest son at God's command, 
and God himself could offer up his only Son 
for man's redemption. Parents must make 
rnore sacrifices in this way than they ever 



1834.] 



PRESBYTERIAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 



77 



have made. And they should rejoice that 
they have sons to be thus employed for 
Christ and his church. The mini 
Jesus should make increasing efforts to 
induce young men of respectable talents, 
ardent piety, and good promise, to com- 
mence at once preparation for this holy cal- 
ling. — Charitable assistance should be ren- 
dered to all pious young men of good 
promise who desire to prepare for the min- 
istry, but have not the pecuniary means of 
doing it. The number of males in the Uni- 
ted States, between 14 and 25 years of age, 
is about 1,200,000. One fifteenth part or 
80,000 may be considered pious. One in 
ten or 8,000 ought to prepare for the min- 
istry. One half of these are able in a pe- 
cuniary view to educate themselves; the 
other half or 4,000 need charitable assist- 
ance. And can it be imagined, that the 
churches purchased by the blood of Im- 
manuel will withhold the silver and the 
gold, which are the Lord's ? It cannot be. 

Conclusion. 
Have the friends of Zion thought on this 
momentous subject of educating pious young 
men for the ministry as they ought ? Have 
they sufficiently exerted themselves to be- 
come acquainted with the spiritual woes 
and wants of millions in our own country ; 
and of hundreds of millions in pagan and 
Mohammedan lands ? Have they felt as 
they ought ? Have they experienced one 
hour of distress, one sleepless night on ac- 
count of the impending perdition of those 
who have no knowledge of the way of sal- 
vation by Jesus Christ ? Have they prayed 
as they ought, presented the case before 
the throne of God with strong crying and 
tears — agonized in prayer ? For the pro- 
motion of this object, have they contributed 
of their substance as duty required ? On 
the day of their espousals to Christ, did 
they not make an entire consecration to him 
of all they are, and have, and can do for 
time and for eternity ? Christians will do 
well to ponder these things in their hearts. 



Presbyterian Education Society. 
As the American Education Society held 
its annual meeting this year in the city of 
New York, the Presbyterian Education So- 
ciety did not celebrate publicly its anniver- 
sary. The officers of this Society are 
Hon. Theo. Frelinghuysen, LL. D. Pres. 
Rev. William Patton, Cor. Secretary, 
Rev. John J. Owen, Assistant Secretary. 
Horace Holden, Esq. Recording Secretary. 
Oliver Willcox, Esq. Treasurer. 

Some account of the proceedings of this 
Society, is given in the abstract of the Pa- 
rent Institution. 



The Rev. William Patton, p 
the Centra] Presbyterian church in New 

York, having been appointed to the office 
of Corresponding and Pastoral Secretary of 
the Presbyterian Education Society, with a 
view to^iis devoting the whole of his time 
to that office, the undersigned were cou- 
stitutcd a committee to make all nee 
arrangements and to secure his acceptance. 
We are happy in communicating to the 
Christian public that he has accepted the 
appointment, and will very soon enter upon 
its duties. At a select meeting of gentle- 
men, called from the various churches, it 
was unanimously and strongly urged upon 
Rev. Mr. Patton to accept. A subscription 
was then opened, which amounted to 
$2,837 50, and which has since been in- 
creased to about $5,000. 

The committee are strongly encouraged 
by this demonstration, of the increased in- 
terest taken in this cause. The rapidity 
with which young men of piety and talents 
are coming forward, will require an enlarg- 
ed benevolence ; and we cordially, therefore, 
commend the Secretary and the indispensa- 
ble and noble cause he advocates to the 
prayers, confidence, and benevolence of 
the Christian community. 

Henry White, "] 

Caleb O. Halsted, 

Fisher Howe, )■ Committee. 

R. T. Haines, 

Wm. M. Halsted, J 



Anniversary of the Boston Auxili- 
ary Education Society. 
The Boston Auxiliary Education Society 
held its annual meeting on Monday even- 
ing, May 26, at Park Street Church. The 
services were introduced- with prayer by 
the Rev. President Humphrey, of Amherst 
College. The Report was read by the Rev. 
Nehemiah Adams, of Boston. Addresses 
were delivered by the Rev. Dr. Cogswell, 
Secretary of the Parent Society ; the Rev. 
Hubbard W T inslow, of Boston ; the Rev. 
William Patton, Secretary of the Presbyte- 
rian Education Society ; and the Rev. Mi- 
ron Winslow, of Ceylon. The officers of 
the Society are 
* William J. Hubbard, Esq. President. 

Mr. James M. Whiton, Secretary. 

Mr. Lorenzo S. Cragin, Treasurer. 

The Report follows : 

The Boston Auxiliary Education Society 
was instituted at Boston, Dec. ISIS, under 
the name of the Auxiliary Education Soci- 
ety of the Young Men of Boston. ^ By a 
new organization in the year 1331, its dis- 



78 



BOSTON AUXILIARY. 



tinctive character as a Society of young 
men was changed, and it now embraces 
some of every age in the churches of this 
city. 

This Society is the leading auxiliary to 
the Parent Society, its yearly contributions 
to the latter having exceeded those of every 
other similar association. Its funds are ap- 
plied immediately to the use of the Parent 
Society, and thus it presents the light of a 
goodly stream feeding a river which in a 
peculiar sense makes glad the city of our 
God. 

The sum of $3,482,* raised by this Aux- 
iliary during the past year, is an indication of 
the importance attached by Christians in this 
city to the cause of education for the minis- 
try. They do not, however, and cannot 
transcend its importance by any feelings 
however ardent, or by any efforts however 
great. When Christ at his ascension led 
captivity captive, He gave gifts to men, like 
a royal conqueror, in testimony of his tri- 
umphs, as an assurance of his love and 
protection of his friends. What were these 
tokens of the favor of Him who said, " All 
power is given me in heaven and on earth," 
and from his infinite resources what did He 
select, as, in his view, the greatest gift 
which he could bestow upon man ? It was 
The Christian Ministry. This is the 
greatest blessing which the Saviour has 
given to the world ; it is, in fact, in the place 
of the Saviour's personal presence amongst 
men; it is the instrument of a world's sal- 
vation in the hands of the Holy Ghost. To 
perpetuate the Christian ministry is to in- 
sure the Redeemer's greatest blessing to 
mankind, and the continued influences of 
that Spirit who worketh faith, which cometh 
by hearing; and who as the God of the 
natural as well as the moral creation, re- 
joices in the wise adaptation of means to 
the end, and has exhibited adorable wisdom 
in appointing such means as redeemed sin- 
ners to publish salvation. 

This continuance of the Christian ministry 
is essential, not only to the conversion of 
the world, but to the existence and pros- 
perity of the various plans of benevolence. 
It is plain, that unless the good proposed by 
every other enterprise of Christian zeal be 
followed up in the hearts of men by the 
ministrations of the gospel from a preacher, 
it will be temporary in its influence and 
limited as to its extent. 

It is a singular feature in the government 
of God, that all the objects which lie nearest 
his heart, are in a peculiar manner made to 
depend for their accomplishment upon the 
will and efforts of his friends. Many things 
of secondary importance are performed 
without so distinguished and necessary an 
agency of man, but in those great concerns 



* This sum does not comprize the whole yearly 
contributions, many of the subscriptions or contribu- 
tions not yet having been received. 



[Aug. 



which involve the highest glory of God, 
and are most intimately connected with the 
work of redeeming the world, the Christian 
is set forth as the great instrument, and God 
waits for the exercise of his powers and of 
his spiritual affections, the use of his posses- 
sions, and the consecration of himself a 
living sacrifice, before these objects can be 
accomplished. This is without doubt from 
the Son of God, who, knowing the honor 
and glory which will accrue to him who is 
instrumental in the accomplishment of such 
designs, is willing to add to the honor con- 
ferred on man in redemption, the happiness 
of being a co-worker with God. This is 
applicable to the object with which this 
Society is connected. We have seen that 
the ministry of reconciliation was the gift 
chosen by the Saviour to be a lasting me- 
morial of himself, and to effect the purposes 
contemplated by his humiliation, his cross 
and triumph. We have seen that it is all- 
important; that Christ is dead in vain, 
unless his constituted means of spreading 
the knowledge of his name and salvation, 
are provided. But this responsibility is left 
with his friends. " How can they believe 
except they hear, how can they hear with- 
out a preacher, how can they preach except 
they be sent ? " These questions are solemn 
affirmations, and it is left with the Christian 
to supply that indispensable instrumentality, 
during whose delay the destinies of a world 
are at stake. 

In the providential administration of God, 
enterprises destined to effect distinguished 
good, are in many instances compelled to 
struggle with great difficulties and opposi- 
tion. From the reformation downwards, 
they who have been connected with noble 
plans of benevolence, have, in the majority 
of instances, been compelled to hard and haz- 
ardous labors, which have tried their souls. 
As through much tribulation we must enter 
into the kingdom of heaven, so the desirable 
object must be purchased at much expense ; 
and this, in accordance with the sentence, 
In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat thy 
bread ; for sin has separated us from the 
once easy acquisition of that which is de- 
sirable, and has made labor a necessary con- 
dition in every thing, and especially in that 
which concerns the restoration of souls to 
holiness, and the favor of God. An illustra- 
tion of this is seen in the difficulties which 
attended the commencement of the scheme 
of benevolence now considered. A perfect 
illustration of it upon a smaller scale is seen 
in the trials and sufferings of multitudes of 
pious young men, in striving to obtain the 
necessary qualifications for the ministry. 
God seems for a long time to hedge up their 
path. The opposition of friends, or growing 
poverty, one or both of these are obstacles 
which hundreds of young men have been 
obliged to encounter ; and in the struggles 
which they have endured, it may be said of 
them the heart knoweth its own bitterness. 



1834.] 



"No stranger can tell what have been the 
sufferings of candidates for the sacred office 
in their first efforts to obtain an education. 
To look through seven years, at least, of 
study, without the means of support, to be 
subjected to the charge or suspicion of in- 
dolence from ignorant and mistaken friends 
for choosing an employment whose hard- 
ships and pains they could not appreciate, to 
sit by a miserable fire through long winter 
nights, to see a scanty wardrobe perishing, 
and no prospect of fresher supply, to feel the 
pressure of accumulating debt, and to have 
the mind agitated and racked almost every 
night by the question whether the indica- 
tions of Providence are not opposed to further 
progress, and to be oppressed in spirit all 
day long with the consciousness of being; 
poov and friendless, are sufferings which 
not a few have endured, who, as has been 
seen with effects of their subsequent labors, 
were chosen and called of God to the min- 
istry of reconciliation. The Great Apostle 
and High Priest of our profession went 
through a course of suffering even unto 
blood ; and though his young followers 
would not shrink from being partakers with 
Him in his sufferings, nor despise the early 
chastening of the Lord, nor withdraw 
themselves from bearing the yoke in their 
youth, they are compelled to say to the 
brethren and sisters in Christ, that they 
must share with them the suffering and 
sacrifice which God has made indispensable 
to their being co-workers with him in sav- 
ing the world. It is one of the most de- 
lightful results of modern Christian benev- 
olence, that a plan has been devised and 
brought to the help of those who are the 
hope of the church and the future heralds 
of mercy, at the same time, that all tempta- 
tion to indolence and pride is prevented by 
a happy contrivance of keeping a sense of 
responsibility upon the mind, while it is 
relieved from the oppression of want and 
uncertainty. The plan of loaning funds to 
candidates for the sacred profession, payable 
without interest at a time when it is sup- 
posed the ability will make it easy, and to 
be cancelled in the case of those who 
enter the missionary service, is a wise and 
admirable feature in the present system of 
this benevolent enterprise. The receipt of 
absolute charity is often so revolting to 
many invaluable but sensitive minds, that 
they have preferred to suffer, and, in some 
instances, forego, the advantages and useful- 
ness which they could not otherwise enjoy. 
The natural delicacy which is found in 
many young minds, is almost always a 
token of merit, and proceeds from qualities 
which may be suppressed or greatly injured, 
if treated in their first opening with harsh 
or unrefined usage. The independence of 
mind which leads some to refuse charitable 
aid, has, with a little indulgence and proper 
management, often been like a compressed 
coil, propelling to harder study and severer 



BOSTON AUXILIARY. 



79 



efforts^and giving a play to the energies of 
the man which might hive collapsed, and 
made him a listless and useless cieatui ■'-•, if 
unwelcome obligations had been forced 
upon him. Here in the opinion of many 
the present system of our Society fulfils a 
delicate and noble end; saving all tbfl 
valuable in the refinement of a delicate 
mind, and at the same time yielding it all 
the aid which an abundant charity would 
afford. Those who contribute to this So- 
ciety, may be assured, in view of some of 
the circumstances just stated, ihat there is 
no plan through which they can exert such 
an influence upon one of the most interest- 
ing classes of their fellow-beings ; and at a 
time, when all that is generous and kind is 
sparingly appreciated ; or that will be more 
fully repaid them on earth and in eternity, 
in the gratitude of the immediate recipients 
of their sympathy, and of multitudes whom 
they will be the instruments of converting 
to God, to be in their time the means of 
salvation to thousands more. 

One principle upon which this Society 
proceeds, and which commends itself to 
every well-informed mind, is, that a thor- 
ough classical and theological education is 
desirable as a qualification for extended and 
permanent influence in the Christian minis- 
try. There is one view of this subject 
which deserves attention and serious con- 
sideration. Many of us can remember the 
time when it was thought that the employ- 
ment of the missionary was one that needed 
merely common and even ordinary talents 
and acquisitions, and when those who could 
not obtain a settlement in a Christian so- 
ciety by reason of their want of acceptable 
talents and attainments, could be as usefully 
employed amongst the heathen, as men of 
greater powers and learning. Even at the 
present day the heathen are by many in- 
discriminately considered as stupid, sottish, 
senseless creatures, without discernment, 
talent, taste or aptitude for any thing but 
animal pleasure, or sensibility to any thing 
but brute force. This is doubtless true in re- 
gard to the majority of the heathen, and even 
the remainder " have their understandings 
darkened, being alienated from the life of 
God through the ignorance that is in them, 
because of the blindness of their hearts.'* 
But under that awful darkness which broods 
over paganism, there is a world of mind, 
and here and there a shrewd, intelligent, 
keen-sighted intellect, which by cultivation 
would honor and bless the world. As 
knowledge and the principles of Christianity 
spread through that mass of mind, creating 
a desire for instruction and a disgust at the 
foul practices of their superstitions, there 
will be questions asked, and investigations 
made, and a spirit of general inquiry roused 
up, which will shake all paganism to its 
centre. Who are the men that we shall 
need to be stationed there to direct that 
wonderful reformation, to guide the awak- 



80 



BOSTON AUXILIARY. 



[Aug. 



ened mind of a new world, to satisfy the 
eager desire and the restless curiosity of men 
with faculties roused and sharpened by par- 
tial discoveries of the wonders of natural and 
revealed religion ? Are they superficial 
thinkers, who shunned the discipline of a 
thorough education ? Are they half-taught 
scholars, who, because the work to be per- 
formed was so great, could not wait to 
prepare themselves to do it? Are they men 
of decent attainments and powers merely 
that will soon be required by the exigencies 
of the heathen world ? This Society has 
answered the question by the decided stand 
which it has taken in enjoining upon all 
within its influence, the duty to themselves 
and their Master, of striving after the high- 
est cultivation and attainments in reference 
to the work of the ministry. 

It is possible that it has appeared to some 
that the learning, and talents, and sensibil- 
ities of Henry Martyn were sacrificed in 
sending him to live and die amidst idolaters ; 
and that such a useless expense of mind 
and such liability to excruciating suffering 
which every one constituted like him must 
endure, ought to be spared, and* men of 
common endowments, and iron nerves, and 
" working men" be selected for this pur- 
pose. But the memoir of Henry Martyn 
would not have blessed Christendom, and 
through us, paganism, had he not been a 
man of just the sensibility and refinement 
and learning that he possessed. The inval- 
uable translations which he made would 
have been performed with less ability, if 
with any, if this ornament of an English 
university had not gone to Persia. Shall the 
important work of translation", that re- 
quires a fine perception of shades of thought, 
and language, and which, in a small mistake 
of a particle, or single word, may convey 
erroneous impressions to a nation of readers, 
be intrusted to men of inferior classical 
abilities; and they be the Wickliffes, the 
Tindalls, the Coverdales, and " the James's 
men" of a new Christendom, who have no 
disposition or patience for the study of lan- 
guages at home under every possible ad- 
vantage ? Were the labor required of the 
missionary only that of a camp-meeting, or 
a conference-room, he were the best qual- 
ified, whose ready utterance and physical 
strength were the greatest; but when we 
consider that the literature of the vast, 
nations of heathenism, soon we hope to be 
converted to God, is yet to be formed, and 
that every thing depends upon the first and 
elementary parts ot it, the office of a foreign 
missionary seems to be one of inexpressible 
responsibility, and to call for men as well 
qualified by the highest and most extensive 
literary attainments as any that remain in 
the churches and institutions of Christendom. 
It is evident, moreover, that now is the time 
when such men are needed to take their 
stations at the opening fields of usefulness 
in foreign lands, to watch for the indication 



of those changes which in the world of mind 
are more sudden than that of the seasons, 
and during which it can never be said, 
" There are four months and then cometh 
harvest," but which call for the reaper 
oftentimes before it is suspected that the 
seed is in the ground. As the Education 
Society rather than any other is engaged 
in furnishing men for the various depart- 
ments of ministerial labor, it seems to be 
incumbent upon them especially, to make 
these statements and to recommend these 
principles to the churches, and they call 
upon ministers and intelligent laymen to 
assist them in giving this subject the prom- 
inence before the community which its 
importance deserves. The effect of the 
general reception of these views, confirmed 
by the apparent revolutions in the heathen 
world, would soon lead Christendom to ex- 
pect that our most accomplished scholars, and 
men of the most powerful minds, should be 
selected for the foreign service ; and that a 
common man would do better to remain at 
home, than be intrusted with the amazing 
responsibility of forming the minds and 
characters of nations, and of laying a foun- 
dation which must be removed at great 
hazard when the superstructure has gone 
up, or stand for ages to give character to all 
that shall be built upon it. 

But if the exigencies of the heathen 
world demand the best men that leave our 
seminaries, what will the churches do for a 
supply of able ministers ? There must be 
a famine amongst them, unless means are 
used to increase the number of such min- 
isters; for increasing knowledge and refor- 
mation in all classes of the community have 
raised the standard of ministerial qualifica- 
tions, so that if the previous description of 
such a minister as a church represent them- 
selves to need, and seem not to be satisfied 
unless they can obtain, is to be answered, 
nothing short of thorough literary and the- 
ological attainments in those who are as- 
sisted by this Society will give the churches 
confidence in receiving any who have been 
under its patronage. Those who cannot 
wait to finish their studies because souls 
are perishing, will then be made to feel 
that it is more painful to see them perish 
while they who were in such haste to save 
them are to their mortification laid aside for 
incompetency, than it would have been to 
have repressed their irregular zeal, and to 
have followed the counsel of wiser and 
more judicious men. 

But while the demands of the heathen 
world are increasing, and the churches of 
our land need a constant supply of able and 
efficient men, where shall we look for the 
reinforcement of the Christian ministry, and 
for the host that is needed to Christianize 
pagan lands. It is believed that the Society 
to which this is an auxiliary is to be, in the 
hands of God, the means of a large supply 
to these demands. And it is not merely by 



1834.] 



rev. mr. Mather's report. 



81 



sending out those whom it has heen instru- 
mental in calling from obscurity and pov- 
erty, and raising up to be ministers, that 
this Society will be a blessing to the 
churches and to the world. It has been 
the means of raising up many to preach the 
gospel whom it never assisted by its funds, 
but to whom it directed the prayers and 
interests of the churches and of its ben- 
eficiaries, and who, in the revivals in col- 
leges which were in consequence of these 
prayers and this interest, were the subjects 
of renewing grace. The American Educa- 
tion Society by having the objects of its fos- 
tering care in colleges and academies, is 
necessarily drawn towards those seminaries 
with an intense interest ; thus it has been 
the means of awakening and sustaining a 
spirit of prayer throughout the churches for 
the literary institutions of our land ; and to 
these institutions we are to look for the 
future ministry. No one may say how 
much the direct or indirect influence of 
this Society has been connected with re- 
vivals in colleges and academies; — those 
events of thrilling interest, those periods in 
which men are called to be apostles, and set 
apart by the Holy Ghost to the gospel of 
God. In this view of the subject the 
American Education Society stands first 
amongst equals in its influence upon the 
destinies of the world. 

It is interesting to see that this great 
enterprise holds so high a place in the 
hearts and charities of Christians in this 
city, and it is hoped that they will continue 
to sustain the example which they have 
given to other auxiliaries, and far surpass 
their own former efforts. To be the instru- 
ments of raising up heralds of the cross, 
requires an exercise of faith in the promises 
of God; inasmuch as this benevolence con- 
templates future, as well as immediate, 
good; and therefore they who thus cast 
their bread upon the waters in obedience to 
the command of God and with trust in his 
word shall have the praise not only of de- 
voted servants, but of those who honor 
God by their " confidence, which hath a 
great recompense of reward." 



INTELLIGENCE. 

American" Education - Society. 

Quarterly Meeting of the Directors. 

The quarterly meeting of the Board of 
Directors was held on Wednesday, July 9, 
1834. Appropriations were made to ben- 
eficiaries, in various institutions as follows : 

Former Ben. Netn Ben. Total. Am't Ap. 

4 Theol. Sem's, 54 1 55 $1,010 
11 Colleges, 231 1 232 4,296 

40 Academies, 77 27 104 1,380 



55 Institutions, 362 29 391 $6,6S6 
VOL. VII. 



The Directors were obliged by their 
Rules to strike from the list of Beneficiaries 
the names of two young men for impropri- 
eties and immoralities of conduct. Such 
instances of misdemeanor have rarely oc- 
curred of late, and are deeply to be deplored. 
May the Directors be never again called to 
the performance of the like painful duty. 



Report of Rev. Wm. L. Mather. 

To the Secretary of the American Education Society. 

My last quarterly report I think was 
made out from Berkshire county, April 1. 
I continued my labors in that county till 
I had visited the remaining towns of 
Williamstown, Dalton, Hinsdale, Peru, 
Windsor, Lanesborough, Tyringham, New 
Marlborough, Sandisfield and Sheffield. 
These towns, except one, all contributed at 
the time to the funds of the Society, as will 
appear from the list of donations published 
in the Journal. This list, however, it should 
be observed in justice to some of these 
towns, does not exhibit the whole amount 
contributed for the season. Providential 
circumstances with regard to some of them 
prevented much effort being made at the 
time. 

With regard to the town which contrib- 
uted nothing at the time the subject was 
presented, something has perhaps been 
contributed since. It was understood that 
there would be. It was thought not expe- 
dient to call upon the people to act on 
the subject immediately, lest they should 
do too much and would afterwards repent 
of their liberality — that they had better 
take time to think of the matter and act 
understandingly. 

Now, Sir, without any particular refer 
ence to the place here alluded to, (for I 
hope in that instance your Journal will show 
a very liberal contribution as the result of 
waiting and thinking,) allow me to make a 
remark on the feature in the system of be- 
nevolent contribution. This thinking and 
deliberating, is an excellent thing. 1 love 
to have men think well before they act 
on any subject ; and especially in regard 
to the Education Society. If I can only 
get men to think of this cause, scrutinize 
it, and understand it throughout, I have no 
fears about their giving. I have never 
known a man who became thoroughly ac- 
quainted with this Society, and understood 
properly its bearings upon the church and 
the world, who was disposed to withhold 
his aid from it. This waiting, however, 
and putting off the matter to some future 
time before acting, when there is no other 
reason for doing so but to think about it, is 
quite another "affair. If the subject is so 
unfortunately presented by an agent, that 
the people cannot understand it from his 
11 



82 



REV. C. S. ADAMS'S REPORTS, 



[Aug. 



address, but each for himself must procure 
and examine all the public documents on 
the subject before be can have a proper 
view of it, it is certainly a good reason for 
his delaying and taking time to do this. 
But when the cause is properly presented, 
(as it is believed is generally the case,) all 
needful information to a correct understand- 
ing of it is communicated, all the important 
facts respecting it are spread out before the 
mind, and its various bearings and relations 
exhibited in a single view; and then, if 
ever, is the time when the subject can be 
contemplated in its true light and be prop- 
erly understood, and then is the time when 
men can act in reference to it more under- 
standing^ than at any other. Whereas a 
delay of a week, instead of increasing the 
light in most cases, would actually extin- 
guish in a measure that which already 
exists. It will be observed that I speak 
only of this particular reason for deferring 
immediate action. There may be many 
other reasons which would render an im- 
mediate contribution or subscription inexpe- 
dient. The question is one of expediency 
altogether in regard to these reasons. In 
regard to the other, I cannot avoid being 
very uncharitable. The suspicion will, in 
spite of me, steal over my mind that some 
other than benevolent feeling is the ground 
for wishing this delay. However, this 
whole remark may, in a good measure at 
present, be unnecessary, as the time has 
come when the friends of Zion are but 
little disposed to put off to a future time 
what is properly their present duty. 

The Berkshire County Auxiliary Society 
held its anniversary on the first of May. 
The meeting was well attended by the 
ministers of the county, and an unusual 
interest manifested in behalf of the cause. 
Berkshire county does well for some objects 
of benevolence, while others and this among 
them, has hitherto been sadly neglected. 
This was felt, and a determination man- 
ifested that with regard to the Education 
Society at least an effort should be made to 
place it on its proper footing. 

The churches embraced in the Plymouth 
County Auxiliary, presented my next field 
of labor, which I have occupied till the 
present time. These churches, with a few 
exceptions, are well known to be neither 
large nor wealthy. They are nevertheless 
liberal. I have, in most cases, been favor- 
ably disappointed in the amount of their 
contributions. I do not mean that they 
have done more than they ought to have 
done in any case ; for such an occurrence 
would be rare indeed, perhaps no one of 
them has come up to the proper standard of 
duty in this respect, but they have done 
well comparatively. And I feel happy to 
hear this testimony to their benevolence, 
not to exalt them in their own estimation, 
but to encourage them to do the more. My 
reception has been cordial and it is truly a 



pleasure to plead the cause of benevolence 
among a people who love that cause. 



Extracts from the Rev. Charles S. Adams's 
Reports. 

To the Secretary of the American Education Society. 

Rev. and Dear Sir, — On account of 
bodily indisposition 1 remained at home the 
Sabbath after my return from Boston. The 
Sabbath following I spent at San ford, where 
they did better than 1 anticipated— $27 50 
was subscribed, though not all collected 
when I left. I attended the annual meet- 
ing of the York County Auxiliary Foreign 
Missionary Society, at Biddeford, where I 
had an opportunity of saying something 
relative to the education cause. I offered 
the following resolutions: 

1. Resolved, That whereas the operations 
of Missionary Societies must be retarded 
without an increase of ministers, it is the 
duty of every minister to seek out young 
men suitable to be educated for the min- 
istry. 

2. Resolved, That in view of the want of 
missionaries, it is the duty of parents and 
Sabbath school teachers to infuse into the 
minds of children a missionary spirit. 

If we would raise up soldiers of the 
cross, I am satisfied we must begin where 
the men of this world begin to raise up 
soldiers for war and blood, with children. 
The world is to be supplied with ministers 
from our Sabbath schools, and these should 
be considered as infant schools of the proph- 
ets. Children should be taught to think 
early on this subject, and to feel that many 
of them are to be called to bear the message 
of salvation to a dying world. J cannot 
now enlarge on this point, but I feel that it 
is a subject which ought to be thought of 
more by parents and Sabbath school teach- 
ers. Books and tracts, on this subject must 
take the place of swords and guns, which a 
few years ago almost every boy possessed, 
and which was calculated to inspire a mar- 
tial spirit ; and parents and Christians gen- 
erally must turn their attention to this 
subject more, and converse with their 
children upon it, as if they were actually 
training them up for the army of the Lord 
of Hosts. Then in a few years there will 
be young men enough who will cheerfully 
consecrate themselves to the service of the 
ministry. 

The world will never be converted till 
something more is done to raise up ministers, 
and I know not where we can better begin 
than with the children of our Sabbath 
schools. 



Having finished Strafford county, 

New Hampshire, I returned to this place — 
ready to depart for some other field of 
labor, when you shall direct. I have sue- 



1834.] 



ceeded better than I expected in those 
towns which I have visited, viz.: Conway, 
Sandwich, MoultOnboroiigh, and Meredith, 
Old Strafford will not be behind any part of 
the granite Stale in good enterprises. 



ANNIVERSARY MEETING9. 



Rev. Mr. Ellis's Report. 



To the Secretary of the American Education Society. 

Rev. and Dear .Sir,— Although but just 
entered on my labors in this field, I send 
you this brief notice as you requested. 
The manner in which the education cause 
has been received by the churches will be 
best seen by the results. 

Three places have been visited. Ply- 
mouth has contributed $350 11. Boscawen 
$155 60, and Concord, $268. $129 was 
collected at the anniversary of the county 
society, at Boscawen, the week previous. 
"Whole amount of all the collections $902 71. 
$25 of the sum contributed, at Concord, 
are from a young lady who recently died in 
the triumphs of faith. While in the last 
struggle with the "king of terrors," she ex- 
claimed, "send that money to the valley of 
the West, to teach some poor sinner how to 
die as happily as I do." May it assist some 
pious youth there to go and tell of the dying 
Saviour. One of the above donors, as he 
made himself an honorary member of your 
Society said, " but a few years ago 1 was 
selling about 70 hogsheads of rum annually, 
now I se'l none." The evidence that the 
friends of Zion are determined to sustain the 
cause of the Redeemer, in times of severe 
pecuniary difficulty, is among the happiest 
signs of the times. And that blessings are 
in store for the faithfulness in the church, 
none who read the Bible can doubt. 

There seems to be generally an increas- 
ing conviction of the importance of sustain- 
ing the Education Society. And while our 
ministers and churches are beginning to 
awake to the deplorable want of ministers of 
the gospel, and to make special efforts to 
prepare, by a shorter course, many hopeful 
candidates for the sacred office } whose age 
and circumstances preclude their taking a 
regular course of study; none wish, so far 
as I can discover, to lower the standard of 
ministerial qualification, or to discourage 
those who can obtain a thorough education, 
but the contrary. 

I wish here to state one fact for those, 
who, because they have passed 21 or 22 
years of age, think they are too old to at- 
tempt a thorough education. Visiting the 
venerable patriarch" at Boscawen, who 
long since preached his half century ser- 
mon, 1 was anxious to learn particulars of 
the ministerial life of one so eminent in use- 
fulness. In answer to my inquiries, he 
stated that twelve revivals had occurred un- 
der his ministry. He recollected the num- 



ber of hopeful converts, in five or six of 
them. It exceeded 500. He had fitted 
about 100 young men for college; 40 of 
whom had entered the mini-try. He said he 
once had an education society of his own, 
ami that although he wai leveral hundred 
dollars in debt when he left college, and had 
nothing to pay, vet he afterwards had, at 
one time, $1,5^)0 loaned out to his young 
men without interest — who refunded it for 
the use of others in the same pursuit. This 
man entered college at the age of twenty- 
four. 

I wish here only to add, that if I am al- 
ways to share the kindness which God pro- 
vided for me among the friends whose ben- 
efactions 1 have The pleasure to report, I 
desire no pleasanter service, this side heaven, 
than the laborious ' thankless' service of an 



agency. 

Concord, JY. H. 



June 27, 1834. 



Anniversaries of Auxiliary So- 
cieties. 
Berkshire County. 
The annual meeting of the Berkshire Co. 
Education Society was held April 31, at 
Richmond. The Report was read by the 
Secretary, the Rev. Edwin W. Dvvight. 
Addresses were delivered by the Rev. 
Messrs. Yeomans, Hawley, and Hooker, 
t he Rev. Dr. Shepard, and the Rev. Mr. 
Mather, agent of the Parent Society. The 
officers of the Society are Rev. Samuel 
Shepard, D. D., President, Rev. E. W r . 
Dwighl, Secretary, and John Hotchkin, Esq. 
Treasurer. 



* Rev. Dr. Wood. 



Worcester South. 
The Worcester South Education Society 
held its anniversary at Sturbridge, April 30, 
1834. The report was read by the Rev. 
John Maltby, of Sutton. A sermon was 
delivered by the Secretary of the Parent 
Society, which was followed with some re- 
marks by the Rev. Levi Packard, of Spen- 
cer. The officers of the Society for the 
ensuing year are Gen. Salem Towne, Presi- 
dent, Rev. J. Maltby, Secretary, and the 
Hon. A. Bigelow, Treasurer. 



Worcester North. 

The annual meeting of the Worcester 

North Education Society, was held May 1, 

1834, at Templeton. The report was read 

by the Rev. Samuel Gay. A sermon was 



84 



ANNIVERSARY MEETINGS. 



[Aug. 



preached on the occasion by the Secretary 
of the Parent Society, and was followed by 
an address from the Rev. Charles S. Adams, 
an agent of the Society. Dr. Anson Bates 
is President of the Society, the Rev. Samuel 
Gay, Secretary, and Dea. J. Ellingwood, 
Treasurer. An extract from the report 
follows. 

Your committee have the pleasure of 
stating that the collections raised within the 
limits of this Society in aid of its proposed 
benevolent object, were greater the last 
year than in the preceding years. 

In 1831, the whole sum raised was 
$500 82. In 1832, there was raised only 
$346 30. The last year, 1833, there was 
raised by this auxiliary $740 83, which was 
more than double the sum raised the year 
immediately preceding. This fact proves 
the utility and necessity of having agents to 
address our churches upon the great objects 
of Christian charity. Objections have been 
sometimes suggested against so much being 
expended in supporting agents ; and were 
all Christians seeking opportunities of doing 
good, and ready to every good work, the 
treasury of the Lord might be replenished 
without employing agents to remind them 
of their duty. But the great difference be- 
tween the sum collected within the limits 
of this Society the year before last, when no 
agent was employed to visit our churches, 
and address the people upon the subject, to 
enlist their feelings and to call forth their 
sympathies in behalf of those who are desti- 
tute of the gospel ministry ; and the last 
year, when they were addressed by an in- 
teresting agent, speaks volumes in favor of 
employing agents. 

The cause in which we are engaged de- 
mands our most persevering efforts ; " let 
us not be weary in well doing." The 
American Education Society is doing much 
towards furnishing this dark world with the 
light of life and salvation ; and shall we not 
consider it a privilege to be auxiliary to this 
benevolent Society, and to be engaged in 
the same noble enterprise ? 

This is a period of revivals of religion. 
God is calling into his vineyard laborers 
who have been inured to hardships and la- 
bor ; and they are best calculated for sol- 
diers of the cross. They are more peculiarly 
fitted for the great and arduous work of cul- 
tivating the many extensive moral wastes, 
which affords striking proof that the Lord 
has smitten the earth with a curse. 

The word of God presents before us the 
certain prospect that all these moral wastes 
will ere long be well cultivated fields. The 
wilderness and the solitary place will re- 
joice, and the desert will blossom as the 
rose. But how is this to be effected ? Will 
the Lord work miracles to bring about this 
happy state of things ? Or will it be accom- 
plished by the use of means ? Is there not 



the same connection between means and 
ends in the moral as in the natural world ? 
It is by the labor of man the natural wilder- 
ness becomes a fruitful field. So also, in 
the moral world, the blessing of God attend- 
ing the efforts put forth by his people causes 
pagan darkness to flee before the rising of 
the Sun of Righteousness; and the absurd 
and abominable rites of the degraded and 
superstitious heathen, to give place to the 
blessed institutions and ordinances of the 
gospel of Christ. 



Norfolk County. 
The Norfolk County Education Society 
held its anniversary at Franklin, on Wed- 
nesday, June 11, 1834. A sermon was de- 
livered on the occasion by the Rev. Benja- 
min Labaree, President of Jackson College, 
Tennessee, and remarks were made by the 
Secretary of the Parent Society. The Rev. 
Harrison G. Park, of South Dedham, is ap- 
pointed to deliver a sermon before the So- 
ciety on the next anniversary. The officers 
of the Society are Nathaniel Miller, M. D., 
President, Rev. Samuel Gile, Secretary, 
Rev. Dr. Codman, Treasurer, and Dr. Jesse 
Wheaton, General Agent. 



Plymouth County. 
This auxiliary held its anniversary at 
Bridgewater, (Rev. Mr. Gay's parish,) on 
Thursday, June 12, 1834. The report was 
read by the Rev. Ebenezer Gay, and ad- 
dresses were delivered by the Rev. Thomas 
Boutelle, of Plymouth, and the Secretary of 
the Parent Society. The officers of the 
Society are Hon. Josiah Robbins, President, 
Rev. Ebenezer Gay, Secretary, and Dea. 
Morton, Treasurer. 



Essex South. 
This anniversary was held in connection 
with the County Conference of Churches, 
on Wednesday, July 9, 1834. The Rev. 
Charles S. Porter, of Gloucester, read the 
annual report, and the meeting was ad- 
dressed by the Rev. David Greene, one of 
the Secretaries of the American Board of 
Commissioners for Foreign Missions, and the 
Secretary of the Parent Society. The offi- 
cers of the Society are Rev. Samuel W. 
Cozzens, President, Rev. Charles S. Porter, 
Secretary, and David Choate, Esq. Trea- 



1834.] 



WINDHAM COUNTY AUXILIARY. 



>i 



Windham County. 

At the annual meeting of the Windham 
County Education Society, (Ct.) the Rev. 
George J. Tillotson read the report, and the 
Rev. William L. Mather, agent of the So- 
ciety, delivered an address. 

The officers of the Society are Job 
Williams, Esq. President ; Rev. Mr. Tillot- 
son, Secretary; Dr. William Hutchins, 
Treasurer. 

An extract from the Report follows. 

The American Education Society seems, 
at the present time, to be in some respects 
the most important in the whole brother- 
hood of benevolent institutions. No one 
thing is now so much impeding the work 
of the world's illumination and salvation, as 
the lack of qualified heralds of the gospel. 
It is a settled point, that if indigent pious 
young men are not aided into the ministry, 
if the church relies upon those able and 
disposed to educate themselves for the 
work, the destitution even in our own land 
will rapidly increase, and multitudes die 
annually without the ministrations of the 
gospel, and heathen nations never be con- 
verted. For even with the assistance of 
education societies, in multiplying the num- 
ber of able and faithful ambassadors of 
Christ, so rapid has been the increase of 
population in our land, and so numerous 
the vacancies occasioned by death, that the 
wants of our own country have been an- 
nually increasing. After all the efforts of 
the pastors of the churches in persuading 
to the work of the ministry those able to 
educate themselves, and in encouraging 
the indigent, still the appeals from various 
portions of our land have been growing 
more numerous and affecting. 

The American Home Missionary Society 
is now straitened in its enlarged efforts, 
for the lack of qualified preachers to send 
out among the destitute. Its object is a 
very popular one among the philanthropic 
and pious; and pecuniary means to almost 
any amount can be raised in its behalf. 
But as thrilling appeals are every week 
coming up from different portions of the 
country, to its secretary, for missionaries, 
in a very great majority of the cases he is 
under the painful necessity of sending back 
the cold and despairing reply, " who will 
go for us, and whom shall we send ?" The 
secretary annually visits our theological 
institutions, saying, " we are in want of 
hundreds of qualified men to send out as 
missionaries to meet the present demands of 
the land ; and while he pleads for several 
hundreds, he is unable to obtain as many 
tens. The enlargement of the operations 
of the Home Missionary Society must de- 
pend in a great measure on the enlargement 
of the operations of the American Education 
Society. It would seem to be enough to 



melt a heart of adamant to read in the 
monthly paper of the Home Missionary 
Society, the reiterated solicitations of des- 
titute churches and Christians, for preachers 

of tbe gospel to be sent among them. 
Many of the missionaries in the distant 
vresl who have been instrumental in col- 
lecting churches about them, send up 
earnest appeals for fellow-laborers- to aid 
them in building up the churches already 
planted, and in forming others. But they 
generally call in vain, merely for the lack 
of qualified ministers to send. The cry of 
every State from Maine to I>ouisiana is, 
"send us ministers of the gospel." Des- 
titute churches even in Connecticut and 
Massachusetts are beginning to find it dif- 
ficult to obtain candidates for settlement. 
From States at the south and west, solici- 
tations loud and often repeated have of late 
been made for missionaries, and in many 
instances most of their support been pledged, 
and still because of the scarcity of educated 
ministers, they remain destitute. An intel- 
ligent clergyman from Michigan, has re- 
cently entreated with great earnestness for 
at least ten missionaries of the Presbyterian 
order immediately for that territory. He 
says to the secretary of the Home Mission- 
ary Society, " can you not send us some 
soon ? some of the churches here are ready 
to famish. Every minister on the ground 
has more than he can do. Many places are 
entirely destitute. Oh! send us help. 
Send two or three if no more. Numbers 
have come to me lately with the inquiry, 
How shall we get a minister ? We cannot 
live as we are. We must have preaching. 
Can you recommend to us a man ? To 
such inquiries I can only say, ' men cannot 
be had.' " Similar appeals come up from 
Missouri. The ground already gained 
there within three years is said to be in 
danger of being lost, for the lack of mis- 
sionaries. Thrilling solicitations have lately 
come from Lower Canada for thirty mis- 
sionaries for that province. The fields are 
white for the harvest. Christians are cry- 
ing for help. Some have gone forty-five 
miles to attend meeting and get their chil- 
dren baptized. Many of the inhabitants 
there were educated amidst New England 
institutions, and are now famishing for the 
bread of life. Instead of thirty missionaries 
for that region, probably not more than 
three or four will be furnished it, for the 
year to come. Says the secretary of the 
Canada Missionary Society, " Words cannot 
express the emotions which struggle in ray 
bosom on the mention of this theme. Often 
is my soul harrowed by letters which I 
receive from different parts of Canada, in- 
quiring if there are ministers to be obtained. 
I can only lay them down and weep, 
and despondingly say, " send forth laborers 
into thy harvest." The American Board 
for Foreign Missions would gladly send 
forth more missionaries among the heathen 



86 



ANNIVERSARY MEETINGS. 



[Aug. 



than can be obtained. Money can be 
raised ; but the qualified men are wanting. 
The world can never be converted, unless 
the number of ministers is much more rap- 
idly increased. The glorious cause of the 
evangelizing of the world, now labors more 
for the lack of ministers, than perhaps from 
all other causes combined. How then 
should pastors and churches judiciously in- 
cite pious young men of talents, and of 
pecuniary ability, to fit themselves for the 
ministry; and how too should they en- 
courage and aid the indigent forward? 
How obvious and how great the importance 
of education societies. Let our interest 
in them increase, and let us here pledge 
to their great object more of our prayers, 
our ffforts and charities, and thus more 
effectually aid in hastening on the day, 
when all the inhabitants of the earth shall 
know " how beautiful upon the mountains 
are the feet of those that come publishing 
to them salvation." 



Merrimack County, N. H. 
The Annual Meeting was held on June 
26, 1834. The report of the Directors was 
read by Rev. Liba Conant. The meeting 
■was addressed at length by the Rev. John 
M. Ellis, a deputation from the Parent So- 
ciety. The Rev. Messrs. Bouton, Bennett. 
Lancaster, Rankin, Wilder, and Mr. Cham- 
pion of the Theological Seminary, Andover. 
took part in the meeting. The officers of 
the Society, for the year ensuing, are Hon 
Joshua Darling, President ; Rev. Liba Co 
nant, Secretary ; and Hon. Samuel Morril, 
Treasurer. 

Presbyterian Education Society. 
Quarterly Meeting of the Directors. 
The quarterly meeting of the Board of 
Directors was held on June 24, 1834. Ap- 
propriations were made to beneficiaries as 
follows : 

Former Ben. New Ben. Total. AmH Ap. 

8 Theol. Sem's, 38 2 40 $ 715 

20 Colleges, 143 12 155 2,742 

43 Academies, 131 36 167 2,877 

71 Institutions, 312 50 362 $6,334 



Connecticut Branch. 
The anniversary of this Society was held 
at Vernon, June 17, 1834. The report of 
the Directors was read by Rev. William W. 
Turner. The report of the Treasurer, Eh- 
phalet Terry, Esq. was also read. The 



meeting was then addressed by the Rev. 
Dr. Cogswell, Secretary of the Parent So- 
ciety, Hon. John Hall,* of Ellington, Ct., 
the Rev. Messrs. Badger, of Andover, Ms., 
Nash, of Wintonbury, Ct., Vail, of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio, and Professor Sturtevant, of 
Illinois college. The officers of the Society 
for the year ensuing, are Hon. Thomas 
Day, President, Rev. William W. Turner, 
Secretary, and E. Terry, Esq. Treasurer. — 
An extract of the report follows : 

The return of another anniversary of this 
Society admonishes the Directors, of the 
duty of reviewing the events of the past 
year, and of presenting to their patrons and 
friends a statement of what they have been 
enabled to accomplish ; of the present con- 
dition of the Society ; and of its prospects 
for the future. It is with the Directors a 
matter of unfeigned thankfulness to God 
that he has sustained this Society during the 
years of its infancy, and given it favor with 
the peopie of the State, until it is no longer 
problematical whether they will contribute 
sufficient to meet its increasing demands on 
public charity. It is no longer questionable 
whether the cause of Christ will be greatly 
aided by its operations. Its object and its 
plan are become familiar ; and it is confi- 
dently believed that every enlightened 
Christian feels the obligation of duty to 
pray for the Education Society, and to give 
systematically, and every year, according 
as God has prospered him, to its treasury. 

The whole number of young men who 
have within the year received aid from the 
funds of this Branch is 82 ; one of whom 
has recently sailed as a mis.-ionary to China. 
The number of those who applied at the 
last quarterly meeting of the Directors is 
65. The number of new applicants, who 
have been received and who have entered 
upon a regular course of study is 16. The 
Directors are happy to be able to repeat 
what they stated in their last report respect- 
ing the high standing for scholarship and 
piety, of the young men under their patron- 
age. No one has been stricken from the 
list of beneficiaries within the past year, 
for the want of these indispensable qualifi- 
cations. 

Your Directors have never before been 
so deeply impressed with the importance of 
a well-educated ministry to the speedy 
conversion of the world. Talents and learn- 
ing cannot supply the want of piety and 
zeal in the minister of the gospel, but they 
do make his piety and zeal a thousand times 
more efficient. The time has gone by when 
Christian ministers are respected solely on 
account of their sacred office ; they are 
now respected just in proportion as they 



* The address of Judge Hall will appear in the next Journal. 
There is not room for it in the present number. 



1834.] 



afford evidence of possessing the appropri- 
ate qualifications for the office. They must 
be holy and devoted men ; they must be 
well trained in the schools of human and 
divine wisdom, or they cannot command 
respect at the present day ; and unless they 
are respected by those to whom they min- 
isier, they cannot be useful to them. They 
must feed the flocks committed to their 
oversight with knowledge as well as with 
the bread of life; and be able to draw from 
the fountains of literature and to press every 
department of science into the service of 
Christ. Men of talents and taste and learn- 
ing are to be interested in the subjects of 
religion ; the sophistry of the crafty infidel 
is to be exposed ; the doubts of the skeptic 
are to be resolved; the arguments of the 
heretic are to be met and confuted ; the 
hypocrite is to be divested of his false hope ; 
the wavering is to be confirmed in the faith ; 
the desponding encouraged and the afflicted 
consoled. The ignorant pagan must be 
patiently and perseveringly taught; the 
heathen philosopher and idolatrous priest 
must be reasoned with, and convinced of 
the errors of their systems of philosophy 
and religion. Those who bear the high 
commission of ambassadors of Christ, must 
be thoroughly furnished for their work. 
They must be men of piety and talents and 
learning, well educated men, or they can 
never become efficient agents in the con- 
version of the world. 



MAINE BRANCH. 



87 



Maine Branch. 
The annual meeting of this Branch was 
held at Bath, June 25, 1S34. The report of 
the Directors was read by the Rev. Ben- 
jamin Tappan. The report of the Trea- 
surer, Professor Newman, was read. The 
meeting was addressed by the Rev. Mr. 
Bardwell, General Agent of the Ameri- 
can Board of Commissioners for Foreign 
Missions, Professor Pond, of the Ban- 
gor Theological Seminary, Rev. Mr. Mc- 
Kean, of Belfast, Rev. Mr. Clark, of Wells, 
the Rev. Mr. Wright, Agent of the Ameri- 
can Sunday School Union, and the Secre- 
tary of the Parent Society. The officers of 
the Society are Rev. William Allen, D. D. 
President of Bowdoin College, President, 
Rev. Benjamin Tappan, Secretary, Profes- 
sor Newman, Treasurer, 

Extracts from the Report. 

The religion of Jesus Christ is just what 
is wanted to make a peaceful, happy world. 
It is suited to the common wants and neces- 
sities of the human race. It provides a de- 
liverance from those evils to which all are 



alike subject, and bestows those blessings 
which all equally need. Such are the in- 
stituted means of accomplishing its benevo- 
lent designs, that they can be employed in 
every land, and exert an influence over 
every heart In sy>tem^ of human inven- 
tion no way is proposed of reconciling man 
to his Maker, which satisfies reason, or re- 
lieves conscience. No truths are presented 
which have power to redeem from the do- 
minion of sin, and to impel and animate to 
the practice of holiness. But the exhibition 
of Christ crucified does relieve the burdened 
conscience, does satisfy the bewildered rea- 
son. In the gospel, truths are inculcated 
which do melt the heart in penitence and 
love, which are efficacious to reclaim from 
the ways of death, and to bring the wan- 
derer back to God. Let it spread then— let 
its truths be made known to earth's entire 
population— let Christ crucified be so lilted 
up, that all the ends of the earth may look 
unto him and be saved. 

Hut this must be done chiefly by the in- 
strumentality of men — chiefly by means of 
the living preacher. Men do not believe in 
him of whom they have not heard ; and they 
do not hear without a preacher. — Why has 
not Christ's universal reign already com- 
menced ? Why has not the glorious gospel 
of the blessed God been published in every 
land, and its saving power experienced by 
all nations ? The Christian feast is pre- 
pared ; the table is spread — all things are 
ready ; the king has given orders that mes- 
sengers should go forth and invite all men 
every where to come ; and has promised 
that the invitation suitably given, and ac- 
companied with fervent prayer, shall receive 
attention and be obeyed; but there has 
been a deficiency of messengers; and pro- 
per measures have not been taken to procure 
them ; and vast multitudes are living and 
dying and perishing unblessed by the gos- 
pel, which bringeth salvation. At this 
moment, where are the men to carry the 
glad tidings to Mohammedan and heathen 
nations ? At present, there is scarcely one 
laborer in the field, where a thousand are 
needed. 

There is need of much prayer — fervent, 
agonizing prayer. The primary qualifica- 
tion for an ambassador of Christ, vital piety, 
devoted, self-denying, expansive, is his gift. 
Of the necessary intellectual endowments 
he is the author. He can wake up an ear- 
nest desire for the good work of a bishop, 
and he can open the way in his providence 
for the object of that desire to be attained. 
Pray ye the great Lord of the harvest that 
he would send forth laborers into his har- 
vest — is a standing ordinance of Zion's king ; 
but it has been lamentably disregarded. 

But suppose the young men become 
pious — they need something beside piety 
to qualify them for the ministry ; they need 
an education — a thorough education. Ur- 
gent as the demand is for laborers, Christ 



MAINE BRANCH, 



[Aug. 



does not call any to come into the field until 
they are qualified to labor. And are illiter- 
ate ignorant men qualified to teach ? In no 
vocation are habits of accurate thinking, 
logical reasoning, and plain, forcible ex- 
pression, more urgently needed, than in 
the preaching of the gospel, and such habits 
will not often be formed, unless the mind be 
disciplined by a thorough course of educa- 
tion. Not only is such an education indis- 
pensable to meet the wants and gain the 
confidence of the more enlightened part of 
community, but to prepare for giving in- 
struction to the best advantage to the un- 
learned and ignorant Certain missionaries 
among the heathen, after observing that in 
conversing with them they are obliged to 
hear a great deal of nonsense and folly, have 
remarked, " Ignorant and foolish as they 
are, we are more and more convinced that 
weak answers will not do for them. On the 
contrary, daily experience shows, that it 
requires the clearest and strongest argu- 
ments to make an impression on their 
minds." Such arguments, men of unculti- 
vated minds would not be prepared to ad- 
duce. — To obtain that critical, minute ac- 
quaintance with the Holy Scriptures which 
the preacher should possess, as well as that 
ability to communicate instruction, which 
will prepare him to solve the difficulties of 
the inquiring, and repel the objections of 
the skeptical, to pour light into the minds of 
the ignorant, and be in advance of the more 
intelligent of his flock, to divide skilfully the 
word of truth, and to give unto all their 
portion in due season — for these purposes a 
good degree not only of native talent, but of 
acquired information is necessary. He who 
does not possess it cannot be considered apt 
to teach, nor is he a suitable person to be 
set for the defence of the gospel. Even the 
great apostle of the Gentiles, so illustriously 
distinguished by miraculous gifts, and fully 
instructed in the gospel by the revelation of 
Jesus Christ, was rendered more useful by 
the previous cultivation of his mental pow- 
ers. How much more important that min- 
isters of the present day should be furnished 
with all that knowledge attainable by ordi- 
nary means, which will best prepare them 
to exhibit divine truth, and to commend it 
to every man's conscience with convincing 
light and persuasive power. 

We presume that no one who thoroughly 
examines the subject, will deny the impor- 
tance of the education that has usually been 
thought necessary — including a collegiate 
course, and a three years' course of theolog- 
ical studies. Upon this point the public 
mind, though it has at times wavered to 
some extent, is now very generally and 
firmly established. All will admit that 
there are exceptions ; that in some instan- 
ces, men may advantageously be brought 
forward who have not gone through a com- 
plete course. But if such cases should ever 
become the general rule, and not the ex- 



ceptions it would be an evil day for the 
church of Christ, for our country and the 
world. What could be more inauspicious 
in a day of general improvement, than to 
lower the standard of ministerial qualifica- 
tions I The demand of the present day is 
peculiarly strong for an enlightened minis- 
try. Even among those by whom human 
learning has been formerly denied, the need 
of it is beginning to be felt, and the desire 
to be expressed for educated ministers. 
This desire must be met with a correspond- 
ing supply, or the ministry will sink into 
contempt. 

But how are young men of piety and 
good promise who desire the work of the 
ministry to obtain an education ? Many of 
them are poor and have no wealthy rela- 
tions and friends who will assist them. 
Some might effect the object by means of 
their own exertions, but not without much 
delay ; and others capable of becoming use- 
ful men, regarding the object as unattaina- 
ble, would relinquish it if unassisted, with- 
out an effort. Here then we see the need 
of the Education Society. This Institution, 
without taking away the necessity of fru- 
gality and effort, does reach out to indigent 
students the helping hand; and does afford 
them the means (in connection with what 
they may themselves acquire during the in- 
tervals of study) of going through a course 
of education without involving themselves 
in inextricable embarrassment. Many un- 
questionably have thus been brought for- 
ward and are doing much good — who but 
for the Education Society would have found 
their way entirely hedged up and would 
never have aspired to the sacred office. 

The limits of this Branch of the American 
Education Society are the State of Maine. 
Within these limits there remaineth much 
land to be possessed, and many laborers are 
needed to occupy and cultivate it. It de- 
serves solemn inquiry whether many young 
men among us who love the Lord Jesus 
Christ, and who might render good service 
in the work of the ministry, are not incur- 
ring the displeasure of their divine Master 
by engaging in other occupations. He is 
pointing to many unoccupied fields already 
in some instances whitening to the harvest, 
and inquiring Whom shall I send, and who 
will go for us ? but they do not reply, Here, 
Lord, are we, send us. Are they ignorant 
of the wants of a perishing world? But 
they should be informed. Are they shrink- 
ing from the cross ? Are they drawn away 
by the love of filthy lucre, the desire of 
worldly distinction ? Are they unwilling to 
spend as much time as a thorough course of 
education preparatory to the ministry would 
require, and do they prefer a situation 
which would devolve upon them less of 
awful responsibility, and demand less of 
mental effort, less sacrifice, and afford a 
prospect of an earlier settlement, and of 
more lucrative compensation ? And ought 



1834.] 



considerations like these to render them deaf 
to the cries of countless multitudes, perish- 
ing in sin, and unwilling to do their part in 
executing the command, Go preach my gos- 
pel to every creature ? it is believed that a 
greater number of promising men in the 
State are turning their attention towards the 
sacred office, th.m La times past, and that 
the prospect of raising up, among ourselves, 
a goodly company ot preachers, was never 
so favorable. 

The accounts which have been received 
from their instructors during the past year 
with respect to the talents, scholarship, and 
Christian character of our beneficiaries, 
have been uniformly favorable; so that the 
Directors have not found themselves obliged 
in any instance to withdraw their patronage 
for want of the necessary qualifications ; nor 
have there been any instances, such as 
have repeatedly occurred in ibrmer years, 
of beneficiaries removed by death. Several 
of our beneficiaries in the third stage of 
education, and already licensed to preach, 
have been eminently serviceable in promot- 
ing revivals of religion. 

The signs of the times are in many re- 
spects cheering. Not only is the cause of 
Christ advancing in other countries and in 
distant regions ot our own land, but many of 
the churches in Maine have been blessed 
with the gracious presence of their King. 
Some of us have come to this holy convoca- 
tion from places upon which God has been 
recently distilling the dews of his grace, and 
here, also, on the very spot where we are 
now assembled, mighty displays have been 
witnessed of his saving power. Many 
young men we trust, have given themselves 
to be the servants of Christ. Of some of 
them the Lord hath need in the work of the 
ministry. Let it be a subject of deliberate 
inquiry and of earnest prayer with every 
young man who loves the Saviour, whether 
rt be not his duty and his privilege to com- 
mence a course of study preparatory to the 
blessed work of preaching the gospel. Let 
the attention of ministers and churches be 
directed to this important subject. Let no 
one be kept back by want of information. 
Let no one be discouraged by the impres- 
sion that assistance cannot be obtained. 
The call, which the great Head of the 
church is so loudly making upon every 
pious man of suitable age and talents, whose 
path is not obstructed by special obstacles, 
let no man be allowed to resist without faith- 
ful admonition. 



LETTER TO THE SECRETARY. 

Rev. and Daar Sir, — " Highly esteemed 
in love for your work's sake " — permit me 
to express my disappointment in your failure 
to attend our annual meeting of the County 
Society. We have toiled on through the 

VOL. VII. 



LETTER TO THE SECRETARY. 



89 



" education month" in the expectation that 
the result of this meeting would send a stir- 
ring note of appeal to the heart of every 

friend of Jesus in county, and 

cause all our churches to fall before him, 
crying — Here are we — here are our sons — 
here are all the talents thou hast given us ! 
Lord, what wilt thou have us to do ? How 
shall we best evince the sincerity of our 
daily prayer — " Thy kingdom come, thy 
will be done, as it is done in heaven." — But 
the Head of the church has done all things 
well. Permit me now to inquire, Is there 
a stated season of prayer for the American 
Education Society — its beneficiaries — its 
patrons — and all its operations ? If not, will 
the approaching anniversary be a convenient 
time for the establishment of such a season ? 
We need line upon line ; above all we need 
the continual supplies of that Spirit of our 
Master, which led him to lay down his life 
that the gospel might be preached to every 
creature. 

Yours most respectfully. 



May 26, 1834. 

The above note was received by the Sec- 
retary of the American Education Society, 
from a very highly respectable lady who 
has long taken a deep interest in the So- 
ciety. A season of prayer for the objects 
mentioned in her communication has been 
established for some years. It is the Tues- 
day immediately succeeding the first Mon- 
day in each month. May the great multi- 
tude of pious females throughout this land, 
for whom Christianity has done so much, 
remember at that time, in their fervent sup- 
plications, this cause, which, it is believed, 
lies so near the heart of Infinite Love. 



A VETERAN LABORER. 

The Rev. Dr. Perkins, of West Hartford, 
preached recently his Sixtieth Anniversary 
Sermon. In the course of it he informed 
his auditory, nearly all of whom could date 
their birth since the commencement of his 
ministry, that in his church there had been 
one thousand deaths and one thousand bap- 
tisms — that he had delivered four thousand 
written sermons and three thousand extem- 
poraneous — that he had attended sixty ordi- 
nations and installations ; and had preached 
twenty ordination sermons, twelve of which 
had been published by request — that he had 
attended one hundred ecclesiastical councils,, 
to heal difficulties in the churches— and that 
he had fitted for college one hundred and 
fifty students, and more than thirty for the 
gospel ministry. 

12 



90 



FUNDS. 



[Aug 



FUNDS. 

Receipts into the Treasury of the American Edu- 
cation Society, and of its Branches, from 
April 9th, to the Quarterly Meeting, July 9th, 
1834. 

Abington, Ct. fr. Miss Hannah Sharp, by Rev. Charles 

Fitch 50 

Berlin, Vt. fr. Mr. C. W. Storrs, Tr. of Wash. Co. 

Aux. Ed. Soc. $50 of which a donation fr. Mr. 

Zachariah Pertin, and residue fr. Ladies Ed. Soc. 63 22 
EUingVm, Ct. bequest of the late Joseph Abbott, by 

Hon. J. H. Brockway, one of the ex'rs. 500 00 

Lebanon, Me. fr. Rev. Charles S. Adams, Agt. coll. of 

individuals in Rev. Mr. Weston's Soc. to const. 

him a L. M. of York Co. Ed. Soc. 17 00 

Mendon, N. Y. fr. L. Russell, by Mr. N. Willis 4 50 

New London, Ct. fr. Ladies, by T. S. Perkins, 

Esq. thro' J. Huntington, Esq. Tr. of N. 

L. Aux. Ed. Soc. 37 00 

Fr. a Friend, by Mr. Huntington 3 00 — -40 00 

Portland, Me. fr. Ladies of 3d Cong. Ch. and Soc. by 

Mrs. Lucy Libbey 8 25 

Pelerboro', N. H. fr. Fem. Aux. Ed. Soc. by Miss Jane 

Miller, Sec. 12 50 

Waldoboro', Me. fr. Mr. Samuel Morse, by Mr. J. 

Cook 10 00 

Cumberland Co. Me. Aux. Ed. Soc. fr. Mr. Charles 

Blanchard, Tr. 20 13 

Litchfield Co. Ct. Aux. Ed. Soc. fr. Stephen Deming, 

Esq. Tr. 75 00 

Mecklinburg, Co. N. C. bequest of Mr. Andrew Mo 

Neely, dec'cl. bv Messrs. R. H. Morrison and J. 

F. McNeely, Ex'rs. thro' H. Hill, Esq. 50 00 

New Hampshire Branch, fr. Samuel Moirill, Esq. Tr. 200 00 



INCOME FROM FUNDS 
AMOUNT REFUNDED 



AUXILIARY SOCIETIES. 
Suffolk County. 

[Mr. Lorenzo S. Cragin, Boston, Tr.] 
Boston, Bowdcin St. Ladies Asso. fr. Mrs. T. 



1,213 42 



$ 2,582 52 



imer, 



R. Marvin, Tr. 
Park St. Gent. Asso. fr. J. M. Kimball, Tr 
Salem St. Ladies Asso. fr. Miss E. C. Pal 

Tr. thro' Mr. S. N. Tcni.ey 
Salem St. Gent. Asso. Ir. Mr. A. C. Fearing, 

Tr. $44, 8150, $>8 
Mr. Charles Stoddard, found in cont. box at 

Monthly Concert 
Mary Ann Miller, by H. Hill, Esq. 
Emily Higgins 
Rec'd. fr. the Treasurer 

Do. do. 

Do. do. 



63 50 
141 20 



2 00 
2 00 



613 50 
42 00 
203 33—858 83— 
1,2 



Berkshire County. 

[John Hotchkin, Esq. Lenox, Tr.] 
Pittsfield, fr. "Young Ladies Benev. Soc." 

5th ann. pay't. lor the Tappan Temp. 

Schol. by Miss Amelia Danlorth, Tr. and 

Sec. 
[The following thro' Rev. W. L. Mather, Ag 
Great Barrington, balance of subscription 
Hinsdale, fr Geut. and Ladies Asso. by Mr. 

Oliver Colt 
Lanesboro', fr. Gent, and Ladies Asso. by Dea. 

Z. S. Clark 
New Marlborough, fr. Gent, and Ladies Asso. 

by Benj. SheMon, Esq. 
Peru, fr. Gent, and Ladies Asso. by Peter 

Bowen 
Silver spoons, fr. Mrs. Barnabee, sold for 
Pittsfield, balance of subscription 
Richmond, pay't. on the 3d year's instalment 

of Temp. Schol. by JVltss jerusha L. Perry 
Sandisfield, fr. Gent, and Ladies Asso. by Joel 

Wilcox 
Sheffield, fr. Gent, and Ladies Asso. by Hon. 

R. F. Barnard, in part 
Donation from Elisha Lee, Esq. 
Stockbridge, balance of subscription 
Contribution on the Sabbath 
Fr. Ladies Asso. by Mrs. F. Jones 
Tyringham, a cont. thro' Barnum Fairchilrl 
Washington, fr. Rev. Mr. Knight and family 
Williamstown, fr. Geut. and Ladies Asso. by 

Dea. Cheney Taft 
Fr. Gent, of the College, by do. 
Windsor, fr. Gent, and Ladies Assoc, by Dea. 

Ephraim Ford 



1 00 

27 02 



1 50 
1 12 



Essex County South. 

[David Choate, Esq. Essex, Tr.} 
Salem, fr. Fem. Aux. Ed. Soc. by Miss Anna 
Batclielder, Tr. on acco. of 5lh ann. pay't. 
on Union Temp. Schol. 
Fr. a few Females in Tabernacle church 
Wenham, fr. " Young Ladies Reading Soc." 
by Rev. E. P. Sperry 



38 00 
4 00 



Essex County North. 

[Col. Ebenezer Hale, Newbury, Tr.] 
Andover, fr. Mr. John Foster, a donation 100 00 

Haveihill, West Parish, by Rev. Abijah Cross 10 00—110 OC 



Franklin County. 

[Sylvanus Maxwell, Esq. Charlemont, Tr.] 
Sunderland, fr. Dea. Elihu Rowe, ex'r. of the 
will ot the late Nathaniel Smith, Esq. by 
Rev. S. Whiiuey 200 00 

Whalely, fr. Mrs. Sophia Sanderson, by Mr. 

Levi Bush, Jr. 7 62- 



Hampshire County. 

[Hon. Lewis Strong, Northampton, Tr.] 
Amherst, fr. the " Sewing Circle," by Miss 



14 25 


200 00 


2 00 


5 41 


12 00 


6 08 


3 00 


52 03 


25 00 



Hannah Shepard, Tr. 
3elchertown, fr. Rev. Jared Reid, a coll. in his 
Soc. on i he last Thursday in Feb. $11, 
and residue coll. by individuals 



Hampden County. 

[Thomas Bond, Esq. Springfield, Tr.] 
Blanriford, fr. Ladies 5 31 

Fr. Dr. Eli Hall 5 00 

Ludlow, fr. Gent, and Ladies Asso. 30 33 

Lorigm.en.dom, IV. Geut. Asso. 23 25 

1st Par. fr the church 10 00—43 25 

[Of which $40 is to const. Rev. Jonathan B. 
Condit, a L. 1\1. of the A. E. S.] 
West Springfield, 1st Parish, Ed. Soc. 75 00—158 89 



Middlesex County. 
Charlestown, fr. Winthrop Ch. and Soc by 

Dea. Amos Tuns, Tr. $40 of which to 

const. Rev. Daniel Crosby, a L. M. of the 

A. E. S. 
Camb'idgeporl, fr. the Evang. Soc. by Mr. 

Cambridge, fr. the " Misses Sewing Circle," 
in the Shepard Soc. by Miss Louisa Saw- 
yer, Sec. 25 00 

Medjord, Hev. Mr. Winslow's Ch. and Soc. 

by Dei. Charles Jan.ef 94 13 

Reading, South Parish, fr. several Ladies in 

the Soc. of Rev. Mr. Pickeit, by Mr P. 10 42 

Soutli Reading, 1'r. a few Ladies, by Mrs. S. 

S. Yale 5 00—278 40 



113 85 
30 00 



Norfolk County. 

[Rev. John Codman, D. D. Dorchester, Tr.] 
Braintree, fr. Mr. Levi Wild, his ann. subs. 

by Rev. R. S. Siurrs 5 I 

Dedham, fr. Samuel F. Haven, Esq. adm'r. 

on the estate of Miss Lucy Avery, dec'd. 

amount of her bequest, to const. Rev. 

Joiia. Fisher, Blue Hill, Me. nnd Rev. 

Wm. Cogswell, Boston, L. M.'s of the 

A.E. S. 500 

Rec'd. fr. the Tr. $951 84, as follows, viz. 
Weymouth, South Parish, fr. the Fem. 

Char. Soc. 22 32 

Fr. Fem. Ed. Soc* 8 75 

Fr. Ladies by subs. 12 80 43 

[g40 of the above to const, their pastor, Rev. 
Charles J. Warren, a L. M. of the A.E. S.] 
A public collection 24 ! 

For the residue, the towns not specified 892 



Old Colony. 

[Col. Alexander Seabury, Tr.] 
Wareham, fr. the Soc. of Rev. Samuel Nott 

Plymouth County. 

[De \. Morton Eddy, Bridgewater, Tr.] 
Abington, South Parish, fr. individuals 



1,466 84 



1834.] 



FUNDS. 



91 



45 64 



50 00 
105 34 



of Rob- 



7 50 
13 00 



11 75 

28 77 



46 16 



29 35 
V0 07 



East Bridge water, fr. Gent. nn<l Undid Ed. 

Sim., ol which $10 tu const, their pi.ator, 

Hov. Charlei Banfurd, a L. M. of ilie A. 

K. s. 
North BrldgeioaUr, fr. Hezekiah Packard, $10 

of which to count, his pastor, Rev. Win. 

Thompson, a I,. M. of A. K. B. 
\ oontribution 

riali/a.r, lr. Cent, anil Ladies Asso. 
Hanson, fr. Gent, and Ladies Asso. 

Fr. a Friend, ihro' Dea. Smith 

Plymouth, lr. (icnt. anil Ladies As 

inson Ch. 
Fr. Kel River Ed. Society 
Fr. (ient. Asso. in Rev. Mr Boutelle's Soc. 

by Hon. Josiah Rohhins, Tr. 
Fr. I.adies Asso. in Rev. Mr. B.'s Soc. by 

Miss Sarah M Holmes, Tr. 
Plympton, fr. the F.d. Soc. 

| All the above collected by Rev. Wm. L. Mather.] 
Halifax, fr. Rev. Mr. Howe 3 00 

Hanson, fr. Rev. Mr. Howland 1 50 

Collected at ihc anniversary 11 42 — 39 



Religious Char. Soc. of Middlesex 
North and Vicinity. 

[Dei. Jonathan S. Adams, Groton, Tr.] 
Filchburg, IV. Gent. Asso. by Mr. Justin 

Stearns, Tr. 75 27 

Fr. Fern. Asso. by Miss Sarah Wood, Tr. 26 00—101 27 



South Conference of Churches, 
Middlesex County. 

Holliston, fr. Ladies and Gent. Asso. by Mr. 
Charles Marsh, Tr. 

Worcester County South. 

[Hon. Ahijah Bigelow, Worcester, Tr.] 
South Brookfield, fr. Rev. Mr. Stone 
Charlton, 
North Brookfield, 
Stui bridge, 
Sutton, 

West Brookfield, 
Worcester, \st Parish, fr. Fem. Aux: Ed. 

Soc. on acco. ol the Miller Temp. Schol. 

by Miss Thankful S. Hersey, Tr. 
Contribution at the annual meeting 

[The above thro' George Davis, Esq. Sturbridge.] 
Millbary, fr. Con?. Ch. and Soc. by the Rev. 

Osgood Herrick 
Southbridge, fr. I adies in the Cong, of Rev. 

Henry J. Lamb, to const, him a L. M. of 

the A.E. S. 
Spencer, fr. Rev. Levi Packard, a coll. In his 



4 00 
18 00 
50 00 
75 51 
75 00 
53 00 



37 50 
22 53 



35 00 



40 00 
33 51 
93 60 



Soc. 
Westboro', fr. Rev. Elisha Rcckwood, a coll. 

in his Soc. 
Worcester, 1st Parish, fr» Gent. Asso. on acco. 

of the Miller Temp. Schol. by Dea. Lewis 

Chapin 



Worcester North. 

[Dea. Justus Ellingwood, Hubbardston, Tr.] 

Rec'd. fr. the Tr. balance in his hands 2 37 

Proceeds of Jewelry fr. Phillipston 67 

Templelon, tr. Mrs. Raker, by Mr. E. Brown 2 00 

.[The following by Rev. Charles S. Adams, Agt.] 

Ashburnham, subs. $40 of which to const. Rev. 
George Goodyear, a L. M. ol the A. E. S. 

Jewelry, sold for 

Alhol, '1st ami. p.y't. for Temp. Schol. 

Boylston, subscriptions 

Gardner, subscriptions 

Hubbardston, subscriptions 

Fr. Fein. Char. Soc. 

Holden, subs. 4th payment for Temp. Schol. 

Hardwick, subs. 4th payment for Temp. Schol. 

New Braintue, subscriptions 

Oakham, subscriptions 

Princeton, subscriptions 

Phillipston, lr. the Gent. Ed. Soc. 

Fr. Ladies do. 

Petersham, subs, to const. Rev. Caleb B. Tra- 
cy, a L. M. of the A. E. S. 

Rutland, subscriptions 

Royalston, subs, by Individ. 1st pay 't. for Temp. 
Schoi. 

Subscriptions 

Templelon, contribution 

Fr. " Ladies Sewing Soc." 

Jewelry, sold for 

Westminster, subs. $40 of which to const. 
Rev. Edmund (). Hovey, of Indiana, a L. 
M. of the A. E. S. 
Winchtndon, subscriptions 



49 77 


50 


85 00 


40 80 


39 31 


53 72 


9 00 


93 34 


60 75 


67 27 


50 00 


35 34 


57 76 


34 24 


40 17 


32 70 


75 00 


44 52 


38 57 


13 00 


30 


76 83 


32 18- 


H 



Rhode Island (State) Aux. Ed. Soc. 

[Mr. Albert Peabody, Providence, Tr.] 
Barrington, fr. Fem. Ed. Soc. by Rev. T. T. 

Waterman 



11 00 



MAINE BRANCH. 
[Prof. Samuel P. Newman, Brunswick, Tr.] 

Somerset Co. Aux. Ed. Soc. 

North Yarmouth, 2d Parish, to const. Rev. Caleb Ho- 

bart, a L. M. of A. E. S. 
Annuities, Isaac Rogers 2 00. David Sbepley 2 

S. Thurston 
Sanford, Church and Society, a donation 
Winthrop, donations — S. Cordis 

Stephen Sewall 

D. Carr 
Lincoln County Aux. Ed- Soc. 
Dividends on Bank Stock 
Contribution at Annual Meeting, Bath 
Refunded by a former Beneficiary 





26 61 


ebHo- 






43 25 


4 00 




2 00 6 




:o h 


5 00 




20 00. 




5 00 30 




i 00 




48 00 




76 00 




25 00 



1688 Bfl 



NEW HAMPSHIRE BRANCH. 
[Hon. Samuel Morril, Concord, Tr.] 

Hillsboro' Co. Aux. Ed. Soc. by Richard Eoylston, 

Esq. Tr. 20 12 

Lyndeboro', fr. Dea. William Joues, by Rev. Mr. 

Rankin 2 00 



$22 12 



NORTH WESTERN BRANCH. 
[George W Root, Esq. Middlebury, Tr.] 

Clarendon, from Moses Perkins 3 OC 

East Rutland, fr. Female Praying Circle 7 19 

Congregational Church 18 31 

Ladies Ed. Asso. bv Mrs. Wm. Paee £5 60 51 10 

Essex, fr. Dea Samuel Bradley, by A. J. Watkins 10 00 

New Haven, fr. Fem. Ben. Assoc, to const, their pastor 

Rev. Enoch Mead, a L. M. 20 00 

Orwell, fr. Gent, and Ladies Assoc. 11 00 

Piltsford, fr. Cong. Church 70 00 

Young Ladies Assoc, tn const, their pas- 
tor, Rev. Wiilard Child, a L. M. 20 00 

A donation 50 90 50 



0185 60 



CONNECTICUT BRANCH. 
[Eliphalet Terry, Esq. Hartford, Tr.] 

Berlin, Worthington Soc. a contribution rec'd. by Rer. 

H. Hooker 10 25 

Enfield, IV. individuals, by Ften. Parsons 23 00 

Farmington, fr. individ. by S. IVadsworth 23 00 

Hartford, co lection in 1st Soc. by B. Hudson 103 00 

Donation from a iriend 13 00 

Interest on funds loaned 142 96—258 96 

Milford, fr. Aux. Ed. Society in 1st Church, by H. 

White, Tr. N. H. Co. Ed." Soc. 37 34 

Southington, donation, thro' H. White, Tr. 1 34 

Stafford, collection thro' J. R. Flint, Tr. Tolland Co. 

Ed. Society 12 56 

Tolland, collection thro' do. 15 25 

Vernon, fr. A lyn Kellosre, to const, himself a L. M. 

of Conu. Br. thru' J.~R. Flint, Tr. 



30 00 
$411 70 



PRESBYTERIAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 
[Oliver Willcox, Esq. New York, Tr.] 

Laight Street Church, fr. Mrs. James Boor- 
mace 

Fr. William A. Booth, ann. subs. 
York Toicn, fr. Cong, church, by Mr. Owen 

Do. by Rev. Mr. Hyde, bal. to const, him 
a Director tor lite 
Rutgers St. Church, lr. H. Remson, Esq. 

Mr. E. Piatt, 5th and 6th vear 

G. Fenn 5. T. Price 2. James Thorn 5 

D. A. Frost 2. Mr. Bremner 1. A Friend 1 
New Paltz, Ed. Sue. bv Rev. Mr. Beart 
Bleecker St. Church, fr. Mr. G. Hallock 

George Dong| ; ,ss and family 
Brick Church^ fr. Mr. John Maeomber 

Fayette scholarship, bv Miss P. Shattuck 
Cedar St. Church, lr. Mr. D. Davenport 
West Tennessee Agency, for Tr. draft 
Salem, by Rev. H. Barnes 
Qitskill, fr. Oren Day, Esq. ann. sulsi 



150 00 




20 00—170 00 


12 00 




28 00—40 00 


15 00 




10 00 




12 00 




4 00 11 




10 00 


87 50 




57 00 94 




25 00 




3 00 




87 50 




100 00 




27 00 




73 00 



92 



FUNDS. 



[Aug. 



Troy Branch, fr. Mr. J. T. M'Coun, ann. subs. 75 00 

Bleeuker St. Church, fr. Mr. James Roosevelt 25 00 

Donation fr. Mr. H. Griffin 87 

Cedar St. Church, fr. Mr. Edward Field 37 50 

Donation fr. Mr. Walker 5 00 

Bloomfield Academy, one year's rent 100 00 

Donation fr. X. an unknown frieud, by Rev 

ters, D. D. 
Donations by Rev. A. Scofield — 

Fr. a Lady I. Troy, fr. a friend 1 

Member Dutch church 1. Waterford 8 

Plaltsburgh, a friend 3. Greenfield 3 50 

Hartford, Washington Co. 12. Amster- 
dam, 1st church 6 05 
New York, fr. Mr. Thomas Hastings 
Elkton, by Rev. E. Cheever 
Brick Church, fr. Mr. John C. Halsey 
Money repaid, from a former beneficiary 
New York, fr. Arthur Tappan, Esq. and Lady 
Sag Harbor, by Rev. J. Pillsbury 
Mauriches, fr. Miss Havens 1. Children 50 cts. 
Knox, by Rev. Mr. Kirk 
Pearl St. Church, fr. John Borland, Esq. 
Rutgers St. Church, fr. Ladies, by Miss Goldsmith 
Second Avenue Church, by Rev. Mr. Murray 
Jamaica, fr. E. Wicks, Esq. ami. subs. 
South Hampton, fr. Fem. Ed. Society 22 50 

Collected by Mr. Pillsbury 16 40 — 33 90 

Laight St. Church, fr. Mr. J. Leavitt 25 00 

Fr. Mr. E. L. C. 1 00 

Fr. Mr. James Brown 75 00—101 00 

Canada, fr. a Friend, by G. M. Tracy 20 00 

Troy Branch, fr. Female Industrious Society, by Dr. 

Tucker, 2d church 
Smith Town, by Rev. J. Pillsbury 
Dover, N. J. by Rev. Mr. Scofield 
Brick Church, fr. a Friend 

Mr. J. D. Holbrook 

Misses H. L. and M. Murray 

Fem. Ed. Soc. by Miss C. M'. Haven, Tr. 
Bleecker St. Church, fr. Mr. Geo. Carpenter 
Laight Street Church, fr. A. R. Wetmore 

Fr. Mr. James Ruthven 
Rutgers Street Church, fr. Mr. William Bran 
Brick Church, fr. Mr. H. H. Schuffleir 
Ulica Agency, by J. W. Doolittle, Tr. 
Central Pres. Church, by Tr. of session 
Birminsham, Eng. fr. Rev. John A. James, by Rev. 

William Patton 30 00 

New York, "an orphan's mite," fr. A. M, by Mr. 

Caleb O. Halsted 3 00 



A. Pe- 
300 00 

2 00 
9 00 
6 50 



18 05 — 35 55 

5 00 

35 00 

75 00 

150 00 

412 50 

20 00 

1 50 

4 31 

75 00 

47 78 

75 00 

150 00 





50 00 




8 04 




20 50 


25 00 




37 50 




75 00 




27 50—165 




5 00 


25 00 




25 00 — 50 C 




7 00 




35 00 




175 67 




75 00 



$3,037 12 



WESTERN RESERVE BRANCH. 
[Mr. Walter Wright, Hudson, Tr.] 



Kingsville, Fem. Ed. Soc 






20 00 


Guilford, Gent. anu. subs 






7 00 


Fem. ann. sub. to const, ir 


part the 


Rev. Var- 




num Noyes, a life member of the W. R. 




E. S. 






6 00 — 13 00 


Hudson, Gent. ann. subs. 






15 50 


Donations 






15 16 


Ladies ann. subs. 






4 00 — 34 66 


West. Reserve College, ai 
Donation 


in. subs. 




29 00 

50 — 29 50 


Wodsworth, ann. subs. 






3 00 


Fem. Benev. Soc. to constitule the Rev. Gilbert 




Fay, in part, a L. M. 


of the W. 


R. E. S. 


9 00 — 12 00 


Westfield, ann. subs. 






13 13 


Thompson, ann. subs. 






13 00 


Tdlmadge, ann. subs, 






48 82 


Fem Ed. Soc. 






17 87 


Donations 






£ 00 — 68 69 


Twinsburgh, ann. subs. 






28 75 


Donations 






50— 29 25 


Brownhelm, ann. subs. 






4 75 


Ravenna, ann. subs. 






17 00 


L, Rpuse, Agt. of A. T. Soc. donation 


5 00 — 22 00 


Charleslown, ann. subs. 






7 00 


Female Ed. Soc. 






4 75 — 11 75 


Windham, ann. subs. 






5 75 


Female Ed. Soc. 






50 


Monthly collections 






8 52 — 14 77 


Roolslovm, ann. subs. 






1 00 


Donation 






1 00 2 00 


Geneva and Harpersfield, 


ann. subs 


by Gent. 


32 50 


Female, ann. subs. 






15 87 


Donation 






50 — 48 87 


Aurora, ann. subs. 






31 6Z 


Fem. Ed. Soc. 






16 31 — 47 93 


Canton, Rev. T. M. Hopk 


ns. 




3 00 


Akron, ann. subs. 






4 25 


Franklin, ann. subs. 






150 


Bath, ann. subs. 






3 10 


Wellington, ann. subs. 






25 93 


Dover, aim. 'subs. 






6 00 


Elyria, ann. subs. 






28 00 


Richfield, donations 






4 50 


Slrongsville, ann. subs. 






10 00 


Brecksville, ann. subs. 






10 00 


Burton, ann. subs. 






14 50 


Ctaridon, ann. subs. 






9 75 


Donations 






11 60 — 21 35 



Huntsburgh, ann. subs. 




3 39 


Madison, South Parish, ann. subs. 


12 00 


Unionville, ann. subs. 




14 50 


Hampden, ann. subs. 




6 59 


Fem. Ed. Soc. 




38 6 97 


Jefferson, ann. subs. 




8 00 


Morgan, G. W. St. John 




5 00 


Kirlland, ann. subs. 




5 00 


Filchville, ann. subs. 




1 00 


Wakeman, ami. subs. 




1 50 


Milan, Pies, church 




30 00 


Nelson, Fem. Ed. Society 




8 50 


Stephen Baldwin, donation 




2 00 — i0 50 


Austenburgh, Young Men's 


Ed. Soc. 


12 50 


Young Ladies Ed. Soc. 




11 06 


Donations 




11 25 


Annual subscription 




122 25-157 0« 


Amount refunded 




19 00 

$791 35 


UTICA AGENCY. 




[Mr. Jesse Doolittle, Utica 


Tr.] 



Augusta, in part, payment of amount subscrib- 
ed, fr. J. Knox 20 00 

1177 31 



Fr. sundry i 



lividuals 



Arkpo-t, fr. Mrs. Susan Hurlburt 5 

Delhi, fr. Fem. Benev. Society, to const. Rev. E. K. 
Maxwell, a L. M. of Pres. Ed. Soc. $30; from 
the Monthly Concert cont. $30 to const. Rev. Or- 
lando. L. Kirtland, a L. M. of Pres. Ed. Soc. 60 

Fayelteville, fr. J. McVickar 5. P. Flint 3. Suudrv in- 
dividuals 2 25 10 

Jamesoille, by A. P. Gould 

Lenox, Quality Hill, 5 05 

Wampsville, 6 84 — 11 

Manlius, 25 

Oneida Presbytery, amount coll. at the installation of 
Rev. A. Sedgwick, at Rome 

Otisco, fr. Rev. Richard Corning 10 

Owego, fr. Fem. Ed. Soc. 6. Fr. Pres. Cong. 69; 
30 of which to const. Charles B. Pixby, a L. M. of 
P. E. Soc. and 30 to const. Mrs. Charles White, a 
L. M. of Pres. Ed. Soc. 

Salina, fr. Fem. Benev. Soc. by Mrs. Jerusha A. 
Forbes 

Skeneateles, fr. the Pres. Cong. $30 of which to const. 
Mrs. S. W. Brace, a L. M. of Pres. Ed. Soc. 

Springfield, fr. Fem. Ed. Soc. by Miss Rosetta I. A 



75 



44 



Parmelee, Tr. also 1 box of clothing, value 
Utica, fr. an unknown donor, by the Rev. S. 
C. Aiken, the tenth pay't. towards educat- 
ing a young man lor the ministry 
Fr. the 3d church 

Fr. Ladies in the 1st church, in part payment 
towards the Aiken scholarship for 1834, by 
M. Bagg 
By collection 

Cash rec'd. for sale of Jewelry 
Cash refunded by a former beneficiary 



at $7 



37 50 
5 54 



40 00 

54 87—137 



$603 50 



SUMMARY. 




Parent Society, 


8,788 67* 


Maine Branch, 


285 86 f 
22 12f 


New Hampshire Branch, 


North Western Branch 


185 60f 


Connecticut Branch 


411 701 


Presbyterian Ed. Society, 


2,861 45f* 


Western Reserve Branch, 


791 35 


Utica Agency, 


603 50 




$13,950 25 



* This is exclusive of the $200 received from the New Hamp- 
shire Branch. 

■f In addition. to these sums, there has been received into the 
Treasury of the Parent Society, and included in its receipts 
above, 

From Maine, 55 38 

" New Hampshire, 12 50 

" Vermont, 63 22 

" Connecticut, exclu. of Legacies 115 50 
" New York, &c. do. do. 4 50 

$251 10 
'* Exclusive of $175 67, received from the Utica Agency, 



Clothing rec'd at the Rooms of the Parent Society 
during the quarter ending July 9, 1834. 

Ashby, fr. a few females in the Orthodox Soc. by Miss Sally E. 

Manning, 5 collars, 6 shirts, and 4 pr. socks. 
Peterboro\ N. H. fr. Fem. Aux. Ed. Soc. 1 box, containing 

8 pr. woolen socks, 5 collars, 2 shirts, 3 pillow cases, 1 

stock, 1 quilt. 
Wenham, fr. " Young Ladies Reading Society," by Rev. E« 

P. Sperry, 3 shirts, 4 pr. socks, 2 collars, valued at $5 50. 



THE 



QUARTERLY REGISTER. 



Vol. VII. 



NOVEMBER, 1834. 



No. 2. 



A LIST OF THE GRADUATES, 

AND THOSE WHO HAVE RECEIVED DEGREES, AT ALL OF THE 

NEW ENGLAND COLLEGES, 

From their foundation, to the time mentioned as follows ; viz. of Harvard, to and including 1834 ; Yale, 1834 ; Brown, 1839; 

Dartmouth, 1834; Williams, 1833; Vermont, 1828; Bowdoin, 1834; Rliddlehury, 1832; Waterville, 1834; 

Amherst, 1834, and Washington, 1834. 

FORMING 

A COMPLETE INDEX TO THE TRIENNIAL CATALOGUES OF ALL THE 
COLLEGES IN NEW ENGLAND. 



By John Farmer, Esq. 

Cor. Sec'ry. New Hampshire Historical Society. 



Inducted 
into office. Colleges. 


Presidents of the New England Colleges 








Names. 


Resigned 


Died. 


Age. 


1640 Harvard, 


Rev. Henry Dunster, A. M. 


1654 


1659 




1654 Harvard, 


Rev. Charles Chaunct, B. D. 




1672 


81 


1672 Harvard, 


Rev. Leonard Hoar, M. D. 


1675 


1675 


45 


1675 Harvard, 


Rev. Urian Oakes, A. M. 




1681 


50 


1682 Harvard, 


Hon. John Rogers, A. M. 




1684 


53 


1685 Harvard, 


Rev. Increase Mather, D. D. 


1701 


1723 


84 


1701 Harvard, 


Rev. Samuel Willard, A. M. 




1707 


67 


1701 Yale, 


Rev. Abraham Pierson, A. M. 




1707 


60 


1708 Harvard, 


Hon. John Leverett, A. M., F. R. S. 




1724 


62 


1719 Yale, 


Rev. Timothy Cutler, D. D. 


1722 


1765 


82 


1725 Harvard, 


Rev. Benjamin Wadsworth, A. M. 




1737 


68 


1726 Yale, 


Rev. Elisha Williams, A. M. 


1739 


1755 


60 


1737 Harvard, 


Rev. Edward Holyoke, A. M. 




1769 


80 


1739 Yale, 


Rev. Thomas Clap, A. M. 


1766 


1767 


63 


1765 Brown, 


Rev. James Manning, D. D. 




1791 


52 


1766 Yale, 


Rev. Napthali Daggett, D. D. 


1770 


1780 




1769 Dartmouth, 


Rev. Eleazar Wheelock, D. D. 




1779 


68 


1770 Harvard, 


Rev. Samuel Locke, LL. D. 


1773 


1777 


44 


1774 Harvard, 


Rev. Samuel Langdon, D. D. 


1780 


1797 


75 


1777 Yale, 


Rev. Ezra Stiles, D. D., LL. D. 




1794 




1779 Dartmouth, 


Hon. John Wheelock, LL. D. 




1817 


63 


1781 Harvard, 


Rev. Joseph Willard, D. D., LL. D. 




1804 


66 


1792 Brown, 


Rev. Jonathan Maxcy, D. D. 


1802 


1820 


52 


1793 Williams, 


Rev. Ebenezer Fitch, D. D. 


1815 


1833 


78 


TOL. VII. 13 









letigned. 


Died. 


Age. 




1817 


64 


1809 






1814 








1807 


49 


1826 








1810 


51 




1819 


47 


1817 






1828 






1821 


1823 


52 




1820 


36 


1821 


1830 


70 



94 COLLEGE PRESIDENTS. [Nov. 

Inducted 
into office. Colleget. Names. 

1795 Yale, Rev. Timothy Dwight, D. D., LL. D. 

1800 Middlebury, Rev. Jeremiah Atwater, D. D. 

1800 Vermont, Rev. Daniel C. Saunders, D. D. 

1802 Bowdoin, Rev. Joseph McKeen, D. D. 

1802 Brown, Rev. Asa Messer, D. D., LL. D. 

1806 Harvard, Rev. Samuel Webber, D. D. 

1807 Bowdoin, Rev. Jesse Appleton, D. D. 
1810 Middlebury, Rev. Henry Davis, D. D. 
1810 Harvard, Rev. John T. Kirkland, D. D., LL. D. 
1815 Williams, Rev. Zephaniah S. Moore, D. D. 

1815 Dartmouth, Rev. Francis Brown, D. D. 

1816 Vermont, Rev. Samuel Austin, D. D. 

1817 Yale, Rev. Jeremiah Day, D. D., LL. D. 

1818 Middlebury, Rev. Joshua Bates, D. D. 

Rev. William Allen, D. D. 

1820 Dartmouth, Rev. Daniel Dana, D. D. 1820 

1820 Waterville, Rev. Jeremiah Chaplin, D. D. 1833 

1821 Williams, Rev. Edward D. Griffin, D. D. 

1821 Amherst, Rev. Zephaniah S. Moore, D. D. 1823 52 

1822 Dartmouth, Rev. Bennet Tyler, D. D. 1828 

1822 Vermont, Rev. Daniel Haskel, A. M. 1824 

1823 Amherst, Rev. Heman Humphrey, D. D. 

1824 Vermont, Rev. Willard Preston, A. M. 1826 
1824 Washington, Rev. Thomas C. Brownell, D. D., LL. D. 1831 
1826 Brown, Rev. Francis Wayland, D. D. 

1826 Vermont, Rev. James Marsh, D. D. 1833 

1828 Dartmouth, Rev. Nathan Lord, D. D. 

1829 Harvard, Hon. Josiah Quincy, LL. D. 

1831 Washington, Rev. Nathaniel S. Wheaton, D. D. 

1833 Middlebury, Rev. John Wheeler, D. D. 

1833 Waterville, Rev. Rufus Babcock, D. D. 



Advertisement and Explanations. 

In preparing the following list, the compiler hag been kindly favored by John Kelly, Esq., of Exeter, 
with a manuscript Catalogue of the Graduates and others named in the Triennial Catalogues of all the 
New England Colleges, with those of New Jersey and Union, from the time they were respectively 
founded down to 1828. To this Catalogue, (compiled by Mr. Kelly,) so obligingly furnished, have been 
added the names in succeeding years down to the present time, and the whole has undergone a revision 
and comparison with the latest Triennials, and the names of those receiving Medical and Honorary 
degrees at Harvard and Yale, have been mode to conform to the latest Catalogues of those Institutions. 
The plan of Mr. Kelly and of the indexes of Harvard, Dartmouth, and Bowdoin, in giving a chronological 
arrangement, has been followed throughout the list. The Christian names have been put in English, as 
being shorter and more convenient to the general reader. Many persons have two or three Christian 
names, and in this case, for. the sake of brevity and uniformity, only one of them has been given at length, 
witli the initials of the others. The most important college titles are given, with some of the highest 
civil titles; but the numerous learned societies which are appended to a considerable number of names, 
have, on account of the space they would have occupied, been omitted. The abbreviations used are as 
follow : Aberd. for Aberdeen University, in Scotland ; Amh. for Amherst ; Bow. for Bowdoin ; Camb. for the 
University of Cambridge, in England ; Columb. for Columbia College, in the city of New York ; Dart, for Dart- 
mouth College; Dick, for Dickinson College, in Pennsylvania; Edin. for the University of Edinburgh, in Scot- 
land ; Geo. for the University of Georgia ; Got. for Gottingen, in Europe ; Green, for Greenville College, in Ten- 
nessee; Harv. for the University of Harvard ; Jeff, for Jefferson College, in Pennsylvania; Mid. for Middlebury; 
Penn. for the University of Pennsylvania; Tran3. or Transylv. for Transylvania College; Ver. for the 
University of Vermont, at Burlington; Wash, for Washington College, in Connecticut; Wat. for Water- 
ville; and Wms. for Williams. King's College, the former name of Columbia College, is designated only 
by the latter name, as well before the change of the name, as afterwards. Where the degree is said to be 
at New York, some of the Medical Institutions in the city of New York, possessing and exercising the 
right of conferring degrees, is intended. The names of presidents of the United States, are printed in 
capitals ; of senators in congress, and judges of the supremo court of the United States, in small capitals. 
Those who have been governors of States, territories or provinces, have a * prefixed to their names; 
those who have been judges of the highest courts in a State, colony or province, have a f prefixed, and 
those who have been representatives in congress, are marked with a ||. Ordained ministers are printed in 
Italics. Where a dash precedes a name, it shows that the person was not a graduate at the college 
named, but received at that college the degree designated. Professors are distinguished by Prof., but 
their particular departments are not given. The second degree of those who have been graduated at 
Washington College since 1826, was not added in the list, politely furnished by the head of that Institu- 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



95 



tion. No catalogue could be obtalnod from Vermont University, and it is believed no Triennial of that 
Institution has ever been published. If one should appear soon, as it is expected, it is probable that a 
supplement to the following, containing the names ut that Institution sinco 1828, as well as those at the 
Wesleyan University, and all others who have been oiaittod at any of the Now England Colleges, will bo 
prepared for the Register. 



List of Graduates, &c. 



1764 
1821 

1720 
1723 
1737 
1764 
1784 
1784 
1787 
1787 
1788 
1791 
1792 
1792 
1794 
1796 
1797 
1797 
1798 
1801 
1805 
1806 
1808 
1810 
1820 
1822 
1823 
1825 
1825 
1826 
1826 
1826 
1826 
1827 
1827 
1827 
1830 
1830 
1830 
1831 
1831 
1832 
1832 
1833 
1833 
1833 

1804 



1760 
1819 

1811 

1823 

1825 
1825 
1825 
1827 

1803 

1671 



Abbe 
Yale Shubael, Mr. 
Yale — Alanson, M. D. 

Abbot 
Harv. Hull, Mr. 
Harv. Isaac, Mr. 
Harv. Abiel 

Thomas, Mr. 

John, Mr., Tut.— Prof, at Bow. 

Samuel 

William L., Mr. 

Abiel, Mr., Tutor 

Benjamin, Mr. — LL. D. at Dart. 



Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Bro. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Harv. 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Bow. 

Harv. 

Dart. 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Bow. 

Dart. 

Yale 

Amh. 



[1811 



D. 



Jonathan 

Jacob, Mr. 

Abiel, Mr., D 

David, Mr. 

Henry, Mr. 

William 

Daniel, Mr. 

John, Mr. 

John S., Mr. 

John L., Mr. 

Ephraim, Mr. 

Samuel 

John E., Mr., and at Harv. 1815 

Jacob, Mr.— Prof, at Amh. 

Joseph H., Mr., Tutor 
—Warren, M. D. 

Charles J. 

John S. C, Mr. 

Gorham D., Mr. 

John E., M. D. 

Julian, Mr. 
—James B., M. D. 
—Nicholas, M. D. 

John S., Mr. 

John W. P., Mr., LL. B. 
— Constantine, M. D. 

Ezra 

William E. 

Abiel 

Caleb F. 

Josiah G. 

Charles E. 

Rufus 

Charles 

Sereno T. 

Harv. — John N., N. J. 1787, D. D.; Mr. 
[and Tutor at N. J. 
Abel 
Yale Elijah, Mr. 
Yale James, Mr. 

Abercrombie 
Wms. William H. 
Wms. Otis, Mr.— M. D. at Yale 1827 

Abernethy 
Yale Elisha S. 
Yale John J. 
Yale — Roswell, M. D. 
Yale —George H. ; M. D. 

Adam 
Yale Samuel F. 

Adams 
Harv. William, Mr. 



1694 Harv. 
1697 Harv. 
1710 Harv. 
1721 Harv. 
1730 Yale 
1733 Harv. 
1733 Harv. 

1737 Yale 

1738 Harv. 
1740 Harv. 
1740 Yale 
1742 Harv. 
1745 Harv. 
1745 Harv. 

1747 Harv. 

1748 Harv. 
1752 Harv. 
1755 Harv. 



1759 Harv. 

1760 Yale 
1762 Harv. 

1770 Harv. 

1771 Harv. 

1774 Harv. 

1775 Harv. 
1775 Dart. 
1778 Harv. 
1787 Harv. 



1788 Harv. 
1788 Harv. 

1788 Bro. 

1789 Harv. 

1790 Harv. 

1791 Harv. 
1791 Dart. 

1793 Harv. 

1794 Harv. 

1795 Yale 

1795 Yale 

1796 Dart. 

1797 Harv. 

1797 Dart. 

1798 Harv. 

1799 Harv. 

1799 Dart. 

1800 Yale 

1801 Yale 
1801 Harv. 

1801 Harv. 

1802 Harv. 

1803 Harv. 

1803 Yale 

1804 Yale 
1804 Ver. 

1804 Harv. 

1805 Harv. 

1805 Harv. 

1806 Harv. 

1806 Yale 

1807 Yale 
1807 Yale 
1807 Wms. 
1810 Yale 



LL. D.. Gov. of 
[Mass. 



Eliphalet, Mr. 
Hugh, Mr. 
Joseph, Mr. 
John, Air. 

William, Mr., Tutor 
Jedidiah, Mr. 
Seth 

Thomas, Mr. 
Benjamin, Mr. 
fSamuel, Mr., 
Joseph, Mr. 
Joseph 
Joseph, Mr. 
John 
Ebenezer 
Joseph 
Amos, Mr. 
tllJOHN, Mr., LL. D. & at Dart. 

[1782 ; at Yale 1788 ; at Bro. 

[1797. Vice Pres. & Pres. of 

[the United Stales 
Zabdiel, Mr. 
t||Andrew, Mr., LL. D. 
Phineas, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. 
Moses, Mr. 
Daniel, Mr. 
Henry 

Nathaniel, Mr. & at Harv. 1790 
Peter, Mr. 
||JOHN Q., Mr. & Prof.; LL. D. 

[and at N. J. Sen. & Rep. in 

[Cong, and Pres. of the U. S. 
Solomon, Mr. 
Thomas, Mr. 
||Benjamin, Mr. 
Charles, Mr. 
Thomas B., Mr. 
Zabdiel R, Mr. 

Ebenezer, Mr. and at Bro. Prof. 
Phineas, Mr. [at Dart. 

—Samuel, M. B. ; M. D. 1802 
John, Mr. 
Rufus 
Isaac 

Moses, Mr. 

Daniel, Mr.— M. D. at Harv. 
Isaac 

Daniel, Mr. 
William 
Thomas, Mr. 
Stedman, Mr. 1809 
Josiah, Mr. 
David P. 
Henry, Mr. 
Joseph, Mr. 
Coi-nelius 
Parker 
Charles, Mr. 
Robert 
Joseph 
Joel, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. 
Daniel, Mr. 
William W. 
Joel 

Daniel C. 
Nathaniel 



96 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1810 Dart. Charles G., Mr. and at Harv.— 
[M. D. Harv. 1816 

1812 Mid. Jonathan, Mr. 

1813 Bro. Horatio 

1813 Harv. Zabdiel B., Mr., M. D. 

1813 Dart. James 

1814 Dart. Thomas 

1815 Dart. Leonard, Mr. and at Union 1819 
1815 Bro. -Jasper, Mr. & at Yale 1819. Tut. 

[& Prof, at Bro. Pres. Gene- 
Eva & Charles. D. D. at Col. 

1817 Dart. John, Mr. 

1818 Dart. Weston B., Mr., Tutor 
1818 Harv. Samuel T„ Mr. 

1818 Harv. John R., Mr. 

1820 Harv. Joseph T., Mr. 

1821 Harv. George W., Mr. 
1821 Wms. —John, Mr. 

1821 Dart. Henry 

1821 Dart. —Jacob, M. D. 

1821 Ver. Ephraim 

1821 Yale George E., Mr. 

1821 Yale John, Mr. 

1822 Harv. William J.. Mr. 
1822 Dart. —Frederick W., M. D. 

1822 Dart. —Daniel, M. D. 

1823 Harv. —Edwin, M. D. 

1823 Bow. Charles S., Mr. 

1824 Bow. —Solomon, Mr. 
1824 Yale John T. 
1824 Dart. Darwin, Mr. 

1824 Wms. Ely, Mr. 

1825 Harv. -Charles F., Mr. 

1825 Harv. —Horatio, M. D. 

1826 Harv. Nehemiah, Mr. 
1826 Bow. —John, M. D. 

1826 Yale John G., Mr. 

1827 Yale William 

1827 Bow. Joseph 

1828 Amh. Henry 

1829 Bow. William B. 

1829 Bow. —Stephen, M. D. 

1830 Wms. —Lucius S., M. D. 

1830 Bow. Darius 

1831 Bow. Samuel 
1831 Yale James H. 
1831 Yale James U. 

1831 Dart. Ebenezer, Mr. 

1832 Amh. William W. 

1832 Harv. Charles E. 

1833 Dart. Frederick A. 
1833 Amh. John C. 

1833 Bow. Charles 

1834 Amh. Charles B. 
1834 Yale William H. 

Adan 

1813 Harv. John R., Mr. 

Adee 
1821 Yale Augustus A.— M. D. at N. Y. 
Adriance 

1814 Yale Isaac 

Agry 

1815 Dart. David 

Aiken 

1784 Dart. Solomon, Mr. 
1799 Dart. Joseph, Mr. 

1807 Dart. Jonathan, Mr. 

1814 Mid. Samuel C, Mr. 

1815 Mid. Edward 
1819 Dart. John, Mr., Tutor 
1821 Mid. Henry L. 
1825 Dart. Silas, Mr. 

Aikens 

1808 Mid. Asa, Mr. 



Ainsworth 
1778 Dart. Laban, Mr. and at Yale 
1794 Dart. Andrew 
1794 Harv. Oliver 

1811 Dart. William, Mr. 
1828 Bro. Albert C. 

Akins 

1798 Yale John 

Albro 

1827 Yale —John A., Mr. 

Alcock 
1646 Harv. John, Mr. 
1659 Harv. Samuel 
1673 Harv. George 

Alden 
1692 Harv. Zechariah 
1762 Harv. Timothy, Mr. 
1773 Yale Roger, Mr. and at Columb. 
1787 Dart. Abishai, Mr. 
1787 Bro. Abner, Mr. 
1792 Bro. Peter O., Mr. 

1794 Harv. Timothy, Mr. — Pres. of Alleg. 

1795 Dart. Samuel, Mr. [Coll. 

1799 Harv. Isaiah 
1799 Harv. Martin 
1802 Dart. Augustus 

1806 Bro. Nathan 

1807 Bro. Cyrus, Mr. 

1808 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. — M. D. and at 

[Dart. 1811, and at Perm. 

1812 Harv. Henry B., Mr. 
1814 Bro. Selh, Mr. 

1817 Yale Augustus, Mr. 

1821 Yale —Timothy F., and at Alleg. 
1821 Yale —Robert W., and at Alleg. 
1821 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1821 Bro. Lucius, Mr. 
1825 Bro. —Charles H., Mr. 

1825 Dart. —Samuel, M. D. 

1826 Dart. Edward P. 

1828 Wms. —Washington B., M. D. 
1831 Amh. John 

Aldis 

1796 Bro. tAsa, Mr. 

Aldrich 
1799 Bro. Whipple 
1806 Bro. David 

1818 Bro. Esek 

1826 Bro. Jonathan, Mr. 

Alexander 
1777 Yale Caleb, Mr. at Bro. 1789 
1796 Dart. Foster, Mr. 
1814 Yale —Elijah, M. D. and at Dart. 1815 
1821 Yale Adam L. 
1821 Yale — Eldad, M. D. 
1831 Amh. John L. 

Alger 
1811 Bro. Israel, Mr. 
1825 Harv. Horatio, Mr, 

Alison 
1755 Yale —Francis, Mr. and at N. J.— D. D. 
[at Glasgow and at Penu. 

Allen 
1689 Harv. James, Mr. 
1703 Harv. William, Mr. 
1708 Yale Benjamin, Mr. 
1710 Harv. James, Mr. 
1717 Harv. James, Mr. 
1721 Yale Henry, Mr. 
1726 Harv. Eleazar, Mr. 

1728 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1729 Yale John, Mr. 
1736 Yale Timothy, Mr. 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



97 



1742 Harv. James, Mr. 
1754 IJarv. James, Mr. 
1757 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
1762 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1771 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 

1772 Harv. John 

1774 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
1774 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1785 Harv. James 
1789 Harv. Ephraim 

1789 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1790 Bro. William, Mr. 

1792 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1793 Bro. Paul, Mr. 

1794 Dart. ||Samucl C, Mr. 

1795 Dart. ||Heman, Mr. at Ver. 1824 

1797 Bro. Benjamin, Mr. Tut. — Prof, at 

[Union and Penn. — D. D. at 
[S. C. and Bro. 

1798 Bro. Morrill, Mr. 

1798 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 

1799 Harv. James, Mr. 

1801 Harv. Wilkes, Mr. 

1802 Harv. William, Mr., D. D. — Mr. at 

[Dart. 1812.— Pres. of Bow. 

1803 Bro. Philip 

1804 Bro. Amos, Mr. 
1806 Yale Jason 
1808 Dart. Amos 
1811 Dart. Jacob, Mr. 
1811 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1811 Bro. William H, Mr., M. D. 

1811 Wms. PelegR., Mr. 

1812 Wms. James C. 
1812 Ver. Horatio 

1812 Bro. Thaddeus, Mr. 

1813 Bro. Zechariah, Mr. 

1813 Mid. Solomon M., Mr. and at Wms. 
1813 Yale George [1817.— Tutor and Prof. 

1813 Yale Nathaniel 

1814 Yale Edward 

1814 Dart. Joseph P.— Mr. at Wms. 1822 

1814 Dart. —Jonathan A., M. D.; Mr. 1821 

1815 Bro. Crawford, Mr. 
1817 Bro. Benjamin F. 
1817 Mid. Ethan 

1817 Harv. William. W., Mr. 
1820 Bow. —Frederick, Mr. 
1820 Bro. —Lucius, M. D. 
1820 Mid. Ira M. 
1820 Dart. —Henry, M. D. 

1822 Wms. —Thomas, Mr. 

1823 Amh. David O., Mr. aud at Union 
1823 Bro. Benoni 

1823 Bro. Ethan, Mr. 
1823 Wms. Thomas P. 
1823 Wms. Elisha H. 
1823 Yale Bela 

1823 Ver. Frederick H. 

1824 Mid. Merxnn, Mr. 
1824 Dart. William S. 

1824 Bow. Harrison 

1825 Harv. Phineas, Mr. 
1825 Wms. Samuel A. 
1825 Bro. —Hiram, M. D. 

1825 Yale — Bezaleel C, M. D. 

1826 Bro. Cyrus W. 
1826 Dart. Ebenezer 

1826 Wms. —David, M. D. 

1827 Yale Aldis S., M. D. 

1827 Bow. Horatio O., 1828 

1828 Mid. Samuel 
1828 Bow. William 

1828 Dart. —John, M. D. 

1829 Dart. Diarca H., Mr., Prof, at Mar. 
1829 Amh. John F. 



Cushing 1 

Charles II. 
— Abraham, M. D. 

William 
— Horatio G., M. D. 

John C. 

S. Thompson 

William 11. 

Lewis 
—Charles C, M. D. 

John W. 
—William II., M. D. 



1830 Bow. 

1831 Harv. 

1831 Wms. 

1832 Amh. 

1832 Bow. 

1833 Harv. 
1833 Amh. 
1833 Bow. 
1833 Wms. 

1833 Wms. 

1834 Bow. 
1834 Bow. 

Allenton 

1813 Bro. Russell 

1814 Bro. Goodwin, M. D. 

Allerton 
1650 Harv. Isaac 

Allin 
1643 Harv. John 
1675 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

Ailing 
1679 Harv. James, Mr. 
1746 Yale Enos, Mr. 

Allis 

1724 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1769 Yale Elisha, Mr. 
1796 Yale Thomas W. 

Allison 
1786 Bro. —Burgiss, Mr., D. D. 1804 

Allston 
1800 Harv. Washington 

Allyn 

1725 Yale Samuel 

1785 Harv. John, Mr., D. D. 
1810 Harv. Rufus B. 
1814 Harv. John, Mr. 

Alsop 
1798 Yale —Richard, Mr. 1798 
1821 Yale Charles R., Mr. 
1828 Yale —John, Mr. 

Alston 

1814 Yale Thomas P. 

1815 Yale Jacob M. 

Alvord 
1800 Yale Saul 
1813 Dart. —Elijah, Mr. 

1820 Wms. Alvau 

1821 Wms. —Elijah, Mr. 

1827 Dart. James C, Mr. 

1828 Yale Thomas Gold 

Ambrose 
1653 Harv. Joshua— Mr. at Oxford 
1653 Harv. Nehemiah, Mr. 

Amerman 
1827 Amh. Thomas A. 
Ames 



1645 Harv. 
1761 Harv. 
1764 Harv. 
1767 Harv. 

1774 Harv. 
1791 Dart. 
1803 Harv. 
1813 Harv. 
1S22 Harv. 
1823 Bro. 
1825 Harv. 
1830 Bro. 

Aramidon 

1775 Harv. James 



William 
Nathaniel, Mr. 
Seth, Mr. 
Sylvanus. Mr. 
IIFisher, Mr.— LL. D. at 
John W. 
Benjamin 
John W. 
Jeremiah F., Mr., M. D 



Samuel, Mr. 
Seth, Mr. 
Ellis 



N. J. 
[1796 

Mr. at 
[Bro. 1S27 



98 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



Amory 
1741 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1778 Harv. Rufus G., Mr. 
1784 Harv. William, Mr. 
1787 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1806 Harv. —Nathaniel, Mr. 
1824 Harv. Francis, Mr. 
1830 Harv. Thomas C. 
1832 Harv. —Charles, M. D. 

Anderson 

1784 Harv. James 
1791 Dart. Rufus, Mr. 

1802 Bro. Robert 

1813 Bow. John, Mr. 

1814 Dart. John 
1818 Bow. Isaac P. 
1818 Bow. Rufus, Mr. 

1821 Yale James 

1822 Bow. James 

1822 Harv. Larz 

1823 Mid. —William, M. D. 
1827 Wms. Joseph 

1829 Bow. —Abraham W. ; M. D. 

1830 Yale John G. 

Andrew 
1675 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1711 Yale Samuel, Mr. and at Harv. 
1714 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1739 Yale Samuel, Mr. 

1789 Harv. Israel, Mr. 

1807 Yale Samuel R., Mr. 1817 

1832 Harv. Charles A. 

Andrews 
1695 Harv. Jedidiah, Mr. 
1759 Yale Samuel—Mr. at Columb. 
1783 Harv. Asa, Mr. 

1785 Harv. Joseph G. 

1785 Yale Samuel J. 

1786 Harv. John, Mr., D. D. 
1786 Harv. Samuel 

1797 Yale Josiah B., Mr.— M. D. at N. Y. 

1803 Yale Elisha D., Mr. 
1803 Bro. —Elisha, Mr. 

1805 Wms. Benaiah 

1806 Mid. William, Mr. 

1809 Harv. Edward W., Mr. 

1810 Harv. John D., Mr. 
1810 Harv. Edward 

1810 Yale Ethan A., Mr. 1823 — Prof, at 

1811 Dart. Abraham, Mr. [N. C. 

1812 Harv. Isaiah T. 
1812 Harv. William S. 
1812 Harv. William T. 
1817 Yale Ebenezer 
1821 Bro. Elisha, Mr. 

1824 Harv. James W., Mr. 
1827 Yale — Arza, M. D. 
1827 Yale —John, M. D. 
1827 Yale —Mark A., M. D. 
1829 Yale —Samuel A., M. D. 

1829 Dart. Alonzo 

1830 Yale John W. 

1830 Harv. Benjamin H. , 

1830 Harv. William 

1831 Dart. Seth L. 
1831 Yale William W. 
1831 Dart. —Robert, M. D. 

1833 Harv. Samuel P. 

Andros 

1790 Bro. —Thomas, Mr. 

Andrus 
1777 Yale Noah 
1812 Mid. Joseph R. 
1823 Yale —Jared, Mr. 



Angell 
1807 Bro. Oliver, Mr. 

1813 Bro. Joseph K., Mr. 

1814 Bro. Samuel, Mr. 

1825 Wms. -Daniel M. ; M. D. 

Angier 
1653 Harv. John, Mr. 
1673 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1701 Harv. Ames, Mr. 
1720 Harv. John, Mr. 

1748 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1763 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1764 Harv. Oakes, Mr. 

1787 Harv. Samuel, and at Dart. 1787 

1793 Harv. Charles, Mr. 
1818 Bro. Samuel T., M. D. 

1821 Harv. John, Mr. 
1827 Harv. Charles, Mr. 

1827 Wat. John F. H. 

1829 Harv. Joseph 

1832 Bow. George C. 

1833 Amh. Luther H. 

Annable 
1744 Harv. John, Mr. 

Annan 
1786 Bro. Robert L. 

1786 Bro. _ William 

Annin 

1834 Harv. William L. R. 

Appleton 
1712 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr., D. D. 

1749 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1755 Harv. Henry, Mr. 
1757 Harv. John, Mr. 

1772 Bro. Joseph, Mr. 

1773 Harv. Nathaniel W. ; Mr. 
1791 Dart. Joseph 

1791 Dart. Moses, Mr. 

1792 Dart. Jesse, Mr., D. D. and at Harv. 

[1810. Pres. of Bow. 
1792 Harv. John S., Mr. 

1794 Harv. George W., Mr. 
1813 Harv. John J., Mr. 
1813 Bow. Nathan D., Mr. 

1822 Bow. John, Mr. 

1826 Bow. William 

1828 Harv. Horatio D. 

1830 Amh. Samuel G. 

1830 Harv. Charles D. 

1831 Harv. Thomas G. 

1832 Harv. William C. 

1833 Harv. —John, M. D. 

1834 Bow. John 

Apthorp 
1816 Harv. John V., Mr. 
1818 Harv. William F., Mr. 
1826 Bow. Leonard F. 

1829 Bow. Harrison O., Mr. 1833 
1829 Yale George H. 

1829 Yale William P. 

Archbald 
1736 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

Archer 
1816 Bro. Jason H., Mr., M. D. 
1818 Dart. Samuel H. ; Mr. 

1830 Yale James 

Archibald 
1783 Dart. Thomas 

Armitage 
1660 Harv. Manasseh 

Armor 

1787 Dart. Samuel 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



90 



Arras 
1798 Yale Pliny 

1813 Yale Aaron, Mr. 
1818 Wins. Selah R., Mr. 
1824 Yale Hiram P., Mr. 
1828 Yale Ebenezer W., Mr. 
1830 Amh. William 

Armsby 

1773 Harv. Joshua, Mr. 

Armstrong 

1814 Dart. Edmund W., M. D. 

1826 Yale —Peter L., M. D. 

1827 Wms. —Prosper M. ; M. D. 

Arnell 
1824 Wms. —David R., Mr. 

1827 Wms. James M. 

Arnold 

1723 Yale Jonathan, Mr. and at Oxf. 

1724 Yale Samuel 
1771 Bro. Thomas, Mr. 
1776 Yale Oliver, Mr. 1792 

1788 Dart. Josiah L., Mr. and at Yale 1791 ; 
[at Bro. 1791. Tut. at Bro. 
1795 Bro. Samuel G., Mr. 

1811 Dart. ^Lemuel H., Gov. of R. I. 

1812 Mid. Seth S., Mr. 
1814 Bro. Richard J., Mr. 

1816 Bro. Salmon A., Mr.— M. D. at N. Y. 
1824 Dart. —Joel R., Mr. and at Mid. 

1828 Wms. — Mowry P., M. D. 

Arthur 
1743 Yale Thomas, Mr. 
Ash 

1774 Bro. —John, Mr. 

Ashley 
1730 Yale John, Mr. 
1730 Yale Joseph 
1730 Yale Israel, Mr. 
1730 Yale Jonatlian, Mr. 
1758 Yale Jonathan, Mr. 
1758 Yale John, Mr. 
1767 Yale Israel, Mr. 
1767 Yale Moses, Mr. 
1791 Dart. Thomas 
1793 Harv. William, Mr. 

1808 Wms. Richard H., Mr. 

1813 Wms. Chester 

1817 Bro. Samuel 
1834 Wash. William B. 

Ashmun 

1809 Harv. —En P., Mr. 1809, and at Mid. 
1816 Ver. Jehudi [1807.— Sen. in Cong. 

1818 Harv. John H., Mr. and Prof. 
1823 Yale George 

Ashton 
1766 Harv. Jacob, Mr. 

Aspinwall 
1714 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1764 Harv. William, Mr., M. D. 
1804 Harv. William, Mr.— M. D. at Penn. 
1804 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Atchinson 
1825 Ver. —William, M. D. 

A them 
1775 Harv. George, Mr. 

Atherton 
1665 Harv. Hope 
1762 Harv. Joshua, Mr. 
1762 Harv. Israel, Mr. 
1794 Harv. ||Charles H., Mr. 

1806 Dart. Humphrey 

1807 Dart. Booz M., Mr. 
1822 Harv. Charles G. 



Atkins 
1748 Harv. Dudley, Mr. 

1773 Yale Elisha, Mr. 

1816 Harv. Dudlev, Mr. and at Bow. 1817. 
1816 Bro. Elisha' [— M. D. at Penn. 

Atkinson 
1G67 Harv. Nathaniel 
1691 Harv. Thomas 
1718 Harv. {Theodore, Mr. 
1757 Harv. Theodore, Mr. 
1783 Harv. fWilliam K., Mr. 
1787 Dart. Jonathan, Mr. 
1794 Harv. John, Mr. 

1806 Dart. Daniel C. 
1813 Bro. Samuel 
1813 Bro. Jacob 
1823 Bow. —John, M. D. 

1830 Bow. —Benjamin, M. D. 
1832 Dart. — Bailes, M. D. 
1834 Harv. Kinsman 

Atterbury 

1831 Yale John G. 

Atwater 

1774 Yale Noah, Mr., Tutor 
1781 Yale Jason, Mr. 

1785 Yale Jeremiah, Mr. 

1787 Yale Moses 

1793 Yale Jeremiah, Mr., Tut.— D. D. at 

[Penn. Pres. of Mid., and 
[Dick. 

1797 Yale David 

1804 Wms. Caleb, Mr. 

1805 Yale Charles, Mr. 

1807 Yale William 
1809 Ver. William, Mr. 

1813 Yale Russell 

1825 Yale Jason, Mr. 

1826 Yale Moses 

1827 Yale William 

1831 Yale Lyman H., Tutor 
1834 Yale Charles 
1834 Yale John P. 
Atwell 

1788 Bro. Amos M., Mr. 

1814 Bro. Samuel Y., Mr. 

Atwood 

1806 Yale Curtis 
1814 Yale Anson S. 

1814 Yale John M., Mr. 1818 
1821 Yale Charles, Mr. 
1830 Harv. — Shadrach, M. D. 

Auboyneau 
1799 Bro. P. L. Armand, Mr. 

Auchmuty 
1742 Harv. Samuel, Mr.— D. D. at Oxf. 

Augur 
1784 Yale Joel, Mr. 

Austin 
1762 Yale Punderson, Mr., Tut. 
1766 Harv. Jonathan L., Mr. 
1769 Harv. Jonathan W., Mr. 
1769 Yale —Aaron, Mr. 1805 
1779 Yale David, Mr. 
1783 Yale Samuel, Mr. and at N. J. 17S5. 
[D. D. at Wms. 1807. Pres. 
[of Ver. 
1791 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1794 Yale John P., Mr. 

1798 Harv. William, Mr. 

1801 Yale Ralsa 

1802 Harv. James T., Mr. 
1307 Yale John M. 

1809 Harv. Loring 



100 

1812 Yale 

1813 Dart. 

1814 Bro. 

1815 Yale 
1820 Ver. 
1822 Bow. 
1825 Harv 

1829 Harv 

1830 Harv 

1830 Harv 

1831 Bow. 
1831 Harv 

Averell 
1795 Bro. Isaac 

Averill 
1814 Yale Elisha, Mr. 
1830 Yale James R. 

Avery 
1706 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1706 Harv. John, Mr. 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



Charles 

Daniel, Mr. and at Harv. 1827 
— Benjamin, M. D. 

Stephen G. 

Seneca 
—Samuel, M. D. 

Arthur W. 

Elbriclge G. 

Nathaniel 
— Thomas I. 
-Oliver W v M. D. 

William 



John, Mr. 
Ephraim, Mr. 
John, Mr. and at Yale 
John 



and at Dart. 1773 
and at Wms. 1779 



1731 Harv. 
1731 Harv. 
1759 Harv. 
1761 Yale 
1761 Yale 
1769 Yale 
1771 Harv. 
1777 Yale 
1793 Harv. 
1810 Bro. 
1810 Yale 
1813 Yale 

1818 Mid. 

1819 Harv. 

1822 Yale 
1826 Mid. 
1830 Yale 
1830 Wms. 

Axtell 

1823 Mid. —Henry, N. J. 1796, & Mr 
1830 Wms. —Sylvester, M. D. 

Ayer 



Ephraim 
David, Mr, 
Joseph, Mr 
John, Mr. 
John, Mr. 
David 
Edward 
John, Mr. 1817 
Charles E. 
John, Mr. 
Elijah M. 
John A. 
Daniel D. 
Jared R. 



-D.D. 



1710 Harv. 
1807 Dart. 
1823 Bro. 

1825 Bow. 

1826 Bow. 
1832 Bow. 
1834 Dart. 
1834 Bow. 



Obadiah, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. 7 Tut 
Joseph 
Thomas 

-Benjamin, M. D. 
Joseph C. 
Caleb R. 
James 

Ayers 

1788 Dart. Oliver, Mr. at Wms. 1796 
1831 Yale — Chauncy, M. D. 
Aylesworth 

1827 Wms. — Laban J., M. D. 

Aylwin 

1830 Harv. —William C, Mr. 

Ayres 
1754 Yale Thomas, Mr. 
1833 Wms. 

Babb 
1824 Dart. —James, M. D. 

Babbidge 

1828 Harv. Charles 

Babbit 

1783 Dart. Isaac 

1784 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1790 Harv. Erasmus 
1814 Yale William R. 
1826 Amh. Calvin W. 

1831 Yale Peter T. 

Babbitt 
1811 Mid. Nathan G., Mr. 



M. B— M. D. 

[at Penn. 



M. D. 



1833 Wms. Nathan S. 

Babcock 
1724 Yale fJoshua, Mr. & at Bro. H4, 
1752 Yale James, Mr. 
1752 Yale Henry, Mr. 
1755 Yale Jonathan 
1755 Yale Luke, Mr. and at Columb. 
1761 Yale Stephen, Mr. 
1773 Yale Gamaliel 
1802 Harv. Henry, Mr. 
1806 Harv. Francis 
1816 Bro. Cyrus G. 

1821 Bro. Rufus, Mr. at Columb. Tut.— 

[Pres. of Wat. D. D. at 

[Bow. 1834 
1825 Amh. Elisha G. 

1830 Bow. —Aaron G., M. D. 

1831 Harv. Samuel B. 

Babson 
1779 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 

Bache 
1830 Yale —Alexander, Mr. 

Bachelder 
1796 Dart. Josiah, 31. D. at Harv. 
1809 Bro. — William, Mr. 
1819 Dart. —James, M. D. 
1823 Bow. George W. 
1823 Harv. John 

Bacheller 
1731 Han-. Samuel, Mr. 
1813 Dart. — Joseph, M. D. 

Bachi 
1827 Harv. —Peter. Mr. 

Backus 
1718 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
1724 Yale Simon, Mr. 
1759 Yale Simon, Mr. 
1769 Yale Charles, Mr.— D. D. at Wms. 
1777 Yale Elijah, Mr. [1801 

1787 Yale Azel, Mr.— D. D. at N. J., 1810, 
1787 Yale Matthew [Pres. of Ham. 

1787 Dart. Simon 

1788 Dart. Joseph 
1788 Dart. Sylvanus 

1792 Yale De Lucena 
1797 Bro. —Isaac, Mr. 

1802 Wms. William F., Mr. and at Yale 

[1807, Tut. 
1806 Wms. Gurdon H.. Mr. & at Yale 1823 
1813 Yale Frederick F. ; M. D. 
1818 Bro. —Thomas 
1822 Bro. Andrew 
1830 Yale John C. 

Bacon 
1731 Harv. Jacob, Mr. 
1771 Harv. Jacob, Mr. 
1771 Harv.— \\John, Mr. and at N. J. 

1793 Yale Asa 

1794 Yale ||Ezekiel 
1796 Yale John 
1806 Yale David 
1810 Harv. Rufus 
1820 Wms. Josiah 

1820 Yale Leonard, Mr. 
1825 Bow. Elisha, Mr. 
1825 Bow. —Horatio, M. D. 
1827 Wms. —John F., Mr. 
1827 Bro. Peter C. 

1830 Wms. Marshall J., Mr. 

1830 Bow. —Liberty W., M. D. 

1831 Yale David F. 

1833 Yale Epaphroditus C. 
1833 Bow. — Alvan, M. D. 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



101 



Bacot 
1798 Yale Henry II., Mr. 

Badcock 
1772 Harv. Josiah, Mr. 
1775 Harv. Rulus, Mr. 

Badger 

1747 Harv. Stephen, Mr. 
Moses, Mr. 
Joseph 
Samuel, Mr. 
fGeorge E., Mr. 
Milton, Mr., Tut. 
Stephen C, Mr. 
William 
David L. 



1761 Harv. 
1785 Yale 

1805 Yale 
1813 Yale 
1823 Yale 
1823 Dart. 
1823 Bro. 
1834. A mh. 

Bag-g- 

1806 Wins. Henry 

Bagley 
1813 Yale Anderson 

Bailey 
173G Harv. Abner, Mr. 
1742 Harv. Enoch, Mr. 
1755 Harv. Jacob, Mr. 
1765 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1793 Dart. Kiah, Mr. 

1794 Bro. Jeremiah, Mr. 
1801 Yale Kosvvell 

1806 Wms. Algernons. 

1807 Harv. Winthrop, Mr., and at Bow. '15, 

1807 Bro. ||John, Mr., Tut. [Tut. Bow. 

1808 Bro. Luther, Mr. 
1808 Dart. Edmund 
1810 Bro. Isaac 

1311 Dart. Joseph, Mr. 

1813 Dart. Rufus W., Mr., Tut. 

1814 Mid. David 

1817 Yale Ebenezer, Mr., and at Harv. '22 

1818 Ver. Benjamin F. 
1827 Bow. Lewis 
1827 Dart. —John, M. D. 

1829 Bow. Dudley P. 

1830 Dart. —Horatio, M. D. 
1832 Dart. —William, M. D. 



Baker 



1706 
1724 
1731 
1755 
1760 
1782 
1792 
1795 
1798 
1801 
1810 
1811 
1815 
1816 
1820 
1821 
1822 
1822 
1824 
1828 
1829 
1830 
1830 
1831 
1831 
1831 
1332 
1833 
1834 



Harv. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Yale 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Dart. 

Harv. 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Wms. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Wms. 

Wms. 

Yale 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Yale 

Amh. 

Yale 

Yale 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Yale 

Harv. 

Dart. 



Daniel, Mr. 

Thomas, Mr. 

Jacob 

Elisha, Mr. 

James, Mr. 

Arlemas 

Joel, Mr. 

Thomas 

Charles 

Alpheus 

Thomas K. 

Walter, Mr. 

Henry F., Mr. 

George, Mr., M. D. 

Charles, Mr. 

Curtis P. 

Osmyn, Mr. 
-George G., M. D. 
-D. William, M. D. 

Silas 

Oliver 

Abijah R. 

Wi'lliam N. 

Otis 

Thomas 

John 

Samuel G. 

James L. 

Albert 

VOL. VII. 



Balch 



1724 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


17.;.* Harv. 


Thomas, Mr., and at Yale '41 


1762 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


1763 Harv. 


Benjamin. Mr. 


1782 Harv. 


Saiimel, Mr. 


1806 Wins. 


—JL'zf/uuh, D. D. Pres. Green. 


1811 Dart. 


Israel 


Baldwin 


1726 Yale 


Henry 


1735 Yale 


Isaac, Mr. 


1748 Yale 


David, Mr. 


1748 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1752 Harv. 


Sa?nnel, Mr. 


1763 Yale 


Ebenezer, Mr., Tut. 


17/2 Yale 


||Abraham, Mr., Tut.— Pres. of 




[Geo. Rep. &. Sen. in Cong. 


1774 Yale 


Isaac, Mr. 


1776 Yale 


Ashbel, JMr. 


1777 Yale 


Dudley, Mr. 


1777 Yale 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1779 Yale 


William, Mr. 


1781 Yale 


HtSimeon. Mr., Tut. 


1785 Harv. 


— Loammi, Mr. 


1787 Yale 


Augustus 


1791 Dart. 


John, Mr. 


1791 Bro. 


— Thomas, Mr. — D. D. at Union, 


1795 Yale 


Michael [1807 


1797 Yale 


!| Henry 


1797 Bro. 


jjohn 


1798 Yale 


Amos, Mr. 


1800 Harv. 


Loammi, Mr. 


1801 Yale 


Samuel S. 


1801 Yale 


Isaac 


1802 Yale 


Truman, Mr., and at Mid. '07 


1803 Yale 


Boyle Van B. 


1807 Yale 


Abraham D. 


1808 Yale 


Ebenezer, Mr. 


1809 Yale 


Burr, Mr. 


1809 W T ms. 


Ambrose 


1810 Wms. 


Charles A.. Mr. 


1810 Dart. 


Seth C. 


1810 Yale 


Hezekiah H. 


1811 Yale 


George 


1811 Yale 


Roger S., Mr. 


1311 Yale 


Solomon, Mr. 


1812 Yale 


Elihu W, Mr. 


1812 Yale 


Elijah, Mr. 


1816 Mid. 


Benson C. 


1820 Wms. 


Johnson 


1820 Yale 


Abraham 


1821 Yale 


Dwight, Mr. 


1821 Mid. 


Silas ' 


1823 Dart. 


— Dexter M. 


1825 Yale 


—Charles, M. D. 


1825 Yale 


—James, M. D. 


1827 Yale 


Joseph B.. Mr. 


1827 Yale 


Theron, Mr., '31 


1827 Yale 


—Elijah, M. D. 


1827 Dart. 


Benjamin G. 


1827 Bow. 


Abraham C. 


1829 Yale 


John A. 


1S33 Yale 


Michael 


Ball 




1734 Harv. 


George 


1748 Yale 


Eliphalet, Mr. 


1784 Yale 


Stephen, Mr. 


1787 Yale ■ 


— Flamen 


1791 Dart. 


Heman, Mr., & at Yale "94, D.D. 


1799 Bro. 


Elisha [Union, 1818 


1802 Harv. 


John 


1805 Bro. 


Hyder A. 


1818 Mid. 


Hervey. Mr. 


1820 Dart. 


John, Mr. 


1825 Harv. —Stephen, M. D. 



102 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1826 Bro. Nathan, Mr. 

Ballantine 

1694 Harv. John, Mr. 
1735 Harv. John, Mr. 
1768 Harv. John, Mr. 
1771 Harv. William G. 

Ballard 
1799 Harv. William, Mr. 
1825 Wms. —Joseph, M. D. 

1827 Wms. James 

1828 Wms. —Horatio, M. D. 

1830 Dart. —Edward, Mr. 

1831 Bow. John 
1833 Yale Josiah 

Ballentine 

1777 Yale Ebenezer 

Ballou 

1813 Bro. Barton, Mr. 

1830 Bow. —Ariel, M. D. 

Baltzell 

1829 Yale Charles J. 

Bancher 

1828 Wash. Charles G. 

Bancroft 

1778 Harv. Aaron, Mr., D. D. 
1788 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1791 Harv. Amos, Mr., M. D. 
1809 Wms. Dyar, Mr., Tut. 
1816 Wms. Willard 

1816 Bro. Thomas P. 

1817 Harv. George, Mr., Tut.— P. D. at Got, 
1823 Dart. —Benjamin, M. D. 

1831 Harv. Amos B., M. D. 



1771 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 
1777 Harv. Edward 

Banister 
1700 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1797 Dart. William B., Mr. 

Banks 
1732 Yale Gershom 
1758 Yale Eliphalet, Mr. 

1804 Yale Daniel C, Mr. 
1809 Yale Daniel, Mr. 
1822 Yale — Talcot, M. D. 

Bannister 
1764 Harv. John, Mr. 

Barber 
1730 Yale Jonathan, Mr. 
1762 Yale Thomas, Mr., and at N. J. '77 
1801 Dart. —Daniel, Mr. 

1805 Dart. Isaac B. 

1824 Wms. —Franklin, M. D. 
1826 Yale Eldad, Mr: 
1826 Amh. Israel L. 

1829 Mid. Edward D. 

1830 Wash. Horace B. 

1831 Bow. —Joseph S., M. D. 
1831 Amh. Abel L. 

Barbour 

1818 Harv. James 

1819 Mid. Isaac R., Mr. 

1830 Bow. Francis 

1831 Mid. Edwin M. 
1831 Mid. Nelson 

Barclay 
1734 Yale Henry, Mr.— D. D. at Oxf. 
1830 Yale George G. 

Bar den 
1647 Harv. John 

Bardwell 
1814 Dart. —Horatio, Mr. 



Barker 
1736 Yale Samuel, Mr. 
1742 Yale Nehemiah, Mr. 

1771 Yale \\Joseph, Mr., and at Harv. '82, 

[and at Bro. 1805 

1772 Yale Samuel S. A., Mr. 
1772 Harv. Joshua, Mr. 

1777 Yale John, Mr., M. D. 
1808 Bro. William 

1814 Bro. James 

1815 Harv. ||David 

1820 Harv. — Bowen, M. D. 
1822 Harv. Charles O., M. D. 

1822 Dart. Natlmniel, Mr. 

1823 Harv. —Bowen, M. D. 

1824 Dart. —Lemuel M., M. D. 
1824 Wms. —John L., M. D. 
1826 Yale James M„ Mr. 

1828 Yale —William, M. D. 

1829 Dart. —Thomas C, M/D. 
1834 Wat. Francis 

Barlow 

1778 Yale Joel, Mr., LL. D. at Geo. 

1808 Yale Milton 
1824 Harv. David H. 

Barnaby 

1809 Bro. James 

Barnard 
1642 Harv. Tobias 
1679 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1700 Harv. John, Mr. 
1709 Harv. John, Mr. 
1732 Harv. Thojnas, Mr. 
1736 Harv. Edward, Mr. 
1759 Yale Lemuel, Mr. 
1762 Harv. John, Mr. 

1766 Harv. Thomas, Mr.— D. D. at Edin. 
1766 Harv. ' Ebenezer, Mr. [and at Bro. '94 
1766 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1773 Harv. Jeremiah, Mr. 

1773 Harv. Moses, Mr. 

1774 Harv. Edward, Mr. 
1818 Wms. Daniel D. 
1822 Wms. —Robert F., Mr. 

1828 Yale Frederic A. P., Mr., Tut. 

1828 Harv. Charles F., Mr. 

1829 Wms. —Joseph H., M. D. 

1830 Yale Henry 
1832 Harv. Charles F. 

Barnes 
1712 Harv. Peter 
1752 Harv. David, Mr., D. D. 
1764 Harv. Edward 
1780 Harv. David L., Mr. 

1815 Yale Julius S., M. D. 

1816 Bro. George L., Mr. 
1822 Yale Edward F. 
1825 Ver. — Melvin, M. D. 
1825 Yale Josiah, Mr. 

1828 Yale Romulus 

1829 Bow. Phineas, Prof, at Wat. 
1834 Yale Jeremiah R. 

1834 Wms. —John B., M. D. 

Barnett 
1780 Yale John, Mr. 

Barney 
1792 Bro. Bildad, Mr. 
1804 Mid. Charles 
1821 Bro. James O., Mr. 

Barns 

1770 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1784 Yale Jonathan, Mr. 

1800 Wms. Joseph 

1804 Ver. Wheeler 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



103 



1810 Yale Jonathan 


1781 Harv. 


John, Mr., M. D. 


1820 Mid. Isaac 0. 


1782 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


Barnum 


1782 Harv. 


Benjamin 


17G8 Harv. —Caleb, Mr., and at N. J. 


1786 Harv. 


John 


Barnwell 
1821 Harv. Robert W.> Mr. 
1824 Harv. William 

Barre 


1788 Yale 


— Jonathan, Mr., 1801 


1789 Harv. 

1790 Dart.* 
1795 Harv. 


Zaccheus 
-HtJosiah, M. D. Gov. ofN.H. 
Josiah, Mr. 


1799 Harv. 


Al)iicr, Mr. 


1817 Harv. — John, M. D. 


1800 Yale 


Shubad, Mr. 


Barreli 


1800 Dart. 


—Joshua, M. B. 


1733 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 


1801 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1809 Yale Samuel B. ; Mr. 


1805 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


Barrett 


1807 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1721 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 


1808 Dart. 


yichabod. Mr. 


1757 Harv. Samuel, Mr., and at Yale '61, 


1809 Harv. 


—Josiah, M. D. 


[LL. D. at Ediu. 


1310 Harv. 


Benjamin D., Mr., M. D. 


1780 Harv. John, Mr., and at Dart. 


1812 Dart. 


James, Mr. 


1794 Dart. Charles, Mr. 


1813 Harv. 


Gorham, Mr., M. D. 


1810 Dart. Joshua 


1815 Dart. 


Richard 


1810 Wms. John 


1816 Harv. 


Josiah, Mr., M. D. 


1313 Wms. Elisha D. 


1818 Harv. 


Sidney, Mr. 


1816 Dart. —Thomas T., M. D. 


1818 Wms. 


Homer 


1818 Harv. John 


1819 Yale 


—John S., M. D. 


1818 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 


1820 Harv. 


Henry, Mr., M. D. 


1819 Harv. Benjamin, M. D. 

1820 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 


1820 Dart. - 


-||Josiah, M. D. 


1821 Dart. 


— Erastus H., M. D. 


1821 Bow. John, Mr., M. D. 


1823 Bow. 


John M. 


1822 Bow. Charles 


1824 Dart. 


—Francis D., M. D. 


1822 Dart. Samuel 


1824 Dart. 


—Josiah, M. D. 


1824 Bow. —John, M. D. 


1826 Bro. 


—Elisha, M. D. 


1825 Wms. —John I., M. D. 


1827 Harv. 


George, Mr , M. D. 


1832 Bow. Benjamin F. 


1827 Dart. 


Levi 


1833 Wms. -Solomon 


1827 Yale 


John L. 


Barritt 
1808 Wms. Lyman 
1309 Wms. William, and at Yale 

Barron 


1828 Yale 


David E.. Mr. 


1828 Bow. 

1829 Dart. 
1829 Dart. 


John C, M. D. at Harv. 
—Ezra, M. D. 
—Peter, M. D. 


1829 Wash. 


Hobart M'C. 


1787 Harv. William A., Mr., Tut. 


1830 Bow. 


— EzekielM.,M. D. 


1788 Harv. Oliver, Mr. 


1831 Dart. 


—Peter, M. D. 


1796 Harv. Thomas 


1831 Harv. 


—John S., M. D. 


Barrows 


1831 Harv. 


— John C., M. D. 


1766 Harv. John, Mr. 


1832 Dart. 


—Ezra, M. D. 


1806 Dart. William, Mr. 


1833 Yale 


Shubael F. 


1811 Mid. Eleazer S., Mr., and at N. J. T7, 


1833 Wms. 


—Elisha, M. D. Prof, at Berks 


[Prof, at Ham. 


1833 Wms. 


— Lvman. M. 1). [M. D. at Bro. 


1815 Bro. —Thomas M., M. D. 


1833 Dart. 


—Levi S., M. D. 


1824 Bro. Ira 


Bartol 


1826 Yale Elijah P., Mr. 


1832 Bow. 


Cyrus A. 


1827 Harv. —Ira, M. D. 


"Roi 


1831 Bow. —Horatio A., M. D. 
1831 Amh. Homer 
1334 Wat. Allen 


xjaiiun 
1730 Harv. John, Mr. 
1788 Bro. William, Mr. 


Barry 


1790 Dart. 


Titus T.. Mr. 


1819 Bro. 


Ira, Mr.— LL. B. at Harv. 


1822 Bro. William, Mr. 


1821 Yale 


David W. B., Mr. 


Barsham 


1831 Amh. 


Samuel D. 


1658 Harv. John 


1831 Dart. 


Frederic A. 


Barstow 


1S33 Dart. 


-Calvin. M. D. 


1801 Bro. George, Mr. 


Bascom 


1807 Bro. Luther 


1764 Yale 


Jonathan 


1808 Bro. Simon 


1768 Harv. 


Aaron, Mr. 


1813 Yale Zedekiah S., Mr. 


1798 Dart. 


Ezekiel L., Mr. 


1832 Harv. Haley F. 


1799 Wms. 


Samuel A.. Mr. 


Bartholomew 


1802 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1731 Yale Andrew, Mr. 


1803 Dart. 


Samuel. Mr. 


1778 Yale Phinehas 


1807 Mid. 


Ira, Mr., Tut. 


1822 Yale Isaac 


1807 Wms. 


John 


Bartlett 


1813 Wms. 


Raijnolds, Mr., Tut. 


1730 Yale Moses, Mr. 


1828 Yale 


Flavel, Mr., Tut. 


1747 Harv. John H. 


Bass 


1749 Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 


1715 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


1753 Yale —John, M. D. '99 


1737 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1763 Yale Moses 


1744 Harv. 


Edward, Mr.— D. D. at Penn. 


1764 Yale Elihu 


1761 Harv. 


John 



104 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1782 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr., and at Dart. '90 


1804 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1815 Dart. 


— SethyM. 1). 


1819 Harv. 


William H., Mr. 


1825 Mid. 


—William, M. D. 


1829 Mid. 


— Zaccheus, M. D. 


1832 Mid. 


William M. 


Bassett 


1719 Harv. 


Nathan, Mr. 


1746 Yale 


Ebenezer, Mr. . 


1784 Yaie 


Amos, Mr., Tut.— D. D. at Wms. 

[1817 

—John, and at Columb. — D. D. at 


1786 Yale 


1796 Yale 


Archibald [Columb. 


1803 Bro. 


Anselm 


1804 Wins. 


—John, D. D. 


1807 Yale 


Benjamin 


1810 Harv. 


Francis, Mr. 


1823 Yale 


Martin B., Mr. 


1824 Dart. 


— Thomas, M. D. 


1834 Wilis. 


George W. 


Bastow 


1802 Bro. 


Sumner 


Batchelder 


1815 Harv. 


—John P., M. D., & at Wms. '26.— 


1821 Dart. 


Zachariah [Mr. at Mid. '21 


1825 Dart. 


—Calvin, M. D. 


1827 Dart. 


John 


1830 Dart. 


Jacob 


Bates 


1738 Harv. 


Edward 


1794 Yale 


Elijah 


1797 Bro. 


Liberty 


1797 Harv. 


Daniel 


1800 Harv. 


Joshua, Mr., & at Bro. '13— D. D. 




[at Yale '18— Pres. of Mid. 


1801 Yale 


Henry 


1802 Yale 


||Isaac C, Mr. 


1807 Harv. 


David, Mr. 


1810 Bro. 


William, Mr. 


1812 Wms. 


Charies F. 


1813 Harv. 


—George, M. D. 


1314 Bro. 


— Barnabas, Mr. 


1817 Harv. 


A polios D. 


1818 Wms. 


Chandler 


1818 Wms. 


Lemuel P. 


1822 Dart. 


James 


1823 Yale 


Talcott, Mr. 


1824 Harv. 


Zeohaniah A. 


1825 Yale 


William G., Mr. 


1826 Wms. 


Stephen, Mr— M. D. at Jeff. 


1827 Bow. 


— Niran, M. D. 


1829 Harv. 


Reuben 


1831 Dart. 


—Joseph N., M. D., A. B. at Amh. 


1832 Mid. 


Joshua 


1833 Harv. 


Charles J. 


1833 Yale 


Samuel H. 


1833 Arnli. 


Philander 


Battell 


1816 Bro. 


Hezekiah 


1823 Mid. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1823 Yale 


—Joseph. Mr., & at Mid. '24 


1826 Mid. 


Philip, Mr.— A. B. Yale 


Battelle 


1765 Harv. 


Nathaniel. Mr., and at Yale 


1775 Harv. 


Ebenezer, Mr. 


Ba 


ttey 


1833 Bow. 


— Benjamin A.,M. D. 


Battle 


1808 Yale 


Charles I. 


Baxter 


1693 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1724 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1725 Harv. 


Gregory 



D.D. at Columb. 



Harv. Stephen, Mr. 
Harv. Thomas M., Mr. 
Harv. Joseph, M D. at N. Y. 
Harv. — John, M. D., and at Penn. 

Bayard 
Wms. —William J., M. D. 

Bayley 
Harv. James, Mr. 
Harv. Isaac 
Harv. James, Mr. 
Harv. Jcsiali, Mr. 
Harv. Isaac, Mr. 
Harv. Samuel P., Mr. 
Dart. Stephen M. 

Bavlies 
Harv." William, Mr., M. D. 
Harv. Hodijah, Mr. 
Harv. Gustavus, Mr. 
Bro. Samuel .W., Mr. 

Dart. Nicholas, Mr. 
Bro. ||William, Mr. 
Harv. William G. 
Harv. —Alfred, M. D. 

Beach 
Yale John, Mr. 
Yale Samuel, Mr. 
Yale Abraham, Mr. — 
Yale Burrage, Mr. 
Yale John H. 
Wms. James, Mr. 
Yale Samuel B. 
Yale Hezekiah S. 
Amh. Edwards A. 
Yale Isaac C. 
Yale —Samuel, M. D. 
Mid. Ebenezer C. 

Wms. Nathaniel 
Yale John C. 

Beadle 
Yale Samuel S. 

Beal 
Harv. Thomas P., Mr 
Harv. Henry 

Beale 
Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

Bean 
Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
Dart. Stephen 
Harv. Horatio, Mr. 
Dart. Joshua 
Dart. Aaron 
Dart. Asa 
Dart. John V. 
Bow. —Edward, M. D. 



1788 
1813 
1815 
1818 

1830 

1669 
1701 
1719 
1752 
1781 
1791 
1798 

1760 
1777 
1784 
1791 
1794 
1795 
1806 
1817 

1721 
1757 
1757 

1793 
1804 
1804 
1805 
1812 
1824 
1826 
1826 
1826 
1832 
1833 

1759 

1806 
1825 

1787 

]748 
]798 
1800 
1804 
1804 
1805 
1832 
1833 

Bearce 
1834 Bow. —Simon L., M. D. 

Beard 

1817 Yale John 

1824 Amh. Spencer F. 

Beardsley 
1734 Yale —Ebenezer, Mr. 
1787 Yale Horatio, Mr. 
1805 Yale Nehemiah B. 
1815 Yale Samuel B. 

1818 Yale Cyrus H. 

1825 Yale —Gideon, M. D. 

1826 Yale Henry C, M. D. 

1827 Yale Nelson, Mr. 

1828 Yale Sheldon, Mr , M. D. 
1332 Wash. Eben E. ; Tutor 

Beattie 
1795 Harv. Andrew, Mr., and at Bro. 



1834.] 



Bcauford 
1318 Yale diaries 

Beaumont 
1834 Yale George A. O. 

Bebee 

1802 Wins. Steward, Mr. 

Beckford 

1805 Harv. Ebenezer H. ; Mr., & at Bow. 7 0G 

Beckley 

1803 Yale Hosea, Mr. 

Beckwith 
1723 Yale George, Mr. 
1766 Yale Nathaniel B., Mr. 
1766 Yale George, Mr. 
1773 Yale Baruch, Mr. 
1822 Mid. George C, Prof. 

1827 Wms. Baruch B. 
1829 Bow. —Addison, M. D. 

Beddome 

1770 Bro. — Benjamin, Mr. 

Bedon 

1806 Bro. Richard B. 

Beebe 
1745 Yale James, Mr. 
1759 Yale Asa 

1771 Yale Lewis, Mr. 
1785 Yale David L., Mr. 
1810 Wms. Walter B. 
1824 Dart. Richard, Mr. 

1828 Yale Levi S., Mr. 
1833 Wms. Hubbard 

Beech 

1833 Bow. Thomas P. 

Beeeher 

1797 Yale Lijman, Mr., 1809— D. D. at Mid. 

1804 Wms. David [1818. Pres. Lane Sem. 
1822 Yale Edward, Mr., Tut.— Pres. of llli- 
1828 Yale George [nois Coll. 

1834 Bow. Charles 
1834 Amh. Henry W. 

Beeckman 
1802 Wms. Cornelius, Mr. 
Beede 

1798 Hai v. Thomas, Mr. 

Beeman 
1832 Bow. Samuel 

Beers 
1785 Yale William P. 
1808 Yale Timothy P., Mr., M. D., Prof. 
1817 Yale John P. 
1824 Yale — Augustin P., M. D. 

Belcher 
1659 Harv. Samuel 
1690 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1699 Harv. ^Jonathan, Mr., & at N. J. 1748— 
[Gov. of Mass. N. H. & N. J. 
1717 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1723 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1724 Harv. Andrew, Mr. 

1728 Harv. ^Jonathan, Mr. at Camb. & at 
1814 Bro. Manning [Dub. & at N. J. '56 
1323 Bro. Caleb, Mr — M. D. at Harv. 
1828 Wat. —Hiram, Mr. 
1832 Amh. Nathan 

Belden 
1726 Yale Samuel, Mr. 
1743 Yale Joshua, Mr. 
1751 Yale Thomas, Mr. 
1751 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
1762 Yale Simeon, Mr. 
1775 Yale Ezekiel P., Mr. 
1785 Yale David 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



105 



1787 Yale 


Joshua 






I79fi Yale 


Joseph 






1796 Yale 


Jonathan, Mr., & at Dart. 18 


17% Yale 


Hezekiao 






1803 Yale 


William, Mr. 






1814 Yale 


George 






1821 Yale 


Lemuel W., Mr 


,M. 


D. 


1824 Yale 


Thomas 






1 825 Yale 


Joshua, Mr. 






1829 Yale 


— Cbauocy, M. D. 






1833 Yale 


Stanton 






Beldincr 






1833 Amh. 


Pomeroy 






1834 Wms. 


— Ruius, M. D. 






Belin 






1821 Harv. 


Allard H., Mr. 






Belknap 






1762 Harv. 


Jeremy, Mr., D. 


D. 




1785 Yale 


Ebenezer 






1807 Dart. 


Zedekiah, Mr. 






1816 Mid. 


Horatio 






Bell 






1779 Yale 


Benjamin, Mr. 






1793 Dart. 


t*SAMUEL, Mr.— 


LL. 


D. at Bow. 




[1821— Gov. 
[in Cong. 


ofN 


. H. & Sen. 








1804 Mid. 


Jonathan 






1807 Dart. 


Joseph 






1809 Mid. 


Harvey, Mr. 






1816 Harv. 


Samuel D. 






1822 Bow. 


James 






1823 Bow. 


—John, M. D.— A 


. B. 


at Union. — 
[Prof. Ver. 


1823 Bow. 


Luther V., M.D. a 


1825 Dart. 


—John, M. D. 






1823 Wms. 


—John L., M. D. 






1828 Wash. 


William H. 






1832 Amh. 


James 






1833 Wms. 


—William C, M. 


D. 




Bellamy 






1735 Yale 


Joseph, Mr.— D. 


D. at i 


1772 Yale 


Jonathan 






1808 Yale 


Joseph H., Mr. 






Bellinorharn 






1642 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr., M 


D. 


at Leyden 


1661 Harv. 


John, Mr. 






Bellows 






1793 Dart. 


John 






1813 Ver. 


Ira 






1826 Dart. 


—George, M. D. 






1327 Dart. 


Thomas 






1829 Harv. 


—Albert J., M.D 






1832 Harv. 


Henry \V. 






Belton 






1769 Bro. 


Joseph 






Beman 






1807 Mid. 


Nathan S. S., 


Mr 


— D. D. at 


1818 Mid. 


Carlile P., Mr. 




[Wms. : 24 


Bement 






1826 Wms. 


— Jared, Mr. 






1328 Dart. 


William, Mr. 






Bemis 






1795 Harv. 


Seth, Mr. 






1798 Dart. 


Stephen, Mr., Tut. 




1806 Harv. 


Nathaniel. Mr., 


31. D. 


1808 Harv. 


Charles, Mr. 






1828 Harv. 


—David, M. D. 






1830 Harv. 


Jonathan \V. 






1834 Harv. 


Jonathan W., 31. D 




Bender 






1796 Han-. 


Jotham 






1809 Dart. 


Hastings R. 







106 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



Benedict 

1747 Yale John, Mr. 
1769 Yale Abner, Mr. 

1773 Yale Thaddeus, Mr. 

1774 Yale Amos 

1788 Yale Noah B., Mr. 

1797 Yale William 

1800 Yale Amos 

1806 Bro. David, Mr. 

1814 Yale Amzi 

1817 Wms. —Joel T., Mr. 

1818 Wms. George W., Mr., Tut.— Prof, at 
1821 Wms. Erastus C., Mr., Tut. [Ver. 

1821 Yale A/anson 

1822 Yale Henry, Mr. 
1829 Wms. William W. 
1834 Yale Lewis St. J. 
1834 Wms. James L. 

Benjamin 
1788 Yale De Lucena 

1829 Wash. Park 

1830 Harv. James 

1831 Wms. Nathan 

1832 Wms. —Samuel C, M. D. 

Bennet 

1726 Yale Cornelius, Mr. 

1748 Yale Daniel, Mr. 

1802 Harv. — William, D. D. 

1803 Mid. —Archibald, Mr. 

1806 Harv. Joseph 

1807 Yale Joseph, Mr. 

1810 Yale Isaac K. 

1811 Yale Milo L. 

1815 Mid. Salmon 

1825 Yale Lawrence T., Mr., '31 
1825 Yale —James, D. D. 

1827 Bow. — Gilman L., M. D. 

1828 Wms. —Ezra P., M. D. 

1832 Harv. Joseph 

Bennett 

1818 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1830 Wms. — Alden I., M. D. 

Benson 
1806 Bro. Martin 

1808 Harv.— -lltEgberl, LL. D. at Union 1799, 

1812 Dart. Abishai [& at Dart. 1811 
1825 Bow. Samuel P., Mr. 

1831 Bow. —John, M. D. 

Bent 
1822 Harv. Josiah 
1831 Harv. Nathaniel T. 

Bentley 
1777 Harv. William, Mr., Tutor, D. D.— 
1790 Bro. Jasper [Mr. at Dart. '87 

1824 Amh. Charles 

Benton 
1814 Wms. Albert S. 

1833 Wash. George 

Berdan 

1824 Yale James 

Bernard 
1767 Harv. Thomas, Mr.— LL. D. at Edin. 
1828 Harv. Arthur H. H. 

Berry 
1685 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1712 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1793 Yale Heman 
1833 Bow. —John A., M. D. 

Bertram 

1825 Dart. —John, M. D. 

Bestor 

1813 Yale Dudley P. 

1816 Yale —John, M. D. 



Bethune 
1734 Harv. Nathaniel. Mr. 
1740 Harv. George, Mr. 
1780 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1821 Harv. Horlon, Mr. 

1831 Harv. George A. 

1832 Harv. John McL. 

1834 Harv. —George A., M. D. 

Betton 

1787 Dart. ||Silas, Mr. 
1814 Dart. Ninian C. 
1820 Dart. Thornton 

Betts 
1745 Yale Thaddeus, Mr., M. D. 

1806 Wms. ||Samuel R. 

1807 Yale Thaddeus, Lieut. Gov. of Conn. 
1818 Wms. Daniel J. 

1834 Wms. —Frederick J., Mr. 
Bickens 

1796 Bro. —James, Mr. 

Bicknell 
1825 Dart. Simeon, Mr. 

Bidwell 
1740 Yale Adonijah, Mr. 

1785 Yale ||Barnabas, Mr., and at Wms. '97 ; 

[Tutor.— LL D. at Bro. 1805 
1814 Wms. Lawson D. 

1816 Wms. Adonijah 
1827 Yale Walter H. 
1834 Yale Oliver B. 

Bigelow 
1766 Harv. Jacob, Mr. 

1786 Harv. Timothy, Mr. 

1801 Harv. Tyler 

1802 Yale Henry— Mr. at Mid. '11 

1803 Wms. Daniel 
1803 Wms. HLewis 

1806 Harv. Jacob, Mr., M. D. ; Prof.— M. D. 

1814 Harv. Andrew, Mr. [at Penn. 

1815 Harv. John P., Mr. 

1817 Bro. Jonathan 

1818 Dart. —Luther, M. D. 

1819 Harv. Elijah 

1820 Harv. Thaddeus B., Mr. 
1820 Yale George N., Mr. 
1823 Harv. Asahel 

1829 Harv. George T. 

1831 Harv. Rufus 

1831 Wms. —Reuben M., M. D. 

Biglow 
1765 Harv. Silas, Mr. 
1769 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 
1775 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 
1782 Harv. Abraham 

1794 Harv. William, Mr. 

1795 Dart. ||Abijah, Mr. 

1809 Harv. Horatio, Mr. 

1810 Harv. Alpheus, Mr. 
1814 Dart. Silas 

1827 Dart. Abner P. 

Billings 

1698 Harv. Richard, Mr. 

1720 Yale William, Mr. 

1724 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 

1731 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

1765 Yale William, Mr. 

1766 Yale Caleb 
1772 Yale Elisha 

1775 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

1791 Bro. Barnabas 

1797 Yale Joseph 

1798 Wms. William 
1803 Dart. Jesse L. 
1805 Wms. Israel 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



107 



1819 Yale Noyes 


Bissel 




1821 Yale William W. 


1733 Yale Hezekiah, Mr. 




1825 Harv. — Benjamin, M. D. 


175J Yale Joseph. Mr. 




1829 Yale Silas 


1762 Yale Hezekiah, Mr. 




1834 Amh. Henry W. 


1793 Vale Hezekiah W. 




Bingaman 


1793 Dart. Benjamin 




1812 Harv. Adam L. 


1806 Vale fClark 




1824 Harv. John F. 


L816 Yale — Asaph, M. D. 




Bingham 
1782 Dart. Caleb, Mr. 


1819 Yale Jonathan H. 




1823 Yale Samuel 




1789 Dart. Solomon 


1826 Yale — Benjamin, M. D. 




1790 Yale Silas L., Mr. 


1826 Yale — Henry 11., M. D. 




1801 Dart. James H., Mr. 


1830 Yale Samuel B. S. 




1805 Mid. Amos, Mr. 


Bixby 




1816 Mid. Hiram, Mr., at Yale '19 


1791 Harv. Joseph 




1820 Mid. Albert 


1812 Dart. John 




1821 Mid. Luther, Mr. 


1817 Harv. —Alfred 




1824 Yale — Zaccheus W., M. D. 


Blackaller 




Binney 


1829 Wms. Henry 




1774 Bro. Barnabas, Mr. 


Blackington 




1797 Harv. Horace, Mr., & at Bro.— LL. D. 


1788 Bro. Jesse 




1821 Bro. Amos, Mr.— M. D. at Harv. ; 23 


1826 Bro. Jason B. 




1828 Yale Horatio, Mr. 

Birch 


Blackleach 




1751 Yale Hudson, Mr. 




1828 Yale — Georgius, M. D. 
Birchard 


Blackman 
1663 Harv. Benjamin 




1811 Yale Ely 


1793 Yale Samuel C. 




Birchett 


1817 Yale Ebenezer 




1827 Harv. —Robert, LL. B. 


1828 Yale Alfred 




Birchmore 


Blackmer 




1816 Bro. —William, M. D. 


1834 Dart. Joel 




Bird 


1834 Wms. Willard 




1768 Yale Jonathan, Mr. 


Blagden 




1776 Yale Samuel, Mr. 


1823 Yale George W. 




1782 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 


Blague 
1714 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
1750 Yale Elijah, Mr. 

Blair 
1767 Harv. —Samuel, Mr.— A. B. at N 




1786 Yale ||John 
1809 Harv. Samuel 
1809 Ver. John H. 




1812 Mid. Gustavus A., Mr. 
1816 Yale Isaac, Mr. 


. J. '60. 


1829 Bro. John H. 


1810 Yale Asa [—Tut. & D. D. 


at N.J 


Birdsall 
1815 Wms. John 
Birdseye 


1833 Wms. George T. 

Blaisdell 
1817 Dart. Silas 
1827 Dart. Daniel 




1736 Yale Nathan, Mr. 


1829 Bow. —Jacob, M. D. 




1804 Wms. ||Victory 


Blake 




Birge 
1825 Yale Chester, Mr. 


1711 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1769 Harv. James 




Bisbee 


1784 Harv. Caleb 




1814 Bro. John 


1786 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 




Bisco 


1789 Harv. George, Mr. 




1798 Dart. Abijah 


1789 Harv. Francis, Mr. 




1831 Amh. Thomas C. 


1803 Bro. Aaron 




Bishop 
1665 Harv. Samuel 


1812 Bro. John L., Mr. 




1814 Harv. Francis A., Mr. 




1776 Harv. John 


1816 Yale Eli W., Mr. 




1778 Yale Abraham, Mr. 


1821 Harv. William H. 




1787 Yale John, Mr. 


1824 Harv. Edward, Mr. 




1795 Wms. Samuel 


1824 Bow. —Calvin, M. D. 




1796 Yale Timothy 
1801 Bro. Lemuel 


1826 Dart. —Jeremiah, M. D. 




1827 Bow. Samuel H. 




1803 Dart. — Beriah, M. B. 


Blakeley 




1807 Bro. Lorenzo 


1828 Wash. Ebenezer 




1817 Wms. Henry W., Mr. 


Blakeman 




1819 Yale Elijah, Mr., M. D. 
1822 Wms. Charles, Mr. at Wash. 


1832 Yale —William N., M. D. 




1826 Yale Ebenezer H., M. D. 


Blakesley 




1827 Bro. James 


1785 Yale Solomon 




1830 Yale Alexander H. 


1785 Yale Tillotson 




1832 Wash. Ebenezer C. 


Blanchard 




1833 Yale Noah 


1796 Harv. Charles, Mr. 




Bispham 


1797 Harv. William 




1830 Yale John 


1802 Han\ Francis, Mr. 





108 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1807 Dart. 


Abijah, Mr., and at Mid. '22 


1812 Dart. 


John 


1817 Harv. 


Ira H. T., Mr., Tut. 


1818 Dart. 


—Enoch, M. D. 


1820 Harv. 


—Abijah, Mr. 


1821 Yale 


JNathaniel 


1826 Yale 


Amos, Mr., Tut. 


1832 Mid. 


Jonathan 


1834 Harv. 


Henry 


Blanding 


1796 Bro. 


Abraham, Mr. 


1801 Bro. 


William, Mr., M. D, 


Blaney 


1751 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1778 Harv. 


Joseph 


Blass 


1823 Dart. 


—Richard. M. D. 


Blatchford 


1796 Yale 


— Samuel, Mr.— D.D. at Wms.1808 


Blatchley 


1816 Yale 


—Abraham, M. D. 


Bliss 


1710 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1732 Yale 


Daniel, Mr., and at Harv. '38 


1755 Yale 


Moses, Mr. 


1756 Yale 


Lewis, Mr. 


1760 Yale 


Nezias 


1760 Harv. 


Daniel, Mr. 


1761 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1763 Harv. 


fJonathan, Mr. 


1766 Yale 


Aaron, Mr. 


1784 Yale 


George, Mr.— LL. D. at Harv. 


1787 Yale 


Enos, Mr. [1823 


1790 Yale 


William M. 


1794 Dart. 


Bezaleel 


1795 Yale 


Oliver 


1801 Dart. 


Lemuel, Mr. 


1806 Yale 


Edmund 


1808 Harv. 


John 


1808 Dart. 


Jesse 


1808 Wms. 


John F. 


1812 Yale 


Alexander 


1812 Yale 


George 


1812 Mid. 


Stephen 


1818 Harv. 


William 


1819 Mid. 


—James C, Mr. 


1822 Yale 


Judah L — M. D. at Wms. '25 


1822 Bro. 


—George W., M. D. 
Jonathan 


1824 Dart. 


1825 Ver. 


— Hosea, M. D. 


1825 Dart. 


—Hiram, M. D. 


1825 Yale 


William, Mr. 


1826 Bro. 


Zenas, Mr. 


1828 Amh. 


Isaac 


1829 Amh. 


Asher 


1829 Wms. 


—Clark W., M. D. 


1830 Yale 


— Seth, Mr. 


1831 Yale 


Daniel N. 


1831 Amh. 


Richard 


Blodget 


1783 Dart. 


Joseph 


Blodgett 


1805 Mid. 


Luther P., Mr. 


1815 Dart. 


Van 


1820 Ver. 


Heman M. 


1826 Dart. 


Constanline, Mr. 


1829 Amh. 


Harvey 


1831 Wms. 


John 


Blood 


1800 Dart. 


Mighill 


1812 Dart. 


Samuel 


1821 Harv. 


Oliver H., Mr., M. D. 


1828 Dart. 


Daniel C. 



Bloodgood 
1787 Yale Francis 

Bloom 
1803 Yale George, Mr., '14 

Bloss 
1807 Bro. Samuel, Mr. 
1823 Dart. —Richard, Mr, 

Blowers 
1695 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1721 Harv. Pyam, Mr. 
1763 Harv. fSamson S., Mr, 

Blunt 
1727 Harv. John, Mr. 

Boardman 
1709 Yale Daniel, Mr. 
1758 Yale Benjamin. Mr., Tutor 
1781 Yale Daniel, Mr., and at N. J- 'S4. 
1793 Yale David S., Mr. 
1799 Wms. William 
1812 Yale William W. 
1815 Dart. Elderkin J. 
1815 Wms. William 

1817 Dart. John 

1818 Dart. Elijah 

1819 Yale —Charles A., Mr. 

1822 Wat. George D., Mr., Tut. 

1823 Dart. George 

1823 Yale Frederic W. H., Mr. 

1825 Yale —Daniel H., M. D. 

1826 Harv. John H., M. D. 
1829 Yale Henry A. 
1829 Yale John F. 

1831 Dart. —Elijah, M. D. 

Boccee 
1809 Yale Jacob 

Bodurtha 
1814 Bro. Daniel 

Bodwell 
1805 Harv. Abraham 

1824 Bow. —John A., M. D. 
1829 Bow. —Mortimer, M. D. 
1833 Dart. Joseph C. 

Bogart 

1826 Yale William H. 

Bogert 

1820 Yale Cornelius R.— M. D. at N. Y. 

Boggs 

1827 Amh. George W. 

Bogue 
1808 Yale —David, D. D. 

Boice 
1826 Wms. Harper 

Boies 
1783 Harv. Jeremiah S., Mr. 
1801 Wms. William, Mr., at Mid. "05 

1808 Wms. Joseph, Mr. 

1809 Wms. Patrick 

1816 Wms. Artemas, Mr. 

Boise 
1826 Wms. —Otis, M. D. 
Bolkom 

1817 Bro. Everett 
■ Bolles 

1801 Bro. Lucius, Mr.— D. D. at Union '25 
1806 Yale George W., Mr. 
1808 Bro. Abiel, Mr. 
1819 Bro. —David, M. D. 
1823 Bro. Asa 

1828 Bro. Lucius S., M. D. at Harv. '31 

1828 Amh. William 

1829 Bro. John A. 

1830 Wash. James A. 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



109 



Bolton 
17G9 Bro. —William, Mr. 

1817 Bro. —George A., Mr. 
1829 Mid. Richard R. 

1833 Harv. Thomas 

1834 Harv. Thomas 

Boltwood 

1773 Harv. Ebenezer 

1814 Wms. Lucius 

Bonaparte 
182G Harv. Jerome N. 
Bond 

1766 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1772 Harv. Nathan, Mr. 
1797 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1801 Harv. Thomas 

1813 Dart. Henry, Mr., M. D., Tut. 

1815 Bro. Alvan, Mr., Prof. Bangor 
1825 Yale Thomas H. 

1828 Bow. Francis E. ; Mr. 

Bonesteel 
1827 Yale Virgil D. ; Mr. 

Bonney 
1805 Wms. William 
1824 Dart. Benjamin W. 

Bonticou 
1757 Yale Daniel, Mr. 

Booge 

1748 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 

1774 Yale Aaron J, Mr. 
1787 Yale Publius V., Mr. 

Boorom 

1816 Bro. George W. 

Booth 
1774 Bro. —Abraham, Mr. 
1810 Yale Chauncy, Mr. 
1816 Yale Reuben 
1819 Yale David, Mr. 

Boott 

1810 Harv. Francis, Mr. 
1831 Harv. Francis 

Borden 
1821 Harv. — Aldolphus K., M. D. 

Bordman 
1719 Harv. Andrew, Mr. 
1737 Harv. Andrew. Mr. 

1767 Harv. Aaron, Mr. 

Bordwell 
1756 Yale Joel, Mr. 

Borland 
1772 Harv. John L. 
1774 Harv. Francis, Mr. 
1786 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

Borrowe 

1818 Yale Samuel, Mr.— M. D. at N. Y. 

Bosch 
1732 Yale John 

Bosson 
1723 Harv. William, Mr. 

1811 Harv. Charles T. 

Bostwick 
1729 Yale Ephraim, Mr. 

1762 Yale Gideon, Mr. 
1774 Yale Jared, Mr. 
1780 Yale Samuel, Mr. 
1796 Yale Charles 

Bosworth 

1736 Harv. Bellomy, Mr. 

Botsford 

1763 Yale Amos, Mr., Tut. 
1792 Yale William, Mr., '98 

VOL. VII. 



1802 Bro. 


— Edmund, Mr. 


1811 Yale 


Abie! K. 


1816 Yale 


—Russell, M. D. 


1818 Yale 


David 


Bottom 


1802 Bro. 


Frederic W. 


Boudinot 


1790 Yale - 


-||Klias, LL. D.— Prcs. of Cong. 


1805 Dart. 


— Tobias, Mr. 


Bourn 


1722 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1779 Harv. 


Silvanus, Mr. 


Bourne 


1720 Harv. 


Shearjashub, Mr. 


1743 Harv. 


Shearjashub, Mr. 


1743 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1744 Harv. 


Nathaniel 


1764 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


1764 Harv. 


Shearjashub, Mr. 


1775 Harv. 


||Benjamin, Mr.— LL. D. at Bro. 


1799 Bro. 


Allin, Mr. [1801 


1800 Bro. 


Benjamin F.. Mr. 


1816 Bow. 


Edward E., Mr. 


1818 Bow. 


Israel W. 


1819 Bow. 


Thomas P., M. D. 


1819 Harv. 


George S. 


1825 Bro. 


Herman 


Bours 


1747 Harv. 


Peter, Mr. 


Boutell 


1800 Harv. 


Timothy, Mr. 


1806 Harv. 


Caleb 


1808 Dart. 


John, Mr. 


1819 Yale 


—Thomas R., M. D. 


Boutelle 


1828 Amh. 


Asaph 


1829 Amh. 


Thomas 


Bouton 


1821 Yale 


Nathaniel, Mr. 


Boutwell 


1828 Dart. 


William T. 


Bowditch 


1802 Harv. 


—Nathaniel, Mr., LL. D. '16 


1822 Harv. 


Nathaniel I., Mr. 


1828 Harv. 


Henry I., Mr., M. D. 


Bow-doin 


1735 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1745 Harv. 


*James, Mr., and at Yale '50.— 




[LL. D. and at Edin.— Gov. 




[of Mass. 


1771 Harv. 


James, Mr. [Yale '26 


1814 Bow. 


James, Mr., &. at Harv. '18, & at 


Bowen 


1757 Yale 


Jabez, Mr., & at Bro.'69 — LL.D. 




[at Dart. 1800.— Lieut. Gov. 




[of R. I. 


1762 Harv. 


Pemiel, Mr. 


1763 Harv. 


Benjamin 


1766 Yale 


William, Mr., at Bro. '70 


1775 Bro. 


Pardon, Mr., M. D. 


1782 Yale 


Obadiah 


1786 Bro. 


Oliver. Mr. 


1788 Bro. 


tJahez.'Mr. 


1793 Bro. 


George C. 


1797 Bro. 


Horauo G., Mr., Prof. 


1802 Bro. 


Henrv 


1802 Bro. 


William W. 


1803 Harv. 


—Nathaniel, Mr.— D. D. at Penn., 




[and at S. C. 


1803 Bro. 


William C, Mr.,at Union.— M.D. 


1816 Mid. 


Luke [at Edin., Prof. 


1816 Bro. 


Isaac, Mr. 


1821 Harv. 


—Samuel. M. D. 


1822 Yale 


George T. 




15 



110 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1829 Mid. —Silas, M. D. 
1833 Harv. Francis 
Bowers 

1649 Harv. John 

1733 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

1769 Harv. William, Mr. 

1779 Harv. Andrew, Mr. 

1794 Harv. James 

1819 Yale —Benjamin, M. D. 

1832 Yale John 

Bowes 
1725 Harv. Nicholas, Mr. 

Bowles 
1671 Harv. John, Mr. 
1702 Harv. John, Mr. 
1744 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 

1822 Bow. —Green B. ; M. D. 

Bowman 

1724 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1728 Harv. Edmund, Mr. 

1755 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1761 Harv. Joseph, Mr., and at Dart. 1802 

1764 Harv. William, Mr. 

1766 Harv. Joshua 

1772 Harv. Phinehas 

1782 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 

1786 Harv. Nathaniel 

1790 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1794 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1817 Ver. Francis 

1823 Bow. Edmund B. 

Boyd 
1796 Harv. William 
1810 Bow. George W., Mr. 

1812 Bow. John P., Mr. 

1820 Harv. William, Mr. 

1821 Yale John 

1826 Dart. Isaac, M. D. at Bow. '29 

1826 Bow. Samuel S. 

1827 Wms. —Nathan, M. D. 

1831 Yale James McH. 

Boyden 

1825 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 

1826 Dart. Wyatt C., M. D. 

1827 Dart. William 

Boyle 

1806 Harv. George W., Mr. 

1807 Yale John 

1813 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 

Boylston 
1724 Harv. Zabdiel, Mr. 

Boynton 
1804 Harv. Abe!, Mr. 
1822 Bow. John 
1825 Bow. Alden 

1832 Bow. —James C, M. D. 

1779 Yale ||Jonathan, Mr. 
1801 Yale Thomas K., Mr. 

1804 Yale Joab, Mr., '08 
1812 Wms. John P., Mr. 

1831 Amh. Jonathan 

1832 Yale Seth C. 

Brack enbury 
1664 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

Braekett 

1752 Harv. Joshua, Mr., M. D, 

1789 Dart. Ebenezer, Mr, 

1797 Harv. Joshua 

1800 Dart. Joseph W., Mr. 

1805 Dart. James, Mr. 
1815 Wms. Joseph, Mr., Tut. 
J827 Dart. —Cornelius T. S., M. D, 



Bradbury 
1757 Harv. fTheophilus, Mr. 
1789 Harv. ]|George, Mr. 
1809 Dart. William 
1823 Bow. — Samuel C, M. D. 
1825 Bow. James W., Mr. 
1827 Bow. —Nathan A., M. D. 

1829 Bow. —James C,, M. D. 

1830 Bow. Bion 

1831 Bow. —Samuel M., M. D, 
1831 Amh. Elbridge, Tutor 
1834 Wat. Charles W, 

Bradford 
1713 Harv. Perez, Mr. 
1760 Harv. Williams, Mr, 
1771 Harv. Andrew, Mr. 

1773 Harv. William 

1774 Harv. John, Mr. 

1775 Bro. James, Mr. 
1779 Yale Jeremiah 
1779 Dart. Jeremiah 

1785 Dart. Moses, Mr. 

1786 Harv. Alden, Mr., Tutor 
1796 Dart. Ebenezer G. 

1800 Bro. John 31., Mr., and at N. J. '04.— 
[Tut. at N. J.— D. D. Union 
['12 

1803 Harv. Ephraim P. 

1811 Dart. James 

1814 Harv. Samuel D., Mr. 

1814 Harv. Gamaliel, Mr., M. D. 

1815 Harv. Daniel N., Mr.— Tut. at Trans, 

1816 Harv. William J. A., Mr. 

1818 Dart. Samuel C, 

1819 Harv. —Gamaliel, Mr. 
1822 Harv. Thomas G. 
1S24 Harv. Duncan 

1825 Harv. George P., Mr. 
1825 Bow. Richmond, M. D. 
1825 Amh. Moses B. 
1827 Amh. Ebenezer G. 

1827 Wat. Freeman 

1828 Bro. Milton, M. D. at Harv. '31 
1830 Wms. Thomas 

1832 Dart. —David, M. D. 

1833 Yale Edward A. 

1834 Wat. Zabdiel 

Bradish 
1769 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1773 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 
1792 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1804 Wms. Luther 

Bradlee 
1827 Harv. Frederic H. ; Mr. 

Bradley 
1723 Yale Abraham, Mr. 
1758 Yale Philip B., Mr. 
1775 Yale ||Stephen R., Mr., & at Dart.'86, 
1784 Yale William [LL. D. at Dart. 

1789 Yale Dan 
1789 Yale Joel, Mr. 

1795 Harv. Caleb, Mr. 

1796 Dart. William 

1797 Yale Ezra 

1799 Dart. Samuel A., Mr., & at Harv. 1804 

1799 Bro. Joshua, Mr. 

1800 Yale Jesse 

1807 Dart. Moses H. ; Mr. 

1807 Dart. Micah 

1808 Yale Burr 

1817 Yale — 1| William C, Mr. 

1820 Bow. —Samuel, Mr. 

1821 Yale Joseph H. 

1822 Yale Jonathan D. 
1822 Mid. —Franklin, M. D. 



1834,] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



Ill 



1824 Bro. —William H,, M. D< 
1827 VVms. William 
1831 Harv. Alexander R. 
1831 Harv. Cliarles 
1831 Yale Alvin 0. 

Bradshaw 
17G9 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1780 Harv. Parkman 

Bradstreet 
1653 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1660 Harv. Simon, Mr. 
1693 Harv. Simon, Mr. 
1698 Harv. Dudley, Mr. 
1700 Harv. Simon 
1725 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1728 Harv. Simon, Mr. 

1791 Dart. Nathan, Mr. 

1792 Harv. Dudley S., Mr. 

1795 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. ; M. D. 
1819 Dart. Stephen I., Mr. 
1834 Yale Thomas J. 
1834 Harv. Edward 

Bragg 
1813 Mid. Seneca C. 

Brailsford 
1817 Harv. Daniel H. ; Mr., '27 

Brainard 
1732 Yale JVelmniah, Mr. 
1746 Yale John, Mr. 
1763 Yale Nehemiah 
1763 Yale Hezekiah 
1779 Yale fJeremiah G. 
1797 Yale Israel 
1802 Yale William F., Mr. 
1808 Yale John, Mr. 
1810 Yale Dyer T. 

1817 Dart. Martin 

1818 Yale Eleazar, Mr. 

1822 Yale Joseph H. 

1823 Yale —Austin, M. D. 

Brainerd 
1731 Yale Chiliab, Mr. 
1783 Yale Jehu 
1785 Dart. Elijah, Mr. 

1793 Yale Hezekiah 
1815 Yale John G. 

1828 Bow. —David E. A., M. D, 
1830 Yale Timothy G. 
1834 Yale Davis S. 
Braman 

1794 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 
1815 Bro. Dana A. 

1819 Harv. Milton P. 

Brandegee 
1833 Yale Elishama 

Branden 
1742 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

Brattle 

1676 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1680 Harv. William, Mr. 
1722 Harv. William, Mr. 
1760 Harv. Thomas, Mr., & at Yale ; 69, and 
[at N. J. '69 
Bray 
1765 Yale Thomas W., Mr. 

1795 Yale Oliver, Mr., & at Bow. 1806 

Brayton 

1824 Bro. George A. 

1825 Wms. —Thomas A., M. D. 

Brazer 
1813 Harv. John, Mr., Tut. and Prof, 

Breck 
1700 Harv. Robert, Mr. 



1730 Harv. Robert, Mr. 

1742 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1756 Yale Robert, Mr. 

1758 Yale Darnel B., Mr. 

1761 Yale George, Mr. 

1812 Dart. Daniel 

1818 Yale Joseph H. 

1830 Wms. Edward 

1831 Harv. Samuel 

Breed 
1768 Yale John McC, Mr., and at N. J. 11 
1778 Yale Sbubael, Mr. 
1781 Yale Simeon, Mr. 
1831 Yale William J. 

Breese 
1789 Yale — Arturus 
1789 Yale —Samuel S. 

Brenan 
1825 Harv. Richard 

Brenton 
1707 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr, 

Brewer 
1687 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 
1727 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

1762 Yale Chauncy 
1765 Yale Daniel. Mr. 

1793 Yale Eliab, Mr., at Wms. '99 

1804 Harv. John, Mr. 

1814 Harv. Nathaniel, M. D. 

1816 Harv. George M. 

1821 Yale Josiah, Mr., Tut. 

1823 Yale Edwin, Mr. 

1824 Yale Eliab 

Brewster 
1642 Harv. Nathaniel, B. D. at Dab, 

1763 Yale Cyrus, Mr. 

1786 Dart. William 
1792 Dart. Benjamin 
1797 Dart. Walter 
1806 Yale Ichabod 

1822 Yale Joseph M. 

1824 Bow. —Stephen C., M. D. 
1828 Bow. Charles R., Mr., '33 
1828 VVms. Marshall 

1830 Yale —William A., M. D, 
1834 Wms. Oliver E. 

Brian 
1804 Wms. John O. 

Bridge 
1712 Harv. — Thomas, Mr. 
1724 Harv. Edward, Mr. 
1733 Harv. Christopher, Mr. 
1736 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1741 Harv. Matthew, Mr. 
1758 Harv. Josiah, Mr. 

1764 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1782 Harv. Nathaniel 

1787 Harv. James, Mr. 
1816 Harv. Samuel. Mr. 
1818 Bow. Edmund T., Mr. 

1825 Bow. Horatio, Mr. 

Bridges 

1822 Bow. Otis L. 

1826 Wms. Samuel A. 

Bridgham 
1669 Harv. John, Mr. 
1719 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1726 Harv. James, Mr. 
1736 Harv. Powning, Mr. 
1794 Bro. Samuel \V., Mr. 

1823 Bow. —Rowland H., M. D. 

Bridgman 
1762 Harv. Thomas, Mr., and at Yafe f S5 



112 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1795 
1822 
1826 
1826 
1827 

1828 
1830 

1718 

1831 

1657 
1764 

1764 
1767 
1775 
1786 
1788 
1791 
1794 
1794 
1795 
1799 
1803 
1804 
1804 
1808 
1815 

1816 
1818 
1820 
1820 
1821 
1825 
1828 
1829 
1831 
1831 

1764 
1778 
1778 
1778 
1779 
1788 
1806 
1810 
1819 
1825 
1826 
1829 
1833 

1770 

1817 

1802 
1803 
1814 

1827 

1744 
1775 
1818 

1745 

1772 



Dart. Joseph, Mr., and at Wms. 1800 

Dart. Benjamin H., M. D. '"26 

Yale Frederic, M. D. Harv. ; 30 

Amh. Elijah C. 

Wins. Ansel 

Bridgeman 
Harv. —John B., M. D. 
Dart. John R. 

Bridgwater 
Harv. Edward, Mr. 

Brien 
Wash. Henry 

Brigden 
Harv. Zachariah, Mr. 
Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Briggs 
Harv. Ephraim, Mr. 
Harv. Zephaniah, Mr. 
Yale James, Mr. 
Bro. Joel, Mr. 
Bro. John 

Harv. Ephraim, Mr. 
Bro. Timothy 

Bro. William, Mr. 

Bro. Isaac 
Dart. William, Mr. 
Wms. Calvin, Mr., and at Harv. '06 ; 
Bro. Richard, Mr. [M. D. Harv. ; 07 
Bro. Lemuel W. 

Bro. Otis, Mr. 

Harv. Charles, Mr., and at Bow. '17 ; 
[Tut. at Bow. 
Bro. Avery, Mr., Prof, at Wat. 
Bro. —Tyler, M. D. 
Bro. Moses 
Bro. —John R., M. D. 
Harv. Cyrus, Mr., M. D. 
Bro. George W., Mr. 
Wms.— ||George N., Mr. 
Harv. — Isaac S., M. D. 
Wms. — Lansing, M. D. 
Wms. —Henry, M. D. 

Brigham 
Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
Dart. ||Eiijah, at Yale '92, and at Harv. 
Dart. Eli, Mr. ['94 

Dart. Moses, Mr. 
Dart. Samuel, Mr. 
Harv. Joseph, Mr., and at Dart. '88 
Dart. —Paul, Mr., Lieut. Gov. of Ver. 
Harv. David, Mr., and at Bow. ; 15 
Wms. John C, Mr. 
Harv. Benjamin 
Harv. Alanson, Mr. 
Harv. William 
Wms. Levi 

Bright 
Harv. Henry, Mr. 

Brimblecom 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

Brimmer 
Harv. John A., Mr. ; and at Yale '05 
Harv. George W. 
Harv. Martin, Mr. 

Brinckerlioff 
Yale George 

Brinley 
Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
Harv. Francis 
Harv. Francis 

Brinsmade 
Yale Daniel, Mr. 
Yale Daniel N., Mr. 



1813 Yale James B. 
1822 Yale Horatio N. ; Mr. 

1826 Bow. Peter A. 

Brintnal 
1721 Yale William, Mr., and at Ham. 
1727 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Brinton 
1816 Yale John S. 

Bristol 
1760 Yale Simeon, Mr. 
1798 Yale fWilliam 

1813 Yale Moses, M. D. 
1825 Yale William B. 

1827 Yale Albert G., M. D. 

Britton 
1820 Dart. — Abiathar G. ; Mr. 
1832 Dart. John G. 

Brock 
1646 Harv. John, Mr. 

Brockway 
1768 Yale Thomas, Mr. 
1797 Yale Diodate, Mr. 
1820 Yale John H. 

Brodhead 
1815 Wms. William W. 

1825 Dart. —John M. ; M. D. 

Bromfield 

1742 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

Bronson 

1786 Yale Tillotson, D. D. at Bro. 1813 

1797 Yale Bennet 

1798 Yale Enos, Mr. 

1818 Yale Oliver, M. D. at N. Y. 
1823 Harv. Frederic 

1826 Yale Jesse, M. D. 

1827 Yale — Henry, M. D. 
1829 Y r ale Thomas 

Brooks 
1749 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1755 Yale Thomas, Mr. 
1757 Harv. Edward, Mr. 
1768 Yale David. Mr. 
1780 Harv. William, Mr. 

1787 Harv.*— John, Mr., and at Yale.— M. D., 

[LL. D. at Harv., Gov. of 
[Mass. 

1788 Dart. Thomas 
1794 Harv. Daniel. Mr. 
1805 Harv. John, Mr. 
1809 Harv. Nathan 
1812 Harv. Edward, Mr. 
1814 Harv. Gorham, Mr. 

1814 Wms. Asa, Mr. 

1815 Y r ale Levi 

1816 Harv. Charles, Mr. 

1817 Bro. Aaron, Mr., Tut. 

1819 Yale — David B., M. D. 
1819 Harv. Sidney, Mr. 
1822 Harv. — Orville, M. D. 
1822 Harv. Ward C, Mr. 

1825 Ver. —Pascal P., M. D. 

1826 Dart. —Lyman, M. D. 

1827 Harv. William H. 

1828 Wat. James 
1832 Harv. Charles T. 

1832 Harv. —William F., M. D. 

Broome 
1786 Yale Samuel P., Mr., and at N. J. '86 

Brown 
1697 Harv. Richard 
1709 Harv. Samuel 
1712 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1714 Harv. John, Mr. 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



113 



1714 Yale 
1722 Harv. 
1725 Ilarv. 

1728 Yale 

1729 Yale 
1729 Harv. 

1735 Harv. 

1736 ilarv. 
1711 Ilarv. 
1713 Harv. 
1717 Yale 
1741] Harv. 
1749 Yale 
1749 Yale 
1752 Harv. 
17G1 Harv. 
1763 Harv. 
1765 Harv. 
1768 Harv. 

1770 Bro. 

1771 Bro. 
1771 Yale 
1773 Bro. 
1778 Dart. 
1780 Harv. 

1782 Bro. 

1783 Harv. 

1783 Yale 

1784 Yale 

1786 Bro. 

1787 Dart. 
1789 Dart. 

1789 Yale 

1790 Bro. 
1793 Harv. 

1793 Yale 

1794 Dart. 
1794 Harv. 
1797 Harv. 
1797 Harv. 

1797 Harv. 

1799 Harv. 

1800 Yale 

1801 Yale 
1801 Bro. 
1804 Harv. 
1804 Harv. 

1804 Harv. 

1805 Dart. 



1806 Bro. 
1806 Yale 
1808 Bro. 

1808 Yale 

1809 Yale 
1809 Dart. 
1811 Bro. 

1811 Mid. 

1812 Harv. 

1812 Yale 

1813 Yale 
1813 Harv. 

1815 Wms. 

1816 Bro. 
1816 Bro. 

1816 Mid. 

1817 Harv. 
1817 Mid. 
1817 Yale 

1819 Wms. 

1820 Bow. 

1820 Yale 

1821 Yale 

1822 Harv. 



Daniel, Mr., Tut. 

Nathaniel 

John, Mr. 

John, Mr. 

Isaac, Mr., and at Columb. 

JHmothy, Mr. 

Josiah, Mr. 

Josiah, Mr. 

John, Mr. 

Cotton, Mr. 

James, Mr., and at N. J. '50 

Ward 

Aaron, Mr. 

Samuel, Mr., and at Columb. 

Thomas, Mr. 

Josiah, Mr. 

Joseph, Mr. 

Elijah, Mr. 

Moses, Mr. 
—Joseph, Mr., Prof. 

Micah 

John, Mr. 
— Jolin, Mr. 

Ebenezer 

James, Mr., and at Dart. '91, and 

Obadiah [at Bro. '92 

William, Mr. 

Daniel, Mr., '91 

William 

Nicholas, Mr. 

Ebenezer, Mr. 

Jonathan, Mr. 

William, Mr. 

Moses, Mr., and at Yale 

Samuel, Mr., M. B. 

Pardon 

James 

Luke 

Thaddeus 
—Clark, Mr., and at Yale '94, and 
[at Bro. '97, and at Dart. ; 99 

Samuel, Mr. 

Bartholomew, Mr. 

Daniel B. 

Erastus E. 

Enoch, Mr. 

Elijah 

Oliver, Mr. 

Henry, Mr. 

Francis, Mr., Tut.— D. D. at 
[Wms. '19, &. at Ham. : Pres. 
[of Dart. 

John B., Mr.— M. D. at Harv. ; 13 

Rawlins L. 

Elias 

Henry 

Garrett G. 

John, Mr., Tut.— D. D. at Union 

Nicholas, Mr. P27 

iJTitus, Mr. 

Charles, Mr. 

Solyman, Mr., '17 

Ebenezer, Mr., and at Harv. '22 

John 

Jonas 

John C, Mr. 

John C. 

Ambrose L., Mr. 
— Artemas, M. D. 

Joseph, 31 r. 

Nehemiah, Mr. 

Nelson, Mr., M. D. 

Theodore S., Mr. 

Mason 

Waldo, Mr. 
— Ebenezer, Mr. 



1823 
1823 
1823 
1825 
182S 
1826 
1826 
1826 
18^6 
1827 
1827 
1827 
1827 
1827 
1828 
1828 
1829 
1829 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1832 
1832 
1832 
1832 
1833 
1833 
1834 
1834 

1666 
1725 

1727 
1727 
1755 
1830 



Bow. William, Mr. 

Yale -Samuel W., M. D. 

Dart. Abraham. Mr. 

Wins. Robert 

Wins. — Ambrose, M. D. 

Yale Thaddeus, Mr— M. D. at Harv. 

Yale —Henry C, M. D. 

Harv. Addison 

Bow. —John G., M. D. 

Bow. Enoch L. 

Bow. — Sylvanus, M. D. 

Dart. — SewalJ, M. D. 

Dart. —Henry B., M. D. 

Wms. Nathan, Mr. 

Amh. Andrew M. 

Amh. Hope 

Bow. — Chauncy, M. D. 

Dart. —William K., M. D. 

Dart. George W. 

Dart. —Stephen, M. D. 



1809 
1813 

1827 

1761 
1762 
1809 
1810 
1811 

1781 
1786 
1813 
1814 
1823 

1826 

1831 

1817 
1819 

1793 
1794 
1795 
1804 

1740 
1819 
1829 

1739 
1747 



Samuel G., Mr. 
James F. 
—Asa B., M. D. 
Amos 
Samuel R. 
—Levi C, M. D. 
Isaac 

Gardner S. 
Benjamin F. 
Browne 
Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Benjamin, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. 
William, Mr. 
t # William, Mr. — Gov. of Bermuda 
John W. 
Brownell 

Thomas C., D. D., LL. D., Pres. 
Ver. Chauncv, Mr. [of Wash. 

Ver. Grove L., & at Yale.— Mr. '16 

Brownfield 
Wash. John W. H. 

Brownson 
Yale ||*Nathan, Gov. of Geo. 
Yale David 
Ver. Eli, Mr. 

Ver. John [Columb. 

Ver. — Abraham, Mr., & at Mid., &. at 



Dart. 

Wms. 

Wms. 

Dart. 

Yale 

Wms. 

Amh. 

Dart. 

Amh. 



Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 



Bruce 



John, Mr. 
||Phinehas 
-Nathaniel F., M. D. 

Charles H., and at Harv. '15 

Henry A. 



Dart. 
Yale 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Harv, 

Brundage 
Y r ale — Abner, Mr. 

Brune 
Harv. Frederic W. 

Brunson 

Mid. — Abraham, Mr. 
Dart. David M. 

Brush 
Y'ale Per-Lee 
Dart. Elijah 
Yale Samuel S. 
Y r ale David 

Bryan 
Y T ale Joseph, Mr. 
Mid. Joseph 
Yale — Elijah F., M. D. 

Bryant 

Harv. Lemuel, Mr. 
Yale AVUliam, Mr. 



114 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1796 Ero. Bever 

1806 Wms. —Peter, Mr.— M. D. at Harv. 7 18 
1814 Bro. Reuben 

1819 Wms. —William C. ; Mr. 

1830 Harv. John, Mr. 

1831 Amh. Hillyard 

Bryson 

1769 Bro. —James, Mr. 

Buck 
1718 Yale Daniel, Mr. 

1799 Darl. — 1| Daniel, Mr. 

1807 Mid. ||Daiiiel A. A.,Mr.,& at Dart. '23 

1823 Yale David, Mr. 

1830 Mid. — Amasa, Mr. 

1832 Bow. —James M., M. D. 

Buckingham 

1690 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1693 Harv. Stephen, Mr., & at Yale 1702 

1714 Yale Jedidiah, Mr. 

1718 Yale Isaac, Mr. 

1723 Yale Joseph, Mr. 

1735 Yale Daniel, Mr. 

1765 Yale Gideon, Mr. 

1779 Dart. Jedidiah P. ; Mr., & at Mid. 1807 

1804 Yale Naboth 

1831 Harv. Edgar 

1833 Yale Samuel G. 

1834 Harv. Caleb A. 

Buckland 
1831 Wash. Harlehigh 
Bucklin 

1805 Bro. Sylvester F., Mr. 

1824 Bro. George A. 
1824 Bro. —Hiram, M. D. 
1826 Bro. —Thomas, M. D. 

Buckminster 
1739 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1770 Yale Joseph, Mr., Tut-— D. D. at N. 

1800 Harv. Joseph S., Mr. [J. 1803 

1804 Harv. Jones 

1315 Harv. Lyman, Mr. 

Bucknam 
1721 Harv. Nathan, Mr. 
1737 Harv. David 

1806 Dart. Asa, Mr., & at Harv. '11 

Burlington 
1834 Yale William I. 

Buel 
1741 Yale Samuel, Mr.— D. D. at Dart '91 
1778 Yale Aaron, Mr. 

1805 Wms. David, Mr. 

1810 Wms. —William, Mr.— M.D. at Yale '19 
1823 Mid. Julian G. 
1830 Mid. Alexander W. 
1833 Wms. Samuel 

Buell 

1749 Yale Peter 
1809 Dart. Horatio 
1819 Ver. Samuel 
1826 Yale William P., Mr. 
1826 Yale —Samuel, M. D. 

Buffett 
1791 Yale Piatt 
1812 Yale William P. 
1819 Yale William L., Mr. 

Buffum 

1807 Dart. ||Joseph, Mr. 

Bugbee 

1802 Bro. Samuel, M. D. '16 
1818 Yale Francis 

Bulfinch 
1718 Harv. Adino, Mr. 
1746 Harv. Thomas, Mr., M. D. & at Edin. 



1781 Harv. 
1812 Harv. 
1814 Harv. 
1817 Harv. 
1821 Harv. 



Charles, Mr.. 
John, Mr. 
Thomas, Mr. 
George S. 
Henry 



Bulkley 

1642 Harv. John, Mr. 

1655 Harv. Gershom, Mr. 

1660 Harv. Peter, Mr. 

1699 Harv. John, Mr. 

1726 Yale fJohn. Mr. 

1737 Yale Nathan, Mr. 

1766 Yale Noah, Mr. 

1769 Harv. John, Mr. 

1770 Yale Gershom, Mr. 
1785 Yale Peter 

1810 Yale Joseph, Mr. 

1810 Yale Sylvester, M. D. at Dart. 7 13 

1817 Yale Chauncy, Mr. 

1819 Yale Ichabod 

1821 Yale Henry D., Mr., M. D. 
1824 Yale Eliphalet A. 

1824 Wms. George W., Mr. 

1833 Wash. George R. 

1833 Amh. John 

Bull 

1723 Yale Nehemiah, Mr. 

1765 Yale Jonathan, Mr. 

1777 Yale William 

1806 Yale Thomas 

1813 Yale Norris, Mr., '18 

1816 Yale Edward, Mr., Tut. 
1819 Yale Norman, Mr. 

1822 Wms. George 
1826 Wms. John St. J. 

1826 Yale Edward C, Mr. 

1827 Yale George F. 

Bullard 

1742 Harv. Adam, Mr. 

1776 Harv. John, Mr. 

1787 Yale Eli, Mr. 

1793 Dart. Asa, Mr., and M. D.— M. D. at 

1807 Harv. Henry A. [Harv. 1809 
1810 Yale Royal. Mr. 

1817 Bro. Daniel S. 

1819 Harv. Charles A. 

1823 Bro. Elias 
1826 Amh. Artemas 

1828 Amh. Asa 

1829 Harv. John P. 
1833 Amh. Amos 

Bullen 
1772 Yale Joseph, Mr. 

Bullock 
1798 Bro. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1816 Wms. William A. 

1824 Bro. William P. 
1832 Harv. —Otis, M. D. 

Bump 
1814 Bro. Thomas, M. D. 

Bumstead 
1795 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1820 Mid. Samuel A. 

1830 Harv. —Edward G., M. D. 

Bunker 
1658 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1735 Harv. John, Mr. 

1821 Harv. Charles 
1832 Yale James M. 

Bunnel 

1735 Yale John, Mr. 

1743 Yale Israel, Mr. 

1797 Yale Rufus 

1826 Yale James F. 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



115 



Burbank 
1758 Yale Shem, Mr. 
175 ( J Yale Abraham 
1797 Wms. Asa, Mr., Tut. 
1807 Bro. Leonard, Mr. 
1807 Dart. Jacob 
1809 Bro. Gardner, Mr. 

1821 Dart. Caleb 

1826 Dart. — Alvan, M. D. 

Burbeen 
1731 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1743 Harv. Paul, Mr. 

Burch 
1809 Yale John 

Burden 
1830 Yale Thomas L. 

Burder 
1830 Wms. — Henry F., D. D. 

Burdick 

1822 Bro. James R. 

Burge 

1787 Harv. Josiah 

1805 Harv. Benjamin, M. D.— Mr. at Bow. 

180G Mid. Caleb, Mr. ['15 ; Tut. at Bow. 

B urges 
1796 Bro. ||tTristam ; Mr., Prof., LL. D. 

1820 Bro. Welcome A. 

Burgess 
1800 Bro. Thomas 

1809 Bro. Ebenezer, Mr., Tut. ; Prof, at Ver. 
1814 Yale Archibald 
1818 Yale Anson 

1818 Dart. —Dyer, M. D.— Mr. at Wms. '20 
1822 Bro. Thomas M. 

1826 Bro. George, Mr., Tut. 

1830 Yale — Mowry, M. D. 

1831 Amh. Ebenezer, Mr., Tutor 

Burghardt 
1787 Yale Hugo, M. D. at Harv. 1818 

Burgis 
1758 Yale Thomas, Mr. 

Burhans 
1804 Wms. —Daniel, Mr.— D. D. at Wash. '34 

Burk 
1824 Bow. Frederic W. 

Burke 
1833 Dart. William C. 

Burleigh 
1803 Yale Rinaldo 

Burley 
1742 Harv. Andrew, Mr. 

Burnap 
1770 Harv. Jacob, Mr., D. D. 
1799 Harv. Horatio G., Mr. 

1819 Mid. John L. 

1821 Mid. Uzziah C, Mr. 
1824 Harv. George W., Mr. 
1826 Dart. — Sewall, M. D. 

Burnell 

1735 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1822 Dart. —John, M. D. 
1830 Harv. —Barker, Mr. 

Burnet 
1741 Harv. William 
1798 Yale James, Mr. 
1798 Dart. Archibald 

1824 Dart. Jonathan 

1825 Yale —George W. 

Burnett 

1820 Harv. —Joel, M. D. 



Burnham 



1702 
1709 
1772 
1795 
1798 
1804 
1807 
1816 
1815 
1818 
1820 
1823 
1828 
1829 
1833 

1826 
1826 

1805 
1807 
1813 

1651 

1690 
1697 
1717 
1732 
1734 
1735 
1743 
1753 
1759 
1784 
1809 
1817 
1828 
1830 
1834 

1825 

1771 
1781 
1803 
1826 

1788 
1791 
1818 

1765 
1799 
1800 
1824 
1832 

1670 
1825 

1754 
1757 
1796 
1806 

1824 

1811 
1828 

1736 
1778 
1794 



Harv. William, Mr. 

Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 

Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Dart. Samuel, Mr. 

Harv. John 

Dart. Abraham, Mr. 

Dart. John, Mr. 

Harv. —Samuel, M. D. 

Dart. Amos W., Mr. 

Yale — Zebulon P., M. D. 

Wms. Andrew 

Bow. Jonas, Mr. 

Amh. Thomas 

Dart. Charles G., Mr. 

Amh. John A. 

Burns 

Dart. Samuel A. 
Dart. —William, M. D. 

Burnside 
Dart. Samuel M., Mr.. & at Harv. T7 
Dart. —Thomas, M. D./& Mr. '12 
Dart. James 

Burr 
Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
Harv. fPeter, Mr. 

Samuel, Mr. 

Isaac, Mr. 

William, Mr. 

Moses, Mr. 

Aaron, Mr.— Pres. of N. J. 

David, Mr. 

Isaac, Mr. 
— Thaddeus, N. J. '55— Mr. 

Jonathan, Mr., and at Bro. 1805. 



Harv. 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Harv. 

Yale 

Bro. 

Wms. 

Wash. 

Yale 



James T. 
-Thomas, M. D. 
-Piatt, M. D. 

Eraslus 

William S. 



[—Tut. 



Burrage 
Bro. John 

Burrall 
Yale William, Mr. 
Yale Jonathan 
Yale Thomas D., Mr. 
Yale William P. 

Burrill 
Bro. i James, Mr., LL. D. 
Bro. George R. 

Harv. Samuel 

Burritt 
Yale Blacldeach, Mr. 
Yale Benjamin 
Wms. Eli, Mr. 
Yale Stephen E. 
Yale —Anthony B.. M. D. 

Burrough 
Harv. George 
Bro. William 

Burroughs 
Yale Joseph 

Eden, Mr, 
Richard 



Yale 
Dart. 
Harv. 
Amh. 



and at Dart.— D. D. 
[at Dart. 



Charles, Mr., and at Dart. '11- 
Seth [D. D. at Columb. 

Burrows 
Bro. Latham A., Mr. 
Mid. Stephen R. 
Burt 

Harv. John, Mr. 
Dart. Benjamin 
Yale Timothy, '95 



116 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1798 Wms. Gideon 

1804 Wms. Sylvester, Mr. 

1812 Wms. Federal-Mr. at Dart. ? 19 

1824 Amh. Jairus, Mr. 

1825 Amh. George, Mr., ; 29 
1828 Bro. Daniel C. 

1831 Bow. —Joel, M. D. 

Burton 
1777 Dart. Asa, Mr.— D. D. at Mid. 1804 
1790 Dart. Stephen 

1815 Dart. William, Mr. 
1821 Harv. Warren, Mr. 
1828 Wms. — Elisha S., M. D. 
1830 Wms. —Levi, M. D. 

1832 Wms. —Piatt, M. D. 

Bush 
1756 Yale Henry, Mr. 
1789 Dart. John 
1792 Yale Jonathan 
1800 Dart. Alexander 

1802 Yale Ralph I. 
1814 Bow. John 

1818 Dart. George— Mr. at N. J. '23, and 
[Tut. at N. J.— Prof, at N.Y. 
1821 Dart. — Barzillai, M. D. 

Bushnell 
1735 Yale Benajah, Mr. 
1775 Yale David, Mr. 
1777 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 
1797 Wms. Jedidiah, Mr. 
1808 Wms. Calvin, Mr., Tut. 

1826 Mid. Jedidiah S. 

1827 Yale Horatio, Mr., Tut. 

1828 Yale William, Mr. 

Bussey 

1803 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

Buswell 

1821 Dart. Thomas G., Mr. 

Butler 

1651 Harv. Henry, Mr. 

1722 Yale Isaac 

1752 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

1767 Yale Amos, Mr. 

1770 Harv. Zebulon, Mr. 

1785 Yale Frederic, Mr. 

1800 Dart. Caleb, Mr. 

1803 Harv. ||Josiah 

1816 Yale Charles F. 

1823 Yale Anthony W. 

1824 Mid. Calvin 

1825 Yale John S., Mr. 

1827 Wms. —Benjamin F.. Mr. 

1828 Yale —Thomas B., M. D. 

1830 Yale Norman W. H. 

1831 Dart. —William, M. D. 

1833 Yale William A. 

1834 Dart. Calvin 

Butterfield 
1792 Dart. Erasmus 
1796 Dart. Abraham 
1820 Harv. Charles, Mr. 

Butterworth 
1796 Bro. — Lawrence, Mr. 

Buttolph 
1803 Wms. David 

Button 
1823 Mid. Harvey, Mr. 

Buttrick 
1819 Harv. Ephraim 

Butts 

1822 Yale Asa 

Buxton 
1830 Bow. —Benjamin F., M. D. 



Byington 
1821 Yale —Charles, M. D. 
1831 Mid. Joel, Mr. 

Byles 

1725 Harv. Mather, Mr.— I). D. at Aberd. 
1751 Harv. Mather, Mr., and at Yale '57.— 
[D. D. at Oxf. 

Bynum 
1828 Yale , Benjamin S. 

Byram 
1740 Harv. Eliab 

Cabot 
1724 Harv. Marslon, Mr. 
1724 Harv. John, Mr. 
1763 Harv. John, Mr. 
1779 Harv. — George, Mr., Sen. in Cong. 
1788 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1796 Harv. Charles G., Mr. 

1797 Dart. Sebastian, Mr. 
1815 Harv. Joseph S. 

1818 Harv. William P., Mr. 

Cadwell 
1729 Yale Jacob 

Cady 
1807 Bro. James H., Mr. 

Cahoon 
1820 Ver. George C. 

Cairns 

1823 Yale William D., Mr. 

Caldwell 

1757 Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 

1773 Harv. William, Mr. 

1784 Yale Henry 

1784 Yale Henry, Mr. 

1799 Harv. John W., Mr. 

1802 Harv. Joseph B., Mr. 

1814 Dart. Ebenezer B., Mr. 

1817 Dart. Abel 

1818 Harv. Samuel 

1819 Harv. Thomas L., Mr.— Tut. at Trans. 

1824 Bow. Zenas 
1828 Bow. Meritt, Mr. 

1828 Harv. Jacob 

Calef 

1786 Dart. John 

1787 Dart. Jonathan, Mr. 

Caleff 
1777 Bro. Jedidiah 

Calhoun 
1804 Yale ||John C, LL. D., Vice Pres. of 
[U. S., and Sen. in Cong. 
1814 Yale William B., Mr. 
1814 Wms. — George A., and at Harv. 

1829 Wms. Simeon H., Mr., Tutor 

Calking 
1725 Yale James, Mr. 

Call 
1790 Dart. Timothy, Mr. 
1823 Dart. — Royall, M. D. 
1829 Wms. —Moses, M. D. 
1834 Bow. Hamilton M. 

Callender 
1710 Harv. Elisha, Mr. 
1723 Harv. John, Mr. 
1790 Harv. John, Mr. 

Cameron 
1829 Wash. Paul C. 

Camp 
1743 Yale Ichabod, Mr. 
1764 Yale Samuel, Mr. 
1766 Yale Joseph 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES!. 



117 



1773 Yale Abraham. Mr. 

1776 Yale Elisba. Mr. 

1777 Yale John, Mr. 




Carlile 




1809 Bro. 


Thomas, Mr., and at Harv. '14 




1826 Amh. 


Huek. Mr. 


1787 Yale Joseph E., Mr. 




Carlton 


1805 Dart. Joshua. S. 
1810 Ver. David M. 
1822 Yale Albert B. ; Mr. 
1831 Yale Henry B. 
1831 Wash. Riverius 




1806 Yale 
1811 Harv. 
1826 Dart. 
1831 Dan. 
Cai 
1742 Harv. 

1805 Harv. 

1806 Yale 


Henry 

John I., Mr., M. D. 
—Peter C, M. D. 
John L. 


Campbell 
1728 Harv. Olhniel, Mr. 
1761 Harv. Archibald, Mr. 
1783 Bro. Jacob, Mr. 




nes 

John, Mr. 
Francis, Mr. 
Benjamin S. 


1801 Dart. Daniel, Mr. 




Carpenter 


1808 Harv. Edward F. 




1720 Harv. 


Ezra, Mr. 


1812 Dart. Alexander S. 




1730 Harv. 


Comfort, Mr. 


1816 Yale —Harvey, Mr. 




1787 Dart. 


Josiah, Mr. 


1824 Wms. —Robert, M. D. 




1795 Dart. 


Asa 


1833 Yale A B. 




1805 Bro. 


Royal 


1830 Wash. James G. 




1818 Bro. 


Alva 


Candee 
1774 Yale John, Mr. 
1805 Yale Shelden W., Mr. 
1825 Yale —Joel G. ; M. D. 

Caner 




1818 Bro. 


Thomas F., Mr. 




1821 Bro. 

1823 Bro. 

1824 Wms. 
1824 Dart. 


Praper, Mr., M. D. 
—Thomas O. H., M. D. 

John H., Mr., M. D. 
— Epbraim, M. D. 




1824 Yale 


—Nelson, M. D. 


1724 Yale Henry, Mr.— Mr. and D 


D. at 


1825 Yale 


Eber, Mr. 


1736 Yale Richard, Mr. 


[Oxf. 


1826 Wms. 


—Patrick, M. D. 


Canfield 




1827 Bro. 


Simeon B., M. D. at Harv. '30 


1739 Yale Thomas, Mr. 




1828 Yale 


Walter 


1762 Yale John, Mr. 




1829 Bro. 


Benoni 


1772 Yale Thomas 




1829 Bro. 


William B. 


1782 Yale Judson, Mr. 




1830 Dart. 


—Walter, M. D. 


1806 Yale Henry J. 




1830 Wms. 


—Frederick A.,M. D. 


1818 Yale Orlando 




1832 Wms. 


—Eber G., M. D. 


1822 Yale — Arza ; M. D. 




1834 Wms. 


—Israel D., M. D. 


Canning 




Carrigain 


1830 Wms. Ebenezer S., Mr. 




1794 Dart. 


Philip, Mr. 


1834 Wms. Edward W. B. 




Carrington 


Cannon 




1767 Yale 


Edward, Mr. 


1803 Wms. Josiah W., Mr. 




1786 Yale 


Samuel 


1825 Amh. —Frederic E., at Union '22, 


Mr. 


1800 Yale 


Abijah 


Cantey 
1796 Yale James 




1816 Yale 


—Jesse, M. D. 




1822 Yale 
1828 Yale 


George, Mr. 
—Edwin W., M. D. 


Capen 




1832 Mid. 


Edward 


1677 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 




Carroll 


1782 Harv. Theophilus, Mr. 




1808 Bro. 


Abiel L. 


1810 Harv. Lemuel, Mr. 




1813 Harv. 


William 


1827 Harv. Aaron D., Mr. 




1827 Dart. 


—Carlo C, M. D. 


Capers 




Carruth 


1814 Yale Charles W., Mr.— M. D. at S. C. 


1832 Yale 


James H. 


1822 Harv. Thomas F. ; Mr. 




Carson 


Caperton 
1832 Yale Allen T. 




1818 Harv. 


William A. 




Cartee 


Capron 




1825 Bro. 


Cornelius S., Mr. 


1823 Bro. —George, M. D. 




Carter 


1834 Wash. David J. 




1660 Harv. 


Samuel 


Carew 




1786 Bro. 


Benjamin B v Mr. 


1828 Wash. Simon S. 




1797 Dart. 
1805 Wms. 


Ezra, Mr. 
Bushnell 


Carey 




1811 Dart. 


Nathaniel H. ; Mr. 


1797 Bro. Nathan, Mr. 




1813 Dart. 


Abiel, Mr. 


1800 Dart. John F. 




1S13 Harv. 


William F. 


1806 Bro. — William, D. D. 




1816 Dart. 


Laicson, Mr. 


1815 Dart. Maurice, Mr. 




1817 Harv. 


Sewall, Mr. 


1828 Bow. —Nelson H., M. D. 




1817 Harv. 


Thomas D. 


Cargill 




1819 Mid. 


Galen C Mr. 


1814 Bow. James 




1819 Harv. 


Charles S. 






1820 Harv. 


James G., Mr. 


Carle ton 




1821 Dart. 


William C. 


1803 Dart. —Edmund, M. B. 




1322 Yale 


—Samuel, M. D. 


1822 Dart. Edmund, Mr. 




1824 Harv. 


Charles H. 


1824 Dart. Oliver, Mr., Tot. 




| 1824 Bow. 


—Ezra, M. D, 


VOL. VII. 






16 



118 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1828 Yale William, Mr., Tut. 


Chadbourne 




1829 Mid. Paschal, Prof, at Ohio 


1808 Dart. 


Ichabod R., Mr. 




1829 Yale Bernard M. 


1813 Dart. 


—Thomas. M. D. 




1830 Harv. Henry W. 


Cflpddnrk 




1831 Bow. —Benjamin, M. D. 
1834 Dart. —William F., M. D. 


1791 Dart. 


Calvin, Mr., & at Bro. 1801 


1834 Dart. —Sylvester, M. D. 


ChaawicK 




Cartland 


1770 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 




1816 Dart. Samuel, Mr. 
Carver 


1821 Yale 
1825 Dart. 
1830 Dart. 


— Joseph, M. D. 
George, Mr., M. D. 
William 




1816 Yale — Hartwell, M. D. 


CJjQflFoo 




1833 Yale Robert 
Cary 


1309 Yale 


Hezekiah B., Mr. 




1810 Yale 


Samuel G..Mr. 




1731 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 


CholLroi. 




1733 Harv. Henry, Mr. 
1755 Yale Samuel 
1761 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 


1728 Yale 
1834 Yale 


Isaac, Mr. 
Henry 




1763 Harv. Richard, Mr. 


Chamberlain 




1797 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 


1765 Yale 


Theoj/hilus 




1798 Bro. Lucius, Mr. 


1793 Harv. 


||John C, Mr., at Dart. 1805 


1804 Harv. Samuel, Mr., and at Yale '05 


1804 Bro. 


Jason, Mr., and at Bow. 


7 06, at 


1811 Harv. Thomas G., Mr.' 




[Ver. '11, and Prof. 


at Ver. 


1816 Harv. Robert H., M. D. 


1814 Mid. 


Remembrance, Mr. 




1824 Bow. — Tolman, M. D. 


1816 Dart. 


Mellen 




1825 Bow. —Luther, M. D. 


1818 Dart. 


William, Mr., Prof. 




1832 Amh. Josiah A. 


1822 Mid. 


Hiram, Mr. 




Caryl 

1761 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

1788 Harv. George 

1831 Harv. — Lucian W., M. D. 


1823 Dart. 


John, Mr. 




1826 Mid. 

1827 Dart. 
1827 Bro. 


Edmund 
— Levi, Mr. 

Mellen 




Case 
1733 Yale Benajah, Mr. 


Chambers 




1830 Yale 


— Ezekiel, Mr., LL. D 


'33.— 


1757 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 




[Sen. in uong. 


1758 Yale Jonas, Mr. 


Champion 




1798 Bro. —Benjamin W., Mr. 


1751 Yale 


Judah, Mr. 




1821 Yale William 


1817 Yale 


Aristarchus 




1822 Yale Francis H, Mr. 


1817 Yale 


—Henry, Mr. 




1826 Yale —Lyman, M. D. 


1831 Yale 


George 




1828 Yale Joel T. 


Champlin 




1831 Wash. JohnR. 


1786 Harv. 


Christopher G., Mr.— 


Sen. in 


Casey 


1808 Mid. 


Samuel 


[Cong. 


1828 Yale Edward W., Mr. 


1810 Yale 


Christopher 




Castle 


Champney 




1825 Yale —Andrew, M. D. 


1721 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 




1834 Wms. —Alfred, M. D. 


1762 Harv. 


Ebenezer 




Caswell 


1821 Bro. 


—John S., M. D. 




1822 Bro. Alexis, Mr., Prof, at Columb. 


Chandler 




1832 Mid. Jesse 


1728 Harv. 


James, Mr. 




Catlett 


1735 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 




1829 Yale Fairfax 


1743 Harv. 


John, Mr. 




Catlin 
1779 Yale Daniel 
1784 Yale Jacob, Mr., D. D. 
1784 Yale Russell 
1786 Yale Lynde 
1820 Yale John M. 
1321 Wms. Jacob 
1822 Yale Charles T., Mr. 
1825 Yale Abijah 

Caulkins 


1745 Yale 


Thomas B., Mr., & at 


Oxf.— 


1747 Yale 
1753 Yale 
1763 Harv. 
1766 Harv. 
1763 Harv. 
1772 Harv. 

1772 Yale 

1773 Yale 
1775 Harv. 
1779 Harv. 


Joshua, Mr. [D. D. 

John, Mr., & at Dart. 19- 

Charles C. 

Rufus, Mr. 

Nathaniel, Mr. 

William 

John, Mr. 

William, Mr. 

Samuel, Mr. 

Samuel 


at Oxf. 
-Tut. 


1788 Yale John 


1787 Harv. 


John, Mr. 




1825 Wms. Alonzo, Mr., Tut. 


1787 Harv. 


Thomas 




Caverno 


1787 Harv. 


Gardner L., Mr. 




1831 Dart. _ Sullivan 


1790 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 




Cazier 


1792 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 




1793 Dart. Matthias, Mr., A. B. at N. J. '85 


1795 Bro. 


Pel eg 
Abiel 




Cenas 


1798 Harv. 




1825 Harv. Joy B., Mr. 

Center 


1801 Harv. 
1805 Dart. 


William, Mr. 
John 




1806 Yale 


Rufus, Mr. 




1818 Mid. Samuel 


1806 Harv. 


Abiel, Mr. 




Chace 


1807 Harv. 


Joshua, Mr. 




3.830 Bro. George L 


1807 Ver. 


Anuviah 





1834] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



Lit 



1810 
1814 
1815 
1818 

1822 
1822 
1821 
1826 
1827 
1828 
1829 
1831 
1831 
1831 
1834 

1781 

1781 
1791 
1798 
1807 
1812 
1819 
1829 

1779 
1786 
1788 
1788 
1790 
1791 
1803 
1804 

1805 
1805 
1805 
1808 
1808 
1811 
1813 
1813 
1814 
1814 
1814 
1816 
1817 
1817 
1819 
1819 
1826 
1826 
1828 

1829 

1763 
1772 
1778 



Yale 
Ver. 
Bro. 
Haw 

Hat v. 

Harv. 

J Sow. 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Mid. 

Dart. 



John 
— Benjamin, M. D. 

Anson G , Mr. 

George L., Mr. 
— Alpheua 6., M. D. 

Samuel W. 

Charles P. 

George B. 

Samuel A. 
— John L. 

Oliver P. 
Dart. — Wolcotl C. ; M. D. 
Vale —George, M. D. 
Harv. —Herman, M. D. 
Wat. — Lucius 
Bow. Beleg VV. 

Charming 

Yale —William, Mr., A. B. at N. J. '69 

Henry i Mr., Tut. 

Francis D., Mr. 

William E., Mr., D. D. 

Henry W., Mr. 
—Waller, M. D., & at Penn.— 
—Edward T., Mr., Prof. [Prof. 

William H. 



Yale 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 



Chapin 



Dart. 
Dart. 
Yale 
Yale 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Mid. 
Harv. 



Sewall 
—Pelatiah, Mr. 

Calvin, Mr.,Tut.— D.D. at Union, 

David [1815 

Uriel 

Joel 
Walter, Mr., Tut. 

Stephen— D. D. at Bro. '22; Prof. 
[at Wat. &, Pres. at Columb. 

Reuben 

Oliver, Mr., Tut. 

Cyrus 

Selh, air. 

Perez 

Moses, Mr. 

Chester, Mr., at Union '18 

Thomas P. 

Ephraim 

Phinehas J. 

Henry D., Mr. 

William A., Mr. 

James, Mr. 

Augustus L. 

Edward, Mr. 

Graham H. 
-Charles O. C, M. D. 

Alonzo, Mr.— M. D. at Penn. '31 

Jason 
Chaplain 
Wash. William R. T. 

Chaplin 
Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 
Harv. Daniel, t Mr., D. D. 
Yale Benjamin, at Harv. '79— Mr. at 

[Yale 

Jeremiah, Mr., Tut., D. D. at 
[S. C. 1819— Pres. of Wat. 
Harv. —James P., M. B. . M. D. '11 
Ver. John H., Mr. 
Yale Jonathan E., Mr. 
Wat. John F. B., Mr., Tut. 
Wat. Jeremiah 
Harv. —Charles F., M. D. 

Chapman 
1707 Yale Daniel, Mr. 

1737 Yale John 

1738 Yale Daniel, Mr. 

1761 Yale —Benjamin, Mr., A. B. at N.J. '54 

1762 Yale Jedidiah, Mr., at N . J. '65 



Wms. 

Wms. 

Bro. 

Bro. 

Mid. 

Yale 

Bro. 

Mid. 

Wms. 

Wms. 

Yale 

Dart. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Harv. 

Amh. 

Amh. 



1799 Bro 



1805 
1806 
1808 
1825 
1828 
1829 



1763 Yale 


Zachariah 


1766 Yale 


llizekiah, Mr. 


1784 Dart. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


L78SJ Yale 


Daniel 


1792 Vale 


fAsa, Mr. 


1797 Vale 


Elisba 


1799 Yale 


Ezekiel J., Mr. 


1803 Dart. 


Luther 


1801 Dart. 


George T., and at Yale, Mr. — 


1805 Yale 


Henry [D. D. at Transylv. 


1811 Dart. 


Thomas F. 


1815 Wms. 


Robert II. , D. D. at Wms. '15 ; 




A.B. at N.J. 1789. Pres. of 




N. C. 


1816 Yale 


Epupliras, Mr. 


1821 Wms. 


—Henry D., M. D. 


1825 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1826 Yale 


James D., Mr. 


1828 Yale 


Frederic W., Mr. 


1828 Harv. 


George 


1829 Wms. 


— Solomon, M. D. 


1830 Amh. 


Alvan W. 


1832 Harv. 


Richard M. 


1832 Amh. 


Mahlon P. 


1833 Wms. 


—Robert 31., 31. D. 


Chappell 


1819 Mid. 


— Absalom H. 


Chardon 


1757 Harv. 


Peter, Mr. 


Charnock 


1743 Harv. 


William 


Chase 


1728 Harv. 


Stephen 


1738 Harv. 


Josiah, Mr. 


1764 Harv. 


Stephen, Mr. 


1767 Harv. 


Simeon, Mr. 


1780 Dart. 


Amos, Mr., & at Yale '95 


1785 Dart. 


Salmon, Mr. 


1786 Dart. 


Baruch, Mr. 


1791 Dart. 


Heber, Mr.— M. B. at Ham. '94 


1791 Dart. 


t Dud ley, Mr. — Sen. in Cong. 


1793 Dart. 


David H. 


1796 Dart. 


Philander, D. D. at Columb.— 


1797 Dart. 


Moses, JMr. [Pies, of Kenyou 


1800 Yale 


Harvev 


1811 Dart. 


Caleb/Mr. 


1813 Harv. 


Charles, Air. 


1814 Mid. 


Benjamin, Mr., at Dart '17 


1814 Mid. 


bah, Mr,,€ol.P*t>f. 


1814 Dart. 


Alexander R. 


1814 Dart. 


Horatio 


1817 Dart. 


Carleton, Mr. 


1817 Yale 


George 


1818 Harv. 


Philander 


1818 Harv. 


George 


1818 Mid. 


—Charles Y., Mr. 


1820 Dart. 


Moses, Mr., at Mid. '26 


1821 Yale 


Paine W. ; Mr. 


1821 Yale 


Simeon 


1821 Mid. 


— Leonard, M. D. 


1821 Bow. 


Plummer 


1822 Harv. 


George E. 


1822 Bow. 


—Hall. 31. D. 


1823 Dart. 


—Henry B., 3Ir. 


1824 Bow. 


—Jonathan, 31. D. 


1825 Bro. 


— Peter, 3Ir. 


1826 Dart. 


Salmon P. 


1827 Dart. 


James 31., 3Ir. 


1829 Yale 


—Alexander R.. 31. D. 


1829 Dart. 


Moody. 31 r. 


1830 Wms. 


—Warren E.. 31. D. 


1831 Dart. 


—Enoch, 31 D. 


1831 Bow. 


—Moses B., Mr. 


1832 Dart. 


Stephen 


1832 Bow. 


Stephen H. 



120 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov, 



1832 Bow. —Charles, M. D. 
Chassel 

1810 Dart. David, Mr. 

Chatfield 
1735 Yale John, Mr. 

Chauncy 
1G51 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 
165 1 Harv. lchubod, Mr. 
1657 Harv. Barnabas, Mr. 
1661 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1661 Harv. Elnathan, Mr. 
1661 Harv. Israel, Mr. 
1686 Harv. Charles, Mr. 
1693 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 
1702 Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 
1721 Harv. Charles, Mr.— D. D. at Edin. 

1723 Yale Ichabod W., Mr. 

1724 Harv. Israel 

1740 Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 
1743 Yale Elnathan, Mr. 

1748 Harv. Charles, Mr. 

1779 Yale — fCharles, Mr.— LL.D.at Mid.1811 
1792 Yale Charles, Mr. 
1796 Yale Elihu, Mr. 
1806 Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 

1819 Harv. Charles W., Mr., M. D. 
1828 Yale Charles 

Checkley 
1715 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1738 Harv. John, Mr. 
1743 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1756 Harv. William, Mr. 

Cheesbrough 
1726 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Cheeseborough 
1755 Yale Peleg, Mr. 

Cheeshahteaumuck 
1665 Harv. Caleb (Indian) 

Cheever 

1659 Harv. Samuel 

1677 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1707 .Harv. Ames, Mr. 

1733 Harv. Ezekiel, Mr. 

1737 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

1741 Harv. Nathan, Mr. 

1749 Harv. Israel, Mr. 

1750 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1771 Harv. William 
1779 Harv. Abijah, Mr. 

1813 Harv. Charles A., Mr., M. D. 

1817 Bow. Ebenezer, Mr., at Union '27 

1825 Bow. George B. 

1834 Bow. Henry T. 

Chenevard 

1788 Yale Michael 

Cheney 

1711 Harv. Thomas 

1767 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1771 Yale Abiel, Mr. 

1795 Dart. Alpheus 

1796 Dart. Abner 
1801 Bro. Joseph 
1821 Harv. John M, Mr. 

Chesebrough 
1817 Yale Robert J., Mr. 

1820 Yale Henry A. 

Chesley 
1819 Bow. Jonathan H. 
Chessman 

1811 Bro. Daniel, Mr. 



Chester 
1721 Yale Stephen J. 



1722 Harv. John, Mr. 
1766 Yale John, Mr., and at Harv. 
1769 Yale Leonard, Mr. 
1780 Yale Stephen, Mr. 
1780 Yale Thomas, Mr., & at Harv. '84.— 

[Tut. 
1804 Yale John, Mr.— D. D. at Union '21 

1813 Yale Stephen M. 

1814 Yale Donald, Mr. 
1818 Mid. Elisha 
1818 Yale Alfred, Mr. 
1831 Yale Orlando 

Cheves 
1826 Harv. Joseph H. 

Chickering 
1774 Harv. Jabez, Mr. 

1799 Harv. Joseph, Mr., and at Mid. 1826 
1804 Harv. Jabez, Mr. 

1818 Harv. Jesse, Mr. 
1826 Mid. John W. 

Chiffelle 
1803 Yale Thomas P. 

Child 
1738 Harv. Stephen, Mr. 
1757 Yale Jeremiah 
1776 Harv. John, Mr. 
1787 Harv. Caleb 
1806 Ver. Gardner, Mr. 
1811 Harv. —Timothy, M. D. 
1817 Harv. David L., Mr. 
1817 Yale Willard, Mr., & at Mid. '51 
1821 Yale Asa 
1821 Dart. Eber 

1823 Harv. Edward V., Mr. 

1824 Yale Linus 

1831 Bow. —Thomas, M. D. 

Childs 
1791 Yale —Francis, Mr., & at Ver. 1812 

1800 Wms. Perry G. 
1800 Wms. David W. 

1802 Wms. Henry H. ; Mr.; M. D. at Harv. 
1806 Wms. James 
1811 Wms. Timothy 
1820 Bro. Abiel 



1825 Wms. —Samuel R 

Chipman 
1711 Harv 



M. D. 



1738 Harv. 
1770 Harv. 
1777 Yale 



John, Mr. 

John, Mr. 
fWard, Mr. 

{Nathaniel — LL. D. at Dart. 
['97 j Prof, at Mid.— Sen. in 



[Cong. 
||Daniel, Mr., 



at Mid. 1808, and 
[Prof. 



1788 Dart, 

1803 Mid. "Henry, Mr. 
1805 Harv. Ward, Mr. 
1808 Mid. Fitch 

1808 Mid. Gustavus D. 

1815 Mid. Silas 
1818 Harv. George 
1823 Mid. John S. 
1828 Mid. Joseph N. 
1832 Dart. Richard M. 

Chisolm 

1816 Bro. John M. 

Chittenden 

1789 Dart. ||*Martin, Gov. of Ver. 
1791 Dart.— *Thomas, Mr., Gov. of Ver. 

1809 Ver. Thomas, Mr. 

Choat 
1703 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
Choate 

1795 Harv. Amos, Mr. 
1816 Harv. —James, M. D. 
1818 Harv. George, Mr., M. D. 



1834] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



121 



1819 Dart. ||Kufus, Mr., Tutor 
1823 Ilarv. Augustus 

1827 Bow. —Charles, M. D. 
Christie 

1815 Dart. Daniel M. ; Mr. 

Christophers 
1702 Flarv. Christopher 
1737 Yale Christopher, Mr. 
1814 Yale Richard P. 

Chubbuck 
1725 Harv. Jeremiah, Mr. 

Church 
1727 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1754 Harv. Benjamin, Mr., & at Yale '73 
1756 Yale James, Mr. 
175U Harv. Edward, Mr. 
1765 Yale Aaron, Mr. 
1765 Yale Selden, Mr., & at Dart. ; 91 
1768 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
1778 Harv. Samuel 
1784 Dart. Nathan, Mr. 

1796 Dart. Benjamin 

1797 Dart. Daniel 

1797 Harv. John H., Mr., & at Dart. 1813— 
1800 Wms. Aaron [D. D. at Wms. 1823 
1803 Yale Samuel 

1816 Mid. Alonzo, D. D.— Pres. of Geo. 

1820 Bro. Benjamin G. 
1822 Mid. Aaron 

1822 Mid. Moses 

1823 Yale —Austin. M. D. 
1826 Wms. —Jefferson, M. D. 
1826 Yale Ebenezer 

1829 Yale John B. 

1830 Yale Edward 

1831 Wash. Thomas B. 
1833 Wms. — Amasa, M. D. 

Churchill 
1787 Yale Silas, Mr. 
1789 Harv. Asaph 

1830 Wms. Charles, Mr. 

1831 Harv. Asaph 

Chute 
1810 Dart. Daniel 
1813 Dart. James 

1832 Bow. Ariel P. 

Cilley 

1825 Bow. Jonathan 

1826 Dart. Horatio G., Mr. 

Clafflin 
1826 Wms. Levi F. ; Mr. 

Claggett 
1808 Dart. William, Mr. 
1826 Dart. William 

1826 Dart. Rufus, Mr., at Bro. '29 

1827 Yale John M. 
1832 Dart. —Clifton, M. D. 

Clancy 
1818 Mid. John 

Clap 
1690 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1722 Harv. Thomas, Mr.— Pres. of Yale 
1725 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1731 Harv. Supply, Mr. 
1735 Harv. Noah, Mr. 
1740 Yale Ezra, Mr. 
1785 Yale Caleb 

1797 Harv. Elisha, Mr., & at Bro. 1810jTut. 
1799 Harv. Ebenezer 
1805 Harv. Nathaniel 
1805 Dart. —Benjamin, M. D. 
1807 Harv. Eleazar, M. D. 
1814 Yale Theodore 



1820 Ver. 

1820 Mid. 

1821 Dart. 

1822 Yale 
1825 Amh. 
1829 Amh. 

1831 Yale 

1832 Amh. 

1833 Amh. 

1834 Wins. 
1834 Harv. 



Clapp 



Lbenezer 
—Joel, Mr. 
Zenas 

Summer G. 
Ralph 
Joseph B. 

John M. 
Charles, Tutor 
Rufus C. 
—Chester E., M. D. 

Thaddeus 



Clark 

1670 Harv. lipomas, Mr. 

1687 Harv. John, Mr. 

1690 Harv. John, Mr. 

1705 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

1712 Harv. Peter, Mr. 

1714 Yale Nathaniel 

1723 Harv. Ward, Mr. 

1726 Harv. William, Mr. 

1726 Yale George, Mr. 

1728 Harv. John, Mr. 

1734 Yale Gamaliel, Mr. 

1739 Harv. Peter, Mr. 

1743 Yale Gershom, Mr. 

1747 Yale Joseph 

1749 Yale John, Mr. 

1752 Harv. Jonas, Mr. 

1756 Yale Jesse. 

1757 Yale —Samuel, Mr.— A. B. at N. J. '51 
1759 Harv. William, Mr. 

1785 Dart. Joseph 

1786 Dart. Erastus, Mr. 
1786 Yale Smith 

1791 Dart. Timothy, Mr. 

1792 Bro. Thomas M., and at Y'ale 
1794 Yale Jehu, Mr. 

1799 Harv. John, Mr., M. B. 

1800 Dart. Benjamin, Mr. 

1801 Yale Elijah 

1802 Yale Levi H., Mr. 

1804 Yale Gerard, Mr. 

1805 Harv. Samuel, Mr., and at Ver. '10 
1805 Wms. Azariah, Mr. 

1805 Wms. Saul, Mr., and at Yale '08 

1806 Mid. Asahel, Mr. 

1806 Yale John 

1807 Ver. Satterlee 
1809 Yale Charles 
1809 Wms. Josiah, Mr. 

1809 Bro. Henry F. 

1810 Bow. William, Mr. 

1811 Dart. —Samuel, M. B. 

1811 Wms. Eber L., Mr., at Yale '16 

1811 Wms. Job 

1811 Wms. JohnC. 

1812 Wms. Elam C. 
1812 Dart. Samuel 

1814 Mid. Caleb 

1815 Wms. Epaphras 

1815 Bro. Joseph 

1816 Harv. Justin W. 
1816 Harv. John, Mr. 

1816 Ver. Samuel 

1817 Yale William L., Mr. 

1817 Yale Smith 

1818 Mid. Philelus 

1819 Harv. Moses, Mr. 

1820 Dart. —Edward, Mr. 

1821 Yale — Peter G., Mr. 

1821 Yale Peter F., Mr. 

1822 Dart. William 

1823 Dart. Samuel W. 
1823 Dart. —John, 31. D. 
1823 Bro. Frederic, Mr. 



122 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1823 Mid. 


Merrht, Mr. 


Clav 


1824 Mid. 


Joseph T. 


1806 Bro. 


|— Joseph, Mr., '06, and at N. J. 
Thomas S., Mr. 


1824 Dart. 


Epkraim W., Mr. 


1819 Harv. 


1824 Bow. 


— Eliphalet, M. D. 


1825 Harv. 


— ||Henry, LL. D. — Sen. in Cong. 


1825 Yale 


Aimer P. 


1832 Yale 


Cassius M. 


1825 Amh. 
1825 Harv. 
1825 Bro. 


Lincoln 
—Joseph, M. D. 
Lucius W. 


Clayes 
1815 Mid. Dana 
Clayton 


1826 Bow. 


Samuel L., '27 


1826 Dart. 


Ansel R. 


1815 Yale 


John M.. Sen. in Cong. 


1826 Yale 


Edwin E. 


Cleaveland 


1827 Amh. 


Charles G. 


1735 Harv. 


Aaron, Mr. 


1827 Amh. 


Joseph S., Mr., Tut. 


1748 Yale 


Ebenezer, Mr., and at Dart. '82 


1827 Amh. 


Lucius F., Mr. 


1777 Yale 


Moses, Mr. 


1828 Wins. 


Alonzo 


1793 Yale 


William P. 


1829 Dart. 


Peter 


1799 Harv. 


Parker, Mr., Tut.— Prof, at Bow. ; 


1829 Bow. 


Dennis 




[M. D. at Dart. 1823; LL.D. 


1829 Wms. 


Kufus C. 




[at Bow. '24 


1829 Wms. 


— Elisha F., M. D. 


1803 Bro. 


—John, Mr. 


1831 Wms. 


Edward - 


1813 Bow. 


Nehemiah, Mr., Tut. 


1831 Yale 


Samuel W. 


1816 Yale 


William P.. Mr. 


1831 Yale 


Thomas M. 


1821 Bow. 


John P., Mr. 


1832 Dart. 


Daniel A. 


1823 Yale 


—William, M. D. 


1832 Dart. 


John L. 


1824 Harv. 


— Nehemiah, M. D. 


1832 Dart. 


William C. 


' 1824 Yale 


Richard F. 


1833 Amh. 


Stanford R. 


1824 Yale 


—Hiram, M. D. 


1833 Harv. 


Luther 


1825 Ver. 


— JNorman, M. D. 


1833 Wms. 


Horatio F. 


1825 Bro. 


Ira 


1833 Yale 


Charles 


1825 Wms. 


—Benjamin F., M. D. 


1833 Yale 


Josiah 


1825 Wms. 


— Anthony B., Mr. 


1833 Yale 


Noah B. 


1826 Wms. 


— Elisha W., M. D. 


1834 Dart. 


Daniel 


1826 Bow. 


John 


1834 Dart. 


Benjamin 


1827 Bow. 


Moses P., Mr., M. D. 


1834 Dart. 


James 


1828 Bow. 


James B., Mr. 


1834 Yale 


James A. 


1828 Bow. 


James 


1834 Bow. 


—Henry G., M. D. 


1829 Bow. 


Elisha L. 


1834 Wms. 


Azariah S. 


1830 Bow. 


—Moses P., M. D. 


1834 Amh. 


Albert 


1830 Wms. 


— Thomas 


1834 Amh. 


Sereno D. 


Clement 


Clarke 


1774 Yale 


Peabody 


1729 Harv. 


Richard, Mr. 


1818 Mid. 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1745 Yale 


Joseph, Mr. 


1834 Bow. 


Milton 


1750 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


Clemson 


1760 Harv. 


Josiah 


1829 Yale 


William F. 


1762 Yale 


Richard, Mr., and at Columb. 


{jl pnfl 1 onn 


1769 Bro. 
1772 Harv. 


— William, Mr. 


1745 Yale 


John, Mr., and at Dart. '82 


1774 Harv. 
1777 Harv. 
1785 Yale 
1785 Yale 
1788 Yale 
1788 Harv. 
1790 Harv. 


John, Mr.— D. D. at Edin. 

Peter, Mr. 

Abraham L., Mr. 

James B. 

Adam S. 

Edward 

Pitt, Mr. 


1806 Bro. 
1824 Mid. 
1827 Dart. 
1827 Harv. 
1827 Harv. 
1832 Harv. 
1832 Yale 


Palmer, Mr. 
Charles, Mr. 

Charles D., Mr.— Prof, at Dick. 
Richard J. [and at IN. Y. 
Henry R., Mr. 
George W. 
Edward 


1797 Yale 


Asahel 


Cleverly 


1803 Harv. 


Ray 


1715 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1804 Harv. 


Amos, Mr. 


1733 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1808 Harv. 


Charles C. 


Clifford 


1809 Bro. 


John H. 


1825 Bro. 


Lewis W. 


1815 Yale 


Edward 


1827 Bro. 


John H. 


1817 Wms. 


Dorus, Mr. 


Clinton 


1820 Wms. 

1821 Bow. 


Benjamin F., Mr. 
Daniel 


1786 Yale 


Isaac, Mr. 


1824 Yale 


Tertius S. 


Close 


1826 Mid. 


Joseph S. 


1771 Yale 


David, Mr. 


1828 Mid. 


Nathaniel C. 


1826 Yale 


Reuben H., Mr. 


1829 Harv. 


James P. 


Cloud 


1830 Yale 


George R. 


1823. Yale 


John W. 


1830 Yale 


Robert 


/~ii 




1831 Wash. 


Jacob E. 


Clougn 


1832 Dart. 


William C. 


1806 Dart. 


Nathan K. 


1834 Wat. 


Ivorv 


1816 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


Clary 

1808 Mid. Joseph W. 


1823 Dart. 
1834 Dart. 


Henry 
Moses T. 


1818 Yale 


Henry, Mr. 


Cobb 


1828 Wms. 


—-Lyman, M. D. 


1737 Harv. 


Samuel 



1834.] 

17G6 Harv. 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



123 



1772 Yale 
1779 Harv. 
1788 Yale 
1790 Bro. 
17% Bro. 

1806 Bow. 

1807 Dart. 
1810 Ver. 

1810 How. 

1811 Dart. 

1813 Bro. 

1814 Harv. 
1817 Harv. 
1817 Dart. 

1819 Dart. 

1820 Harv. 

1820 Bow. 

1821 Bro. 
1824 Bro. 

Cobbet 
1663 Harv. Samuel 
Coburn 

1812 Harv. Peter 
1817 Mid. 
1819 Mid. 
1824 Bro. 
1830 Dart 



David, Mr., at N. J. '"83, and at 
[Pro. ; 90.— Lieut. Gov. of 
[Mass. 



Moses 

Samuel, Mr. 
William 
Thomas 

Oliver, Mr., D. D. '34 
Richard, Mr. 
—Moses, M. B. 
James D. 
Edward H., Mr. 
Nomlas. Mr. 
ALvan, Mr. 
Isaac E., Mr. 
Jonathan H. ; Mr. 
Elias, Mr., at Wat, 
— Hosea P., M. D. 
Frederic A., Mr. 
Jedidiah, Mr., M. D. ; Prof, at 



'27 



Nathaniel 
Leander 



Jonas 
Stephen 
Moses 
Loammi S. 



[Ohio 



Cochran 

1798 Dart. Peter, Mr. 

1799 Bro. Thomas 
1809 Bro. Robert 

1824 Bow. —James, M. D. 
1829 Bow. —Jeremiah, M. D. 
1833 Bow. —William, M. D. 

Codman 
1782 Harv. Richard, Mr. 
1802 Harv. John, Mr., and at Yale, and at 
[Bro. '14 j D. D. at N. J. '23 

Henry, Mr. 

William A., Mr. 

William, Mr. 

Randolph 

William H. 

John 



1808 Harv. 

1814 Harv. 

1815 Yale 

1816 Bow. 
1824 Bow. 
1827 Bow. 

Coe 
1776 Bro. 
1808 Yale 
1811 Wms. 
1815 Mid. - 
1818 Wms. 



Curtis, Mr. 
Noah, Mr. 
Harvey, Mr. 
-Jonas, D. D. 
David L. 



'15— Mr. at N. J. 
[and Union 



1825 Yale —Truman, Mr. 

CofTeen 
1785 Dart. Lake 

Coffin 
1714 Harv. Enoch, Mr. 
1718 Harv. Brocklebank S., Mr. 
1733 Harv. Peter, Mr. 
1744 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr., and at Yale '56 
1759 Harv. Paul, Mr., D. D. 
1759 Harv. Charles, Mr. 
1769 Harv. Peter, Mr. 
1772 Harv. Thomas A., Mr.— Bart. 
1785 Harv. Charles, Mr. 
1789 Harv. Ebenezer 

1791 Dart. John, Mr., & at Yale '98, & at 

N. J. '95 
1793 Harv. Charles, Mr.; D. D. at Wms. 
[1808, Pres. of Green. 
1799 Dart. Charles, Mr. 
1799 Dart. Nathaniel. Mr. 
1806 Bow. Isaac F., Mr. 



1811 
1813 
1815 
1817 
1821 
1321 
1822 
1823 
1823 
1825 
1826 
1828 
1828 
1829 
1830 
1834 

1830 

1808 
1817 

1827 

1763 
1803 
1834 

1718 
1742 
1777 
1780 
1784 
1794 
1797 
1806 



Harv. 

Pro. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Dart. 

Bow. 

A mh. 

Harv. 

Amh. 

Harv. 

Bow. 

Harv. 

Bow. 



D. 



Yale 

Yale 

Dart. 

Harv. 

Harv. 



1808 
1811 
1811 

1814 
1819 
1822 
1823 
1826 
1829 
1830 
1831 

1697 
1712 
1761 
1776 
1816 
1818 
1818 
1819 
1819 
1821 
1822 
1825 
1828 

1726 
1831 

1779 
1808 
1820 
1820 

1827 



—John G., M. D. 
Tiinothy G., Mr. 
Thomai A. 
Edward L., Mr., M. 
William P. 
— Nathaniel, M. D. 
— James, M. D. 
— Joshua 
Egbert B. 
Robert A. 
—Isaac, Mr.— Bart. 
James H. 
Charles P. 
George 
Henry R. 
John H. C. 
Coffing 
Yale Churchill 

Coggeshall 
Bro. Josias H., Mr. 
Harv. Peter C. 
Bro. Thomas J. 

Coggin 
Harv. Jacob, Mr. 
Harv. Jacob, Mr. 
Dart. William S. 

Cogswell 
Harv. Francis, Mr. 
Yale James, Mr., D. D. 
Yale Samuel, Mr. 

Mason F., Mr., M. D. 
Roger 

Nathaniel, Mr. 
Stephen 

Jonathan, Mr., &. at Bow. '15. 
[Tut. at Bow., & Prof. Theo. 
[Inst. Ct. 
Joseph G., Mr., & at Yale '07. 
[Tut. & Prof.— P. D. at Got. 
James F., Mr. 
Francis 

William, Mr., & at Bro. '16 ; at 
[Harv. '17; D.D. at Wms. '33 
Charles N., Mr. 
Nathaniel, Mr. 
Francis, Mr. 
—William H., M. D. 
Francis, Mr. 
Mason F. 
—George, M. D. 
Wms. —Francis, M. D. 

Coit 
Harv. Joseph, at Yale 1702 ; Mr. 
John, Mr. 
William 
Joshua, Mr. 
Joseph L., Mr. 
—Thomas, M. D. 
John C. 
David G. 
Joshua 

Thomas W., Mr., '31 
Benjamin B.,Mr.— M.D. at Penn. 
Daniel T., Mr.— M. D. at Penn. 
Gurdon S., Mr. 

Coker 

Harv. Theodore, Mr. 
Harv. Robert A. 

Colburn 
Dart. Ezekiel, Mr. 
Dart. Samuel W. 
Harv. Warren. Mr. 
Harv. —Elijah, M. D. 
Bro. Zaccheus 



1806 Harv 



Wms. 
Dart. 
Dart. 

Bow. 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Yale 
Dart. 
Yale 
Dart. 



Harv 

Yale 
Harv 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 



124 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1829 Bow. — Zaccheus, M. D. 
1832 Dart. —Simeon D., M. D. 

Colby 
1777 Dart. Zaccheus, Mr. 
1817 Dart. —Isaac, M. D. 
1817 Bro. —Philip, Mr. 

1821 Dart. —Moses F., M. D. 
1823 Dart. —Elijah, M. D. 

1826 Amh. Enoch 

1827 Dart. —Lewis, M. D. 
1827 Bro. Harrison G. O. 
1831 Dart. —James, M. D. 

1831 Dart. — Jonas, M. D. 

1832 Harv. Lewis 

Cole 
1731 Yale 
1783 Yale 
1798 Harv. 

1822 Harv. 
1822 Mid. 
1825 Harv. 
1825 Bro. 

1830 Bow. 
1834 Yale 
1834 Bow. 



Samuel 
Matthew 
Thomas 
Joseph G. 
Bicknell C. 
Jonatlmn, Mr. 
Sands G. 
George W. 
—Erastus, Mr. 
Albert 



Coleman 
1718 Yale John, Mr. 
1765 Yale Seth, Mr. 

1796 Dart. —William, Mr. 
1800 Wms. Eliphalet B. 
1805 Wms. Benjamin, Mr. 

1805 Wms. Spencer 

1815 Bro. Ebenezer, Mr., at Amh. *27 
1817 Yale Lijman, Mr., Tutor 

1829 Yale —James B., M. D. 
1832 Yale —Isaac P., M. D. 

Coles 
1814 Yale Nathaniel 
1323 Yale Oliver 

Coley 

1816 Yale John H. 

Collamer 
1810 Ver. Jacob 
Collamore 

1806 Harv. Anthony, Mr. 

Collier 

1797 Bro. William, Mr. 

Collins 
1649 Harv. John, Mr. 
1660 Harv. Nallianiel, Mr. 
1697 Harv. Nathaniel 
1718 Yale Timothy, Mr. 
1747 Harv. Peaslee, Mr. 
1758 Yale Ambrose, Mr. 
1760 Yale Daniel, Mr. 
1775 Dart. Samuel 
1786 Yale Aaron C, Mr. 
1795 Yale Alexander 
1795 Wms. John 
1800 Wms. Luke 
1800 Wms. Daniel, Mr. 
1802 Yale Levi, Mr. 
1819 Wms. —Augustus B., Mr. 
1826 Yale Josiah, Mr. 
1828 Wms. —Ethan S., M. D. 

1832 Wms. John J. 

1833 Amh. William O. 

1834 Yale John D. 

Collis 
1826 Yale John T., Mr. 

Colman 
1692 Harv. Benjamin, Mr.— D. D. at Glasg. 



1727 
1765 
1770 
1805 
1834 

1739 

1764 
1786 
1829 
1833 
1833 

1710 
1737 
1745 
1756 
1775 
1783 
1804 
1804 
1806 
18,12 
1822 
1826 
1829 
1832 
1832 
1834 



Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

Harv. Dudley, Mr. 

Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Dart. Henry, and at Harv. '06 

Harv. James F. 

Colson 

Harv. Adam, Mr. 

Colt 

Yale Peter 

Harv. Daniel 

Wms. Samuel D. 

Yale John O. 
Wms. —Edwin N. ; M. D. 

Colton 

Yale Benjamin, Mr. 

Yale Eli, Mr. 

Yale Jonathan, Mr. 

Yale George, Mr. 

Yale Jabez, Mr. 

Yale Abishai 

Yale Chester 

Yale George 

Yale Simeon 

Yale Calvin, Mr., '32 

Yale Walter, Mr. 

Amh. Chauncy, Mr., Pres. Brist. 

Yale Melancthon H. 

Yale John O. 

Yale Erastus 

Wms. Wells 

Comstoek 



1807 Yale 


Eleutheros D., Mr. 


1822 Mid. 


—John L., M. D. 


1827 Yale 


—Daniel, M. D. 


1828 Bro. 


— Oliver C, Mr. 


1830 Yale 


David C. 


1831 Yale 


—Joseph, M. D. 


Conant 


1732 Yale 


Shubael, Mr. 


1740 Harv. 


Silvanus, Mr. 


1756 Yale 


Shubael, Mr. 


1765 -Yale 


Roger, Mr. 


1770 Yale 


William, Mr., and at Dart. 7 80 


1776 Yale 


Eleazer 


1777 Harv. 


Jacob 


1784 Harv. 


Ezra 


1800 Bro. 


Gains 


1810 Mid. 


Horatio, Mr., Tut. 


1813 Mid. 


Henry 


1815 Dart. 


Abel 


1819 Bro. 


Liba 


1823 Mid. 


Thomas J., Mr.— Prof, at Wat 


1828 Yale 


— Callin, M. D. 


1829 Harv. 


Edwin 



Condy 
1726 Harv. Jeremiah, Mr. 
Cone 

1784 Yale Daniel 



1789 Yale 
1808 Yale 
1813 Yale 
1815 Mid. 
1818 Yale 
1820 Yale 
1826 Yale 
1830 Yale 



Salmon, Mr. 
Jonathan, Mr. 
William 
Edward 
Hiram F., Mr. 
Theodore C. 
Frederic 
William R. 



Coney 
1829 Bro. Samuel 

Conkey 
1800 Dart. Alexander 

Conklin 
1806 Mid. Solomon G. 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



125 



1830 

1806 

1832 

1723 
1790 
1830 

1799 
1812 
1813 

1820 
1822 
1823 
1825 
1827 
1830 
1833 

1794 

1828 

1820 

1777 
1779 
1783 
1785 
1787 
1791 
1795 
1797 
1802 
1804 
1805 
1806 
1807 
1807 
1811 
1822 
1827 
1828 
1829 
1831 
1833 

1657 
1660 
1661 
1697 
1705 
1716 
1723 
1730 
1735 
1747 
1748 
1750 
1758 
1769 
1772 
1776 
1780 
1786 
1788 
1791 
1793 
1803 
1807 
1808 
1811 



Wms, —William, M« D, 

Conner 
Yale ||Samuel S. 

Conolly 
Wash. Horace L. 

Convers 
Harv. Josiah, Mr. 
Bro. Jacob 
Bow. John H. 

Converse 

Harv. James 

Dart. Joshua 

Yale Sherman 

Yale —Alexander B. ; Mr. 3 A. B. at 

Dart. Amasaj Mr. [Union '16 

Dart. —Frederic L., M. D. 

Ver. James 

Dart. Jonathan K., Mr. 

Dart. Freeman, Mr. 

Dart. —William, M. D. 

Conway 
Dart. John 

Conwell 
Yale —Joshua, M. D. 

Cony 
Bow. —Daniel, Mr., and at Dart. '25 

Cook 
Yale Rozell, Mr. 
Yale Justus, Mr. 
Yale Thaddeus 
Yale Enos 
Yale Daniel 
Dart. John, Mr. 
Yale Samuel 
Bro. Joseph B., Mr. 
Dart. Amos J, Mr. 
Mid. Milo, Mr. 
Bro. Dennis 
Mid. Chauncey, Mr. 

Bro. — ||Orchard, Mr. 
Bro. Daniel 

Wins. Elisha B., Mr., at Yale '16 
Yale —Charles C, M. D. 
Mid. Robert L., Mr. 
Wms. Loomis 
Yale —Chauncey L., M. D. 
Wat. James M. 
Wat. Daniel F. 

Cooke 
Harv. Elisha 
Harv. Joseph 
Harv. Joseph 
Harv. Elisha, Mr. 
Yale Samuel, Mr. 
Harv. William, Mr. 
Harv. Middlecott, Mr. 
Yale Samuel, Mr. 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
Yale William, Mr. 
Harv. William, Mr. 
Yale ||Joseph P., Mr. 
Yale Samuel, Mr. 
Harv. Noah, Mr. 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
Bro. Amasa 
Yale Daniel, Mr. 
Yale Oliver £>., Mr. 
Yale Daniel B., Mr. 
Yale Amos, Mr. 
Yale Increase 
Wms. Phinehas 

Dart. Josiah P., Mr., and at Harv. '10 
Bro. Henry T. 
Yale James C. 

VOL. VII. 



1815 
1815 

1821 
1822 
1827 
1829 
1830 
1832 
1832 
1834 

1727 

1813 

1735 
1773 
1792 
1805 
1813 
1814 
1816 
1826 
1827 

1724 
1724 
1750 
1769 
1798 
1811 
1817 
1819 
1825 

1831 

1712 

1743 
1763 
1811 
1824 
1826 
1827 
1827 
1827 

1814 
1815 
1815 

1822 

1744 
1811 
1826 
1832 

1817 
1819 
1821 

1822 

1818 



1670 



1831 



Yale 

Mid. 

Yale 

Wms. 

Yale 

Bro. 

Wash. 

Dart. 

Mid. 

Wash. 



George 
Oliver D. 



A. B« at Union 
['19 



Friend, M. D.j 
Parsons, Mr. 
Joseph P., Mr. 
James W. 
George F. 
George 
William D. 
William 
Cookson 
Harv. John, Mr. 

Cooledge 
Dart. Augustus 

Cooley 
Yale Moses 
Yale Daniel 

Yale Timothy M., Mr., D. D. 
Mid- William H. 
Wms. John B. 

Yale James, Mr., at Wins. '18 
Wms. Timothy C. 
Yale Jefferson 
Wms. —Phinehas R., M. D. 

Coolidge 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
Harv. Stephen, Mr. 
Harv. Hezekiah, Mr. 
Harv. Samuel 
Harv. Cornelius, Mr. 
Mid. Carlos 
Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
Harv. Thomas B., Mr., and at Yale 
Bow. Cyrus H., Mr. 

Coombs 
Harv. George C. 
Cooper 



Harv 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Bow. 
Bow. 
Harv. 
Yale 



William, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr., and at Yale '50 5 
Nathaniel, Mr. [D. D. at Edin. 
John T. 

Mr. 

M. D. 

M. D. 



Samuel A. 
— William F 
— Alanson L. 

Oliver 
-Charles R., M. D. 
Copeland 
Yale Alexander 
Bro. Benjamin 
Bro. George 
Copleston 

Harv. —Edward, D. D. 

Copp 
Yale Jonathan 
Dart. Amasa 
Dart. — Robert S., M. D. 
Bow. John 

Corbett 
Harv. Penuel 
Harv. John H. 
Harv. Richard 

Corbin 
Ver. Pliny M. 

Cordes 
Yale James J. 

Corey 
Bro. Jacob, Mr. 

Corlet 
Harv. Ammi R., Mr. 

Corliss 
Bro. George W. R., Mr., M. D. 
Dart. Horatio G. F. 

17 






126 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



Cornelius 
1813 Yale Elias, Mr.— D. D. at Dart. '29 

Cornell 
1827 Bro. William M. 

Corning 
1831 Wms. Alfred H. 

Cornish 
1820 Harv. — Aaron, M. D. 

Cornwall 

1818 Yale —John A., M. D. 

Cornwell 
1782 Yale Wait, Mr. 
1831 Wash. Nathaniel E. 

Correa de Serra 

1819 Harv. —Joseph, LL. D. 

Corser 
1811 Mid. Enoch, Mr., at Dart. '18 
Corson 

1829 Wash. Levi 

1830 Amh. Charles C. 

Cossit 
1771 Bro. Ranna, Mr. 
1798 Dart. Ranna 

1813 Mid. Franceway R. 

Cotes 
1829 Yale —Christopher, Mr. 

Cotting 
1767 Harv. Amos, Mr. 
1834 Harv. Benjamin E 

Cotton 
1651 Harv. Seaborn, Mr. 
1657 Harv. John, Mr. 
1678 Harv. John, Mr. 
1681 Harv. John, Mr. 
1685 Harv. Roland, Mr. 
1696 Harv. Roland, Mr., M. D. 
1698 Harv. Josiah, Mr. 
1701 Harv. Theophilus, Mr. 
1710 Harv. John, Mr. 
1717 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1719 Harv. Roland, Mr. 
1722 Harv. Josiah, Mr. 

1729 Harv. Ward, Mr. 

1730 Harv. John, Mr. 
1747 Harv. John, Mr. 

1749 Harv. John, Mr. 

1750 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1759 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1771 Yale Josiah, Mr. 
1793 Harv. Ward, Mr. 

1808 Harv. Charles, Mr.— M. D. at Bro. '13 
1810 Harv. John, Mr., M. D. 
1816 Yale —James, M. D. 
1826 Amh. Chauncey 
Couch 

1802 Yale fJessup N., Mr. 
1805 Yale Simon 

1823 Dart. Paul 
Couper 

1814 Yale James H. 

Covell 
1822 Bro. Joseph S. 

Cowan 
1814 Wms. Alexander M., Mr. 

Cowdery 
1825 Wms. -Harris, M. D. 

Cowell 
1732 Harv. David, Mr. 

1803 Bro. Benjamin, Mr. 



Cowles 
1770 Yale Isaac, Mr. 

1788 Yale Whitfield, Mr. 

1789 Yale Giles H., Mr.— D. D. at Wms. 
1792 Dart. Rums [1823 
1798 Wms. Samuel, Mr., Tut. 

1800 Yale Pitkin, Mr. 

1805 Yale Leonard, Mr. 
1821 Yale George, Mr. 
1821 Yale Samuel H., Mr. 
1826 Yale Elijah, Mr. 
1826 Yale Henry 

1826 Yale John P., Mr. 

1826 Yale —Ives, M. D. 
1828 Yale Orson, Mr. 

1828 Yale —Joseph N. ; M. D. 

1829 Yale Albert S. 

1829 Yale Thomas 

1831 Amh. Chester 
1834 Yale Chauncy D. 

Cox 

1789 Dart. John W. 

1806 Yale Henry C. 

1823 Wms. —Samuel H., D. D.— Mr., at N. J. 

['18 

1824 Wms. —Abraham L., Mr., & at N. J. '25 

1826 Harv. Benjamin, Mr., M. D. 

1827 Yale Adam T. 

Coxe 

1820 Bro. —Charles S., Mr., and at Penn. 

Cozzens 
1811 Bro. Benjamin, Mr. 

1828 Mid. Samuel W. 

Craft 
1759 Yale Ebenezer, Mr., and at Harv. '84 

1761 Harv. Jonathan 

Crafts 
1783 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1785 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1790 Harv. Samuel C, Mr., & at Ver. 1811 
1805 Harv. William, Mr., and at Yale '08 

1816 Bro. Frederic, Mr., and at Harv. '20 

1817 Bro. Jonathan P. 

1821 Bro. Eliphalei P. , Mr. ,& at Harv. '25 

1833 Harv. George I. 

Cragin 

1830 Dart. — Francis W., M. D. 

Craig 

1798 Dart. William 

1819 Yale —James, Mr. 

Cram 
1782 Dart. Jacob, Mr. 
1813 Dart. Daniel 

Cranch 
1780 Harv. —Richard, Mr. 
1787 Harv. William, Mr. 

Crandall 
1828 Yale —Reuben, M. D. 

1747 Yale Matthew, Mr. 

1762 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1780 Harv. John, Mr., and at Bro. '92— D. D. 

1785 Dart. Calvin, Tutor [at Bro. 

1796 Bro. Daniel, Mr. 

1799 Dart. John H„ Mr. 
1813 Yale John 

1820 Mid. Abijah 

1823 Bro. Silas A., Mr., Tutor 

1824 Harv. Phinehas M., Mr., M. D. 
1826 Yale Eliezer 

1828 Bro. Benjamin 

1832 Wms. Lyman M. 

1834 Wms. Charles O. 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



127 



Cranston 


1824 Dart. — Enos, M. D. 


1810 Harv. 


Walter, Mr., Tut. 


1828 Harv. Joseph W. 
1830 Bow. —Luther, M.D. 


1821 Bro. Samuel A. 


Crossett 


p r 




1792 Dart. Samuel 


KsTaiy 

1827 Wash. Isaac E. 


Crossman 


Crawford 


1795 Bro. Joseph W., & at Yale 1803 


1761 Harv. 


—William, Mr., and at N. J. 


Croswell 


1807 Dart. 


William, Mr. 


1728 Harv. Andrew, Mr. 


1815 Mid. 


Henry 


1780 Harv. William, Mr. 


P, t 


1798 Harv. Andrew 


1805 Wms. Noah, Mr. 


1817 Yale —Henry, Mr. 
1822 Yale William 


Cressy 


1822 Yale Sherman 


1826 Amh. 


Benjamin C, Mr. 


1827 Wash.— William, Mr. 


1828 Amh. 


Timothy R. 


1831 Wash.— Harry, D. D. 


1834 Dart. 


—Oliver S., M. D. 


Crouch 


Crittenden 


1787 Bro. Abraham, Mr. 


1831 Wms. 


—Lucius W., M. D. 


Crowell 


Crocheron 


1811 Dart. Robert 


1830 Wms. 


—John M., M. D. 


Crowninshield 


Crocker 


1827 Harv. Benjamin V. 


1713 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


Crozier 


1716 Harv. 
1734 Harv. 
1738 Harv. 


David, Mr. 
Joseph, Mr. 
Josiah, Mr. 


1824 Yale Robert C. 
Cruft 


1743 Harv. 


John, Mr., and at Yale ; 59 


1831 Harv. Edward 


1760 Harv. 


Josiah, Mr. 


1834 Harv. William S. 


1762 Yale 


Ephraim, Mr. 


Crukshanks 


1765 Harv. 


Josiah, Mr. 


1812 Yale John, Mr. 


1774 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


Crump 


1782 Yale 


Daniel, Mr. 


1833 Yale John 


1801 Harv. 


Samuel M., Mr. 


Cullick 


1802 Harv. 
1805 Yale 


Nathan B., Mr., and at Bro. '12 ; 
John A. [D. D. at Gen. 


1668 Harv. John 
Cuming 


1815 Harv. 


John D. 


1822 Bro. 


William A., Mr. 


1761 Harv. —Alexander, Mr., & at N. J. '60 


1822 Bro. 


Samuel L. 


1762 Harv. Matthew 


1827 Yale 


Zebulon, Mr. 


1771 Harv. —John, Mr. 


1829 Harv. 


Frederic G., Mr. 


Cumings 
1760 Harv. Henry, Mr., D. D. 


1834 Yale 


Amos 


Crooke 


1795 Harv. Henry, Mr. 


1824 Bro. 


Saunders M. 


Cummens 


Crooks 


1814 Harv. William 


1818 Yale 


Warham, Mr. 


Cumming 


Crosby 


1806 Wms. John 


1653 Harv. 


Thomas 


Cummings 


1770 Harv. 


Aaron, Mr. 


1768 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 


1772 Harv. 


Joseph 


1776 Bro. Abraham, Mr. 


1773 Harv. 


Stephen, Mr. 


1801 Harv. Jacob A., Mr. 


1777 Harv. 


Ebenezer, Mr., and at Yale '82 j 


1806 Dart. David, Mr. 




[M.D. at Penn.— Prof, at N.Y. 


1808 Dart. Solomon, Mr., M. D. '16 


1777 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr., and at Yale '82 


1817 Harv. Asa. Mr.— Tut. at Bow. 


1786 Harv. 


Amos, Mr., Tutor 


1817 Bow. Nathan 


1791 Dart. 


Otis 


1819 Dart. Jacob, Mr. 


1792 Bro. 


— Joshua, Mr. 


1822 Bro. Preston 


1794 Harv. 


William 


1823 Bow. —Sumner, M. D. 


1795 Harv. 


Oliver, Mr. 


1824 Mid. Isaac 


1802 Yale 


—John P., and at Columb. & N. J, 


1825 Bow. — Asa, Mr. 


1804 Harv. 


Jaazaniah 


1827 Dart. —Silas, M. D. 


1810 Dart. 


Henry 


1828 Wat. Ebenezer 


1811 Dart. 


—Asa, M. D. 


1833 Bow. John M. 


1812 Yale 


Piatt H. 


Cunningham 
1806 Yale John P. 


1816 Dart. 


—Josiah, M. D. 


1820 Dart. 


Nathan, Mr. 


1806 Harv. John A., Mr. 


1823 Bow. 


John, Mr. 


1814 Harv. Ephraim M., Mr. 
1825 Harv. Francis 


1823 Bow. 


William G., Mr. 


1823 Yale 

1824 Dart. 


Daniel, Mr. 
— Dixi, M. D. 


1829 Harv. Edward L., Mr., M. D. 


1827 Dart. 


Alpheus, Mr., Prof., Tutor 


Currie 


1833 Dart. 


David 


1827 Dart. —Samuel, M. D. 


Cross 


Currier 


1819 Harv. 


Robert, Mr. 


1765 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 


1821 Dart. 


AMjah 


1796 Dart. Seth 



128 

1812 Dart. 
1818 Dart. 
1820 Harv. 
1831 Bow. 
1833 Harv. 

1833 Yale 

1834 Dart. 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



—David, M. B. 

Amos 
—Amos, M. D. 
—George S., M. D. 
—Charles, M. D. 

John M. 

Moody 



Curtis 



1719 Yale 
1724 Yale 
1738 Harv. 

1765 Harv. 

1766 Harv. 
1771 Harv. 
1776 Dart. 
1788 Dart. 
1798 Wms. 
1800 Wms. 

1800 Dart. 

1801 Wms. 
1804 Wms. 
1808 Bro. 
1811 Dart. 
1811 Dart. 
1811 Harv. 
1815 Wms. 
1818 Harv. 
1821 Harv. 

1827 Wms. 

1828 Yale 

1829 Harv. 

1831 Mid. 

1832 Harv. 

1833 Harv. 



John 

Jeremiah, Mr. 
Philip, Mr. 
Charles 
Samuel, Mr. 
Benjamin, Mr. 
Abel, Mr. 
Benjamin C. 
Moses S. 
Jared, Mr., Tut. 
David 

David B., Mr. 
Philo H. 
David, Mr. 
Jonathan, Mr., Tut, 
Joseph W. 
Charles P., Mr. 
Joseph E. 
Nathaniel, Mr. 
Loring P. 
Moses A. 
Rodney 

Benjamin R., LL. B„ 
Harvey 
George T. 
Hiram K. 



Curtiss 



1740 Yale 
1777 Yale 
1807 Yale 
1807 Yale 
1821 Yale 



Peter, Mr. 
Eli, Mr. 
Hoi brook, Mr. 
Sheldon C. 
-Erastus, M. D. 



Curwin 
1701 Harv. George, Mr. 
1735 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1735 Harv. George. Mr. 

Gushing 
1676 Harv. Jeremiah 
1692 Harv. Caleb, Mr. 

1711 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1712 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 



1714 Harv. 
1714 Harv. 
1725 Harv. 

1728 Harv. 

1729 Harv. 
1731 Harv. 
1739 Harv. 
1741 Harv. 
1744 Harv. 
1746 Harv. 
1748 Harv. 

1751 Harv. 

1752 Harv. 
1755 Harv. 
1761 Harv. 

1763 Harv. 

1764 Harv. 

1767 Harv. 

1768 Harv. 
1794 Harv. 
1796 Harv. 
1798 Harv. 
1804 Harv. 
1808 Harv. 
1810 Bro. 



Adam, Mr. 
Job, Mr. 
James, Mr. 
Nathaniel 
Jolin, Mr. 
Joseph, Mr. 
Matthew, Mr, 
Loring 
*||Thomas, Mr. 
Edward, Mr. 



and at Yale '50 ; 
[LL. D. 



Jacob, Mr., D. D 
tWiLLiAM, Mr., and at Yale 7 53 : 
[LL. D. ; Just.S. C.ofU. S. 

Joseph, Mr. 

Charles, Mr. 

John, Mr. 
tNathan, Mr. 

John, Mr., D. D. 

Lemuel, Mr. 

Roland, Mr. 

Christopher, Mr. 

Charles, Mr. 

Isaiah, Mr. 

Thomas J. H., Mr. 

Ezekiel D. ; Mr.— M. B. at Dart. 

Abel ['11 



1813 

1817 
1817 
1817 
1821 
1823 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1827 
1830 
1832 
1832 
1834 
1834 

1787 
1791 
1794 
1802 
1805 
1805 
1807 
1807 
1811 
1812 
1819 
1824 
1824 
1827 
1830 
1832 

1813 
1816 

1663 
1698 
1701 

1732 
1734 
1741 
1765 
1765 
1771 
1773 
1786 
1793 
1795 
1798 
1798 
1800 
1801 
1807 
1816 
1819 
1822 
1825 
1826 
1829 
1829 
1831 

1725 
1752 
1805 
1811 
1814 
1818 
1821 
1824 
1828 
1832 
1833 



Dart. Frederic, M. D. 
Harv. —Frederic, M. D. 
Dart. Jonathan P., Mr. — Pres. ofHamp. 

Caleb, Mr., Tut. [Syd. 

Rufus K., M. D. 
—Luther S., LL. B. 
—Erastus, M. D. 

David 

Edmund L., Mr., Tut, 

Joseph, Mr. 

Milton F. 

Wil 



Harv. 

Bow. 

Harv. 

Wms. 

Wms. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Wms. 

Harv. 

Wms. 

Harv. 

Harv. 



nam 
Stephen B. 
Thomas 
Edmund L- 



Cushman 
Harv. \\ Joshua, Mr. 
Dart. Timothv A. 
Dart. Noah 
Bro. Apollos 

Bro. Bartholomew 
Wms. Rufus, Mr. 
Yale ||John P., Mr., at Union '16 
Dart. Hercules, Mr. 
Dart. Bezaleel, Mr., and at Bow. ? 12 
Mid. Isaac N. 
Bro. Job 
Yale — Elisha, Mr. 
Wms. —Solomon P., M. D. 
Harv. —Charles, M. D. 
Bow. David 
Bow. — Hosea L., M. D. 

Cuthbert 

Yale James, Mr. 
Yale John A., Mr. 

Cutler 
Harv. Nathaniel 
Harv. Peter, Mr. 

Harv. Timothy, Mr.— D. D. at Camb. 
[andOxf.— Pres. of Yale 

John, Mr. 

Timothy, Mr. 

Robert, Mr. 

Samuel, Mr. 

\Manasseh, Mr., and at Harv. '70 ; 



Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Yale 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Bro. 

Wms. 

Dart. 

Bro. 

Wms. 

Wms. 

Yale 

Dart. 

Bro. 

Wms. 

Amh. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Yale 



Thomas, Mr. 

Nahum 

William 

Charles, Mr. 

Stephen 

Elisha P. 

Nathan, Mr. 

Enos, Mr., Tut. 

Isaac G. 

Abel 

George Y. 

Calvin, Mr. 

Benjamin C, Mr. 

Jotham C. 

Robert 

Curtis 

Leman W. 

William W. 



[LL. D. 



Cutter 

Harv. Ammi R., Mr. 

Harv. Ammi R., Mr., M. D. 

Dart. William P. 

Dart. Jonas, Mr.— M. D. at Yale '14 

Mid. Nehemiah, M. D. at Yale T7 

Harv. Charles W., Mr. 

Bow. William 

Harv. Benjamin, Mr., M. D. 

Bow. Edward F.. Mr. 

Dart. — Calvin, M. D, 

Dart. Daniel B, 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



120 



Cutting 

J 802 Dart. John R. 
1805 Dart. Samuel 
1823 Dart. Jonas, M. D. 

1827 Dart. — Flavel, M. D. 

Cutts 

1747 Harv. Foxwell C. 

1781) Harv. Charles, Mr., Son. in Cong. 

1790 Harv. ||Ricbard, Mr. 

1801 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

Cuyler 

1737 Yale James 

1748 Yale John C. 
1756 Yale Henry, Mr. 

Dabney 
1811 Harv. Jonathan P., Mr. 

1828 Harv. Frederic, Mr. 

Daggett 
1748 Yale Naphtali, Mr., & at Harv. '71 ; 



1762 Yale 
1771 Yale 
1775 Yale 
1778 Yale 
1783 Yale 
1788 Bro. 
1802 Bro. 

1807 Yale 

1808 Yale 
1813 Yale 
1826 Bro. 
1828 Yale 
1833 Bow. 



[D. D 

[Pres. 
Phillip, Mr. 
Henry, Mr. 
Henry, Mr. 
Ebenezer, Mr. 
IDavid, Mr. 
Herman, Mr. 
Gardner, Mr. 
Leonard A., Mr. 
David L. 
Henry 
John, Mr. 
Oliver E., Mr. 
-Elijah A., M. D. 



N.J. '74, Prof. & 



Dakin 
1797 Dart. Samuel, Mr. 
1828 Bow. —Moses. M. D. 

Dall 
1815 Harv. John, Mr. 

Dalton 

1755 Harv. Tristram, Mr. 
1814 Harv. John C, Mr., M. D. 
1820 Dart. —John, Mr. 

1826 Bro. Walter W., Mr. 
1831 Dart. —John E., M. D. 
Daman 

1756 Harv. George, Mr. 

Dame 
1812 Dart. —John, M. B. 

Damon 
1776 Harv. Jude, Mr. 
1811 Harv. David, Mr. 

Dana 
1718 Harv. Richard, Mr. 
1753 Harv. James, Mr.— D. D. at Edin. 
1755 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1759 Harv. Edmund, Mr., & at Camb. 

1760 Yale Joseph , Mr.— D. D. at Harv. 1801 

1762 Harv. ||tFrancis, Mr., LL. D. 

1763 Harv. Josiah, Mr., & at Yale 7 66, at 

[Bro. '90, & at Dart. '94 
1775 Yale ||Samuel W., Mr. 
1782 Yale Daniel 
1788 Dart. Joseph, Mr. 
1788 Dart. Daniel, Mr., D. D. & Pres. 

1794 Dart. William, Mr. 

1795 Dart. Judah, Mr. 

1796 Harv. Francis, Mr. 

1796 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1797 Yale Sylvester, Mr. 
1813 Harv. James F., Mr 



1813 Harv. 



at Dart. 1801 
,M. D.&atDart. 
['21, &. Prof, at Dart. 
Samuel L., Mr., M. D. 



1819 Dart. 


Hope L. 


1826 Vale 


.Sylvester 


1828 Dart. 


Charles 11., Mr. 


1828 Dart. 


William C, Mr. 


1828 Harv. 


Joseph W. 


1830 Bro. 


Gideon 


1830 Mid. 


Anderson G., M. D. 


1830 Harv. 


James 


1831 Harv. 


—Francis, M. D. 


1833 Harv. 


James D. 


Dane 


1778 Harv. 


||Nathan, LL. D. 


1799 Harv. 


Joseph 


1800 Dart. 


John 


Danforth 


1643 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1671 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1677 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1679 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1683 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1703 Harv. 


Elijah, Mr. 


1715 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1758 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr., M. D. 


1762 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr., Tut. 


1792 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr. 


1800 Dart. 


—Isaac, M. B. ; M. D. '15 


1805 Bro. 


Walter R., Mr. 


1811 Dart. 


Josiah, Mr. 


1811 Wms. 


Oliver 


1818 Wms. 


Joshua N. 


1819 Dart. 


Francis, Mr. 


1825 Bro. 


Horatio L. 


1826 Wms. 


Charles 


1832 Dart. 


—Samuel P., M. D. 


Daniels 


1776 Harv. 


David, Mr. 


1824 Bro. 


David 


Danielson 


1756 Yale 


Timothy, Mr., and at Harv. 19 


1764 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1786 Dart. 


William 


1811 Yale 


William, Mr., Tutor 


Darbe 


1748 Yale 


John, Mr.— M. D. at Dart. 'S2 


Darby 


1831 Wms. 


John 


Darken 


1832 Yale 


—Edward J., M. D. 


Darling 


1740 Yale 


Thomas, Mr., Tut. 


1769 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1777 Yale 


Joseph, Mr. 


1779 Yale 


David 


1794 Dart. 


Joshua, Mr., and at Harv. 1822 


1801 Yale 


Noyes, Mr., Tut. 


1803 Yale 


William S. 


1803 Yale 


Thomas, Mr. 


1810 Bro. 


Collins 


1811 Dart. 


Benjamin 


1819 Dart. 


Elijah, M. D. '25 


1820 Yale 


Charles C, Mr. 


1822 Harv. 


Timothy 
—Moses C., M. D. 


1825 Wms. 


1832 Dart. 


— Lewis, M. D. 


Darrack 


1827 Yale 


James 


Darrinsfton 


1806 Yale 


John 


Dart 


1816 Yale 


Ashbel, M. D. 


1820 Harv. 


John S. 


Dascomb 


1833 Dart. 


—Jacob, M. D. 



130 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



Dashwood 
1783 Harv. John, Mr. 

Dasset 
1687 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Daveis 
1807 Bow. Charles S., Mr. 

Davenport 
1687 Harv. John, Mr. 
1689 Harv. fAddington, Mr. 

Addington, Mr., at Oxf. 
John, Mr., Tut. 
Abraham, Mr. 
James, Mr., & at N. J. '49 
||John, Mr., Tut. 
||James, Mr. 
—John, Mr., at N. J. '69, & at Bro. 
[1805 



1719 Harv. 

1721 Harv. 

1732 Yale 

1732 Yale 

1770 Yale 

1777 Yale 

1785 Yale 

1802 Yale John A. 

1802 Harv. Matthew 

1821 Yale George F., Mr. 

1829 Harv. —Edward J., M. D. 

1830 Yale James R. 
1833 Yale John S. 

David 

1772 Bro. Ebenezer 

Davidson 

1792 Harv. —Thomas, Mr., D. D. 

Davie 
1674 Harv. Edmund, M. D. at Padua 
1681 Harv. John, Bart. 

Davies 

1758 Yale Thomas, Mr. 

1759 Harv. Nathan. Mr. 
1813 Yale Thomas F., Mr. 
1825 Wms. —Charles, Mr. 

Davis 
1651 Harv. John, Mr. 
1721 Harv. Simon, Mr. 
1724 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1735 Harv. Anthony, Mr., & at Yale '37 
1738 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
1740 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1745 Harv. William, Mr. 
1769 Bro. —John, Mr., and at Penn. 

1773 Dart. Stephen, Mr. 

1774 Bro. —Benjamin, Mr. 

1781 Harv. John, Mr.— LL. D. at Dart. 1802 

1793 Dart. Jonathan 

1796 Yale Henry, Mr., & at Wms. '99, Tut., 
[D. D. 1810, Prof, at Union, 
[and Pres. of Mid. and Ham. 

1796 Harv. Wendell, Mr. 

1796 Harv. Charles, Mr. 

1797 Harv. —Daniel, Mr. 

1798 Dart. James, Mr. 
1804 Harv. Timothy, Mr. 

1804 Harv. Nathaniel M., Mr. 

1805 Mid. Joel, Mr. 

1806 Bow. John 

1806 Bro. —John, Mr., and at Dart. 

1810 Harv. John W., Mr. 

1811 Harv. —Frederic H. 

1811 Mid. Charles, Mr. 

1812 Mid. Samuel $., Mr., & at Union,Tut. 
1812 Mid. —James, Mr., and at Union 

1812 Yale *||John, Mr.— LL. D. at Harv. ? 34. 

[Gov. of Mass. 

1813 Wms. Leonard M., Mr., at Yale 7 16 
1815 Yale James 

1815 Dart. John 

1815 Harv. John B„ Mr., Tutor 

1817 Dart. Henry W. F. 

1818 Yale Richard 

1819 Dart. Moses F. 



1819 Harv.— ||Samuel, Mr. 

1820 Harv. Edward G., Mr., M. D. 

1821 Wms. Emerson, Tut., Mr. 

1822 Bro. Isaac, Mr. 

1823 Harv. Wendell B., Mr. 

1824 Wms. Henry, Mr. 

1825 Yale —David, M. D. 
1827 Wat. —Gustavus F., Mr. 
1827 Harv. Thomas K., Mr. 
1829 Harv. George T., LL. B. 
1829 Harv. Jonathan T. 

1831 Dart. —Daniel W., M. D. 
1833 Dart. Thomas 

1833 Yale Benjamin F. 

1834 Wms. _ Elnathan 

Davison 
1815 Harv. Andrew C, Mr. 
Dawes 

1777 Harv. fThomas, Mr. 

1785 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1801 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Dawson 

1782 Harv. John 

1818 Harv. —George A. F. 

Day 

1738 Yale Aaron, Mr. 

1756 Yale Jeremiah, Mr. 

1768 Yale Benjamin, Mr. 

1774 Bro. —Robert, Mr. 

1783 Dart. Asa, Mr. 

1786 Dart. Elkanah 

1795 Yale Jeremiah, Mr., & at Wms. '98, 
[Tut., Prof., LL. D. at Mid. 
[15, and at Harv. '31, D. D. 
[at Union '18, Pres. Yale 

1797 Yale Thomas, Mr., & at Wms. 1800: 

[Tut, 

1801 Dart. —Sylvester, M. B., M. D. '13 

1803 Yale Mills, Mr., Tut. 

1804 Wms. JohnB. 

1806 Harv. James, Mr. 

1807 Bro. Israel, Mr. 

1812 Yale Benjamin 
1814 Dart. Warren 

1817 Yale —Israel, Mr. 

1818 Yale Caleb 

1823 Mid. Alva, Mr. 

1824 Wms. —Jonathan, M. D. 

1824 Yale Edgar B., Mr. 

1825 Ver. Ira 

1826 Yale Sherman, Mr. 

1827 Yale Samuel S., Mr. 

1828 Yale Henry N., Mr., Tut. 

1829 Bow. John Q. 

1830 Bow. —Alexander H., M. D. 
1833 Yale George E. 

1833 Wms. Samuel 

1834 Amh. Plin B. 

Deacon 

1831 Mid. Daniel H. 

Dean 

1737 Yale Barzillai, Mr. 

1738 Yale Seth, Mr. 
1773 Dart. James, Mr. 

1800 Dart. James, Mr., and at Ver. '05, and 
[Prof, at Ver. 
1806 Bro. John G. 
1809 Bro. Joshua 

1813 Harv. —Paul, M. D. 
1826 Bro. Benjamin R., Mr. 
1826 Bro. Francis 

1832 Harv. —James B. ; M. D. 

1758 Yale ||Silas, Mr. 



1834.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



131 



1760 Harv. Samuel, Mr., Tut. j D. D. at Bro. 
1795 Bro. Gaius, Mr. ['90 

1805 Bro. Samuel, Mr. 

1809 Yale St. George, Mr. 

1822 Bro. —Timothy B. 
1824 Bow. Ebenezer F., Mr. 
1833 Bow. —William P., M. D. 

Dearborn 
174G Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1821 Dart. —Ebenezer, M. D. 
1821 Harv. —Abraham D., M. D. 
1824 Bro. —Jonathan, M. D. 

1830 Harv. —Henry A. S., Mr. 

Deblois 
1813 Harv. Thomas A., Mr. 

1816 Harv. John A., Mr. 

De Charms 
1826 Yale Richard 
Deering 

1810 Harv. JNathaniel, Mr. 
1820 Harv. James F., Mr. 

DeForest 

1826 Yale John, M. D. 

1831 Yale George F. 
1831 Yale William B. 

1831 Yale Samuel S. 

1832 Yale Henry A. 

Dehon 
1795 Harv. Theodore, Mr.— D. D. at N. J. 

1833 Harv. William [1809 

1834 Harv. William 

Delafield 

1808 Yale Joseph 

1812 Yale Edward, M. D.— Prof, at N. J. 

Delamatter 
1824 Wms. —John, M. D.— Prof, at Berk. 

DeLancey 

1817 Yale William H., Mr.— D. D. at Penn. 

[and Pres. 

Delaney 
1828 Bow. —Michael G., M. D. 

Delano 
1790 Bro. Joseph 

1809 Bro. David 

1823 Dart. Samuel 

1833 Dart. — Baraa L., M. D. 
Delavan 

1827 Yale George E. ; Mr., '31 

Delong 
1827 Wash. JohnL. 

Deming 
1700 Harv. David, Mr. 

Josiah, Mr. 

Joseph 

Oliver, Mr. 

William 

David, Mr., Yale '12- 

William 

Martin C, Mr. 

Luther L., M. D. 



1709 Yale 
1737 Harv. 
1760 Yale 
1779 Dart. 
1809 Wms. 

1811 Yale 

1812 Mid. 
1822 Mid. 

Demond 
1816 Dart. Elijah 

Dench 
1793 Bro. Gilbert, Mr., Tut 

Denison 
1681 Harv. William, Mr. 
1684 Harv. John, Mr. 
1690 Harv. Daniel 
1693 Harv. George 

1710 Harv. John, Mr. 
1742 Harv. John, Mr. 



1756 Yale Jesse 
1763 Yale Joseph, Mr. 

1784 Yale Joseph, Mr., Tut. 

1796 Yale Charles, Mr., and at Wms. '99 ; 
1811 Ver. — John, Mr. [Tut. at Wms. 

1824 Yale Jeremiah T., Mr., M. D. 

1826 Yale Zina 

1827 Yale Ebenezer 

1828 Yale —Joseph A., M. D. 

Dennie 

1790 Harv. Joseph 

Dennis 
1723 Harv. Josiah, Mr. 
1730 Harv. John, Mr. 
1770 Bro. John, Mr. 
1803 Yale Littleton 
18 6 Bow. Rodney G., Mr. 
1834 Bow. Samuel W. 

Dennison 

1811 Bow. Cornelius 

1825 Ver. Joseph A. 

Denniston 
1807 Yale John 
Denny 

1797 Harv. Nathaniel P. 
1814 Yale Austin, Mr. 

1823 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1831 Amh. Andrew 

Denton 

1833 Wms. Jonas 

Derby 

1785 Harv. Samuel G., Mr. 

1786 Harv. John, Mr. 

1791 Harv. Ezekiel H., Mb. 
1803 Harv. — Elias H., Mr. 

1811 Bow. John B., Mr. 

1812 Harv. Richard 

1814 Harv. George 

1818 Harv. Ezekiel H., Mr. 

1824 Harv. Elias H., Mr. 

1829 Harv. Nathaniel F. 

1834 Harv. Andrew, M. D. 

Dering 

1784 Yale Henry P., Mr. 

1813 Yale Nicoll H., Mr., M. D. at N. Y. 

Desaussure 
1810 Harv. William F. 

Desbrisay 
1833 Dart. —Thomas B., M. D. 

Deshon 
1820 Yale Francis B. 

Devens 
1829 Harv. Samuel A. 

Devereux 
1767 Harv. Burrill, Mr. 

1798 Harv. Humphrey, Mr. 
1813 Yale Thomas, Mr. 

1815 Yale George P. 
1829 Harv. George H., Mr. 
1829 Harv. Nicholas 

Devotion 

1707 Harv. Ebenezer 

1732 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 

1754 Yale John, Mr. 

1759 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 

1785 Yale John 
1806 Yale Samuel H. 

Dewey 
1779 Dart. Elijah 

1787 Yale Joshua 

1792 Yale ||t— Daniel, Mr. 
1794 Dart, Eldad 



132 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Nov. 



1806 Wms. Chester, Mr., and at Yale '"09, 
1311 Wms. Charles A., Mr. [Tut. and Prof. 
1814 Wms. Loring D., Mr. 

1814 Wms. Orville 

1815 Dart. —John, M. D. 

1819 Dart. Benjamin W. ; Mr.— M. D. at 

1820 Yale Daniel N., Mr. [Mid. ; 22 

1832 Yale Amasa 

1833 Wms. Egbert 

1834 Wash. Daniel J. 

DeWint 
1795 Dart. —Christian, Mr., and at N. J. 
1828 Yale Peter C. 

DeWitt 
1785 Yale Abraham V. H. 

1799 Yale Peter 

DeWolf 
1743 Yale Nathan. Mr. 
1747 Yale Daniel/Mr. 
1806 Bro. Henry 
1806 Bro. John. Mr.. Prof. 
1827 Yale Allen M. 

Dexter 

1720 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1776 Harv. Aaron, Mr., M. D., and at Dart. 
[1805: Prof. 
1781 Harv. Samuel, Mr., LL. D. 
1798 Bro. Andrew 
1801 Bro. Samuel 
1806 Bro. Elijah, Mr. 
1810 Harv. Thomas A., Mr. 
1812 Harv. Samuel W., Mr. 
1812 Harv. Franklin, Mr. 
1812 Yale Theodore, M. D. 
1812 Bro. Clfristopher C, Mr. 
1834 Amh. Nathaniel M. 

Dey 
1823 Yale —Richard V., Mr. 

D'Honneur 
1753 Yale # John 

Diamond 
1725 Harv. Thomas 

Dibble 
1734 Yale Ebenezer, Mr., D. D. at Columb. 
1758 Yale John, Mr. 
1778 Yale_ John A., Mr. 

Dickerman 
1736 Yale Isaac, Mr. 

Dickerson 
1826 Mid. Jonathan L., M. D. 

Dickey 
1818 Dart. David W., Mr. 

Dickinson 
1706 Yale Jonathan, Mr., Pres. of N. J. 
1717 Yale Moses, Mr. 
1723 Harv. Benjamin 

1730 Yale Azariah, Mr. 

1731 Yale Jonathan, Mr. 
1749 Yale Samuel, Mr. 

1758 Yale Israel, Mr., and at N. J. '59 

1766 Yale David 

1771 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

1778 Yale Obadiah, Mr. 

1785 Yale ||John D. 

1785 Dart. Timothy, Mr. 

1795 Dart. Samuel F., Mr. 

1797 Dart. John 

1798 Dart. Pliny, Mr. 

1800 Wms. Moses 
1800 Wms. John 

1804 Yale Matthew, Mr. 

1805 Yale Rodolphus 
1805 Dart. —David, Mr. 



1811 Wms. Lewis E. 

1811 Bro. Joshua P., M. D. at Harv. '16 

1813 Dart. —William G., M. D. 

1813 Dart. Austin 

1816 Harv. —Joshua P., M. D. 

1817 Yale Baxter, Mr. 

1818 Harv. Edwards, Mr., M. D. 

1819 Wms. Samuel 

1821 Yale —Levi, M. D. 
1823 Yale Richard W., Mr. 
1823 Yale Edward, Mr. 
1823 Yale —Edward, M. D. 

1825 Amh. Appleton 

1826 Yale James T., Mr. 

1827 Yale John 

1832 Amh. Erastus 

1833 Amh. Thomas H. 

Dickson 
1808 Mid. John, Mr. 

1814 Yale Samuel H., Mr., M. D. at Penn, 

1814 Yale John, Mr. 

1832 Yale Charles 

Diggins 
1740 Yale John, Mr. 

1767 Yale Augustus 

Dillaway 
1825 Harv. Charles K., Mr. 
Dillingham 

1815 Wms. William H., Mr. 
1819 Wms. Charles, Mr. 

Diman 

1730 Harv. James, Mr. 

1768 Harv. James, Mr. 

Dimmick 
1810 Yale Alpheus 

Dimock 
1823 Yale —Timothy, M. D. 

Diraon 
1728 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 
1783 Yale Ebenezer 

Dingley 
1785 Harv. Amasa, Mr. 

Dinsmoor 
1789 Dart. *||Samuel, Mr., Gov. of N. H. 
1814 Dart. Samuel, Mr. 

Dinsmore 

1791 Dart. Silas, Mr. 
1813 Dart. James 

1822 Harv. Othniel 

Ditson 
1829 Bow. Asa M. 

Dix 
1758 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1769 Harv. Jonas, Mr. 

1792 Harv. William, Mr.. M. B, 
1801 Harv. John, Mr. 

1813 Harv. Henry E. 

1816 Bro. —Charles, M. D. 
1320 Bro. —John A., Mr. 

1833 Harv. John H. 

Dixon 
1799 Bro. Nathan F. 

1807 Yale David R. 

1808 Yale —David, Mr., D. D. '21 
1813 Yale Abraham 

1822 Yale Simeon F., Mr. 



Correction. — We inadvertently omitted to insert 
the following :— Against the name of Pres. Allen, 
on page 94, of this number, '1820 Bowdoin.' In- 
stead of 'Middlebury,' against Pres. Wheeler, read 
'Vermont.' 




l OTse, Tirtrf: 



pglHll* 



tie** 



IPJ5F, FJSATCJS BIMBOS', I},©, 

Late President of Dartmouth College. 
Published Far the. American Quarterly Register: 



1834.1 LIFE OP PRESIDENT BROWN. 133 



SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF PRESIDENT BROWN. 

[By Rev. Henry Wood, Haverhill, N. II. ] 

Rev. Francis Brown, D. D., President of Dartmouth college, was born 
at Chester, Rockingham county, in the State of New Hampshire, Jan. 11, 
1784. His father, Benjamin Brown, was a respectable merchant, in mod- 
erate circumstances, who lived to be gratified in all the hopes he had 
cherished of the future character and eminence of his son, though he 
died at an early stage of his presidency, without witnessing, unless from 
heaven, the triumphant termination of his career. His mother, whose 
maiden name was Prudence Kelly, lived only to the tenth year of his age, 
and yet in that short and early period, evidently exerted a strong influence 
in forming that full and symmetrical character he afterwards developed ; 
imparting those traits for which she and her family were distinguished, 
particularly that love of order and propriety in every thing however minute 
and apparently unimportant, and that inflexible adherence to truth and 
right, for which his own conduct was always so conspicuous. Though he 
exhibited nothing of the solicitudes, the hopes, and the obedience of re- 
ligion during the period of childhood, such was the power and ascendency 
of conscience over his heart and life, that according to a declaration of his 
father, he was never known, but in one instance, to be guilty of falsehood. 
His boyhood was marked by uncommon thirst for knowledge, which he 
sought to gratify by recourse to whatever sources of information lay within 
his reach, whether they were books, or the conversation of intelligent men, 
or intercourse with his own better educated associates ; whilst the extreme 
facility with which he made his acquisitions, imparting a pleasure beyond 
what sports could give, abstracted him in a great measure, from the society 
of his equals, for undivided attention to the cultivation of his mind. His 
very amusements, whenever he indulged in them, were in advance of his 
years, more intellectual, more manly ; less violent and unmeaning, less 
perilous to health and life, less liable to injure the feelings, interrupt the 
happiness, and excite the jealousy of his associates. At the age of fourteen, 
he solicited his father, with much importunity, to furnish him with the 
means for attaining a public education. Amiable as he was in disposition, 
precocious in the manifestation of original greatness of mind, and beloved as 
an only son, still his father judged it inexpedient, with his limited resources, 
to make the effort. In contradiction of all his cherished views of the 
future, and with deep anguish of heart, young Brown saw nothing before 
him but the prospect of his minority spent in the counting-room of his 
father, with the rest of life devoted to the exclusive acquisition of money, 
which even then he regarded with an indifference that in subsequent times 
reached almost to contempt. Not long after this, the second marriage of 
his father removed what had seemed an insuperable obstacle in the way of 
his education. The new mother providentially raised up for this exigency, 
with a sagacity at once discovering his rich promise, and a disinterested- 
ness worthy of lasting record, proposed furnishing the necessary funds from 
her own private fortune. With a gratitude he felt to the last, and an in- 
genuousness which loved to confess it, he said to her in his final sickness, 
and only a few days before his death : " My dear mother, whatever good 
I have done in the world, and whatever honor I have received, I owe it all 
to you." 

VOL. VII. 18 



134 LIFE OF PRESIDENT BROWN. [NOV. 

Unshackled at length from pecuniary embarrassment, he repaired, in 
his sixteenth year, to Atkinson academy, for the prosecution of his prepar- 
atory education — an institution then under the care of the Hon. John Vose, 
and for a long period among the most respectable and flourishing in New 
England. In respect to his appearance at that time, his instructor states : 
" Though he made no pretensions to piety during his residence at the 
academy, he was exceedingly amiable in his affections and moral in his 
deportment. It is very rare we find an individual in whom so many excel- 
lences centre. To a sweet disposition was united a strong mind ; to an 
accuracy which examined the minutiae of every thing, a depth of inves- 
tigation which penetrated the most profound. I recollect, that when I 
wrote recommending him to college, I informed Dr. Wheelock, I had sent 
him an Addison." 

It is not easy in many cases, to trace back religious history to the first 
moment of spiritual life ; its origin is frequently hidden from observation, 
like the fountain-stream, concealed by shrubbery and shade, or struggling 
long under the matted grass, till at last it breaks out in purity and power far 
from its source. If at one time three thousand are converted to the Saviour 
by the preaching of Peter in the prescribed ministration of the gospel ; at 
another the falling leaf, or the withering flower, is sufficient to accomplish 
the same effect upon individual hearts ; and the voice of Peter with all its 
announcements of guilt and danger, on that occasion, was not more terri- 
ble to the consciences of his hearers, than the simple, often heard, often 
neglected clarion of the cock, that fell upon his own ear, when he went 
out and wept bitterly. Rules and prescriptions are most preposterous in 
respect to the causes, the methods, and the development of the divine life : 
sufficient for us is it to know, that " all these things worketh that one and 
self-same Spirit, dividing to every man severally as he will." The most 
trifling occurrence under the direction of this Spirit, has often excited re- 
flection, awakened conscience, and conducted to the Saviour. At the 
close of his residence at Atkinson, president Brown was visited by a severe 
attack of sickness in the form of fever. On his death-bed he remarked to 
those who stood by his side: — "During my sickness at Atkinson academy, 
about the time the fever formed a crisis, whilst in a state of partial delirium, 
I had a view of the happiness of heaven : I was gently led on to the portal, 
and beheld a glory which I can never describe. I was then conducted to 
the gate of hell, where I had a view of the pit below. I fell asleep, and 
upon awaking, thought I could not live. Greatly distressed in my mind, 
I called for my mother, and asked her what I should do ? When she had 
counselled me, and directed me, as my case required, I changed my posi- 
tion in the bed, and, for the first time in my life, attempted to pray. After 
this, I had clear and impressive views of the Saviour, succeeded by great 
enjoyment, such as I had never experienced before. I felt a desire to go 
to college, and become a minister." We know not, nor is it needful for 
us to know, what confidence he reposed in these exercises of mind : 
whether he regarded this as the time of his submission to God, or these 
exercises as only the first stage of a course, which ultimately led him to the 
cross. No one could less esteem a religious hope begun and matured in 
the marvellous and exciting : his views of the gospel forbade any sympathy 
with experiences and professions, built upon any thing but a knowledge of 
God, and cordial admission of the grand doctrines of his word. In him 
reason presided over and kept in subjection all the inferior powers : cool, 
investigating, cautious, the rigid discipline he maintained over his spirit, 
allowed little indulgence for excitement of feeling, little play for the fervor 



1834.] LIFE OF PRESIDENT BROWN. 135 

of imagination. It was the cautiousness of his natural character, the 
severe jealousy he exercised over the workings of his heart, which probably 
induced him for so many years, to defer a public acknowledgment of 
Christ as his Lord, till he united with the church in Chester, in the year 
he became a tutor in Dartmouth college. However his religious impres- 
sions originated, they deepened year by year, till they resulted in the for- 
mation of an intelligent, humble, steadfast and transparently pure Christian 
character. 

In the spring term of 1802, he entered the freshman class of Dartmouth 
college. For the four subsequent years, he pursued the tenor of his way 
in a diligent, delightful application to the usual studies, impelled by the 
consideration of duty, in cultivating to the utmost the powers God had 
given him, and by interest in the objects held out for attainment, instead 
of that odious selfishness and dwarfish pride, upon which so much of 
college ambition is often founded. Determined fully to pursue, and 
thoroughly to understand, whatever came within the prescribed course, 
such was the equal cultivation, such the beautiful proportions of his mind, 
it would be difficult to say in what department he excelled himself, though 
in all he so much excelled others. Affable and condescending, careful to 
inflict the slightest wound upon no one when it could be avoided, it 
was easy for him to secure the respect and affection of his fellow-students, 
who in the highest honors of the class which he received upon graduating, 
could use and understand the language of the poet : " Non invideor ; miror 
magis." Conscientious in observance of the college discipline, judicious 
and self-possessed in whatever he did, dignified and manly even in youthful 
buoyancy, beyond what mere age and art, without the inspiring soul, can 
effect, the officers of the institution, whilst they loved him for the qualities 
of his heart, discovered in his mind that rare combination of excellences, 
which even then to their presentiment made him their future associate, 
their counsellor, their guide. 

The year following his graduation, he spent as private tutor, in the 
family of judge Paine, of Williamstown, Vermont, — a rare specimen in 
noble independence, vigorous intellect, plain manners, and unsullied 
honesty, of the " temporis longe acti," where every thing in congeniality 
with his own soul, incited to those high and disinterested principles of 
action which he now cherished in their abstractions ; afterwards in the 
toils and sacrifices of a most devoted life. At the close of this period, he 
repaired to Hanover to discharge the office of tutor, to which he had been 
called ; here he spent the three succeeding years in the able and satisfac- 
tory fulfilment of his duties, improving and delighting his classes by his 
lucid and thorough instructions, at the same time he was furnishing his 
own mind for future usefulness, by the pursuits of like nature, and the 
study of theology. Perhaps this ill-reputed, this odious office, was never 
more effectually protected, than by the urbanity of his manners, the man- 
liness of his intercourse, and the kind yet decided course of his discipline, 
from the ill-will and disrespect which it is heir to. Among the manuscripts 
found after his decease, was a paper containing a series of Resolutions 
which he drew up soon after entering upon the office of tutor, dated 
Dartmouth college, October IS, 1807. How fully and scrupulously they 
were observed, no one needs be told, who knew him in the different rela- 
tions of his subsequent life ; they are his own autobiography — his character 
unwittingly drawn by his own hand, 



136 LIFE OF PRESIDENT BROWN. [Nov. 

" Resolved,— That the glory of God shall be my leading motive in all 
my actions ; and I will look to God by prayer, and consult his holy word, 
for direction herein. 

" I will seek the good of mankind in all things, and thus endeavor to 
conform to the golden rule of the blessed Redeemer. 

" My conduct shall be marked with meekness and humility, and my 
conversation shall be principally upon religious subjects. 

" In all my secular concerns, literary pursuits and instructions, I will 
have an eye to religion, and to the glory of God. 

"I will live as a stranger and pilgrim upon the earth, and consume no 
more of this world's goods, than are required as the necessaries and con- 
veniences of life. I will seek the approbation of God, rather than the 
praise of men ; I will endeavor, however, to merit the esteem of men, and 
if I should incur their displeasure, will carefully inquire whether I have 
not given just occasion of offence. 

" I will always be willing to acknowledge my errors and sins, and give 
reasonable satisfaction to any one I may have injured. 

" If insulted and injured by others, I will pity them, forgive them, and 
do them good. 

" I will slander no man ; and I will injure no man's feelings, but when 
his good or the cause of truth requires it : The truth shall always be 
strenuously, but prudently maintained. 

" Morning and evening I will humbly confess my sins, and seek deliv- 
erance from them ; thank God for his goodness, and pray for pardon, and 
a continuance of his blessings." 

At the commencement of 1809, relinquishing his office at college, he 
commenced preaching the gospel, for which he had received, some time 
before, a licensure from the Grafton association. After rejecting various 
applications for his services, of a flattering nature, if he had consulted 
ease or honor in the ministry, he was ordained pastor of the church in 
North Yarmouth, Maine, on his birthday, January II, 1810. Venerated 
for his piety, honored for his talents and learning, confided in for his judg- 
ment and prudence, beloved for the gentleness and kindness of his heart, 
with growing reputation and unwearied labors, his people sat under his 
shade with unmingled delight ; willingly did they resign themselves to 
the guidance of a leader, whose skill they could not but see, whose safety 
their own experience taught them to acknowledge. It was however but a 
few months after his ordination, that the fears of his affectionate parishioners 
were excited by news of his appointment to the vacant professorship of 
languages, at Dartmouth college, but which, for reasons deemed satisfactory 
by himself, he declined. For the five succeeding years, his people were 
suffered without interruption and without molestation to rejoice in his light 
and profit by his labors. United, strengthened, edified, they had the 
pleasure of seeing many from time to time added to the Saviour's flock, to 
whom his ministry had apparently been a savor of life unto life ; besides 
a general revival of religion in his parish, with which God was pleased for 
once to crown his labors, he was permitted to see what is still more de- 
sirable, a progressive and steady advance of the work of divine grace, 
securing all the advantages, at the same time it excluded many of the 
defects, of a period of religious excitement. Nor were his labors and in- 
fluence restricted to the limits of his own parish. As an overseer and 
then a trustee of Bowdoin college, he zealously co-operated with the ex- 
cellent president Appleton, and other friends of learning in the State, in 



1834.] LIFE OF PRESIDENT IJROWN. JIJ7 

advancing the institution towards its present reputable character and 
growing usefulness. Often did Dr. Appleton, in the perplexed and 
straightened circumstances in which it was placed, visit North Yarmouth 
for the purpose of consultation with the young parish minister, or for the 
same reason send his request that Mr. Brown would visit Brunswick. As 
a director of the Bible, Education, and Missionary Societies of the State, 
he manifested his interest and afforded his aid, in what has been so justly 
denominated the glory of the age. Pursuing the delightful work of the 
ministry, in his secluded, quiet, confiding parish, beloved as hardly pastor 
ever was beloved, with an amiable wife, the daughter of his predecessor, 
the Rev. Mr. Gilman, and a group of children growing up around him in 
his own image, to share and enhance his happiness ; the good work of the 
Lord prospering in his hand, in the improved morals, the intelligence and 
scriptural piety of his flock ; ambition had not a place in his heart, he 
asked for no removal to the affluent and refined congregation of the city ; 
he thought not of the offices of colleges, or the honors bestowed upon lit- 
erary pursuits. 

At this very hour, however, the providence of God brought about such a 
concurrence of circumstances as to blast the hopes of his parishioners, and 
in an unasked, undesired station, to exhibit his character in new and 
striking lights. For some years a collision had existed, and been ripening 
for a crisis, between the president and trustees of Dartmouth college ; 
originating, according to the averment of the trustees, in the claims pre- 
ferred by the president to certain rights in regard to the appointment of 
professors and the government of the institution, which they as strenuously 
denied and withstood. At the same tempestuous time, the period closing the 
recent war with Great Britain, the spirit of party rose to the point of the bit- 
terest exacerbation, where the soul of ancient religious hatred seemed to be 
transfused into bosoms burning with political rancor ; and the persecution 
of sect, to be exchanged for the persecution of party. We speak not as 
partisans ; we would write unqualified condemnation or approval, for 
neither of the great factions of that day ; on both sides lay abundant error 
in spirit or in action: we record these things only as matters of history, 
and happy for us is it to know and to make known, that many who were pre- 
cipitated into these scenes by the violence of party spirit, so rife and even 
vindictive at that day, have seen and acknowledged their error. On both 
sides, every subject and circumstance, however trivial and foreign, were 
dragged into controversy, and made subservient to annoying the political 
foe. No wonder, then, that the college soon became debatable ground ; 
inflammatory appeals were made to the passions and the prejudices of party ; 
the multitude, least of all able to comprehend motives of this sort, with 
which they are so little conversant, and in which usually they feel so little 
interest, were taught to regard the president as their partisan, and a martyr, 
so far as he could be, to the interests of their cause. An excited legislature 
was appealed to on the part of the president, who appointed a committee to 
repair to Hanover, during the recess of the general court, and inspect the 
records of the college, examine witnesses, hear the statements of the 
parties, investigate the general condition of the institution, and make 
report of their doings at the next session. The committee, consisting of 
three highly intelligent, and disinterested individuals, after a protracted 
investigation, presented their report, fully vindicating the trustees from the 
charges brought against them, and asserting that the charter of the college 
had been preserved hitherto inviolate. This committee was appointed in 
June, 1815, and reported in November following. In the meanwhile i 



138 LIFE OF PRESIDENT BROWN. [Nov. 

August 26, the president, by vote of the trustees, was removed from 
office. In these stormy times, it was no enviable lot to be called to the 
vacant chair ; to be placed at the helm of the foundering vessel, with the 
charge of steering her through the waves : the best established character, 
the most extended influence, were hardly adequate to the crisis. With 
what surprise then, on the part of the public, was the announcement heard 
that Francis Brown was designated president! Who is Francis Brown? 
was the hurried inquiry : the minister of North Yarmouth, without notoriety, 
without friends, living remote in another State and in a retired parish ; a 
young man of only thirty years, an age when no one has been elected to 
this responsible office in a New England college, and when his own 
election is environed by difficulties, at which the boldest heart might 
tremble, and the most tried wisdom despond. The enemies of the college, 
hoping the measure would accelerate the accomplishment of their own 
purposes, exulted over an act they deemed of the most palpable folly ; 
whilst its firmest friends were not a little disheartened for what might be 
found upon the result, to be at least an injudicious choice. It was charac- 
teristic of president Brown, that he was always equal to any emergency ; 
no call could be made upon his resources unhonored ; at a word, all the 
sleeping energies of his mind came up in their glowing beauty and just 
proportions, awakening the admiration and securing the confidence of timid 
friends, and overawing the presumption that already exulted in the over- 
throw of the college. Reluctantly given up by his people, he had only to 
touch again the soil of his native State, and move amid the eyes and ears 
of its citizens, to be admitted as that superior mind which Providence had 
raised up, and kept like Moses in the desert, for this very crisis. A certain 
dignity of person, altogether native and inimitable, made every one feel 
himself in the presence of original greatness, in honoring which, he also 
honored himself: such were the conciliation and command belonging to 
his character, that from the first moment of his re-appearance in his own 
State, the voice of detraction was silent ; whoever else was rebuked, he 
escaped, whom all conspired to honor. 

In the meantime, political exasperation, unappeased by the lapse of 
time for reflection, marched onward to its object. Notwithstanding the 
investigation of their committee, the legislature utterly refused to accept 
their report as the basis of their proceedings. An act was passed, annulling 
the original charter, giving a new name to the college, increasing the number 
of the trustees, creating a board of overseers, and placing the institution in all 
its departments and interests in abject dependence upon any party legislature. 
The students, almost without exception, still attended the instruction of 
professors in the old college even when they were expelled from the college 
buildings, deprived of libraries, apparatus, and recitation-rooms. A penal 
enactment was judged expedient by this enlightened legislature, imposing a 
fine of $500 upon any one who should presume to act as trustee, president, 
professor, tutor, or any other officer in Dartmouth college ; for every instance 
of offence, one half of the penalty to be appropriated for the benefit of the 
prosecutor, and the other for the encouragement of learning ! Such was 
the hold of a superior mind upon the attachment and confidence of the 
students, that still they followed their proscribed, exiled president, with 
the affection of children, and the heroism of martyrs. He opened a new 
chapel, procured other recitation-rooms, morning and evening gathered 
his pupils around him, in the devotions of a pure and confiding heart com- 
mended them and himself to God. Through this scene of strife and 
peril of more than five years' continuance ; when the chances against the 



1834.] LIFE OP PRESIDENT BROWN. 139 

college were in preponderance ; when disgrace in the public estimation, 
together with a forfeiture of academical honors, was what the students 
expected as the result of their adherence to the old faculty ; so absolute 
was the power of a great mind and a noble heart over them, so effectual 
was moral influence in the government of more than one hundred young 
men, when college laws were stript of authority, that never was discipline 
more thorough, study more ardent, or proficiency more respectable ; three 
of the presidents and nine of the professors in our colleges, besides a large 
number of the most resolute, aspiring, useful members of the different 
professions, are the children nursed and cradled in the storms of that time. 
The college moved onward ; commencements were held ; degrees were 
conferred ; new students crowded around the president to take the place 
of the graduated — when edicts were fulminated, and penalties imposed for 
every prayer that was offered in the chapel, and every act of instruction in 
the recitation-room. 

Such was president Brown's influence in college : as much must we ad- 
mire his activity and direction of affairs out of it. Whilst every thing 
demanded his presence at home, the condition of the college none the 
less urgently required his intercourse and agency abroad. Funds were 
needed to compensate for the abstraction of college property in the hands 
of the treasurer ; his vacations, therefore, instead of affording repose from 
laborious service, were only seasons for services still more arduous, and in 
addition to the labor, offensive to a delicate and sensitive mind. The claims 
of the college were also submitted to the decision of the laws of the State ; 
the importance of the cause in its intrinsic nature, and the additional 
interest created by its association with the politics of the day, contributed 
to awaken the most intense solicitude, the most anxious expectation. 
President Brown had informed himself upon almost every subject, especially 
upon whatever might be of practical concern ; judgment founded upon a 
clear and ready perception of things, was a leading characteristic of his 
mind ; it is not known that he ever applied himself to the systematic study 
of the law, yet he had become so intimately acquainted with the great 
principles of that science, he so well understood the structure of our insti- 
tutions, the power of legislatures and the rights of corporate bodies secured 
by contract, he was so confident of success in the ultimate decision of the 
highest tribunal of the nation, that when others were disheartened, and urged 
an abandonment of the cause, a good one, as they believed, but fated, like 
many other good causes, to be unsuccessful, he stood erect ; if not so confi- 
dent of success, yet as much as ever fixed in his purpose. Never has a 
cause been litigated in our country more important from the principle to 
be established, and the interests remotely involved : the existence not only 
of this, but of all seminaries for education, and of all corporate bodies 
whatever, was suspended upon the present decision. The permanence of 
all the institutions of our country, whether charitable, literary, or religious, 
and indeed the very character of the nation in its future stages, were con- 
nected with this adjudication upon a point of constitutional law. Such was 
the confidence reposed in the president's judgment, and in his knowledge 
of the case, that the eminent professional men engaged for the college did 
not hesitate to receive his advice, and urge his attendance at the courts ; 
the case would seem almost to have been prepared in his study, and drawn 
out by his own hand. Honorable testimonials have they left of the opinion 
they entertained of his capacity, by their frequent consultations : honorable 
also to themselves, in the evidence that they were not ashamed to acknow- 
ledge merit, when found in a young man, guiding and protecting an un- 



140 LIFE OP PRESIDENT BROWN. [Nov. 

popular and unpromising cause. Never have higher legal attainments been 
brought into powerful and splendid exhibition at the bar of our country. 
On the one side, in behalf of the college, were Jeremiah Smith and Jer- 
emiah Mason, those " men of renown" in the civil jurisprudence of the 
State ; and Daniel Webster, a son of the college, just entering upon his 
luminous career of eloquence in the senate and the forum; and Joseph 
Hopkinson of Philadelphia, who when he had exerted all that admirable 
talent for which he is so distinguished in the final trial at Washington, did 
not refuse this homage, to brilliant genius and vigorous intellect, when he 
said in a letter written to president Brown announcing the happy and final 
decision : " I would advise you to inscribe over the door of your institu- 
tion, Founded by Eleazer Wheelock : Refounded by Daniel Web- 
ster." On the other side were employed John Holmes of Maine, 
William Pinckney of Baltimore, and that most accomplished scholar, that 
ornament of our country, that humble disciple at last of the Saviour, of 
whose talents and honorable conduct in this case, even his professional 
opponents make the most respectable mention, William Wirt, attorney 
general of the United States. Whatever research, argument, eloquence, 
could do for a cause, or against it, was done in the process of this trial. 
In the superior court of New Hampshire, November, 1817, a decision was 
given against the pretensions of the trustees. Without delay, and apparently 
without dejection, on the part of president Brown, the cause was carried 
up to the supreme court of the United States, at Washington, where it 
was argued in the March following, with the utmost legal learning, and the 
most fervid eloquence these distinguished advocates could command, and 
as it would seem, on the part of some, with the serious, religious conviction 
of duty. The case was deferred by the court for advisement, till the February 
term of 1819, when, to the entire satisfaction of the patrons of the college, 
and with the devout thanksgiving of the friends of learning and religion 
throughout the land, the claims of the trustees were sustained against the 
fear of all future legislative despotism and party intermeddling. Others 
would have exulted ; president Brown was humble : they would have 
triumphed over a fallen foe ; he, on the contrary, was more courteous and 
conciliating : they would have taken the praise to their able counsel and 
perseverance ; he ascribed the whole to Heaven. There was the same 
composure of countenance, the same earnest and direct address to duty : 
too much occupied by God's goodness, to be any thing but abased and 
devout. 

At the time when all was darkness and confusion in relation to the 
college, when every thing invited retreat, president Brown was elected 
to the same office in Hamilton college, a peaceful, well endowed, and 
flourishing institution in New York. So many reasons solicited his 
acceptance— adherence to the destinies of Dartmouth seemed so much 
more the act of a desperate than a sound mind — that the patrons of 
the college could hardly ask him to make additional sacrifices, and they 
who best knew him, scarcely thought him capable of so inflexible a purpose, 
so dauntless a courage, so entire a self-devotion. Every emergency, how- 
ever, serving to bring out new qualities, or enhance those already exhibited, 
he was found again equal to the crisis. 

" Victrix causa diis placuit sed victa Catoni." 

The question at issue he deemed too important not only to the interests 
of this college, but of all the literary, charitable, and religious institutions 



1834.] LIFE OF PRESIDENT BROWN. J 41 

of our country, to be abandoned for considerations of personal advantage. 
The flattering offer, though earnestly pressed, was instantly rejected ; 
Providence called for him, as a sacrifice upon the altar of learning and 
religion : he could not refuse the martyrdom. In the year 1819, the honor 
of doctor in divinity was conferred upon him by Hamilton and William - 
colleges, as an expression of the regard in which his character and 
labors were held ; but it was an honor destined to flourish in his grave, 
rather than adorn his living brow. Incessant labors, the most painful 
solicitudes, together with frequent exposure to the cold and the storm, 
were too much at last for his delicate frame. Occupied in the chapel 
morning and evening in the exercises of devotion ; through the day in 
hearing recitations, sometimes in metaphysics, sometimes in the languages, 
and sometimes in miscellaneous studies, besides the general supervision of 
the college : on the Sabbath preaching in the destitute congregations in the 
vicinity, to eke out the means of a scanty support ; during the vacations 
travelling extensively to collect funds and sustain the interests of the college ; 
corresponding with the bar, and hurrying from home to attend the courts ; 
— all business, all activity, all solicitude, and suspense ; how could he but 
become the victim of his own generous devotion? Soon after the com- 
mencement of 1818, he was troubled with a slight hoarseness; in spite of 
medicine and precaution, this affection continued, aggravated occasionally 
by hemorrhage at the lungs. The last time he preached was at Thetford, 
Vermont, October 6, 1818. With the hope of improving his health, 
he journeyed to the western part of New York; still unable to stay the 
encroachment of the disease, he prosecuted travelling in the fall of 1819, 
as far as Georgia, where, and in South Carolina, he spent the following 
winter and spring. 

Unimproved in health by climate, by travelling, and the prescriptions of 
the most eminent physicians, he slowly pursued his way homeward, that 
having once more seen and blessed the college he had saved and honored, 
with nothing more he could do, he might lie down and die. He arrived 
at Hanover in the month of June ; the students, in the ardor of their affec- 
tion, would have formed a procession, as they heard of his approach, to 
receive him, though his pale countenance and emaciated form told them 
too truly his sojourn was to be transient — that he was soon to depart forever. 
The tear stole down his face as the college spire once more broke out upon 
his view, with the young men sent to meet him hanging in his train : but 
he could not permit what his native modesty and the seriousness of the 
hour forbade; he needed pall-bearers, not a triumphal procession. In the 
full exercise of his understandino;, or rather his understanding!; invigorated 
and perfected by the celestial visions beginning to break upon him, as like 
Brainerd - , he " stood upon the sides of eternity," like him too he wished to 
be useful to the last. The senior class was about leaving upon their last 
vacation ; he invited them to his sick room ; they stood around him ; as a 
father, as a dying Christian, he gave them his farewell advice, his latest 
counsels and blessing, with a seriousness of air befitting the grave ; with a 
serenity and joy most like heaven. They listened; they wept; they 
retired ; they parted on earth forever, but not. till they had sent back an 
address filled with prayers for his recovery, and promises that they would re- 
member and follow his counsels. Few of the remarks he made in his last 
sickness can now be recalled, so as to be recorded ; the following are of 
those remembered. " At the commencement of my sickness, I felt very 
unwilling to die ; I seemed to have just begun to live; I wished to do 
something to make it more evident on whose side I was. I thought I 

VOL. VII. 19 



142 LIFE OF PRESIDENT BROWN. [NoV. 

should be ashamed to appear among those who had been actively engaged 
in the service of God and their generation. But now I have passed this 
trial; if I do not mistake my feelings, I have been brought to be willing 
to be saved by grace, without doing any thing." To a minister he said, 
" The last winter (when he was travelling at the south) I read the Scrip- 
tures a good deal in Greek : I was surprised at the new views I obtained 
from passages the most familiar." At another time : "lam often reminded 
of the plain, blunt manner in which I was addressed by Mr. W. in New 
York. He had not been in my presence perhaps a minute, when he said : 
* You are promoted to honor ; you hold an elevated place ; but to be saved, 
you must come down as low as the poorest and meanest sinner that lives.' 
I think I fully assented to it : I do not exactly recollect his words at this 
time, but it was said in so sincere and affectionate a manner, as rendered 
it altogether acceptable." To one of the professors : "I am far gone ; 
1 am now expecting every day to be my last." Have you much choice ? 
it was inquired. " No ; if I can be of any use, I suppose I ought to be 
willing to live : I can yet speak to those who come in to see me." After 
a short pause, he asked : " Is there any thing in the Bible respecting the 
ministration of the saints ? " To one of the tutors, who inquired if he 
found his mind much composed^ " I am not discomposed ; if it should 
please God to give me stronger affections, I trust I shall be thankful. You 
are just entering upon the world ; be decided and active for Christ : keep 
self down." After a season of great distress, he repeated these lines : 

Well, if ye must be sad and few, 

Rolf on, my days, in haste : 
Moments of sin and months of wo, 

Ye cannot fly too fast. 

On being asked, if the doctrines of grace appeared as precious as ever, 
and particularly the divinity of Christ, he replied: "They appear the 
same ; but I am not sure we duly appreciate the Holy Ghost." To an 
inquiry, how he did, " I am getting along very fast ; nor have I any de- 
sire to go slow." On Thursday, July 27, his attendants observed in the 
morning a marked alteration in his appearance and symptoms. His wife 
leaning over his bedside in much agitation : " Be still," said he, " this is 
my last day." When after a season of speechlessness, she asked him, if 
he could not say to her one word more : he raised his eyes to heaven, and 
said : " the Lord be your God, my dear, and the God of our children." 
Closing his eyes, he then lay for some time in a state of quiet : as he 
opened his eyes again, and saw his wife standing over him, he added ; 
" Well, my love, you seem very quiet ; be quiet, all is well, I believe." 
After a short struggle, when all thought him dying, he revived and said : 
" Had it pleased my Lord to have released me, I should have rejoiced ; let 
him not withdraw his Holy Spirit from me. May the Holy Ghost be with 
me : glorious Redeemer, take my spirit." He lay a short time, and then 
all was motionless ; his spirit ascended, it cannot be doubted, to the arms 
of his Saviour — the bosom of his God. It was one o'clock, July 27, 1820. 
The recollection of that sad day is yet vivid ; the heavens were serene ; 
the winds nearly suspended in their gentleness ; the sun shone out in 
unusual brightness ; the students, held in painful expectation from hour to 
hour, were seen walking solitary under the trees and in the sequestered 
paths they frequented ; or else seated in their chambers, they opened a 
book, only to close it again : at length the dreaded note came in solemn 



1834.] LIFE OP PRESIDENT BROWN. 143 

cadence from the college bell : upon every heart it struck as a sound from 
eternity, as all stood still, looked upward, and said : My father ! my father', 
the chariot of Israel, and the horsemen thereof! 

The published writings of president Brown are the following : — 

An Address on Music, delivered before the Handel Society of Dartmouth 
college. 1809. 

The Faithful Steward ; a sermon delivered at the ordination of the 
Rev. Allen Greely. 1810. 

A Sermon delivered before the Maine Missionary Society. 1814. 

Calvin and Calvinism; defended against certain injurious representations 
contained in a pamphlet entitled : " A sketch of the Life and Doctrine of 
the celebrated John Calvin :" of which Rev. Martin Ruter claims to be 
the author. 1815. 

A Reply to the Rev. Martin Ruter's Letter, relating to Calvin and 
Calvinism. 1815. 

A Sermon delivered at Concord, before the Convention of Congregational 
and Presbyterian ministers of New Hampshire. 1818. 

In person, president Brown was of a middle stature, a little inclining in 
his posture, with an open, serene, penetrating eye of hazel, surmounted by 
a bold forehead, upon which a rich auburn hair fell gracefully ; a light, 
delicate complexion, which on his cheeks was mantled with the flush of 
health and youth : slow and contemplative in his gait though alive to all 
around him : remarkable for his neatness of dress, whilst it never ap- 
proached to fastidiousness and display. A serious, thoughtful air, with the 
marks of a sleepless attention, sat upon his countenance, at the same time 
so remote from moroseness and coldness, as to invite rather than repel ap- 
proach. A certain native dignity, having as little relation to art, as self- 
conceit to true greatness, diffused almost an air of sacredness around his 
person, forcing upon all the consciousness of being in the presence of a 
superior mind, whom it was impossible at the same moment not to love 
and reverence ; fear, and yet be attracted to nearer intimacy. A sort of 
enchantment held firmly, yet pleasingly, all who drew near him ; not the 
effect of a first impression, but strengthened more and more by protracted 
acquaintance. 

As a scholar, his acquirements were extensive, if not the most profound : 
thoroughly digested, so far as he went, and so much at the command of a 
well disciplined mind, as to be ready to appear, at a moment's bidding, to 
execute whatever he ordered. With no department of science and literature 
was he a stranger : to no one did he manifest an exclusive preference. 
He could delight in all, pursue all ; or in obedience to duty, abandon all. 
Such was the command he maintained over his acquisitions, that in the 
time of his presidency, as occasion called, he could with equal facility 
hear the recitations of the junior classes in Tacitus, algebra, and geometry, 
and the seniors in the elegant speculations of Butler and Stewart, and the 
deep abstractions of that prince of divines, as Robert Hall has denom- 
inated him, president Edwards. What he could not learn from application 
to books, on account of his importunate engagements, he extracted from 
others, with a tact which, whilst it gratified them, concealed the defect of 
his own knowledge. Ever laborious and inventing methods for doing good, 
as a preacher ; ever oppressed and distracted by conflicting duties, as 
president ; 'a young man just fairly entered upon life when he died ; were 



144 LIFE OP PRESIDENT BROWN. [NoV. 

it not for the order of his mind, it could hardly be told, how and where 
he obtained so varied and substantial learning. Had he lived and died the 
minister of North Yarmouth, or of any other, even the most obscure 
parish, so sacred to God did he consider his time and intellect, so re- 
ligiously did he regard the highest cultivation of his understanding as well 
as his heart, that he would have been the same man, the same mind, the 
same scholar still. 

As a writer and preacher, it may be said of the dress of his thoughts 
as well as of his person, it was the "simplex munditiis ;" a style not elab- 
orate, yet cautious ; never overwrought, always chaste ; not ornate but 
beautiful ; if not eloquent yet elegant, pure, noiseless as the deep stream, 
bearing along noble thoughts, clear conceptions, and convincing arguments, 
instead of that artificial rivulet, which is made to rush over rocks, and 
dash among precipices, and, concealed among thickets, to hide its native 
feebleness and poverty. Whatever he did, was done earnestly ; a negligent 
style, crude thoughts, superficial investigation, the repetition of stale facts, ' 
commonplace illustrations and forceless truisms, transmitted from author 
to author and preacher to preacher, he could not away with ; under the 
transforming operation of his original and philosophical mind, every subject 
he touched put on freshness and beauty ; with a new direction of thought, 
new lights and illustrations, and a resolute vigor in approaching it, he gave 
interest and attraction to what had seemed most jejune and soporific. 
In illustration of this is his address upon music, of which he was an ac- 
curate judge and a skilful performer, delivered when he was a tutor in 
college : his views upon this subject, thrown out when he was a youth 
merely, and more than twenty-five years ago, are in striking accordance 
with the taste and execution of that distinguished master of the art, who 
w r ithin a few years has so much reformed the psalmody of our country by 
his own beautiful airs, and the introduction of the chaste productions of 
Germany. The missionary theme has become attenuated by the various 
lights in which it has been exhibited ; and yet if we were to select one out 
of the innumerable productions the press has sent forth upon this subject, 
we know of none possessing more interest, and carrying a deeper conviction 
than the one preached before the Maine Missionary Society twenty years 
ago, when the receipts of that society were only $650. If president Brown 
had not the scrupulousness of Oberlin, whose conscience disturbed him 
for the wrong configuration of a letter in writing, he was never satisfied, if 
every thing of the smallest moment was not done just as it should be. For 
awhile in the course of his ministry, he attempted preaching extempora- 
neously for half of the Sabbath ; others were satisfied, edified, and even 
applauded ; he only was disgusted, and nearly indignant with his preaching; 
it did not reach the order, the select language, the compass of thought, the 
beauty of illustration, the strength and conclusiveness of argument, the 
apposite introduction of Scripture quotations, in a word, that perfect finish 
which he sought to give to every production. After a short experiment, he 
abandoned the effort, thinking, with president Davies, " that it was a terri- 
ble thing to talk nonsense in the name of the Lord." In preaching, his 
delivery was serious, self-possessed, impressive : his eloquence was in an 
eye beaming purity, majesty, heaven ; in a countenance lit up with in- 
telligence, conveying, like the telegraph, in its delicate and changing hues, 
a knowledge to his audience of what was working within, as he poured out 
successive truths and persuasions from his overflowing heart ; and in a 
deep, clear, sweet voice, under perfect subjection, almost like melody itself, 
bearing in its rich lines to other minds, the convictions and emotions of 



1834.] LIFE OF PRESIDENT BROWN. 145 

his own breast. Had he stood silent in the pulpit, his very looks would 
have spoken, his eyes been eloquence, and his face have inspired purity and 
devotion ; every one, as he looked, would have felt himself constrained to 
become a better and holier man. 

In his views of religion, president Brown was decidedly orthodox. At 
the greatest remove from blindness and bigotry, admitting only what he had 
examined with an independent judgment, following Christ as the only Lord 
of the conscience, he did not hesitate, after long and prayerful investigation, 
to receive into his head, more to receive into his inmost heart, those great 
truths of Christian doctrine, which were professed at the period of the 
Lutheran reformation, and by those heroic, those eminently Christian men, 
who felled the forests, planted the institutions, and with life and blood 
bought the liberties of New England. These truths he preached plainly 
and often to his own people, " with the Holy Ghost sent down from heaven ;" 
he preached them fearlessly and frequently in his subsequent elevation, 
when weaker minds would have pleaded indulgence for popularity and 
expedience : on them he reposed his salvation, as in the triumph of faith, 
he breathed out his soul into the hands of his Redeemer. When these 
truths, preserving their fortune still from age to age, were exhibited in 
distortion and caricature, as worthy only of unmingled execration, and the 
receivers of them as actuated by a spirit hardly less than diabolical, he did 
not refuse, however reluctant from native feeling, to engage in controversial 
strife, to stand forth in defence of the faith once delivered to the saints. 
He did stand forth, and made it evident that the controversy was not be- 
tween the orthodox and their accusers, but between these accusers and the 
plainest, most reiterated declarations of the word of God. A more able, 
dignified, and convincing argument for primitive Christianity, is seldom 
exhibited ; to overthrow the foundations of orthodoxy, and uproot these great 
and purifying truths of Christianity, which in every age and every place 
where they have been proclaimed, have been " mighty through God, to the 
pulling down of strong holds, casting down imaginations and every high 
thing that exalteth itself against the knowledge of God," was found a very 
different thing from echoing the old calumny of centuries : " Calvin burnt 
Servetus ! Calvin burnt Servetus ! " 

But it is upon his courage and self-devotion in preserving a venerable 
and useful institution of learning from the destruction of political phrenzy, 
and his unrivalled skill in governing the young men connected toith it, that 
his permanent fame will rest. Here was his greatest, noblest, latest, most 
triumphant effort : he carried to successful issue, young and single handed, 
in opposition to party excitement, and in defiance of penal enactments the 
most important question ever submitted to the decision of the American 
tribunal of law ; he gave rest to our literary institutions from political 
agitations ; he gave security and permanence to those endowments of 
learning, and enterprises of Christian benevolence, which are the glory 
and the protection of the land. For this he counted nothing dear unto 
him ; for this he spent his energies, wasted his property, impoverished his 
family, lavished his life. If over the door of every college should be in- 
scribed the name of its founder, in characters equally bright should it be 
written : Preserved by Francis Brown. Honored be the name which 
men like Hopkinson, and Wirt, and Webster, did not refuse to honor ; 
sleep on in peace, that form so finished in dignity and manly beauty, as 
almost to give some shadowing of what the body may be after the resurrec- 
tion ; loved forever be the mind which inhabited it, hardly receiving new 
fires and new purity as it ascended to the society of the just. 



146 



NOTICES OP NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



[Nov. 



NOTICES OF NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



Address to Christian Parents of the 

Churches in Vermont. Rutland: W. Fay, Print- 
er. 1834. pp. 36. 

The General Convention of Congrega- 
tional and Presbyterian Ministers in Ver- 
mont, at their session in Royal ton, Sep- 
tember, 1833, passed resolves, expressive 
of their opinion, that greater fidelity is 
demanded of parents, in educating their 
children to labor for the advancement of 
the kingdom of Christ ; and that it is ex- 
pedient to address the churches on this 
subject. In pursuance with these resolu- 
tions, Rev. Messrs. Edward W. Hooker, 
Amos Drury, and Hosea Beckley, were 
appointed a committee, who, at the late 
session of the convention at Brandon, re- 
ported the address, whose title we have 
given. It was written, we learn, by Mr. 
Hooker, and contains sentiments of great 
weight, expressed in a very impressive and 
scriptural manner. We hope that the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the American 'Tract 
Society will take pains to read it. If they 
do, we are sure it will be adopted into their 
series. We insert the closing paragraph. 

"Christian parents, if we expect to see the 
kingdom of Christ rising, the sons and daughters 
of the church must be trained with special refer- 
ence to the work. 'The children of this world 
are, in their generation, wiser than the children 
of light.' They make long, patient, pains-tak- 
ing preparation for the accomplishment of their 
schemes. Can we do any thing for the Lord 
Jesus on any other plan 1 Do we expect that 
God will work miracles, by taking our sons and 
daughters and making them eminently useful, 
without our care ? Has Christ any school, sepa- 
rate from our families, in which he will bring up 
the arrearages of our negligence and remove the 
defects of our children's characters, fostered by 
us for j'ears 1 Let us not quiet ourselves in neg- 
lect of duty by any such thoughts. Our children 
will be, in serious measure, such servants of 
Christ as we instrumentally make them, and as 
they, under our influence, make themselves. 
They will enter his service with our characters 
stamped upon them; and will tell, by their fit- 
ness or deficiencies, our fidelity or our shame. 
Let us esteem every day of their minority as 
solemnly important. Their pupilage with us is 
passing away on the swift wings of time. What 
we do we must ' do quickly. 7 Let us seek for 
and cultivate, in them, every thing which has 
been lovely and honorable in the characters of 
devoted men and women, whose records are 
with us, and by whom God has ' made known 
the savor of his love.' Let us enter ourselves 
more into the spirit of the first propagators of 
Christianity, and take our children along with us 
in the labors of love. Higher attainments in 
piety must be aimed at, and made. The ' feeble 
must become as David, and David as the Son of 
God.' It must cease to be the fact that a. few men 
and women of a generation, shall appear with 
the spirit of Swartz, Buchanan, Brainerd, Su- 



sanna Anthony, Isabella Graham, and Harriet 
Newell. There ought to be Christians active, 
holy, fervent as they, in every church; yea, 
why should not every church be composed of 
such; and the places of their abode become 
' too strait for them/ and they, with ' the love of 
Christ constraining them/ go forth in the untiring 
spirit of Christian enterprise, over the whole face 
of the earth. With such pillars and 'polished 
stones/ the temple of the Lord will indeed be 
beautiful. Blessed with such supporters of the 
cause of Christ at home, the church will be 
strong for her Lord's work. Blessed with such 
messengers of salvation to the heathen, the work 
of evangelizing the world will go rapidly on. 
As they go forth and proclaim the Saviour's 
love, there will break forth from all 'the dark 
places/ the cry, ' How beautiful upon the moun- 
tains are the feet of him that bringeth good tid- 
ings, that publisheth peace; that bringeth good 
tidings of good ; that publisheth salvation; that 
saith unto Zion, Thy God reigneth.' " 

An Address, delivered before the Phi 

Beta Kappa Society of Harvard University, Aug. 
28, 1834, on Classical Learning and Eloquence. 
By William Howard Gardiner, Counsellor 
at Law. Cambridge : James Munroe & Co. 1834. 
pp. 68. 

We notice this oration for the purpose of 
introducing an extract. It contains sound 
doctrine, expressed in truly simple and elo- 
quent language. It is one of the best de- 
fences of classical study which we have 
seen. It utters truths which are grating 
to the ear, that is accustomed to flattery, and 
if uttered from beyond the Atlantic, would 
turn away from them in moody silence or 
indignation, but which, nevertheless, may 
be like the herb bitter but wholesome. It 
is a shame and a deep reproach that there 
should be any necessity for such apostro^ 
phes as these, 

" Accurate knowledge of the ancient lan- 
guages useless! A waste of life to spend its 
best years on syllables and sounds, — mere names 
of things and those dead and forgotten ! Rather 
Jet us say, that it is a waste of life to stop short 
of accuracy ;— that language is thought, and the 
memory of words the memory of things. For 
God and nature have so mysteriously mingled 
body and soul, thought and expression, that man 
cannot set them asunder. They are one and 
indivisible. The principle of intellectual life 
hangs upon their union. We cannot think but 
in words. We cannot reason but in proposi- 
tions. Or if the excited intellect should some- 
times leap to an intuitive result and flash upon 
truth, it is yet a useless result, an unutterable, 
incommunicable, voiceless truth, — a waste flower 
in the wilderness, — a gem buried in the ocean, — 
until it has been embodied in language, and 
made visible by signs, or audible by sounds. 
And however it may be rarely true that the man 
of accurate thought is incapable, because he has 
not studied language, of accurate expression, it 
is universally true that he who has greatly studied 









1834.] 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



147 



accuracy of expression, words, their arrange- 
ment, force, and harmony, in any language, 
dead or living, has also greatly attained towards 
accuracy of thought, a.s^ well as propriety and 

milosophers 



energy of speech. 'For divers p 
, clothing phi 
' that the lip is parcel of 



hold,' says Shakspeare, clothing philosophy in 
the mantle of the Muse, ' 
the mind.' 

" A waste of life ! Why, what is man, his 
pursuits, his works, his monuments, that these 
niceties of language, the weight of words, and 
the value of sounds should be deemed unworthy 
of his immortal nature ? He is fled like a 
shadow. The wealth which he toiled for is 
squandered by other hands. The lands which 
he cultivated are waste. That hearth-stone on 
which he garnered up the affections of his own 
home is sunk into the elements. The very mar- 
ble, which his children raised over his ashes for 
a memorial unto eternity, is scattered to the 
winds of heaven. His sons, his kindred, his 
name, his race, his nation, all their mighty 
works, their magnificent monuments, their im- 
perial cities, are vanished like a mist, and swept 
out of the memory of man. Yet the very word 
that he spoke, — that little winged word, — a 
breath, a vapor, gone as it was uttered, clothing 
a new and noble thought, embodying one spark 
of heaven's own fire, formed into letters, traced 
in hairy lines upon a leaf, enrolled, copied, print- 
ed, multiplied and multiplied, spreads over the 
whole earth ; is heard among all tongues and 
nations; descends through all posterity; and 
lives forever, immortal as his own soul. Homer 
and ye sacred prophets, attest this truth ! " 

Our academies and preparatory schools 
must attend to this matter. Scholars must 
be better fitted before they enter college. 
They must become thoroughly versed in 
all the rudiments of the two languages. 
Our college professors have the deplorable 
office of teaching what ought to have been 
mastered years before. 

The Teacher's Office. Inaugural Ad- 
dress of Rev. Rufus Babcock, Jr., President of 
Walerville College, July 29, 1834. Augusta : 
L. Severance. 1834. pp. 22. 

Truly glad are we to reiterate such en- 
lightened sentiments as the following. 

" But a more serious objection has been made 
to the study of the ancient classics, on the ground 
of their immoral tendency. The whole spirit 
which they breathe, it is said, tends to the in- 
crease of war, licentiousness, and impiety. The 
indirect bearing of this objection on the theme of 
present discussion will not allow me more than a 
general and brief answer to it. After a most 
careful consideration of what has been so ably 
urged in support of this objection, I am con- 
strained to believe that much' more of this kind of 
influence is attributed to the classics than facts 
will warrant. When has it ever been shown, by 
a sufficiently ample and candid induction, that 
students of ancient literature are more warlike, 
more profligate, or even more irreligious than 
others ? On the contrary, I hazard little in sav- 
ing, that such an investigation would show di- 
rectly the reverse of this. One of the most effec- 
tual antidotes for the evils in question is presented 
in the disgusting sensuality and the debasing 
superstition of the ancient systems and practices. 
Let these be held up in contrast with the lovely 



and winning purity inculcated find exemplified m 
the Scriptures, and the result cannot but be 
favorable. Especially will this be true, if a 
judicious use of this contrast be made by the 
teacher, and the mind of the pupil be indirectly 
led to a contemplation of the immense difference 
of diese systems, by a comparison of ibeir fruits 
What would be thought of that artist, who should 
undertake to improve the effect of some of the 
noblest productions of the pencil, by removing 
all their shades? Revelation distinctly as-un-s 
us, that it was ' in the wisdom of God 7 diat the 
demonstration so full, various, and conclusive, in 
all ages and all circumstances, has been made, 
' that the world by wisdom knew not God.' 
And shall we presume to be wiser, or more be- 
nevolent than the author of our being, by hiding 
that demonstration from sight 1 n 

From every quarter of the country a 
voice is lifted up in favor of the ancient 
classics. It augurs well for the future. 
President Babcock's address is a well con- 
ceived and able production. 

American Advocate of Peace. Two 

numbers. Conducted by C. S. Hinrt. Hart- 
ford : William Watson. 1834. pp. 103. 

We have before adverted to the praise- 
worthy labors of the Connecticut Peace 
Society. We welcome with our whole 
heart this new auxiliary. It combines 
fine taste with its other excellent qualities. 
The articles are written by Mr. Gallaudet, 
F. Fellovves, Esq., Professors Holland and 
Upham, and the editor. We would gladly 
quote from all the articles, if we had space. 
Salutary changes are manifestly taking 
place in this great department of philan- 
thropic enterprise. 

Seventh Report of the American Tem- 
perance Society, presented at the meeting in 
Philadelphia, Way, 1834. pp. 116. 

We can only echo the universal note of 
the press in commending this report. It 
discusses and settles a momentous question, 
bearing most intimately on the temporal 
and eternal welfare of man. Reports like 
those of this Society, the Prison Discipline, 
the New York State Temperance, and some 
others, are likely to constitute a new and 
most important portion of literature. They 
are written with great care, and combine 
with close reasoning, a great array of most 
important facts. 

Baccalaureate Address, delivered Aug. 

11, 1834, at the thiid annual Commencement of 
the University of Alabama. By Alva Woods, 
I). D., President of the University. Published by 
request of the Trustees, pp. 16. 

The author thus speaks of the art and 
science of teaching. 

" Is there not also reason to fear that the im- 
portance of this subject to the welfare of our 
country is often overlooked 1 It it be acknow- 
ledged" that intelligence and virtue are essential 
to the permanent prosperity of a republic, what 
can be more important to the welfare of our be- 



148 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



[Nov. 



loved country, than the instruction of the rising 
generation ? ' This, then, is the profession, which, 
in these United States, ought to enlist and 
employ the highest order of intellect, and the 
highest attainments in literary and moral excel- 
lence. If it be better for individuals and for 
society to prevent crime than to punish it, then is 
that office of the very first importance, which 
requires a man, in the discharge of its duties, to 
enlighten the youthful mind and to inculcate a 
love of virtue and an abhorrence of vice. 

" While this office is wholly unknown, or 
lightly esteemed among the more barbarous 
nations, it is held in the highest veneration 
among the enlightened. In the brightest days 
of the glory of Greece, you find the instructors of 
her youth ranked among the illustrious, the re- 
vered, and the honored men of the country. Go 
to the most polished nations of Europe at this 
day, and you find their philosophers and teach- 
ers associated with the great and the noble 
and the virtuous of the land. Indeed, you may 
judge of the progress which any community has 
made towards a state of general intelligence and 
high culture, by the respect which they render 
to men of learning, and by the estimation in 
which they hold the office of an instructor of 
youth." 

The Introductory Lecture before the 

Alabamian Institute, delivered Dec. 7, 1833, in 
the Hall of the House of Representatives. By 
Alva Woods, D. D., President of the University 
of Alabama. Tuscaloosa: W. W. & F. W. 
McGuire. 1834. pp. 19. 

This address is upon the " influence of 
knowledge on man in his social state." We 
quote one sentence, containing an interest- 
ing historical fact. 

" These literary societies may also exert a 
wholesome influence upon the cause of morals 
and of freedom. All error flourishes best in the 
darkest shades of ignorance : and tyranny, 
whether civil or ecclesiastical, holds an undis- 
puted sway only where the light of knowledge 
pours not its radiant beams. The foundations 
of despotism are sapped, and its whole fabric 
endangered, by schools and colleges, by literary 
societies and printing presses, and by all similar 
means for irradiating the human understanding 
with the light of truth. Sixty-four years after 
the first settlement of Virginia, Sir William 
Berkley, then governor of that province, in an 
official communication to the lords of the colo- 
nies, observed, ' I thank God, that there are no 
free-schools nor printing presses here ; and I 
hope we shall not have them here these hundred 
years; for learning hath brought disobedience 
and heresy and sects into the world, and print- 
ing hath divulged them in libels against the best 
governments.'" 

The American Almanac and Repository 

of Useful Knowledge, for the year 1835. Boston : 
Charles Bowen. 1834. pp. 336. 

The astronomical department of this 
volume has again been prepared by R. T. 
Paine, Esq. The subjects which have re- 
ceived the most attention, are banks and 
the periodical press. In addition, there 
will be found to be a variety of miscellane- 
ous matters, together with the usual regis- 
ter of the general and state governments. 
The present is the sixth volume of the 



series, and is worthy of equal commenda- ' 
tion for the valuable information which it 
communicates. The editor's labors are 
characterized by remarkable judgment and 
industry. 

Persuasives to Religion ; consisting of 

ten Sermons, written on a voyage from England 
to America. By George Whitefield. Fifth 
American edition, with a brief Memoir of the 
Author. Boston : James Loring. 1834. pp. 240. 

An interesting memorial of the spirit if 
not of the eloquence of Whitefield. 

Lectures on Phrenology, delivered be- 
fore the Young Men's Association for Mutual 
Improvement in the city of Albany. By Amos 
Dean. Albany: Oliver Steele, and Hoffman & 
White. 1834. pp. 252. 

We make a single extract from this vol- 
ume on the faculty of Hope, as it seems to 
give the author's views of the connection 
of phrenology with religion. 

" The function of this faculty seems to be the 
reverse of cautiousness. It encourages the pro- 
gress onward by its specious illusions, regardless 
of the obstacles in the way of its progress. It 
affords anticipations of the future not reflected 
from the mirror of the past, but adorned with its 
own imagery, and heightened by its own color- 
ing. It is the parent of disappointment, because 
realities are seldom found to square with its in- 
spirations. Notwithstanding, however, the fre- 
quency and severity of disappointment, it still 
hopes on, and thus continues till its function ter- 
minates. 

" This faculty in religion is productive of faith. 
Faith is, in fact, defined to be ' the substance of 
things hoped for.' It inspires a reliance and a 
confidence in the attributes of the being adored 
by veneration. It is therefore an essential ele- 
ment in man's religious nature. 

" We have seen that theology is indebted to 
this science for the direct proof it furnishes of 
the existence of a Supreme Being, in the fact of 
the bestowment of the faculty of veneration. 
Based upon the same chain of reasoning, may 
we not recognize in this faculty evidence of the 
existence of a future state 1 With such a state 
this faculty seems to be in relation. Its home is 
the future. Nor is it confined within that limited 
horizon, that bounds our earthly vision. It pene- 
trates the thick gloom that settles over the final 
resting place of its organ, and dares its flight 
into the illimitable future beyond it, with untir- 
ing wing and unquailing spirit. Even in time 
it stretches into eternity, and revels upon the joys 
and delights that can cease only with the capac- 
ity for enjoying them. 

"United with the faculty of conscientiousness, 
the pure feeling of right and wrong is experi- 
enced, from which arises the conviction of ac- 
countability, and from the union of both results 
the belief in a future state of rewards and pun- 
ishments. 

" It is thus that man's moral and religious na- 
tures are found to harmonize with each other. 
Veneration adores a Supreme Being ; ideally 
invests him with its beauty, benevolence with 
its goodness, conscientiousness with its justice, 
while hope, with undrooping pinion, carries for- 
ward their joint possessor to experience the ex- 
ercise of the attributes of that being, through a 
never-ending eternity." 



1834.] 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



149 



Counsels to Young Men on Modern 
Infidelity and the Evidences of Christianity. Hy 
John Moiuson, D. J). Boston: Jamos Loring. 
1834. pp. 237. 

The first part contains a portraiture of 
modern skepticism, and the second a delin- 
eation of the truth and excellence of Chris- 
tianity. The author is a Congregational 
minister in the vicinity of London, and 
seems to be familiarly acquainted with the 
shifts and wretched devices of the modern 
skeptic. The book is written in a popular 
and pleasing style, and is well adapted to 
obtain a wide circulation. 

Letters on Practical Subjects, to a 

Daughter. By William B. Sprague, I). D. 
Pastor of the Second Presbyterian Church in Al- 
bany. Third edition. New York: D. Appleton 
& Co. 1831. pp. 281. 

Three genuine editions of this work 
have been published in this country, one 
by the Religious Tract Society in England, 
and an altered and mutilated edition in 
Scotland, under the title of the Daughter's 
Own Book. Of this last, two editions have 
been published in Boston. 

The Annals of Salem from its first set- 
tlement. By Joseph B. Felt. Salem: W. & 
S. B. Ives. 1827. pp. 611. 

History of Ipswich, Essex, and Hamil- 
ton. By Joseph B. Felt. Cambridge: Charles 
Folsom. 1834. pp. 304. 

The history of Salem is strictly in the 
form of annals, the principal events being 
detailed in chronological order. A large 
appendix is inserted containing a great 
variety of curious and useful documents. 
The history of Ipswich, Hamilton, and 
Essex, without excluding the order of time, 
is rather constructed on the plan of sub- 
jects, as military concerns, education, fish- 
eries, currency, deaths, &c. We hope that 
every town in Massachusetts, whose history 
is not yet recorded, will find such annalists 
as Mr. Felt. He goes to his work con 
amove: accurate, clear, full, impartial ; we 
find little or nothing to be desired, which 
he has not included in his volumes. The 
mechanical execution is remarkably good. 
The contents are so multifarious, and our 
limits are so narrow, that we are compelled 
to refrain from quotation. Many curious 
facts and incidents might be found, which 
would greatly enliven our pages. 

Proceedings of the Society for the Ad- 
vancement of General Education in the County 
of Bucks, Pa. Doylestown, Pa.: James Kelly, 
1834. pp. 8. J ' 

We received this pamphlet with great 
satisfaction. We could wish that such men 
as have put it forth could be found in every 
county of this great, but we are sorry to 
say, uneducated State. We should think 
there were enough in the following para- 

VOL. VII. 



graphs to rouse every friend of the Com- 
monwealth, to immediate and energetic 
action. 

" The Governor of this Commonwealth, in a 
recent message, utters a trumpet-tongued appeal 

to his fellow-citizens on this subject. Jn that 
document the extraordinary fact is staled, that 
there arc nearly 600,000 children in Pennsyl- 
vania, under the age of 15 years, and nearly 
150,000 between 15 and 20 J and out of this num- 
ber there is reason to believe that 380,000 avt 
destitute of instruction. And of those who are 
sent to school, how few, comparatively, acquire 
any thing that deserves to be called education. 
There are multitudes who learn to read, and (in 
consequence of defective methods of leaching) 
learn nothing more. But this is not knowledge; 
it is only the instrument by which knowledge is 
acquired. Some of .the most deplorably ignorant 
men who are to be met with in society, are per- 
sons who have been taught to read, without be- 
ing inspired with a love of information. 'As- 
suming the last census as a basis, (says the 
Committee on Education, in their report to the 
Legislature of Pennsylvania,) we have 636,849 
children under the age of 20 : between 4 and 
500,000 of these are, by the Constitution, placed 
under the guardianship of the Legislature ; of 
which by official returns made last year to the 
Secretary of the Commonwealth, only 17,462 
are now receiving (and that nominally perhaps) 
instruction gratis. Here then, are 400,000 at 
least, wholly without any kind of schooling ; yet 
we now only begin to hear a murmur of dis- 
content. 7 

"'In Pennsylvania, (says the same valuable 
document.) our right of suffrage is as broad as 
possible. A citizen who pays a tax of a few 
cents only, can go to the election with power 
equal to him who pays a tax of many hundred 
dollars; and by his vote directs the public weal 
with the same authority as the richest citizen. 
It becomes necessary, therefore, to give the man 
of humble means, an opportunity of understand- 
ing the advantages in which he so largely 
shares.' 

" Upon the same authority we have the start- 
ling fact, that in Pennsylvania, there is a large 
number of voters who cannot raid the tickets that 
are handed to them at the polls — and their num- 
ber is annually increasing. Surely such a state 
of things may well create alarm in the bosom of 
every lover of his country. Surely it ought to 
be sufficient to arouse the leaders of society in 
this Commonwealth, from that indifference to the 
condition of the popular intellect by which they 
have hitherto been ungraciously distinguished.'' 

A Committee at a public meeting held at 
Newtown, on the 7th of June, 1834, " recom- 
mend the formation of A Society for the promotion 
of public Education in the. County of Bucks. 
Let it be composed of men of all parties and de- 
nominations; let it confine itself merely to the 
awakening of the public mind to this important 
theme; and let all its meeting's and transactions 
be open to the investigation of any one who de- 
sires to examine them. 

" If it be asked how such an association will 
operate for the attainment of its important ob- 
ject, it may be replied, that its members will be 
better able to determine this, as they convene 
from time to time, and become fully acquainted 
with the population on which they desire to act. 
It may be said, however, in a general way. that 
they will have at their disposal, all the ordinary 

20 



150 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



[Nov. 



instrumentalities by which men influence the 
public mind. 

" A society of this kind will, of course, have 
its Board of Managers. That Board may, per- 
haps, be divided into four committees — 1st, A 
committee on the press — 2d, On public meet- 
ings — 3d, On correspondence — 4th, On schools. 
The standard publications on the subject of Ed- 
ucation, both in Europe and America, should be 
subscribed for, and placed at the service of these 
Committees." 



A society was subsequently formed, 
(James Worth, President, John H. Gordon, 
Secretary, and twenty-five Managers,) 
which has entered on its truly philanthro- 
pic course with much spirit. 

An Address delivered by Chaunct 

Colton, A. M., at the Inauguration of the Fac- 
ulty of Bristol College, Pa. 1834. pp. 47. 

The Past and the Present, a compara- 
tive view of Idolatry and Religion, as aids to 
learning. Pronounced bpfore the Athenian So- 
ciety of Bristol College, July 23, 1834. By Wil- 
lis G. Clark, pp. 23. 

The Power of Literature in connection 

with Religiou ; an oration delivered at Bristol 
College, July 23, 1834, before the Philologian 
Society. By Francis S. Key. pp. 19. 

We quote from each of these documents. 

" The peculiar religious advantages of this 
college present a feature of great interest. The 
President sustains the relation of pastor to the 
students and families connected with the institu- 
tion. The Faculty as a body recognize also the 
obligations and duties of religious guardianship 
over the students. At the Faculty meetings of 
each week the religious stale of the college and 
the spiritual interests of individual students are 
made subjects of inquiry and prayer in connec- 
tion with their progress in study, and their faith- 
fulness in business in the manual labor depart- 
ment. 

" The weight of religious influence on the part 
of a large number of pious students who are 
studying for the ministry, should be regarded as 
of very precious account in this estimate. Of 
the whole number of students, it is hoped that 
between fifty and sixty are truly spiritual in heart 
and life. Several of these appear to have been 
brought to a saving knowledge of the truth, since 
their connection with the college. The greater 
part of those who are regarded as truly pious, 
are now communicants in the college church. 
The exemplary, and in many instances, deeplv 
serious deportment and spirit of the remaining 
part of the students, afford the most animating 
promise. 

"The moral power and efficiency already 
possessed by this college, and beginning to be 
exerted in the promotion of the most cherished 
objects of beneficence in the church, may be in 
some degree illustrated by the doings of its infant 
missionary society, which is auxiliary to the 
Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church of the United 
States. A course of monthly missionary lectures 
in connection with the general subject of Chris- 
tian beneficence, and the responsibilities of the 
church in the nineteenth century, was com- 
menced soon after the organization of the insti- 
tution. These lectures are especially designed 
to promote and cherish an intelligent and scrip- 
tural missionary spirit, among the students and 



the other members of the congregation of the 
college church. The missionary society was 
organized on the first Monday evening of De- 
cember. It will this year contribute to the cause 
of missions in the church, more than $300." 

Colton. 
" Yet when those broken shrines were in their 
prime, — 
The brightest objects in the eye of Time. — 
When wrapt in guile those ancient cities lay, 
And scenes of riot turned the night to day; 
When lust and murder stalked unchecked abroad, 
And sin's wide current like a river flow'd, — 
Then rose that star above Judea's land, 
And bade its lustre o'er the world expand : 
Then struggling Paul in Athens stood, and cried 
Against idolatry, and fraud, and pride: 
He spake of One, whose smile could warm the 

grave, — 
Who walked unshrinking on the midnight wave; 
Whose love was boundless, and whose tender eye, 
Look'd down on men with kind benignity. 
' The God that made the World,' he praised aloud, 
Till Felix quaked, and Dionysius bow'd : 
At Caesar's judgment seat, sublime he stood, 
"With words of eloquence, a glowing flood : 
With hand extended, and persuasive tongue, — 
In royal ears his melting accents rung ; 
Till tears around him, fell like morning dew, 
And Justice whispered that his God was true! 

" Since then, rejoicing science on its way, 
Hath moved, illumined by religion's ray; 
That dawn unbarred the gates of heavenly light, 
And quenched the darkness of that gloomy night — 
Through the dim wastes of centuries it spread, 
And bade the monk in cloisters, 'cowl his head,' — 
Till halls of learning felt its cheering soul, 
And bade the genial radiance onward roll. 
Through Europe's boundaries it swept along — 
Inspired the preacher's heart — the poet's song; — 
3arbarian hordes to Virtue's path it won, 
And walked in beauty like the golden sun ; 
Till half the world its kindling power confest, 
And the glad spirit ran from breast to breast." 

Clark. 

" Where the two great objects of religious and 
literary instruction are properly united, and 
where the latter is made to stand, as it ought to 
do, in a station secondary and subordinate to the 
other, the temptations which are so apt to ac- 
company the acquisition of learning are happily 
counteracted. There will be found no inconsis- 
tency in the motives or objects which such a 
course of education presents. While the heart 
is soflened, the taste refined, and the reasoning 
powers exercised in the various pursuits of litera- 
ture and science, there is no cause to apprehend 
that the lessons of religion will be rendered less 
efficient. Nor can youth so situated be insensi- 
ble to that which pleads more successfully with 
man than all argument and precept — the beauty 
and the brightness of the Christian character 
shining around diem in their companions and 
instructors. 

" Above all, when Christians, awakening at 
the call of duty, have established such an institu- 
tion, and placed it in the charge of men with 
hearts devoted to the Redeemer's cause, willing 
to give themselves up to the work of preparing 
the rising generation for his service ; when from 
its hallowed walls, and from the rejoicing courts 
of Zion the prayer of faith shall ascend, how can 
we doubt that it will be answered with the bene- 
diction of heaven? " 

Key. 

Report on Classical Education. 

At the annual meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of the Western Reserve college, in 
August, 1833, a committee was appointed 
to confer with the Faculty, and report on 



1834.] 



NEW PUBLICATIONS. 



151 



the course of study to be pursued in the 
college. That committee, after mature delib- 
eration and conference with the Faculty, 
presented a report, which was adopted at 
the meeting of the Board in August, 1834, 
and which was ordered to be published in 
the Ohio Observer. The main topic for 
consideration in the report is the expediency 
of substituting the Bible and Christian 
authors, as classics in colleges, instead of 
heathen authors. It is an enlightened and 
able exposition of the subject. 

"In studying the Greek and Latin languages, 
the student is studying the English, not merely 
because many of its words are derived from these 
languages — not merely because he is learn- 
ing the general principles of grammatical and 
rhetorical construction — but because he is forced 
to know his own language, in order to make a 
correct translation. While studying an ancient 
language, he is to nearly an equal extent, studying 
his own. He is also becoming acquainted with 
the sentiments of ancient authors, and the great 
mass of historical fact which they present, and is 
preparing himself to gain a knowledge of anti- 
quity which he could never acquire through the 
medium of translations. It is believed that the 
study of the ancient classics, as sustained in the 
colleges, is the connecting link by which we re- 
tain our hold upon the knowledge of antiquity ; 
and were all the colleges to dispense with the 
study of them, nearly all this knowledge would 
soon be lost to community, and go into fbrgetful- 
ness. And though some have expressed their 
willingness that it should be forever blotted out, 
so far as it may be learned from heathen classics, 
we are not of their number. And we are the 
more solicitous to retain our hold upon it, when 
we remember that the Scriptures were written 
in the days of antiquity, and must be interpreted 
by the light which antiquity casts upon them. 
We see not how a man can become a good 
interpreter of the Scriptures, who has not studied 
the ancient classics, and secured the knowledge 
to be gained through this avenue. A part of 
the Scriptures were written in a dialect of the 
Greek, to understand which, it is necessary to 
have studied Greek in its purity. A good in- 
terpreter of the Scriptures must" be acquainted 
with the nations that existed, and the manners 
and customs that prevailed when the Scriptures 
were written, and to these he is introduced by 
the study of die classics. Some of die best 
commentators and aids to the interpretation of 
the Scriptures, are written in Greek and Latin, 
and will never be translated. 

" Does any one ask, what practical benefit am 
I to derive in my profession from the study of 
the ancient classics ? We answer, they are not 
a part of a professional course. They belong 
to that common ground which it is needful that 
all literary men pass over, previous to enlerin 0- 
upon the appropriate studies of a profession. 
Yet they are of practical utility in each of the 
learned professions. They introduce the lawyer 
to the nations and governments and laws of 
antiquity, and acquaint him with Roman law, 
from which modern law takes its origin. They 
help the physician to gain the knowledge of the 
healing art, and to understand the terms of his 
profession. They assist the divine in unlocking 
the volume of inspiration, and aid his researches 
for the treasures of heavenly wisdom. True, 
we may be pointed to men who have become 



eminent in professional life, without their aid. 
But these are rare instances, while we might 
refer to many, who have failed or have been all 
their lifetime pressed down with a consciousness 
of inferiority to others of their own profession. 

" But while we decide to retain the study of 
the ancient classics, we do not thereby decide to 
exclude the study of the Bible ana Christian 
authors from the collegiate course. This h;>s 
not been done in time past. And we believe, 
that by the increase of preparatory studies, and 
by greater diligence (luring the four years in 
college, the study of the Bible and Christian 
authors may receive increased attention. And 
we would recommend as a part of the collegiate 
course, the study of the Hebrew, and increased 
attention to the Hellenistic Greek of the Septua- 
gint and New Testament, and to the principles 
of sacred interpretation. It is our opinion, that 
the Hebrew ought to be studied at an early age, 
and there are strong reasons for making it the 
first language, upon the study of which the youth 
shall enter. It is a simple language — it is the 
most ancient language, and to place it first in a 
course of literature, would be to follow the order 
of time, and the order of nature. If it were 
made a first study, the youth would become ac- 
quainted with the word of God, at a time when 
he needs its influence, and when it might be 
expected to make upon him deep and permanent 
impressions. And by its influence he might 
become so fortified and established, that no 
danger could be apprehended from the subse- 
quent study of the Greek and Latin classics. 
But if the Hebrew is not the first study, it should 
be a part of the collegiate course. The Bible is 
a most wonderful book, for its antiquity, for the 
historical facts it communicates, for its classical 
and moral purity, and for its sublime strains of 
poetry and eloquence. And considering what 
the Bible is, what are its truths, and what bear- 
ings it has upon the best interests of men, in this 
world and the world to come, no man, liberally 
educated, ought to be without a knowledge of 
its original languages, and the principles by 
which it is interpreted." 

The Immorality of the Traffic, Manu- 
facture and Use of Ardent Spirits as a drink ; and 
the duty of Christians, with reference to the 
temperance cause; being the substance of a dis- 
course, delivered in the 2d Presbyterian church in 
Baltimore, June 8, 1834. By Robert J. Breck- 
inridge. Baltimore: Sands and .Neiison. ]834. 
pp.23. 

The energy and closeness of Mr. Breck- 
inridge's appeals may be learned from the 
following paragraph. 

" One of the most clear, distinctive, and oft- 
repeated inculcations of Christianity is, Thou 
shall love thy neighbor as thyself. And the 
whole of the divine oracles scarcely contain a 
more striking and noble exhibition of truth, than 
that beautiful parable in which our Saviour 
teaches us to consider and treat as our neighbor, 
every creature that bears the image of God. 
Dear Christian brethren, give full play to the 
better emotions of your hearts, and answer at 
its bar, as you will answer at the burning throne 
on high, — is there one possible aspect of this 
trade, which the ingenuity of Satan could so 
gloss over, as to make it bear the light of that 
glorious truth ? Do you love money so much, 
that for the hope of gaining it. you will pursue 
and justify on Christian principles, a line of con- 



152 



GENERAL POST OFFICE. 



[Nov. 



duct, which you are sure, will one day pierce 
you through with sorrows ? Yet you pursue 
towards your neighbor the conduct, which you 
are sure, will, unless God interpose to save him 
from you, ruin him, soul and body ! — Do you 
care so little for the partner of your bosom, the 
sharer of all your hopes and joys, the mother of 
your little ones, the tried, the devoted friend, 
who clings but the closer to you, as all things 
else loosen around you— oh ! do you value her 
at so low a rate, that you will barter away her 
peace, her hopes, her highest joys for paltry 
gain 1 And yet, what but the hand of God, 
can save your neighbor's wife from the compli- 
cated sorrows which the successful prosecution 
of your business, must bring down upon her 
head ! — Oh ! man, hast thou a heart, and canst 
thou look upon the bright face, and the lovely 
form of the little boy that sports around your 
hearth, and then calmly brutalize thine own 
issue for vile dust ? Thou canst not ; thou dar- 
est not ; omnipotent nature forbids the horrid 
deed! And yet thou wilt entice to ruin Un- 
friend's boy, and break thy friend's heart, with 
the clear sanction of thy Saviour's word, and 
under the broad protection of thy Saviour's 
name 1 Corruption, thy name is man ! "' 

The Holy Bible, containing the Old and 

New Testaments, translated out of the original 
tongue, and with the former translations dil- 
igently compared and revised; the text of the 
common translation is arranged in paragraphs, 
such as the sense requires ; the division of chap- 
ters and verses being noted in the margin, for 
reference. Boston : Perkins, Marvin, & Co. Phil- 
adelphia: Henry Perkins. 1834. pp. 1,264. 

u Lest any one who sees this Bible should 
imagine," says Mr. Nourse, " that it is a 
new translation, or an amendment of the 
old, he is assured that not a word is altered 
from the common copies ; the arrangement 
is new, and is intended to prove that the 



Bible has beauties, which have been hitherto 
obscured by an improper and almost ridic- 
ulous subdivision of its sacred contents." 

The common division of chapters and 
verses is rejected, and the text is divided 
into paragraphs according to the sense, in 
the same manner as the Greek Testaments 
of Wetstein, Griesbach and Knapp are 
divided. The numbering of the chapters 
and verses, is, however, preserved in the 
margin for facility of reference, and for the 
use of the old concordances. The design 
of Mr. Nourse is judicious, and apparently 
well executed. 

A Practical Exposition of Psalm cxxx. 

By John Owen, D. D., vice chancellor of the uni- 
versity of Oxford. Abridged by Ebenezer Porter, 
D. D. president of the Theol. Seminary, Andover. 
Boston: William Peirce. 1834. pp.252. 

" I have long been accustomed to hear," 
says Dr. Porter, " devout admirers of Owen, 
especially Scotchmen and Englishmen, 
speak of his treatise on Spiritual Minded- 
ness, and his commentary on the Hundred 
and Thirtieth Psalm, as being his two most 
valuable works. When the abridgment 
of the former was published last year, an 
intimation was given, that, should it be 
well received by the Christian public, a 
similar abridgment of the present work 
would be prepared. The testimony of pub- 
lic sentiment, in this case, has been suf- 
ficiently distinct; for while the original 
work was of so heavy sale, that I am not 
aware of more than one edition having ever 
been issued from the American press, 
the demand for the abridgment, as I am 
informed by the publisher, will exhaust his 
edition in a few months." 



GENERAL POST OFFICE. 



Receipts for Postages, from July 1, 1832, to July 1, 1833, . . $2,616,538 27 

Expenditures : 

Compensation to Post Masters, 826,283 62 

Transportation of the Mail, 1,894,688 08 

Incidental expenses, 87,701 61 

2,808,673 31 

Excess of expenses over revenue, . . . $192,135 04 

Number of Post Offices in the United States, June 30, 1833, . . 10,127 

Increase during the year, . . 922 

Annual transportation of the Mail, viz. 

In stages, 17,693,839 miles. 

In steam-boats, 628,737 

On horseback and in sulkies, 8,531,909 

Total, . • 26,854,485 miles. 



Length of post roads in the United States, 119,916 miles, of which 13,256 miles are in 
the State of New York. 



1834.] 



NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS. 



153 



SCHOOLS AMONG THE NORTH AMERICAN INDIANS. 

From the report of the Committee on Indian Affairs, presented to Congress 
in May last, we learn that there are among them 4,857 scholars at sixty dif- 
ferent stations. The following table will show the number of teachers and 
pupils under the direction of several different sects, and the amount appropri- 
ated to the support of each, from the civilization fund of the United States. 

Under the direction of Teachers. Pupils. Am?t paid. 

United Brethren, 3 20 

American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, 98 1,339 $1,690 

Methodist Society, 1 47 550 

Baptist General Convention, 17 280 2,000 

Methodist Episcopal Church, 7 85 

Protestant Episcopal Church, 7 160 

Roman Catholic Church, 4 120 1,300 

Total, 137 2,011 5,540 

To the Choctaw Academy, . 310 

To Godfrey, a Pottawattamie Indian, . . . . . . . 200 

To Choctaws, 300 

To Mohegan Indians, 400 

Total, . $6,750 

The following is a statement of sums provided by treaties with Indian tribes, 
for the purposes of education, exhibiting the names of the tribes, the amount 
for each, and the period for which the payment is to be continued. 



Names of the tribes. 
Miamies, 
Pottawattamies, 

Do. of Indiana, 

Winnebagoes, 
Menomonies, . 
Chippewas, 

New York Indians and others, 
Sacs, Foxes and Ioways, 
Shawnees and Delawares, 
Kickapoos, 
Choctaws, 
Creeks east, 
Cherokees west, 
Florida Indians, 



Amount. 


How long payable. 


$2,000 


Pleasure of Congress 


3,000 


do. 


2,000 


do. 


3,000 


till 1859 


500 


1842 


1,000 


Pleasure of Congress 


1,500 


do. 


3,000 


till 1840 


500 


1835 


500 


1835 


12,500 


1S40 


3,000 


1851 


2,000 


1S39 


1,000 


1843 



$35,500 



Progress of Indian Pupils. 

The Cherokee children in the school at Brainard, are more forward than the 
children of New England, who have had no greater advantages of schools. 
Those who have attended two years could read, write and spell well — are 
familiar with the elements of geography, arithmetic and grammar, and show 
great skill and taste in writing composition, for children of their age. Many 
of the adults, some fifty or sixty years old, have learned to read their language 
without any teacher but themselves. Children who have an English father 
and Cherokee mother, can usually speak both languages at three years old. 
Boudinot and Ridge, who married northern women, have each four or five 
uncommonly fine children. One, four years old, reads well in the Testament ; 
two other little girls know much about geography, and something of numbers. 
Ridge's eldest son, who is six or seven, is a fine scholar and a great reader. 



154 WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. [Nov. 

Major Ridge is known both as a warrior and a statesman ; in addition to this, 
he proved himself an orator in a lecture on the history of nations, which he 
gave through his son as interpreter. The son followed him in an animated 
address on the present state of the Cherokees. 



FINANCES OF THE UNITED STATES. 

From the Report of the Secretary of the Treasury, December, 1833. 
Receipts into the Treasury, in 1832. 

From Customs, 28,465,237 24 

Sales of Public Lands, 2,623,381 03 

Dividends on U. S. Bank Stock, .... 490,000 00 
Sales of Stock in the Bank of the U. S. . . 169,000 00 

Incidental receipts, 117,942 89 31,865,561 16 

Balance in Treasury, January, 1832, 4,502,914 45 

$36,368,475 61 
Expenditures in 1832. 
Civil list, foreign intercourse, and miscellaneous, 4,577,141 45 
Military service, including fortifications, ordnance, 
Indian affairs, pensions, arming the militia, and 
internal improvements, .... 7,982,877 03 
Naval service, including the gradual improve- 
ment of the Navy, 3,965,370 29 

Public Debt, 17,840,309 28 34,356,698 06 



Balance in the Treasury, Jan. 1, 1833, . . $2,011,777 55 



SKETCH OF THE HISTORY OF THE WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. 

[Communicated by Rev. President Fisk.] 

The Wesleyan University is delightfully situated, in the city of Mid- 
dletown, on the eastern bank of the Connecticut River, fifteen miles south 
of Hartford, and twenty-four miles north of New Haven. The buildings 
of the university are those formerly occupied by captain Partridge, for a 
military school. They afford accommodations for about 150 students, together 
with a building for public rooms, and an extensive building for commons, 
student's residence, society rooms, &c. The premises were generously pledged 
by the proprietors to those who were concerned in establishing the university, 
on the condition that an endowment of forty thousand dollars should be raised 
in addition. This has since been done, and the premises have been deeded to 
a board of trustees, who were incorporated with the usual collegiate powers 
and immunities, by the legislature of Connecticut, in May, 1831. The col- 
lege was opened in September, 1831. Two small classes have been graduated, 
one in 1833, and one in 1834. The present number of students, 90. Vol- 
umes in the libraries, connected with the university, about 3,000. Philosophi- 
cal and chemical apparatus respectable. 

This institution is officially patronized by seven annual conferences of the 
Methodical Episcopal Church, embracing the geographical territory of the 
whole of New England, and the State of New York. No religious test, how- 
ever, is required, either of the officers or of the students, and the institution 
is conducted on the most liberal principles. 

In the character and extent of the collegiate course of studies, the Wes- 
leyan University is essentially the same with the other New England colleges. 
Professional departments of law and medicine are contemplated ; but neither 
has yet been established. 

In one respect, however, the arrangement of this university differs materially 



ORDINATIONS AND INSTALLATIONS. 



1834.] 



from most others, viz. In the classifi- 
cation. The course of study is divided 
into departments, and the students of 
each department are divided into sec- 
tions, according to their standing, with- 
out reference to time, and without 
reference to their standing in other 
departments. This renders the work 
of instruction more laborious for the 
faculty, but more beneficial to the stu- 
dents. It secures more uniformly a 
knowledge of all the branches required, 
and holds back a diploma, until the 
student has merited it. His advance- 
ment in college, and his final graduation 
are governed really., as well as nom- 
inally, by attainments, and not by time. 
It also encourages the attendance, in 
the college classes, of many young 
men, whose time, circumstances, or in- 
clination, will not permit them to take 
the entire classical course. This has 
been attempted in other colleges — But 
it has been found on experiment, that 
the distinctions of caste rendered perma- 
nent and inflexible, by the old system 
of classification, so entirely excludes 
their irregulars, from the sympathies 
and honors of the college community, 
that few indeed have been disposed to 
avail themselves of the advantages 
proffered them. In the Wesleyan 
University,' the result of the experiment 
is precisely the reverse.. The students 
of the partial and of the full courses, 
mingle together on terms of equality 
and common sympathy, in all their 
social intercourse, differing only in 
the extent of their attainments and in 
the final testimonials indicative of those 
attainments. Thus far this feature, in 
the constitution of the university, has 
answered the most sanguine expecta- 
tions of the Board and Faculty ; and it 
is confidently believed to be an im- 
provement, in a college constitution, 
worthy of the public favor. 

The present prospects of the institu- 
tion are encouraging. Seven or eight 
large and flourishing academies send a 
good share of their college candidates 
to this university. The place is re- 
markably healthy, moral, beautifully 
situated, easy of access by reason of the 
daily steam-boats and stage-coaches, 
and about the proper size, being large 
enough for the accommodation of the 
institutions, and not so large as to exert 
a dissipating and corrupting influence 
on the students. 



155 



QUARTERLY LIST 

OF 

ORDINATIONS AND INSTALLATIONS. 



NATHANIEL W. SHELDON, inst. pastor, Cong. Rumford, 

Maine, July 23, 1834. 
JOHN MAl.TBY, inst. pastor, Con?. Bangor, Me. July 23. 
JOHN a. DAY, ord. e»ang. Unit. Portland, Me. July 30. 
SAMUEL G. APPLETON, ord. deacon, Epis. Portland, Me. 

Aug. 28. 
ALPHONSO L. WHITMAN, ord. pastor, Cong. Brewer, 

Me. Sept. 17. 
DAVID OLIPHaNT, inst. pastor, Cong. Wells, Me. Sept. 24. 
ENOS MERRILL, inst. pastor, Cong. Alna, Me Oct. 8. 

MILTON WARD, ord. pastor, Cong. Hillsborough. New 

Hampshire, Jnlv 23, 1834. 
JONATHAN CURTIS, inst. pastor, Cong. Pittsfield, N. H. 

October 1. 

BENJAMIN ABBOTT, ord. evang. Cong. Bethel, Vermont, 

Aug. 6, 1834. 
CALVIN GRANGER, ord. evang. Cong. Bethel, Vt. Aug. 6. 
E. J. BOARDMAN, inst. pastor, Cong. Randolph, Vt. Aug. 

13. 
WILLIAM EATON, inst. pastor, Cong. Charlotte, Vt. Sept. 

24. 
JONATHAN LEE, inst. pastor, Cong. Weybridge, Vt. 

JOSEPH ALDEN, ord. pastor, Cong. Williamstown, Massa- 
chusetts, July 3, 1834. 
N. E. LOVELL, ord. pastor, Baptist, Princeton, Ms. Julv 10. 
CHARLES P. GROSVENOR, ord. pastor, Cong. Waterford 

Village, Mendon, Ms. July 16. 
WILLIAM G. ELLIOT, ord. evang. Unit. Boston, Ms. July 

17. 
RICHARD STONE, ord. pastor, Unit. West Bridgewater, 

Ms. July 20. 
CORB1N KIDDER, ord. pastor, Cong. Framingham, Saxon- 

ville, Ms. Julv 30. 
JOHN WAYLAND, inst. pastor, Baptist, Salem, Ms. Aug. 6. 
JOHN EASTMAN, ord. evang. Cong. Charlemont, Ms. Aug. 

13. 
SAMUEL MAY, ord. pastor, Unit. Leicester, Ms. Aug. 13. 
WILLIAM W. NEWELL, inst. pastor, Cong. Brighton, Ms. 

Aug. 19. 
JAMES L. HODGE, ord. pastor, Baptist, Sheffield, Ms. Aug. 

20. 
WILLIAM M. CORNELL, inst. pastor, Cong. Quincy, Ms. 

Auff. 20. 
JOHN JENNINGS, ord. pastor, Baptist, Beverly, Ms. Sept. 

JOSEPH T. MASSEY, ord. pastor, Baptist, Bellingham, Ms. 

Sept. 10. 
JACOB ABBOTT, ord. evang. Cong. Roxburv, Ms. Sept. 18. 
GEORGE W. BR1GGS, ord. pastor, Unit. Fall River, Ms. 

Sept. 24. 
GEORGE WATERS, ord. pastor, Baptist, Holden, Ms. Sept. 

EBER CRANE, ord. pastor, Baptist, Amesbury, Ms. Sept. 30. 
JOSEPH W. CROSS, ord. pastor, Coug. Boxboro', Ms. Oct. 

JOHN L. RUSSELL, ord. evang. Unit. Salem, Ms. Oct. 2. 
BENJAMIN HUNTOON, inst. pastor, Unit. Milton, Ms. Oct. 

15. 
JOHN WHITNEY, ord. pastor, Cong. Boxford, Ms. Oct 15. 

PALMER BROWN, ord. deacon, Episcopal, Woonsocket, 

Rhode Island, June 15, 1834. 
ASA DRURY, ord. evang. Baptist, Providence, R. I. Sept. 14. 

ELLIOTT PALMER, inst. pastor, Cong. West Stafford, Con- 
necticut, May 21, 1334. 
LORENZO T. BENNETT, ord. pastor, Epis. New Haven, 

Ct. Julv 1. 
SAMUEL S. MALLERY, inst. pastor, Baptist, Nerwich, Ct. 

Julv 9. 
JOHN D. BALDWIN, ord. pastor, Cong. West Woodstock, 

Ct. Aug. 3. 
THOMAS "HUNTINGTON, ord. evang. Cong. Brooklyn, Ct. 

Sept. 3. 
THOMAS H. GALLACDET, evan?. Miss. Consr. Hartford, 

Ct. Sept. 23. 
CHARLES ROCKWOOD, ord. miss. Con?. Hartford, Ct. 

Sept. 23. 

MOSES ROWLEY, ord. Baptist, Evans and Hambursr, New 

York, Feb. 29, 1834. 
HOWELL SMITH, ord. Baptist, Evans, N. Y. Mav 6. 
DAVID MORSE, ord. Baptist, Evans, N. Y. May 6. 
D. D. GREGORY, inst. pastor, Pres. Westfield, N. Y. June 

11. 
ISAAC OAKES, inst. pastor, Pres. Lancaster, N. Y. June 24. 
JOSEPH WILSON, inst. pastor, Reformed Dutch, Athens, 

N. Y. July 1. 



156 



ORDINATIONS AND DEATHS. 



[Nov. 



LORENZO W. PEASE, ord. miss. Pres. Auburn, N. Y. July 
9. 

HENRY TOPPING, ord. miss. Baptist, Sharon, N. Y. July 

16. 
TRYON EDWARDS, ord. pastor, Pres. Rochester, N. Y. 

July 22 
JOHN GIBBS, inst. pastor, Cong. Upper Aquebogue, L. I. 

July '23. 
ALBERT C. PaTERSON, ord. evang. Buffalo, N. Y. Aug. 

13. 
JARED F. OSTRANDER, ord. evang. Pres. Oswego, N. Y. 

Sep'. 3. 
ALANSON C. HALL, ord. miss. Pres. Rochester, N. Y. Sept. 

4. 
D. H. BARLOW, hist, pastor, Unit. Brooklyn, N. Y. Sept. 

17. 
J. EASTMAN, inst. pastor, Pres. Oswego Falls, N. Y. 

JOHN FORSYTH, ord. pastor, Pres. Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, July 2, i834. 

SAMUEL A. McCOSKRY, inst. rector, Epis. Philadelphia, 
Pa. Julv 13. 

DAVID DeFORREST ELY, ord. evang. Pres. Philadelphia, 
Pa. Julv 24. 

JOHN R. DODGE, inst. pastor, Pres. Northern Liberties, Pa. 
Aug. 8. 

DANIEL G. BRAGONIER, ord. pastor, Ger. Refcrmed, Clear 

Spring, Maryland, June 25, 1834. 
RICHARD WYNKOOP, inst. pastor, Pres. Hagerstown, Md. 

June 25. 

ARTHUR B. BRADFORD, ord. pastor, Pres. Southwark, 
Virginia, Sept. 16, 1834. 

PETER J. SHAND, ord. priest, Epis. Charleston, South Caro- 
lina,. July 13. 

S. S. McROBERTS, ord. evang. Pres. Clinton, Mississippi, 

July 24, 1834. 
ARCHER E. DICKERSON, ord. evang. Pres. Clinton, Mis. 

July 24. 

SAMUEL STEELE, ingt. pastor, Pres. Hillsboro', Ohio, June 

13, 1834. 
HENRY T. KELLY, inst. pastor, Pies. Madison, 0. July 9. 
WILLIAM LEWIS, inst. pastor, Pres. Darr Town, O. Aug. 



Whole number in the above list, 73. 





SUMMARY. 








.. 7 






.. 2 












.. 22 






























.. 2 






1 




.... 2 South Caiolina 


.. 1 



Missionaries 3 Mississippi 2 

Notspecified 4 Ohio 3 



Total 73 Total. 



DENOMINATIONS 

Congregational 

Presbyterian 17 

Episcopalian 5 

Baptist 13 

Unitarian 8 

Reformed Dutch 1 

German Reformed 1 

Notspecified 1 

Total 73 



DATES. 
27 1831. February.... 

May 

June 

July 



j-u.-t,. 



September.... 

October 

Not specified. 



QUARTERLY LIST 

OF 

DEATHS 

of Clergymen and Students in Theology. 



GEORGE NOYES, Meth. Epis. Lebanon, New Hampshire, 

August 10, 1834. Drowned. 
PLINY DICKINSON, at. 57, Cong. Walpole, N. H.Aug. 



JAMES HUCKINS, jet. 32, Meth. Epis. Bridgewater, N. H. 

Julv 16. 
GEORGE LEONARD, at. 51, Epis. Cornish, N. H. 

LEVI NYE, at. 60, Meth. Petersham, Massachusetts, July 9. 

1834. 
DANIEL GROSVENOR, at 85, Cong. Sandwich, Ms. July 

SAMUEL DEANE, Unit. Scituate, Ms. Aug. 9. 
PRESERVED SMITH, at. 75, Unit. Warwick, Ms. Aug. 

15. 
JONATHAN NASH, at. 70, Cong. Middlefield, Ms. Sept. 3. 
ELIJAH FOSTER, at. 35, Baptist, Amesburv, Ms. Sept. 27. 
SAMUEL PRESBURY, at. 8a, Taunton, Ms. Oct. 6. 

LEVI KNEELAND, Baptist, Packersville, Connecticut, Aug. 

25, 1834. 
THOMAS MANCHESTER, at. 85, Baptist, Coventry, Ct. 

ISAAC A VAN HOOLE, at. 59, New York, New York, July 

18, 1834. 
WILLIAM P. CURTIS, at. 45, Epis. Tomkinsville, N. Y. 

Aug. 21. 
HENRY HUNTER, at. 39, Pres. New Nork, N. Y. Aug. 27. 
DANIEL PARKER, at. 61, New York, N. Y. Sept. 27. 
W. J. REESE, at. 35, Univeisalist, Buffalo, N. Y. 



GREGORY T. BEDELL, at. 43, Epis. Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, Aug. 30, 1334. 
JACOB LARZELERE, Bucks Co. Pa. 



STITH MEAD, at. 68, Meth. Epis. Amherst, Virginia, Sept. 

1, 1834. 
THORNTON ROGERS, at. 40, Pres. Scottsfiekl, Va. 
JESSE NICHOLSON, at. 75, Meth. Epis. Portsmouth, Va. 

THOMAS PHILLIPS, Montgomery County, North Carolina. 

JOHN M. GRAY, Baptist, Harris County, Georgia, July 14, 
1834. 



PARKER SNEDECOR, at. 28, Meth. Epis. Potosi, Missouri. 

JAMES KEMPER, at. 81, Pres. Walnut Hills, Ohio, Aug. 

20, 1834. 
SAMUEL W. SELDEN, Epis. Ashtabula, O. Sept. 2. 
FREDERICK HAAS, at. 60, Lutheran Church, Canton, O. 

BENJAMIN C. CRESSY, Pres. Salem, Indiana, July. 

JESSE LOCKWOOD, at. 30, Cong. Dwight, Arkansas Ter- 
ritory. 



CHARLES B. G. GUILD, at. 24, student in Princeton Theol. 

Seminary, July 28, 1834. 
OREN SMITH, Easton, Massachusetts, member of the Theol. 

School of Harvard University, Sept. 26, 1834. 

S. O. WRIGHT, Methodist, miss. Monrovia, Africa. 
MATTHEW LAR1D, Pres. miss. Monrovia, Africa. 
JOHN CLOUD, Pres. miss. Monrovia, Africa. 



Whole number in the above list. 



AGES. 

From 20 to 30 

30 40 

40 50 

50 60 

60 70 

70 80 



Notspecified. 



Total 

Sum of all the ages speci- 
fied .1276 

Average age 53 1-6 

DENOMINATIONS. • 

Congregational 4 

Presbyterian 7 

Baptist 4 

Methodist 7 

Episcopal 4 

Unitarian 3 

Universalist 1 

Lutheran Church 1 

Notspecified 5 



STATES. 

2 NewHampshire 4 

6 Massachusetts 8 

3 Connecticut 2 

3 NewYork 5 

4 New Jersey 1 

3 Pennsylvania 2 

3 Virginia 3 

12 North Carolina 1 

— Georgia 1 

36 Missouri 1 

Ohio 3 

Indiana 1 

Arkansas Territory 1 

Africa 3 

Total 36 



Total. 



DATES. 

July 7 

August 9 

September 6 

October 1 

Notspecified 13 

36 Total 36 



1834.] 



CALL TO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY. 



157 



JOURNAL 

OF 

THE AMERICAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 

NOVEMBER, 1834. 



A CALL TO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY. 



The following Essay was written by the 
Rev. Dr. Emerson, Professor in the Theo- 
logical Seminary, Andover, and obtained the 
prize of one hundred dollars, given by the 
Rev. Joseph C. Lovejoy, of Bangor, Me. 

* What constitutes a call to the Christian 
ministry ? And what are the proper quali- 
fications for that work?' 

A suitable answer to these questions is 
of prime importance to the church and to 
the world. Placed in the combined light 
of history and of the revealed purposes of 
Providence, and seen by the glowing eye 
of Christian philanthropy, the theme excites 
a deeper interest at every inspection. 

This world is one day to be converted to 
Christ. Holiness and peace are to fill it 
as the waters fill the sea. This greatest of 
moral miracles is to be accomplished prin- 
cipally by the means of preaching. This 
the Christian believes, because the mouth 
of the Lord hath spoken it. The gospel 
he sees adapted to the end for which God 
ordained it, and that the Holy Ghost can 
make it mighty to the pulling down of strong 
holds. And the Spirit will doubtless speedily 
do this when, in connection with other 
causes, there shall be a sufficient number of 
the right men to preach the gospel. Had 
there been an adequate succession of such 
preachers from the apostles to the present 
time, how different would now have been 
the face of the world ! 

But who are these right men ? If the 
church is ever to have a supply of such 
ministers, she must first understand their 
character, as well as feel her need. Such 
knowledge is peculiarly desirable in con- 
nection with the movements and the pros- 
pects of the present day. Hence the 
importance of the subject before us. 

A call to the ministry is commonly under- 
stood as including the literary acquisitions 
as well as the other qualifications that are 
needful to an immediate entrance on the 
sacred work. The subject, however, is 
here divided into two parts, that we may 

VOL. VII. 



better meet the case of those who wish for 
light on the preliminary question of enter- 
ing on a course of study for the ministry. 
It may clearly be the duty of a young man 
to commence study with a design for the 
ministry, while it is by no means clear that 
it will finally be his duty to enter on the 
work. He may not develope such traits, or 
be in such circumstances as are now ex- 
pected. Doubtless many, by confounding 
the two questions, are led to a wrong de- 
cision of one or both of them. Some never 
commence study because they cannot teel 
confident of ever being fit to preach the 
gospel ; — while others may blindly or wil- 
fully adhere to a premature decision of the 
final question, because afraid or ashamed to 
retract, though new light has beamed on 
their path. Knowledge is therefore pecu- 
liarly needful at this early period, both as 
to the nature and the grounds of the first 
decision. 

As to its nature, it clearly does not involve 
a final commitment of the individual, but is 
rather a judgment of his present duty in 
relation to a temporary course which is 
at once probationary and preparative, and 
which may be relinquished at any stage, as 
wisdom may direct. Still it is no trifling 
or unimportant step, as it involves deep 
responsibility, and may be followed with 
consequences lasting and solemn as eter- 
nity. 

In discussing the principles on which 
such a decision should be made, it is to be 
hoped that the genuine import of the term, 
" A call to the ministry," will be rendered 
apparent. This is the more needful, as sad 
mistakes have sometimes been made here 
at the very threshold ; in consequence of 
which, on the one hand, some men. (and 
women even,) have considered themselves 
called to the sacred work without any 
special preparation ; while on the other 
hand, a much greater number have proba- 
bly been prevented, by these false views, 
from giving heed to the real voice of 
God. 

In remarking on the negative side of this 
topic, I observe, 

21 






158 



CALL TO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY. 



[Nov. 



1. A young man is not to wait for an 
audible voice from heaven. Perhaps the 
use of the term call, has led some weak 
minds to such a mistake. The most useful 
men since the days of the apostles, have 
heard no such call; while such as have 
followed an imaginary voice, have shown 
themselves blind enthusiasts. 

The same may be said of any miraculous 
indication since the days of inspiration. 
Should any man now present such a claim, 
we may well demand of him the primitive 
evidence of his divine commission, the 
working of miracles. 

2. No more reliance is to be placed on 
dreams or visions. The superstitious or the 
insane person will be more likely than the 
rational, to imagine some man of Macedonia 
standing by him at night and imploring his 
help. 

3. Unaccountable impressions on the 
mind, however strong and solemn, do not 
of themselves indicate a call. The weak, 
the ignorant, the superstitious, the fanatical, 
the presumptuous, have ever been found 
more liable to such unaccountable impres- 
sions, than the sober and discreet. True, 
indeed, the man's heart should deeply feel for 
a dying world, and be actuated by a power- 
ful sense of duty to do all in his power for 
their salvation. But there is nothing unac- 
countable in this impression, since the call 
for it is obvious. And when the Spirit of 
God impresses any particular duty on an 
individual, it is doubtless in view of truths 
and facis which the attentive mind can 
designate. And the man who is thus ra- 
tionally and divinely impressed with some 
specific duty, will doubtless be able to state 
the reasons of such impression; — if not, 
where is the discrimination he will need in 
teaching the deep things of God ? 

4. Certain passages of scripture coming 
suddenly to the mind, are no proof of such 
a call. Such a text as the following may 
unexpectedly enter the thoughts and per- 
haps long ring in the ear of a recent con- 
vert, — Go thou and preach the gospel. 
It may seem as the voice of one continually 
following him ; or rather, as he may think, 
the voice of the Spirit that has begun to 
dwell in him. In this case, he may indeed 
he able to account for his impression ; — still 
this will not prove the impulse to be divine, 
until he can show that it is God, and not 
satan nor an excited imagination, that thus 
presents texts to his view. Let him re- 
member, that satan once quoted scripture 
to a much better personage, to induce him 
to cast himself headlong from the pinnacle 
of the temple, in presumptuous reliance on 
divine support. The man who shall listen 
to a like suggestion now, will thus tempt God, 
and will as certainly be left ' to dash himself 
against the stones.' Right well does it suit 
the purposes of the arch fiend, to elevate a 
weak or a fanatical professor to the pinnacle 
of the sacred office, that lie may witness 



the mischief which such will there occa- 
sion, and then triumph in the fall of his de- 
luded victim. 

Still, let no one think lightly of the 
movings of the Holy Ghost on the heart, 
in seeking so good a work. The caution is 
against a counterfeit of the divine impulse. 
It is none but such as ' God judges faithful 
and fit for the ministry,' that he thus moves 
to the work. 

5. Neither are any remarkable dispensa- 
tions of Providence, to be regarded in them- 
selves as indicating a call. It is readily 
granted, that signal blessings or reverses in 
our business or prospects, may prepare the 
way for the diversion of talents already 
posssssed. Such is often the fact with mer- 
chants, lawyers, and others. Obligations 
which justly bound them to earthly occu- 
pations, are thus unexpectedly severed, and 
they are again left to the free choice of that 
vocation for which the Spirit may recently 
have conferred the crowning qualification, 
a change of heart. Yet, even here, the call 
does not consist simply in such a change in 
providence, since this change does but re- 
move obstructions to the compliance with a 
call already existing in his qualifications for 
the work. Where such qualifications do 
not exist, no change in external providence 
can confer them. Nor can such a change 
be regarded as the least indication of their 
existence in the case of the individual. 
Other men besides those who have the 
requisite wisdom and grace for usefulness 
in the ministry, are liable to become bank- 
rupt or hopeless in their worldly business; — 
or to be so prospered as to open the way for 
an escape from worldly entanglements. — 
Wo to the Judas who first turns his thoughts 
to the ministry because he can succeed in 
nothing else. 

6. No strength of desire for the glorious 
work, can of itself constitute a call. Such 
a desire is often of a commendable nature. 
David desired to build an house to the name 
of that God who had redeemed his soul and 
prospered him in his kingdom. And this 
desire was highly commended: but God 
forbade him to do it. Eminent saint as he 
was, God saw him to be not the proper man 
for that sacred work. And what pious 
and enlightened heart would not now leap 
with grateful and holy exultation to be 
called of God, in this signal manner to aid 
in rearing the spiritual temple ! Joy to that 
heart, whatever be its sphere : for God 
accepts the willing mind; and he will as- 
sign to that mind its proper office; — and, we 
may add, that with that divine allotment, 
the right kind of mind will be content and 
happy. But it would be preposterous to 
suppose, that all who have a heart to the 
good work, are fully adapted to this highest 
vocation on earth. God himself has taught 
us, in illustrating the very topic of divers 
gifts and callings, that he has framed the 
spiritual as he has the natural body — each 



1 834. J 



: 



CAUr ^O THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY. 



150 



member for its place ; — and it would be 
absurd for all the members to aspire to be 
the Im ad. The obedient hand would indeed 
delight io the charming office of the eye; 
but it also delights to aid the eye in the 
discharge and the enjoyment of that high 
duty. But the refractory (dot wbicb should 
repine, or should envy the eye, the head, 
the heart, or the tongue, would prove itself 
not only unworthy to become either, but 
unworthy any longer to bear so distin- 
guished an assemblage. A proper desire 
for the divine work, will lead one candidly 
to inquire for his appropriate sphere of use- 
fulness; — while an envious desire will only 
prove its possessor unlit for even the lowest 
service in the temple of God. 

7. The general charge which Christ gave 
his disciples, to preach his gospel among 
all nations, does not imply a call on each 
individual personally to preach it. For if 
so, then it equally implies that all are to 
become missionaries, and the whole church 
is to emigrate to heathen lands. In apply- 
ing the general injunction as a call on indi- 
viduals literally to preach, the exceptions 
soon become so numerous as to constitute 
the rule. Not a quarter part can thus be 
considered as called, provided we have any 
regard to common sense, or to the exi- 
gencies of human society, or even to other 
portions of the divine word. For if all are 
to be preachers, where will be the hearers ? 
if all commanders, where will be the sol- 
diers of the cross? if all the top-stone, where 
the foundation and the body of the Lord's 
temple ? 

The import of Christ's language is plainly 
this; that the grand Christian enterprise of 
preaching the gospel at home and abroad, 
he designs to commit to the church as a 
common concern. All are to bear their part 
in its accomplishment. And each individual 
is to inquire conscientiously, how he can 
effect the most ; whether by preaching the 
gospel in person or by proxy, i. e. by doing 
all in his power to give efficacy to the gos- 
pel at home and to send it to the ends of 
the earth. 

In the actual arrangements of the primi- 
tive church, neither Christ nor his apos- 
tles appear to have committed the work of 
preaching to more than a select few out of 
many. 

8. It is not every one who can pray with 
fervor and speak with fluency in the social 
circle, that is fit to become a preacher. 
Many an excellent deacon has changed 
fafmself into a very poor minister. A ready 
and fervid utterance is but one out of many- 
qualifications that are needed. 

9. Nor is it sufficient for one to plead the 
pressing want of laborers as a reason for his 
admission to the field. True, in such an 
exigency, poor reapers are better than none, 
and many must now be accepted whose 
services would be of more use in some other 
department, if there were such a supply of 



fust-rate men as the church may expect at 
a future day. Still, in order to be accepted 
at any time, the man mutt he truly a r< ipet 

— one who will gather, and not watte ihe 
precious grain. 

The preceding cautions are suggested in 
view of past experience, not surely to dis- 
courage; any who arc truly called of God, 
but simply to prevent mistake on so momen- 
tous a question. It is often a greater evil 
for an improper person te enter the ministry, 
than for one to he diverted from it, who 
might he useful in the sacred calling. 

We now turn to the positive side ot the 
subject. 

Here I may remark, that it is not my ob- 
ject to show what a minister ought to be, 
or to paint a clerical character of ideal per- 
fection. Indeed, I am not to paint the 
clerical character at all ; but J simply pro- 
pose to notice some of the leading traits of 
character which a young man should pos- 
sess who is to commence a course of pre- 
paration for the ministry. Strong statement 
and brilliant coloring would of course be 
misplaced, where they would be lia e 
either to allure or to intimidate such as are 
here called to the \\\o<\ calm and imimpas- 
sioned discrimination of the prevalent indi- 
cations of duty. 

1. Personal holiness is to be regarded as 
indispensable. A neglect of this rule has 
proved the bane of established churches, 
and likewise of some others. Where the 
neglect prevails widely, it is first a con- 
sumption on the vitals of religion, destroy- 
ing the spirituality of a church : and then it 
sweeps away succeeding generations with 
the plague of heresy or of infidelity. — To 
the wicked God saith, What hast thou to 
do, to declare my statutes! To whom can 
this apply, if not to ungodly ministers ? 

If then, in given cases, ndividuals may 
be sent to college in the mere hope that 
they will become pious and be ultimately 
fitted for the ministry, yet let no one pre- 
sume actually to enter the ministry, and let 
none presume to " lay hands" on one who 
gives no evidence of having passed from 
death unto life. A regard to his welfare, 
and to that of tho^e who might be committed 
to his care, forbids such presumption. We 
need not deny the possibility of his useful- 
ness, as it is with sacred rules, and not with 
possibilities, that we are here concerned. 
We have no warrant for such a step either 
in reason or in the word of. God. Even 
Judas fell and went to his own place, before 
the apostles were sent forth on their final 
work — a fearful memento to all who possess 
a traitor's heart. -^ 

ySff Good common sense is a prime requi- 
site. It may not be easy to define this 
term : still, few will be likely to mistake its 
import. We may call it a sound and inde- 
pendent judgment in practical concerns. 
It is probably denominated tommen sense to 
denote, not its strength, but its character, as 



160 



CALL TO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY. 



[Nov. 






that which is possessed hy the mass of men 
engaged in common concerns. It stands 
equally in contrast with a propensity to im- 
practicable theories, on the one hand, and to 
a blind application of general rules, on the 
other. Thus, one may be a great scholar, 
possessing a retentive and richly stored 
memory, while he has no judgment to apply 
his facts and precedents to practice. Or he 
may possess great powers of speculation, 
and gain repute as an abstract philosopher, 
while his philosophy proves worthies.*, at 
least in his own hands, in the moment of 
practical exigency. One is too speculative 
and self-confident and unobservant of actual 
facts, for the exercise of a sober and chas- 
tened judgment ; while the other is too ser- 
vile and imitative for that independence 
which is requisite in applying his knowl- 
edge to the varying circumstances of life. 
Combine the excellences of both, and you 
have the happy medium of great price, a 
common sense mind. 

This trait of character is capable of great 
improvement. The best school for this 
purpose, is the active business of life and 
intercourse with men. Hence men of 
business possess this trait in a high degree ; 
and as these constitute the mass of the 
world, hence the term common sense. 

IF, then, a young man has been detained 
on the paternal farm, or in the counting- 
room, or the workshop, till the age of six- 
teen, or even twenty, let him not think the 
years lost in regard to the sacred profession. 
It was perhaps the best school for him, 
though he may have been in it a little too 
long. Patience of labor, quickness of obser- 
vation, judgment, practical tact, in short, a 
common-sense discipline of mind, is thus 
attained, which is indispensable to his high- 
est usefulness. To this, add the value of 
such an acquaintance with common life and 
common men as he could not otherwise 
gain. There is doubtless a choice in this 
respect, among the laborious occupations. 
That of the farmer is probably the best, 
especially if the young man teach a school 
in the winter, and thus learn the art of 
training the human mind. The mechanic 
may work too much by mere rule, for the 
improvement of his invention and indepen- 
dence of judgment. 

But while this talent, or rather this happy 
assortment and combination of talents, is ca- 
pable of great improvement in most persons, 
yet it is doubtless implanted by nature in 
very different degrees ; — and in some, it is 
scarcely found at all. These may be amiable 
in temper and good in their intentions ; but 
they can never do a thing right. They 
may be very laborious ; but they bring little 
to pa«s. Some small if not some great mis- 
take is found to mar the whole. But why 
it i9 they fail, they cannot imagine. Nor 
can you effectually teach them. To put 
them right in one thing, is at best but to 
fix one more rule or precedent in the 



memory — which they will perhaps as blindly 
or as fancifully apply in the next case that 
summons their action. You impart no prac- 
tical wisdom ; and consequently, though 
they may be very grateful, and may see 
their present fault, and be confident for the 
future, they are none the better. They are 
continually plunging into difficulty. Help 
them out of six troubles, and they are soon 
in the seventh. Such men are nature's in- 
curables ; — Solomon's fools. ' Bray them 
in a mortar with a pestle among wheat, yet 
will not their folly depart from them.' 

It is grievous that such men should ever 
enter the sacred ministry, where sound com- 
mon sense is more needed than any where 
else ; where no two transactions, whether in 
the pulpit or out of it, are precisely alike, and 
nothing can be done by mere rule ; and 
where wayward and fanciful experiments 
are the most unseemly and the most peril- 
ous. 

If, then, a young man be particularly de- 
ficient in common sense, let him remain in 
some more secluded sphere, or where he 
will be under the guidance of some other 
mind. If he has already become a scholar, 
and must live by his knowledge, let him 
translate books, or examine proof-sheets; 
but let him not enter the ministry, where 
he will involve himself and his people in 
troubles, and bring disgrace on the sacred 
profession and the cause of God. 

3. A good disposition is highly impor- 
tant. Doubtless the disposition may be so 
bad as of itself to interpose a barrier to the 
prospect of usefulness. It is nature itself 
spontaneously to learn of such as are " meek 
and lowly," while it flees from the voice of 
pride and moroseness. Christ was as harm- 
less as he was undefiled ; as amiable and 
beneficent, as he was wise and dignified. 
Hence that winning grace in his lips, by 
which he spake, for manner as well as 
matter, as never man spake. Paul, with all 
his decision, we may regard as either nat- 
urally amiable, or as having become so by 
the mellowing power of deep conviction 
and the sweetening joys of a glorious hope. 

A youth of good disposition and of com- 
mon sense, will probably be a prudent man. 
I need not, therefore, treat of that char- 
acteristic distinctly ; but may barely ob- 
serve, that what is generally said in favor 
of that cardinal grace, should go to swell 
our view of the importance of these its prime 
constituents. 

A very wakeful regard to the disposition 
should therefore be exercised by those who 
are to counsel young men in respect to the 
choice of this profession. Nor is it merely 
a single species of bad inclination that we 
are to notice. Perhaps a selfish, mean, sor- 
did, suspicious, or envious disposition, is even 
worse than that of a violent or irritable 
temper, as being more hopeless of cure. 

4. A respectable degree of native talent 
is requisite. Although men must now be 



1834.] 



CALL TO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY. 



1G1 



accepted whose labors might be dispensed 
with were not the call so great, still it will 
be worse than useless to bring forward 
feeble men. They cannot be respected as 
teachers and guides, and if respect is want- 
ing towards a teacher, the failure is radical. 
But it is not simply the amount of mental 
power that is to be considered. At least as 
great regard is to be paid to the kind of 
talents, or rather to the amount of excellence 
found in the combination. Some men move 
swiftly, but in such devious directions as to 
make but little progress. Much of the good 
they do is counterbalanced by the bad ; and 
much of their efforts wasted. If then what 
is found in a man is all good ; if he has a 
well balanced mind ; and if that mind is 
fired by a burning soul, an ardent native 
temperament now turned into the channel 
of Christian love, with God's blessing he 
will effect much, though his simple strength 
of mind is not great. Much more depends 
on ardor and perseverance than on mere 
intellect. A pound of gold is worth more 
than a ton of lead ; and " a living dog is 
better than a dead lion." Some wbo have 
held but a low rank in college, have been 
very successful in the ministry. Such men 
are humble and faithful. They go directly 
to their work ; and toil all the day and all 
the year. And that God whom they honor 
is pleased to honor them here, and will 
crown them with signal glory in a better 
world. 

But let no young man be very confident 
that he shall thus supply his lack of mental 
power. The number of such men is small. 
A mere resolution will not make him such. 
That admirable balance of the mind, playing 
nimbly yet safely on its pivot, and the glow- 
ing devotedness by which it is fired, are 
seldom found in union. 

5. Diligence is requisite. This has been 
already intimated, but is worthy of a dis- 
tinct notice. Why should it ever be said of 
an idle boy, " He will be good for nothing 
but to send to college " ? That is just the 
place to which he should not be sent, unless 
you would spend your money for nought. 
And most preposterous and wicked of all is 
it, to think of sending him into the ministry, 
after he has slumbered away his ten or fif- 
teen years of pretended preparation. If he 
will not labor in your vineyard, you maybe 
sure he will not labor in the Lord's vine- 
yard. By hard blows, you may drive a 
sluggish body to its daily task : but a slug- 
gish mind, never. If the etherial spirit 
goes at all to any purpose, it goes like the 
breath of heaven, not impelled but impel- 
ling and rejoicing in its career. And to toil 
day and night, with alert and wakeful move- 
ment — does the indolent youth give promise 
of this? Vain delusion. He will cumber 
the grourid on which he will stand all the 
day idle. No ; if he has given no signs of 
mental industry at school and in his leisure 
hours, and yet will not follow the plough, 



change his occupation ; put him into tho 
workshop — behind the counter — into a toll- 
house — any where rather than into a col- 
lege, and afterwards into an occupation the 
most arduous, and calling for the most spon- 
taneous labor of any which angels behold 
among the children of men. 



From such apostles, O ye mitred heads, 
Preserve the church ! and lay not cm-less hands 
On skull* that cannot teach and will nut learn." 



And yet these mitred heads of England's 
establishment, with all their boasted facilities 
and safeguards for such purposes, have not 
preserved their church from that load of 
clerical indolence beneath which she is now 
pressed almost beyond the power of respira- 
tion. Freed from the cumbrous and treach- 
erous guards of worldly wisdom, let our 
chinches exhibit to the world the superior 
efficiency of a simple regard to the welfare 
of Zion. Let the Christian parent, the guar- 
dian, the teacher, and, above all, the pastor, 
warn off the idle youth from the sacred en- 
closure. And let not the church ever have 
a single bed of sinecure down, on which he 
can stretch his inert limbs. Nor may our 
land ever be cursed with a factitious nobility 
who shall doubly curse an established church 
by sending the idlest of their junior sons to 
fatten at the breast of the blind and bloated 
" mother." No ; we must have none but 
working men. " Go, work to-day in my 
vineyard." Pray ye the Lord of the harvest, 
that he send forth laborers into his harvest. 

6. Finnness and holy boldness will be 
needful. These will be put to the test in 
one who is to be a standard-bearer in the 
Lord's host. He must not be faint-hearted 
in view of real or imaginary dangers. In 
full but friendly tones, he must be able to 
tell men their duty and their danger, whether 
they will hear or forbear. 

On this trait, however, it is important to 
remark, that the inexperienced and unob- 
serving are liable to err in judging of char- 
acter. The bashful man is not always 
found to be a timid man, or wavering in the 
pursuit of measures which he sees of vital 
importance. And less frequent is it, that 
the shy and blushing boy grows up a timid 
man. On the contrary, he may become 
distinguished for the most cool, intrepid, and 
persevering courage : and this from the 
very fact that his courage is founded in 
principle, instead of being a mere animal 
attribute; — in principle, the very soul of that 
moral courage which a minister needs. He 
has his well-weighed object to gain, and 
will not desert the field till it be accom- 
plished. He has, moreover, like the sensi- 
tive female, already died his death in antici- 
pation, and therefore he stands firm while 
those of better but untested nerves desert 
around him. And further: in this holy 
warfare, through faith, even the timid be- 
come brave. Out of weakness they become 



162 



CALL TO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY. 



strong ; wax valiant in fight ; put to flight 
the armies of the aliens. 

Indeed, in Paul's delineation of weakness 
made strong by the visions of faith and the 
fire of love, we have perhaps the best possi- 
ble illustration of the disiinctive nature of 
holy boldness. That sacred principle is not 
a mere brute instinct or savage passion that 
exults in ferocious or perilous daring. Nor 
is it mere strength of human nerve. Cour- 
age enough truly there may be in such an 
attribute, and boldness too but it is not holy 
boldness; — it is not even moral courage. 
The man who possesses only this, has yet 
something more to acquire before he reaches 
the apostolic standard. There is a soften- 
ing, a refining, an elevation, and a steadfast- 
ness even, which he is to gain, before he 
will stand in chains before Felix and a 
haughty throng, and at once shake and melt 
the heart of his judge. Nor will the man 
of native brass be quite so likely to attain 
this elevating principle, as the man of softer 
and more sympathizing fibre. 

Self-diffidence, too, (let it ever be re- 
membered where religion is concerned,) 
impels the soul to look upwards for strength, 
while native boldness reposes on a self-con- 
fidence of its own creating. 

The difference in the effect of discourse 
in the two cases, is heaven-wide. Both 
may, indeed, be powerful and prostrating : 
but it is only the sweet, seraphic voice 
which holy boldness inspires, that can melt 
and draw forth the heart as it should be 
drawn. By the other, it may be thunder- 
riven — and truly converted perhaps ; but 
the convert does not assume so celestial an 
aspect; neither so happy himself nor so 
benign towards others ; — possessing less of 
the Saviour's image, because he beheld less 
of this glory into which he might be changed, 
in the face of his spiritual father. Saved so 
as by fire, he bears the scathing marks upon 
him through life ; and, in turn, breathes the 
same spirit in his attempts to convert men, 
supposing it the best if not the only way. 

The courage of the apostle John we may 
suppose to have partaken deeply of this 
celestial character; and that of Paul to have 
been remodeled after the same type by the 
powerful grace of God. 

How God may regard these two species 
of Christian character, we stop not now to 
gather from his word ; but would barely 
add, in this summary view, that the modest 
man will be the most likely to make solid 
acquisitions of knowledge, and the least 
likely to neglect specific preparation for par- 
ticular duties. Of course he will be likely 
to become the superior man. 

No one, then, need be discouraged be- 
cause of his native modesty. God can give 
him a tongue to speak ; and he will give it, 
as he would have given to Moses, if duly 
besought and confided in for such a bless- 
ing. 

But courage and firmness there must be, 



[Nov. 



— the more of the right kind, the better; 
and the more these are wanting, the more 
must an elevating faith be cultivated, so 
that the youth jnay be brought to feel it is 
rather God who is to speak by him in vindi- 
cation of his own cause. — But if he give no 
rational promise of any such attainment, let 
him not seek an office (or which he has no 
prospect of being competent. Such a tem- 
perament, for instance, as that of Cowper, 
could not attain the requisite self-possession 
by any ordinary attainments in faith. 

7. He should have a heart to enter with 
delight into the work, provided there be a 
prospect of his greatest usefulness in lhat 
sphere. Some men seem as if born to 
delight in addressing popular assemblies 
and laboring to sway the public mind. 
Such a native predilection may have its 
use, but is not essential. A much more 
important predilection, not native but im- 
planted by the Holy Ghost, is to be sought 
in every one who would be a co-worker in 
the salvation of men: I mean a desire to 
be engaged in their salvation, resulting 
from love to their souls and to God. This 
language, though simple, is selected with 
special care to meet the exact case. Some 
men express a desire for the salvation of 
their fellow mortals; and yet they seem 
not ready to do much, directly or indirectly, 
to promote their salvation. And some, on 
the other hand, appear very zealously en- 
gaged in saving men, who, paradoxical 
as it may seem, care but little for their 
salvation. This is the case with all those 
who are willing to toil hard to make one 
convert, but who feel little joy and some 
envy at the conversion of ten by the 
preaching of others. God knows best 
whether such cases exist ; but that they 
may be guarded against in future, let every 
one know assuredly, that neither of these is 
the right spirit for a preacher of the gospel. 
It is not the spirit that John the Harbinger 
felt when he had labored long and hard to 
prepare the way for the Lord's reception 
among men, and then felt his "joy fulfil- 
led," when they forsook him to follow 
Christ. The object for which he longed, 
was the salvation of men and the glory of 
Christ ; and for this, he rejoiced to decrease 
while Christ should increase. — Some of his 
disciples, it seems, felt not so, while they 
manifested a rival solicitude. 

The spirit of this great precursor of the 
new dispensation, is the genuine spirit of 
the gospel ministry ; — a spirit which satan's 
kingdom more dreads than the whole array 
of the Christian world without it. 

The man who possesses this spirit, has 
looked up to a bleeding Saviour, and been 
healed. He now looks abroad on a dying 
world ; and his soul goes forth in longings 
which cannot be uttered; and like the 
spirit that moved on the deep, it seems to 
spread itself in tender sympathy over all. 
" Why may not they also be all healed ?" 



CALL TO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY. 



1834] 



it asks, with mingled hope and wonder. 
"There is balm enough — and a physician 
that is adequate — and tongues enough to 
Bpeak the joyful tidings. And speak it they 
soon must, and to the praise of this Re- 
deemer, or the very rocks will cry out." 
Still, perhaps, he scarcely dares to harbor 
the thought of ever being deemed worthy 
himself to proclaim the glad tidings. For 
the present, it seems enough for him to be 
permitted, in this "new world" on which he 
has opened his eyes, to bear some humble 
part iu aid of those who shall be called as 
ambassadors of God to men. Viewed in 
this new relation to a dying world anil to 
God, a radiance of glory comes down from 
heaven around the secluded sphere in which 
sovereign grace has found him. In thai 
sphere, whether at the plough, the bench, 
the anvil, the counter, he is not merely 
content, but will rejoice to remain, provided 
it be the calling in which he may believe 
it will please God to make him the most 
highly useful (ovvards the salvation of souls. 
But yet, when he muses, with some gath- 
ering hope, on the most blessed employment 
on earth, his heart exclaims, — " 0, if I could 
be fitted for that employment, how should I 
delight to say, here, Lord, am I, send me 
where thou wilt, to preach thy gospel — in 
this or in other lands — to the rude or the 
refined — the poor or the rich — in evil report 
or good report — only let me be where I 
should be and suitably preach thy gospel 
for the salvation of men. Let the success 
and the glory be all ascribed to the riches 
of thine own free grace and power." 

Now men of such a spirit are the men 
whom a dying world needs; and whom it 
must have, or its multitudes will continue 
to crowd the way to death. Such men see 
joy set before them which the world cannot 
proffer — that for which the Saviour endured 
the cross, despising the shame. They are 
prepared to enjoy, not only their own suc- 
cess, but that of all the laborers. And 
when the world shall.be filled with these 
alert and happy co-workers, (not one of 
them a confra-worker,) its salvation shall 
be rapidly hastened. 

At least a germ of this buoyant spirit, to 
commence with, is needful in every one 
who is to devote himself to the celestial 
vocation. A mere leaden sense of duty 
will never serve him as a vivid spring of 
action. It is true, one may properly be 
led, by mere duty, first to examine the 
question ; and every young man should be 
led by it to such an examination. But 
when a youth, who supposes himself con- 
verted, has deliberately contemplated the 
subject, and still finds not his soul beginning 
at all to glow with the kindlings of a sacred 
4 desire for the good work ' ; — if he had 
rather be a farmer, a merchant, a lawyer, a 
statesman ; and his voice come a third time, 
I pray thee have me excused ; and he pre- 
fers that others should reap the field and 



163 



reap the final reward of turning many to 
righteousness, and be the men to shine m 
the stars forever and ever; exeu ed, (alas 
for his baplesS choice! he knows not the 

price put into his hand ; yet,) excused he 

must indeed be — both from the toil and tbe 
reward. The cause "needs not such aid." 

But happy for some younger brother of 
his, who may rejoice to accept the despised 
birthright, and who, mingled with suitable 
humility, feels a joyful leaping forth of heart 
to the work, coming, as came the Saviour 
horn heaven on his embassy to dying men, 
saying, " I delight, to do thy will, () my God." 

8. He should have a spirit to enter zeal- 
ously into the cause of missions, temperance, 
ministerial education, and all the other great 
enterprises for the salvation of the world. 
The nature of this spirit is sufficiently indi- 
cated under the last head. And as to its 
vast importance, we have no space for the 
delineation. Still the topic cannot be pass- 
ed without remarking, that the pastor who 
does not enter into these things, knows 
neither how to labor for the salvation of the 
whole world, nor yet for the salvation of 
his own people, or his own soul, as he 
ought. He will loiter behind his age, and 
soon be numbered with things obsolete. 

9. His constitution and habits should be 
such as to admit of the requisite study and 
of public speaking. In judging of these, it 
is to be remembered, that not every frail 
body nor every species of disease, brings 
imbecility on the whole man. Some of the 
most efficient spirits in the church, have 
put forth their energies through the organs 
of a sickly frame. Such were Baxter, 
Doddridge, Edwards, and many others that 
might be named. Nor is it every robust 
constitution that is fitted to endure the pe- 
culiar toils of study and of speaking. Ex- 
periment alone can fully decide in a large 
number of cases. 

But while some of a feeble frame may 
be found to endure such labor, and by their 
mental energy and pious zeal, to do much 
good, yet let no one be consecrated to the 
sacred work, merely because he is incapa- 
citated for common employments. This 
would be reversing the rule God gave for 
the Jewish priesthood. The maimed, the 
blind, the deformed, were not to minister 
at his altar. And if such a rule is not now 
to be regarded as of divine obligation, yet 
surely a blemish ought not to be the leading 
reason for seeking the ministry. To enter 
God's special service because you cannot 
serve yourself in some more congenial way, 
is surely an insult to his majesty. 

Personal blemishes may not only give 
pain to an audience every Sabbath, but 
also prove a serious bar to influence and 
usefulness ; and this was doubtless one 
reason for excluding the deformed from the 
ancient priesthood. 

Weak lungs or a feeble voice, may also 
be regarded, in decided cases, as proof that 



164 



CALL TO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY. 



a youth is to seek to glorify God in some 
other calling. 

In the preceding remarks, I have en- 
deavored to present the chief requisites, in 
one who has a call in providence to enter 
on a course of preparation for the ministry. 
It is not to be supposed that all the quali- 
fications that are desirable have been men- 
tioned. The case of each individual must 
of course be decided, not in view of any 
single excellence, but by a comprehensive 
regard to his whole case, including his 
character, the age in which he lives, the 
country, indeed the whole circumstances in 
which he is placed. Nor can it be too 
deeply impressed on all minds, that the 
grand question is, not, Whether one may 
do some good in the ministry, but where 
can he be employed to the best advantage ? 

Supposing nov? the question decided with 
a young man in favor of his entering on a 
course of preparation for the ministry, there 
remains yet a further consideraiion, 

The amount of acquisitions in 
knowledge to be sought. 

This point, too, must be decided in view 
of the whole case. Were man's life now 
that of the antediluvians, it might be un- 
wise in him to commence pastoral or mis- 
sionary labors amid such a world of intel- 
lectual giants, and possessed of so much 
time, before the age of threescore years 
and ten. He would" then be comparatively 
but a boy. But now, man's life is a vapor 
that appeareth for a little time and then 
vanisheth away. What he does he must do 
quickly, though it be dene but imperfectly. 
And amid such urgency as the present, 
doubtless many are called to seek the min- 
istry, who are already too far advanced in 
life to admit of their passing through the 
more regular course of training. For some, 
it will be best to resort to a theological sem- 
inary by a shorter course than that of a 
college ; particularly, (if I may name a 
period in which not a few men of experi- 
ence are agreed,) it will be well for such 
as have passed the age of twenty-four be- 
fore commencing the study of Latin or 
Greek. And for others, especially those 
who have reached the age of about eight 
and twenty, a still shorter course, and per- 
haps of private instruction, may be con- 
ducive to their highest usefulness on the 
whole. The increased difficulty of acquir- 
ing new languages, and the haste that men 
usually feel for a profession at so late a 
period of life, are additional reasons for the 
shorter course, of greater or less force in 
the case of different individuals. 

But while there may be exceptions, it is 
now deemed important by competent judg- 
es, that generally a full and liberal course 
of study be pursued, including literature, 
science, and theology. Such a course, in 
college and the theological seminary, is in- 
creasingly demanded by the progress of 



[Nov. 



society, the loud voice of public opinion, 
and especially of the ministers of most 
denominations, as already explicitly uttered. 

" But," says the zealous youth, (glowing 
perhaps with the best of feeling,) " can I 
not be more speedily fitted to go forth and 
do at least some good ? " Yes, doubtless, if 
your heart prove true to the work : — and 
perhaps, inadvertently, some evil also, to 
balance the good. — But have you yet close- 
ly examined the real object of this intense 
eagerness ? You feel, it may be, " an in- 
describable longing to be engaged in saving 
souls." But ought you not to ponder the 
nature and object of this ardent desire until 
you shall be able to describe it, or at least 
to conceive of it more definitely ? There 
may be a youthful and heroic leaping forth 
of the soul, in its pantings for immediate 
action in so glorious a cause, which, at best, 
is of but a mixed and imperfect nature. 
We would neither blame nor check any 
thing youthful, merely because it is youth- 
ful : but neither should it pass without mo- 
ral scrutiny, because it is to be expected in 
the young. Young men, (it was once re- 
marked by Dr. Dwight.) misjudge, not from 
the want of ability to discriminate, but be- 
cause they are too precipitate to examine. 
If time for reflection, then, will help you to 
anticipate the wisdom of years, be entreat- 
ed, in a case so momentous, prayerfully to 
take that time. 

But perhaps you will plead, that you have 
already done this in respect to the motives 
that stir your zeal, and are ready to do it 
further in respect to the guidance of this 
zeal. " Without claiming perfection," you 
say, " I still find something more solemn 
and etherial than a mere love of action, or 
even mere sympathy. I long to be engag- 
ed in saving souls and to glorify him who 
came from heaven to save them." 

The answer is good ; and, we would 
hope, from a good conscience. But a fur- 
ther question must now be put, if we would 
reach the point of true wisdom. Is it the 
object of your glowing zeal, to be publicly 
engaged in doing good now, at all events ? 
or is it, in view of all the light you can 
gain, to aim at the utmost possible good 
while on earth — saving as many of these 
sinking souls as you can in the course of 
your whole life ? This is the only just 
light in which to ponder the main question. 
Think of it then deeply in this light; and 
ask the voice of experience to aid your 
meditations. 

To these last directions, perhaps, you also 
give your cordial assent. And it may fur- 
thermore be, that you will say, "all this 1 
have done, from the beginning." (Would 
not Jesus love this young man?) " And I 
have sought to consult the best of experi- 
ence, viz., that which was guided by wis- 
dom from above, and followed by the best 
results. It is the experience of the apos- 
tles themselves; those faithful but ignorant 



1834.] 



fishermen, who went forth every where 
preaching that men should repent. This 
simple annunciation, which they made with 
a glowing tongue, was every where follow- 
ed hy divine power on the souls of men. 
And my heart pants to do the same, in hope 
of a like blessing." 

It is, then, in closely following the true 
spirit of this example, that you hope for 
such a blessing. You will of course rejoice 
to know, that others give their cordial assent 
to the same position ; and if any mistake be 
found here on your part or that of others, 
you desire its correction. 

At what period, then, did these poor 
fishermen go forth on their final embassy*? 
and with what degree of preparation and 
endowment ? He who called them to the 
work, on a certain occasion, bid them lift 
up their eyes and behold the fields white 
already to the harvest. The harvest was 
also great, and the laborers few. Their 
hearts burned within them, — as yours does 
now. And the Saviour's heart likewise 
burned with a more intense flame to have 
them in the great field that was daily per- 
ishing. What, then, was his command to 
them ? go, without a moment's delay, and 
save what you can? No; — but " pray ye 
the Lord of the harvest, that he would send 
forth laborers. " And how long did he de- 
tain them about him, praying that laborers 
might be sent, and preparing themselves to 
go ? Certainly three, if not seven years. 
True, he sent some of them occasionally on 
short and simple messages, in preparing his 
way among the people, just as you may 
now go forth. But, most of the time, they 
were about him. And during three years, 
he spake to them as never man spake. Nor 
was it merely the brief but comprehensive 
epitome of instruction that is now left for 
our learning in the gospels. One of their 
number affirms, that if the whole had been 
written, he supposes the world would not 
contain the books. 

It is also to be remembered, that they had 
the promise of the divine Spirit to bring all 
these things to their remembrance. None 
of this vast amount of instruction was to be 
lost, but they were to have it always ready 
as occasion should require. 

Consider, likewise, that he who taught 
them, foreknew the situation in which each 
one would be placed. He could, therefore, 
impart exactly the knowledge and admoni- 
tion they needed, without spending their 
time in a preparation for mere contingencies. 
Thus he warned Peter of satan's purpose to 
sift him. 

Reflect further, that when all was done, 
and they had seen this same divine teacher 
ascend up where he was before, they were 
not to embark on their embassy until clothed 
with miraculous powers and filled with the 
spirit of inspiration, and blessed with the 
gift of tongues. 

Now, put all these things together, and 
VOL. VII. 



CALL TO THE C'HKISTIAN MIN1STKV. 



165 



say, Did Christ send forth ignorant men to 
preach his gospel ? — Or did he seem in haste 
to send them? — Or could this delay result 
from the want of that same ardor which 
you now so properly feel ? I vjisdom dwell 
with prudence. He knew the training men 
need in order to preach as he would have 
them preach. And the example he has 
thus given is worth more than the com- 
bined experience of the whole church be- 
sides, even had that experience appeared to 
teach a different lesson. 

But alas, not only for the hasty aspirant 
to the sacred office, but also for even the 
more considerate, this divine example seems 
rather to prove too much than too little. If 
it convict of any thing, it will convict the 
advocates for the most thorough training, of 
having been too lax and accommodating, in 
giving their consent that any should go 
forth with less than the comparatively im- 
perfect preparation which is called liberal. 
We say, if a man is already of mature age, 
and has acquired wisdom in some pursuit 
of business, and has also a family which he 
cannot long leave, he may take a shorter 
course. But when, says the example we 
are examining ? Were not these men of 
mature age, at the time Christ called them 
from the walks of common labor and the 
seat of civil office ? Had they not acquired 
practical wisdom ? Were not some of them 
even married and settled in families ? 

To the young man, then, who has no 
such encumbrance, and who does not inor- 
dinately wish for what the apostles could so 
freely forsake, in order to be with Christ 
and gain their divine education — to such an 
one, we would say, Ponder well the sacred 
precedent you have adduced. Have you 
more wisdom than these men had when 
they came under Christ's teaching? Can 
you hope to gain more that will be to your 
purpose, in seven or ten years, than they 
gained while with him ? Would you not 
rather be with Christ one year, than in 
a college or a theological seminary three 
years ? With Christ, who could tell, in 
a single breath, respecting some doctrine, 
what it will now cost you months of study 
fully to settle in your mind ! And then, to 
be gifted with languages which it will cost 
you yeais to acquire ! And will you not 
need as much wisdom and knowledge as 
they needed who first spread Christianity ? 
Is not the present age as rich and learned 
as was that of the apostles ? Is not even 
most of human knowledge of a later date ? 
On what principle, then, will you think 
to curtail that thorough preparation which 
reason sanctions, and which Christ's exam- 
ple so plainly demands? — You may think it 
a great pity that you must spend so much of 
your precious life before you can begin to 
act effectively. — But was it not equally sad, 
that the apostles should spend so much of 
theirs?— And sadder still, that Christ should 
live on earth till he began to be about 



166 



CALL TO THE CHRISTIAN MINISTRY. 



[Nov. 






thirty years of age, before he commenced 
his public ministry ? A pity that we must 
spend so much of our time ! Are we, think 
you, wasting this time ? misspending it ? 
Are we doing otherwise than God would 
have us do ? than he designed us to do, 
when he formed us men, and not angels ? 
Could he not make us at once fit for action ? 
full grown men, without the gradations of 
infancy, childhood, and youth ? Could he 
not raise up better ministers from the stones 
of the street, than yourself even hope to 
be ? If so, where is the pity ? Is it that 
Providence has indeed so made man, that 
half his life must be spent in preparation 
for the highest usefulness during the other 
half! Engage then in thorough preparation, 
like a Christian man, grateful that God has 
given you capacities to gain such wisdom 
at all, and deeply impressed that you have 
a great work, before you in preparing to 
preach, as well as in the final discharge of 
that high office. When you have faithfully 
devoted the customary period to prayerful 
study, you will feel, as thousands have felt 
before you, that much more remains to be 
learned than all which you at first imagined 
requisite. Then will you begin more deeply 
to feel the truth, that it requires much, very 
much to constitute a good minister. This is 
a truth which will continually deepen in 
your view, in the course of actual expe- 
rience ; and you will exclaim, with in- 
creasing emotion, There is not on earth 
another office which requires such a com- 
bination of excellences. 

Neither need you be troubled with the 
thought, that possibly you may die soon 
after completing your preparation. That 
is for God to decide. And if you must so 
soon die, still it is quite possible you may 
accomplish as great amount of good in 
this way, as by a premature entrance on 
the ministry. For, some persons of piety 
and discretion effect as much good while 
among their fellow students as in any equal 
portion of subsequent life. The early death, 
too, of one who is prepared for extensive 
usefulness, seems often to occasion as much 
good as could have been hoped from pro- 
longed labors. Like the death of Harriet 
Newell, it summons a fresh host to the 
onset. Such possibilities are a cheering 
and ample offset to the ill-boding supposi- 
tion just adduced. But, not to dwell on 
these possibilities; I remark, in favor of 
thorough preparation, that the hand of skill 
sometimes effects much by a single move- 
ment. A physician may save the most 
precious life by one prescription : but it 
cost him a life of study and experience to 
gain that skill. It has been well observed 
by a living preacher, that the battle of 
Waterloo, (on which hung the destinies of 
half the globe,) was soon fought : but the 
wisdom which dictated the victorious move- 
ment was the attainment of many years. 
The signature of our chief magistrate can 



be given to a law by the movement of his 
pen : but what fearful interests hang on the 
moment of decision. Yet not more fearful, 
as eternity shall' disclose, than may hang on 
some few of the sentences in the last ser- 
mon of your short life. Mighty events for 
both worlds were decided by Peter's short 
address on the day of pentecost. Would he 
have made that address if he had not fol- 
lowed Jesus in his course of preparation ? 
It is worth a life of prayerful study, to be 
privileged to preach such a sermon as that 
by Mr. Livingstone at the kirk of Schotts, 
in Scotland, when about five hundred 
turned to the Lord. Such results come 
not by chance either as it respects the 
means or the grace that blesses them. If 
you would preach such a sermon, run not 
before you are sent, but follow the pattern 
of preparation your Lord has given. It is 
as much a duty to prepare to preach the 
gospel well, as actually to preach it well; 
and he who is properly engaged in such 
preparation, is as truly and acceptably 
serving Christ, and as ready to meet him 
at a moment's warning. 

Thus have 1 endeavored, as fully as the 
limits of this tract would permit, to meet 
the true spirit of the questions proposed for 
discussion. 

Having now seen the pressing need of 
young men to preach the gospel, and the 
kind of men that are needed, and the acqui- 
sitions they should first make, it may not be 
improper, in conclusion, very briefly to in- 
quire, How are these young men to be sup- 
plied ? a momentous question truly for the 
church at large, and particularly for those 
on whom the responsibility is more imme- 
diately devolved. And who are these re- 
sponsible persons ? The following classes 
may be readily designated. 

First, the converted young men in our 
country. If such of them as are gifted by 
nature and grace for the work, will not 
freely come forward and devote their lives 
to the divine calling, the world will not be 
saved. Are you, then, a young man whose 
heart the Lord hath opened to rejoice in his 
kingdom ? Seriously and prayerfully in- 
quire with yourself, whether it may not be 
your duty, and your most exalted privilege, 
to bear a part in hastening this kingdom by 
leaving your farm, your merchandize, your 
shop, your office, your endeared home, and 
giving up your life to preaching this same 
Jesus, whose word has now become so pre- 
cious to your soul, Inquire of others, and 
especially of your minister, in hope that 
they may cast light on your path. Above 
all, inquire of God, with a mind that wishes 
above all things to know and do its duty. 
There is not a young man under the age of 
thirty, who ought not solemnly to ponder 
this question as a matter of personal duty. 
Perhaps you will be able, (or will rather be 
compelled,) very speedily to decide it in the 
negative. Be it so : still the time spent in 






GERMAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 



1834.] 



such examination, is not lost. If properly 
spent, it will do you good while you live. 
It will make you a more active and prac- 
tical Christian, by the elevation of mind and 
purity of purpose which such a contempla- 
tion is fitted to impart. — Excite, also, your 
young brethren, perhaps more gifted than 
yourself, to make the same investigation for 
themselves. 

The parents of projnising young men, 
belong to the responsible number. Are you, 
as a father, blessed with a son of the suit- 
able natural endowments, and now doubly 
blessed by his hopeful conversion ? Make 
yourself more than thrice happy in him for 
this world and the future, by giving up this 
son to an employment so elevated, so need- 
ful, and in which angels would delight to 
minister. For mere worldly gain, or honor, 
or ease, to yourself or him, you cannot, you 
must not withhold him. The Lord hath 
need of him, and you must rejoice to send 
him forth. — Are you a devout but poor, 
widowed mother, whose desolate heart, 
sustained by an only son, a child of many 
prayers, and that heart now overflowing 
with gratitude for the conversion of this 
son? Strange as it may seem to the eye 
of worldly wisdom, you will be the last to 
need exhortation to the duty now in ques- 
tion. If, like her who gave all her liv- 
ing, you find it consistent to gratify your 
strongest desire, and give your only son, 
in cheerful faith, the God of the widow 
and the fatherless may make it a memorial 
better than that of sons and of daughters. 

But with Christian parents, we stop not 
here. Ye fathers and mothers in Israel, 
what to you are sons and worldly substance 
more than to other parents ? Every thing, 
if you have but hearts to know. Wait not, 
then, till your sons are converted. Conse- 
crate them to Christ and the church from 
the birth. While rearing them in faith, 
often tell them of this consecration. In due 
time, cheerfully consent to the expense of 
their education at college, in the hope the 
divine Spirit will then meet them, if not 
before, and form them vessels of honor. 
Nor cease to hope and pray and labor in 
faith, provided they should not so soon be 
turned to the Lord; — nor, indeed, ever 
regret your efforts for so good an object, 
though you should not see it accomplished 
in the manner you had hoped. But many 
such parents will see their object accom- 
plished speedily ; many are in fact seeing 
it accomplished, from year to year, through 
the revivals that so frequently bless our 
schools of learning. 

Teachers, also, of every class, from the 
common and the Sabbath school up to the 
college, belong to this responsible number. 
They have special opportunities for dis- 
cerning and guiding the most useful talents 
the country contains. Well may it be ex- 
pected of them that they will not neglect 
so responsible a trust. God will require it. 



If>7 



By a single word, fitly spoken, the most 
obscure Sabbath-school teacher may give 
to the church a blessing that cannot be 
estimated. 

And last but chief of all, may be named 
the ministers of the gospel. To you, ye 
spiritual guides and watchmen, is given 
in charge a sacred deposit, which you are 
bidden in turn to commit to faithful men, 
who are able to teach others. And it is no 
less your duty to seek out and provide such 
men for the church, than to see to it that 
you intrust the deposit with no others. 
And God has accordingly given you the 
ability for this purpose. You, above all 
other men, are the guides of education, in 
smaller and in larger spheres. You are 
acquainted with the schools and the youth 
of the land ; and with their parents ; and 
God has given you a voice that will be 
heard on this subject by parent, child, and 
teacher. Let each Christian minister, then, 
speak this word of power as God would have 
him speak, and thus every year double the 
whole usefulness of his own public ministry 
by selecting at least one for the high call- 
ing from those who might otherwise re- 
main in obscurity. And when seasons of 
refreshing come from the presence of the 
Lord, let the holy man preach each sermon 
as though he were going to convert men 
who were, in turn, to become ministers — 
and who would take him as their sample of 
imitation through life. Let him teach the 
young converts as though he were teaching 
embryo ministers. And when the season 
is through, let the good bishop of the flock 
select, without needless delay, at least a 
tithe of the young men thus converted, for 
the work of the sanctuary. He that will 
be thus faithful over a little, will be made 
ruler over much. He will soon see another 
revival, and another, and another still. His 
sun will finally go down in glory, and his 
light will be long reflected by a hemisphere 
of stars. 

Thus let Zion's watchmen and all her 
sons be intent on increasing this great and 
primordial source of Christian influence, 
and soon the earth will be full of the 
knowledge of the Lord as the waters cover 
the sea. — Reader, will you stand in your lot, 
and do your part in this work ? And, though 
perhaps neither prophet nor prophet's son, 
thus receive a prophet's reward, as having 
at least preached the gospel by the mouth 
of another. 



An Education Society of the German 
Reformed Church. 
The tenth article of the constitution of 
the Education Society of the Classis of 
North Carolina is as follows. 

No beneficiary shall receive pecuniary 
aid from the society as a gift; but it shall 



168 



QUARTERLY MEETING. 



[Nor. 



be considered as a loan on the following 
conditions, viz. 1. He shall pledge himself 
to enter the ministry of the German Re- 
formed church. 2. He shall give approved 
bonds for all the money applied to his use 
by the Board of Education. 3. He shall 
refund all the money expended for his 
benefit, with interest, from the date of its 
expenditure, if he, at any time during his 
studies, shall change his mind and turn his 
attention to some other profession, or attach 
himself to some other church. 4. If he 
shall enter the ministry in the German Re- 
formed church, he shall, if able, refund all 
the money applied to his use by the Board, 
without interest, within the term of four 
years from the date of his licensure. 5. If 
any, or the whole, of the money shall re- 
main unpaid at the expiration of the term 
of four years, he shall from that time be 
required to pay interest. If through the 
providence of God he shall be prevented 
from entering the ministry, by disease or 
death ; or if in the course of the same 
providence he shall always remain poor 
after entering the ministry, neither he nor 
his friend shall ever be called upon for 
either principle or interest. 



INTELLIGENCE. 

American- Education Society. 
The quarterly meeting of the Board of 
Directors was held on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 
1834. Appropriations were made to bene- 
ficiaries, in various institutions as follows : 

Former Ben. New Ben. Total. Am't Ap. 

5 Theol. Sem's, 42 12 54 $1,008 
13 Colleges, 239 22 261 4,813 
29 Academies, 63 17 80 1,032 

47 Institutions, 344 51 395 $6,853 
The Directors of the Presbyterian Edu- 
cation Society held their quarterly meeting 
Sept. 30, 1834, and made appropriations to 
beneficiaries as follows : 

Former Ben. New Ben. Total. Am't Ap. 

6 Theol. Sem's, 35 1 36 $ 648 
18 Colleges, 127 3 130 2,432 
39 Academies, 149 26 175 2,927 



63 Institutions, 311 
Sum Tot. 110 In. 685 



30 341 $6,007 
81 736 $12,860 



The following resolutions in relation to 
Dr. Porter were passed at the meeting of 
the Directors of the Parent Society, in July, 
and ordered to be inserted on the records, and 
ought to have been printed in the last Jour- 
nal. They are here published as a memento 
of that great, good and venerable man. 



Resolved, That the Directors of the 
American Education Society recognize with 
holy submission the dispensation of Heaven 
in the death of the Rev. Ebenezer Porter, 
D. D., who was a most ardent friend, and 
faithful and devoted officer of this Society 
from its commencement; and while they 
unfeignedly lament the loss which this So- 
ciety, and the cause of ministerial educa- 
tion, as well as the cause of Christ gen- 
erally, have sustained in his removal, they 
would gratefully notice the goodness of the 
great Head of the church in endowing him 
with those gifts and graces, which rendered 
him so universally beloved and revered; 
and which qualified him to take so dis- 
tinguished a part in training young men 
for the Christian ministry ; and in ordering 
events in such a manner, that while he 
spent a great portion of his life in educating 
youth for the ministerial service, he was 
enabled to contribute so much by funds for 
this glorious object, at his decease. 

Resolved, That this Board of Directors 
tenderly sympathize with Mrs. Porter and 
her adopted son in their deep affliction, and 
fervently implore the Father of mercies 
that this distressing bereavement may be 
sanctified to them, and that the consolations 
of that gospel, which their dear, departed 
friend so long enjoyed and administered to 
others, may be theirs in this trying dis- 
pensation, and in all the future vicissitudes 
of life. 



The following is an address of the Hon. 
John Hall, Principal of the High School, in 
Ellington, Connecticut, delivered at the an- 
nual meeting of the Connecticut Branch of 
the American Education Society, upon offer- 
ing a resolution in respect to the importance 
of raising up a thoroughly educated ministry. 

It is a common error, that the advocates 
for a well educated ministry are regajded 
by their opponents as either attaching little 
importance to personal piety in a preacher 
of the gospel, or as altogether denying its 
necessity. I deem it proper to correct this 
mistake, before I proceed to consider the 
resolution which has now been offered. Let 
it then be distinctly understood, that the 
American Education Society considers this 
holy principle as an absolutely necessary 
qualification in every ambassador of Jesus 



1834.] 



JUDGE HALLS ADDRESS. 



109 



Christ. We value it as highly, and insist 
upon it as much, as do our opponents. On 
this point, then, we agree. The true question 
hetvvecn us is, whether any thing beyond 
mere personal piety, however great and 
ardent it may be, and however united with 
good natural talents, is requisite to give full 
efficacy and success to the labors of a min- 
ister. 

That we may come to a proper decision of 
the question now before us, let us take a 
cursory view of the appropriate business 
and duties of one who is commissioned to 
preach the gospel to men. We shall then 
be better able to judge of the qualifications 
which his office requires. 

The minister of the gospel is liable to 
meet with those who altogether deny the 
existence of God; who impugn his charac- 
ter, and contemn his authority. Hence it 
will become his duty to silence their atheis- 
tical cavils, and refute their arguments. 
As the ambassador of God, it peculiarly 
behoves him to prove his existence, and to 
vindicate his character against those who 
assail it. This he should be able to do with 
dignity and effect. To believe in God, as 
the Creator, and moral Governor of the 
world, is the very first principle of all re- 
ligion, and the very foundation of all our 
hopes of immortality. A minister, there- 
fore, should be well furnished with argu- 
ments, and proofs, for the establishment of 
this fundamental truth. 

Another class of unbelievers, much more 
numerous and diversified in character, are 
those who admit the existence of a God, 
but deny that he has revealed himself to 
men except in his works of creation, and in 
the subjection of these works to general laws, 
which men must construe as well as they 
can by the simple aid of their own under- 
standings. All of this class, as well as the 
former, deny, of course, the authenticity of 
the Bible as a revelation from God, and insist 
on human reason as a sufficient guide in all 
matters of religious faith. In addition to 
these speculative unbelievers, is a multitu- 
dinous race of practical infidels, who are 
not prepared to deny the authenticity of the 
sacred writings, in theory, but disallow all 
which these contain, of any value, in their 
general conduct. Another portion, still, 
receive a part of the Bible as true, and in 
their wisdom reject the remainder. Others, 
again, profess to receive the whole, and to 
cherish it in their hearts ; but, through ig- 
norance, or prejudice, mistake or distort 
many of its truths. All these different 
classes of men the preacher must be pre- 
pared to meet. He should hold himself 
ready to refute their arguments, to expose 
their sophistry, to check their presumptu- 
ousness, to enlighten their minds with the 
knowledge of truth, and to bring their con- 
sciences to admit its claims. The Bible 
must be defended against all its adversaries, 
or the whole system of revealed truth must 



be abandoned. How important is it, then, 
that he who is peculiarly set for the defence 
of this truth, should be able to accomplish 
this object with success. It is from the 
Bible that he derives his own authority to 
preach. Destroy the authenticity of that 
sacred book, and you make the preachers of 
the jjo-pel mere pioclaimers of an ideal re- 
ligion, which may indeed be admired for its 
purity, and its adaptation to man as a moral 
being, but without power to bind his con- 
science, and control his heart. 

It is the appropriate office of a Christian 
minister to unfold, illustrate, and enforce 
the various doctrines, precepts, duties, and 
truths, which are contained in the sacred 
writings. He should be able to give to 
each one of these its relative importance, 
and bring them all to bear on the great 
object which he has in view — the salvation 
of men. He must not only be able to un- 
derstand these doctrines, precepts, duties, and 
truths, but he should also be competent to 
defend them against all the cavil, learning, 
ingenuity, and malice of their opposers. 
The ambassador of God should surely be 
able to vindicate the " ways of God to man," 
whenever, however, and by whomsoever, 
they may be called in question. 

The duties which I have already named 
are special in their character — to be exer- 
cised as occasion shall offer, and which every 
minister of the gospel is not called upon to 
practice in an equal degree, but from the 
discharge of which none are exempt. — But 
there are two duties which are incumbent 
on all the ministers of Christ, at all times, 
and under all circumstances, being stated in 
their character, and bearing directly on the 
great object which the gospel has in view. 
These are — to bring sinners to repentance, 
and to instruct and edify the household of 
faith. Go where he will, the minister of 
Christ is sure to meet with sinners, for whose 
conversion he is bound to labor with all the 
ability, as well as zeal, which he can sum- 
mon to his aid from earth, and from heaven ; 
by all the means which his own efforts can 
procure, or God shall be pleased to vouch- 
safe. The object in view is too momentous, 
involving interests too vast in their conse- 
quences, to be lost through a deficiency in 
any qualifications, through a want of any 
means, which it is in the power of a minister 
to possess. With all the aids which he can 
command, from every quarter, and with all 
the zeal of benevolence which can be made 
to glow in his bosom, too manj T souls will be 
lost. If there be, then, a single qualifica- 
tion wanting to achieve so noble a purpose, 
so much is subtracted not only from his 
ability to fulfil his high commission, but 
what is more — from the salvation of as many 
souls as that further qualification might have 
made him the instrument of affecting. In 
a matter of such vast concernment, what 
minister should be willing to be deficient in 
any particular which would seem to crown 



170 



JUDGE HALLS ADDRESS. 



his labors with success ? But in proportion 
as his efforts are, in this respect, successful, 
will he be called to fulfil that other duty of 
instructing and edifying the household of 
faith. How arduous and important this 
work is, how many particulars it involves, 
and how much wisdom it demands in him 
who performs it, I need not here undertake 
to show. It is sufficient to say, that the 
conversion of the world itself depends, so 
far as human instrumentality is concerned, 
on the character of the church; and this 
character is dependent on the manner in 
which the collective members of the church 
are taught, and trained, and educated for 
their Master's service, and in conformity 
with his requirements. 

Contemplate, now, for a moment, the 
various characters which the Christian 
minister must encounter in the performance 
of his appropriate duties. Consider atten- 
tively all the grades of character of which 
human society is composed. Qualified, or 
unqualified, he must encounter them all, 
and just as he finds them. On this hetero- 
geneous mass of living mortals he must 
expend his efforts, and out of them fit as 
many as he may for the kingdom of heaven. 
The ignorant, the stupid, the perverse, 
the sullen, the obstinate, the frivolous, the 
prejudiced, the self-conceited, the prodigal, 
the covetous, the ambitious, the haughty, 
the debased, the gay, the self-righteous, the 
learned, the cunning, the treacherous, the 
indifferent, the boisterous, are scattered every 
where through the world, and, along with a 
multitude of others, make up the mingled 
mass of human society. It was to save such 
that Jesus Christ came into the world, and 
toiled, and suffered, and died ; and in behalf 
of such must every minister, who comes in 
his name, also labor in every way which is 
appropriate to his vocation. — The different 
characters just enumerated, with a variety 
of others, are not merely such as he may 
occasionally meet with in his ministerial 
intercourse with men, but are often blended 
together in the same assembly of hearers. 
In all events, the natural aversion of the 
human heart to holiness, and the spiritual 
stupidity of men must be encountered at 
every turn, and be presented in every form, 
and degree. 

I have thus touched upon some of the 
general duties which a Christian minister 
is called upon to perform. The natural 
inquiry now is, What qualifications should 
he possess, other than a spirit of piety, to 
enable him to discharge these duties with 
success ? 

To prove that there is a God, he who 
ministers in his name should be well pro- 
vided with arguments to evince that im- 
portant truth. He should be acquainted 
enough with the works of the Creator to 
draw from them the proofs which they ex- 
hibit of his eternal power and Godhead, so 
that the atheist shall be without excuse. 



[Nov. 



He should be able to expose the sophistry 
of his arguments, and to humble his arro- 
gance. But ere he can detect the false 
reasoning of his opponents, he must himself 
know how to reason, and how to conduct 
an argument to a legitimate issue. To ac- 
complish this with advantage, much dis- 
cipline of the mind is necessary, and much 
acquaintance with the proper rules of argu- 
mentation. He should understand, too, 
what arguments his adversaries employ, and 
be prepared to anticipate their objections. 
However misguided atheists may be, and 
far from the truth, they are not, of course, 
unlearned, nor men of weak understandings. 
They may be adroit contemners of divine 
things, and subtle advocates of falsehood. 
Hence it becomes important, in a high de- 
gree, that their vanity should not be in- 
creased by an unskilful defense of the truth 
on the part of him whose business it is to 
maintain it. 

To prove the divine authority of the 
Holy Scriptures, the preacher will require 
much varied learning. He will need to be 
acquainted with the multiplied evidences in 
its favor which are usually denominated 
external, and with the many arguments 
which those Scriptures contain within 
themselves that they were communicated 
from heaven. A wide range is here given 
to argumentation — one which he should 
be able to take unhesitatingly in vindica- 
tion of the truth. In the prosecution of 
this work he will meet with many false 
systems, and theories, which the perverse 
ingenuity of man has fabricated for the 
avoidance of those obligations which faith 
in the Bible imposes on the conscience. 
Now these systems and theories he should 
be able thoroughly to sift and expose. To 
do this requires an acquaintance with their 
dogmas, their plausibilities, and their ten- 
dencies, which can be only gained with 
much study and research. The two great 
classes of evidence which God himself has 
made the foundation of our belief in a reve- 
lation from him, are miracles, and the fulfil- 
ment of prophecy. It is then incumbent 
on the preacher that he should understand 
them well. He should be competent to 
show that miracles have been wrought in 
attestation of divine truth, and that they 
do in fact prove the thing intended. To 
show the fulfilment of prophecies demands 
a knowledge both of sacred and profane 
history through a long series of ages, and 
of the events which take place in our own 
times throughout the world. The fulfil- 
ment of prophecy is a species of evidence 
which will never fail, and is capable of 
being brought within every man's compre- 
hension, and of being urged with incalcu- 
lable force. A minister who is deficient 
here, is weak where he ought to be strong, 
and inefficient where he should be power- 
ful. 

That he may unfold, illustrate, and en- 



1834.] 



JUDGE HALL'S ADDRESS. 



171 



force, the various doctrines, precepts, du- 
ties and truths, contained in the Bible, the 
Christian minister should make this book 
his peculiar study, with the aid of all such 
helpa as he can command. One of the 
most important of these helps, is a thorough 
knowledge of the languages in which it 
was originally written. Another indispensa- 
ble auxiliary, is a knowledge of the right 
laws of interpreting writings at large, and 
of the sacred writings in particular. In 
this respect the Bible is to be examined 
like any other book ; is subject to the same 
rules of criticism, and is to be interpreted 
on the same principles of construction. It 
is both a mistaken, and a mischievous 
opinion, that its language is to be con- 
strued by other rules than those which we 
apply to the ordinary speech of men. We 
should bear in mind that this book was not 
written in the language of angels, nor in 
that of other inhabitants of some unknown 
world, but in such an one, and in such an 
idiom, as men are accustomed to use. We 
are to receive and understand it accord- 
ingly, discarding the opinion, that we are 
to take its meaning in some sense mysteri- 
ously different from what we attach to the 
language of mankind in general ; or in 
other words, we must interpret it accord- 
ing to those principles which we under- 
stand, not those of which we are ignorant. 

To accomplish the good work of convert- 
ing sinners, and of instructing Christians, 
the minister of the gospel has occasion for 
a great variety of knowledge, which is to 
be acquired only by diligent study and ob- 
servation. To influence successfully that 
diversified mass of characters which he 
must meet, requires an intimate acquaint- 
ance with man as an intellectual, rational, 
voluntary being; as possessing affections, 
passions, and instincts ; and as controlled by 
a great variety of motives which affect him 
in divers ways and proportions. A careful 
study of man, therefore, for the purpose of 
understanding all the powers and proper- 
ties which are essential to constitute him 
a moral and accountable being, and of the 
causes, means, and instruments, which ex- 
cite him to action, must be an appropriate 
part of a thorough ministerial education. 
Without such a knowledge, the efforts of a 
minister must be at random, and indecisive, 
for he will operate on he knows not what, 
with means and instruments whose adapta- 
tion he does not comprehend. A mind 
which is itself unfurnished, dark, and be- 
wildered, will make but a feeble impression 
even on other minds in a like condition ; 
but feebler still, on minds of enlarged and 
cultivated powers. It requires no small 
degree of intellectual acumen to manage 
even an ignorant, uninformed mind aright. 
Its prejudices, antipathies, and partialities, 
may be as various, and as strong, and as 
inveterate, as those which are associated 
with an intellect of the highest grade. 



Nay, more; their strength and inveteracy 
are usually proportionate to the ignorance 
which attends them. To soften, remove, 
or avoid them, requires much skill and 
address, which can be gained only by the 
study of man. But whatever may be tbe 
amount of skill required in this case, a 
greater amount is necessary to influence 
a mind well cultivated, and disciplined 
either to attack the truth, or to defend 
error. — That he may gain access to the 
hearts of his hearers, a preacher must know 
the avenues which conduct to them ; he 
must be acquainted with the affections 
which dwell there, and with the causes 
which will draw forth such of them as he 
may choose, and quiet those which he may 
wish to keep at rest. It will be readily 
seen, from this general statement, that in- 
tellectual, and moral philosophy, in their 
best sense, are studies peculiarly appro- 
priate to a Christian minister. He who 
possesses a competent knowledge of these, 
must labor, surely, with fairer prospects of 
success, than one who is a novice in the 
science of the human mind, and in the 
knowledge of those laws by which it is 
governed. 

Without adverting, even in a summary 
manner, to the many qualifications which 
are useful to a minister of the gospel, per- 
mit me to mention one more, which is less 
frequently insisted on than its importance 
would seem to demand. — This qualification 
is, Eloquence ; and I take the word in 
its best, and broadest meaning. I neither 
restrict it to what is called mere pulpit 
eloquence ; (because in these days of the 
church the minister of Christ is called upon 
to take a wider range than the pulpit gives 
him, and to address assemblies very differ- 
ent in character, and collected under cir- 
cumstances which require various displays 
of the speaker's powers ;) nor do I extend 
it to every thing which has borne that 
name, and which the conceit of men has 
substituted for the original. The object 
of true eloquence is to convince, and per- 
suade. It is attended, indeed, with many 
auxiliaries, but they are all subservient to 
the one great end ; and without such sub- 
serviency they would be delusory and con- 
temptible. Powerful argumentation, sub- 
lime and brilliant conceptions, appropriate 
and elegant language, a just arrangement 
of thoughts, a graceful elocution, and a 
winning address, are among the things 
which eloquence summons to its aid. A 
part of these are employed to convince : 
the rest are employed to persuade. Of 
what avail could be the most correct argu- 
mentation, if it should fail to convince flie 
minds, and influence the conduct, of men ? 
Or where would be the advantage of per- 
suasion, if it conducted men only into error ? 
And where would be the utility of both 
united, were not their aim and tendency to 
brins men to embrace the truth ? The 



172 



JUDGE HALL 5 S ADDUESS. 



[Nov. 



object of true eloquence, then, is not sim- 
ply to amuse and delight; to captivate the 
mind to no useful purpose ; nor to employ 
its charms to dazzle and bewilder. It has 
a higher and nobler aim. It seeks to con- 
vince men of what is good; to show them 
where their real interests lie ; and to ac- 
complish this, it wields the truth with all 
the energy which it can command. To in- 
duce men to pursue their own good, and to 
seek their true interests, it calls to its aid all 
that is inviting and powerful in language; — 
all which is attractive in elocution, and ad- 
dress. It explores every avenue to the 
mind, and searches the recesses of the 
heart. It looks at home, and abroad, for 
motives to control the will, for whatever 
can sway the affections — for whatever can 
arouse to action. It borrows arguments, 
illustrations, and beauties, from every region 
of creation, and makes them subservient to 
its one great purpose. While it captivates, 
it imposes no servitude, for the subjects of 
its power are so from choice ; and their 
obedience is that of the understanding, and 
their assent is the assent of the heart. 

We have already seen that the great 
object of a Christian minister, is to convince 
men that there is a God ; that he has given 
them a revelation; that they are sinners; 
that Jesus Christ has made a propitiation 
for them ; and that they may obtain forgive- 
ness of sin, through his blood, by faith in 
his name, and repentance of sin. Here, 
then, if any where, is occasion for elo- 
quence, of the highest, noblest kind. Here 
men need to be convinced of the sublimest 
truths, of the dearest interests, of the most 
important good, in which they are, or ever 
will be, concerned ; and, from their natural 
aversion to all these, their indifference and 
stupidity, they need the most cogent per- 
suasion to induce them to profit by the 
truth. Here are interests at stake, in com- 
parison with which ail other interests are 
insignificant. In times of political trouble, 
how do we wish our real patriots to be 
irresistibly eloquent in their endeavors to 
maintain the public weal against the attacks 
of folly, or of wickedness ? And when some 
consummate statesman arises who, by his 
eloquence, is able to cope with these at- 
tacks, and defeat the schemes of ambition, 
how highly do we value the man, and bless 
the skill which gave him the victory? But 
what are political evils, or any which afflict 
us here on earth, either in magnitude or 
duration, compared with those which sin- 
ners will endure in a world to come ? Or 
what political, or other happiness, can equal 
that which the gospel presents, in boundless 
love, to those who comply with its condi- 
tions? If eloquence can accomplish such 
great things in the concernments of this 
world, as we know it can, and that too, 
when flowing from lips which are impure ; 
what can it not effect when coming from a 
foeart which the love of God has warmed, 



and from lips touched and sanctified by his 
Spirit; when its aim reaches to heaven, 
and its theme is salvation? — To mention 
no others, what think you of Paul, and of 
Whitefield ? What was the mighty instru- 
ment which they employed for the con- 
version of men, so far as human agency 
was concerned ? It was eloquence. With- 
out this they would have passed through 
their ministry with no other success than 
has attended the efforts of ten thousands of 
their fellow-laborers, whose zeal and love 
may have equalled theirs, but whose suc- 
cess fell far behind. Do you say that 
these two distinguished ministers wielded 
the sword of the Spirit, and that was the 
instrument which gave them success? — But 
how did they wield it? They wielded it 
eloquently. They preached the word of 
God eloquently — they reasoned eloquently 
— they persuaded eloquently. — Their hear- 
ers felt the power of their eloquence, and 
God honored and blessed it, as the means 
of conversion, to multitudes. So will he 
always do. He will always honor those 
means which are worthy of honor, and give 
efficacy to such as are adapted to their 
object. He will not dignify what is un- 
worthy of regard, nor give success to 
means which are adapted to no end. 

In a matter of so great importance, far 
be it from me to insist on any position 
which cannot have truth for its support, or 
to magnify it beyond its deserts. But, as it 
appears to me, there is little danger of over- 
rating the rank which eloquence should 
hold among the qualifications of a Christian 
minister. The records of the church will 
show that its greatest victories have been 
achieved by an eloquent exhibition of di- 
vine truth. I know there are those who 
seem to think it enough to have the truth 
on their side, and think themselves scarcely 
responsible for the manner in which they 
present it to others. If they do but preach 
the truth, it is no matter how. Let the 
presentation of it be ever so dull, feeble, 
and languid ; let it be wrapped in ever so 
much obscurity; let it be blended with 
matters ever so foreign ; let it be said, or 
sung, or chanted ; let it be conveyed in 
language low and disgusting, or fierce, or 
vaporing ; in tones suited to excite a smile 
when you should weep, and in terms which 
repel, rather than invite; — they have per- 
formed their duty ; and if sinners are not 
saved, the latter are alone in fault. If their 
manner be objected to, the reply is, we are 
minister's of Christ; it is your business and 
duty to receive our message, however de- 
livered ; to respect us for our Master's 
sake, demean ourselves as we may; and 
to receive the truth for its own sake, what- 
ever we may do to render it forbidding. 
All this is perfectly true ; and did it render 
those who say it as excuseless as their 
hearers, it would be well. But neither 
the soundness of their cause, nor the un» 



JUDGE HALLS ADDRESS. 



1834.] 



reasonableness of their hearers, makes out 
a sufficient apology for failing to maintain 
the one, and to overcome the other, by all 
the means which they can properly employ. 
We know that sinners are unreasonable, 
captious, and ready to transfer the blame 
of their rejecting the gospel to those who 
preach it — nay, to the very Author of it 
himself. But this is the very difficulty 
which a minister should expect, and be 
prepared to encounter and remove; and not 
one to be used in justification of his own de- 
ficient performances, and failure in prompti- 
tude to maintain so good a cause against so 
groundless an opposition. 

I have dwelt the longer on eloquence as 
a qualification for a preacher, from a con- 
viction that its importance has been too 
much overlooked in a course of theological 
education. The subject has an extensive 
bearing on the interests of the church, and 
is intimately connected with the extension 
of the Redeemer's kingdom on earth. 1 
should add, that eloquence is not a natural 
gift. The obtaining of it demands much 
careful study and discipline ; a wide range 
of knowledge of various kinds, and a thor- 
ough comprehension of the objects which it 
embraces. Like other acquisitions of the 
mind, it does not come without labor, and 
search ; but, when once possessed, it yields 
a full and ample reward. 

It has often been said, by way of objection 
to the arguments in favor of an educated 
ministry, that the Holy Spirit alone confers 
on those who are authorized to preach, all 
necessary powers and gifts for that purpose. 
But do facts warrant such a position ? Do 
they show us that uneducated, and ignorant 
men, with all the aids which the Holy 
Spirit is pleased to vouchsafe to them, are 
the most successful preachers : — that they 
are even tolerable expositors of his word ; — 
that they are able defenders of the truth 
against infidels and calumniators ? Where 
are the monuments which such men have 
erected in the cause of Christianity, to sig- 
nalize their prowess, and their achieve- 
ments ? That plain, unlettered men have 
sometimes been the instruments of good, on 
a limited scale, is not denied. But the good 
which they have done bears no comparison 
with what they might have accomplished 
with the same natural talents, cultivated, 
and expanded with superior knowledge ; 
while even this has been blended with 
evils which their ignorance has occasioned, 
and which a better education might have 
avoided. Facts, surely, do not teach us that 
ignorance is a qualification for any enter- 
prise, whether its object relates to the things 
of this world, or that which is to come. 
The office of the Holy Spirit is not to confer 
knowledge on men, but to sanctify it, and 
lead them to put it, when possessed, to a 
right use. He does not countenance their 
ignorance, and indolence, and self-conceit, 
but disapproves them. He urges them to j 

VOL. VII. 



173 



employ all the neans, within their reach, 
for doing good, and advancing the kingdom 
of heaven. lie gives them a holy disposi- 
tion of heart, and sheds abroad his love 

there, for nobler and higher ends than to 
neglect and despise the means of usefulness 
which his own wisdom has provided. 

But is it not " by the foolishness of preach- 
ing," some will reply, " that God is pleased 
to save them that believe ?" An able com- 
mentary, truly, which construes the opinion 
of Greek philosophers, that the preaching 
of the gospel was foolishly inadequate to 
change the religious belief of mankind, into 
a divine commendation of foolish preach- 
ing! Folly itself could not wish for a more 
appropriate vindication. Yet this passage 
has often been quoted, with great serious- 
ness and gravity, in defence of such preach- 
ing as excited censure for its leanness and 
inefficiency. 

It is further objected by some, with an 
air of triumph, that the apostles, whom 
Christ commissioned to be the first preach- 
ers of his gospel, and whose labors were 
crowned with such glorious success, were 
unlearned, and uneducated men. — That the 
apostles were selected from the humbler 
walks of life, is very true ; but it is evident 
from sundry considerations, which I shall 
not stop to mention, that they had received, 
at least, those rudiments of education which 
were commonly enjoyed by their country- 
men. For three years and a half, as is 
generally supposed, they received instruc- 
tion from One who M taught, as never man 
taught." They were the daily companions 
of their Master, listening to the wisdom 
which continually fell from his lips, and 
witnessing the w 7 ondrous, and instructive, 
acts which he performed. Who can esti- 
mate the advantages for instruction and 
knowledge, which these men enjoyed ? — 
The Master did not select and commission 
these apostles just as he left our world, and 
thus send them forth untaught, and igno- 
rant, depending alone on the mere super- 
natural influences of that Comforter whom 
he promised to send, inestimable as those 
influences were ; but himself became their 
instructor, and educated them for their work. 
He has thus set an example of what should 
be done, for the training up of men to minis- 
ter in his name. With all the advantages 
which young men, preparing for the minis- 
try, enjoy at this day, none of them, I trust, 
would consider his opportunities of acquiring 
knowledge appropriate to that work equiva- 
lent to those which the apostles possessed, 
and he unwilling to exchange his privileges 
for theirs. It would be a useful and pleasing 
undertaking to point out the various particu- 
lars in which the Saviour instructed his 
apostles, and compare them with those 
which are embraced by a course of theo- 
logical education such as is now most ap- 
proved. But this occasion does not admit 
these minuter inquiries, and I leave them 

23 



174 



JUDGE HALL'S ADDRESS. 



[Nov. 



to be made by tbose wbo may choose to 
investigate the subject more at large. 

When our Saviour, after his ascension to 
heaven, made choice of one to bear his 
name among the gentiles, whom did he 
select ? Did he make choice of an ignorant, 
unlettered, uneducated man ? No ; he chose 
Saul of Tarsus, a man skilled in the various 
learning of his times, and educated for action 
in public life. His fellow-laborer, Luke, 
was an educated physician ; Apollos was, 
we are told, an eloquent man and mighty 
in the scriptures ; and who can doubt, from 
the accounts which are given of them in 
the sacred writings, although we have not 
their particular histories, that Barnabas, and 
Silas, and Mark, and Timothy, and Titus, 
were far advanced above ignorant and un- 
learned men ? The whole tenor of these 
accounts serves to convince us that they 
were men of no ordinary attainments. 
Passing by the days in which the Fathers 
flourished, and coming down to modern 
times, for the sake of obtaining names 
which are familiar to us, who have been 
the great luminaries of the church in this 
latter period? They are such men as Lu- 
ther, Melancthon, Calvin, Wesley, White- 
field, Robert Hall, Henry Martyn, Edwards, 
Dwight, and a numerous company of others 
who have sustained the ministerial office, 
and been a blessing to mankind. Who can 
believe that human learning did not render 
these men immensely more useful to the 
world, as ministers of Christ, than they 
could have been without attainments in 
learning and knowledge ? They faithfully 
cultivated their intellectual powers, and 
then consecrated them to the service of 
God and man. He accepted the conse- 
cration, and vindicated, in so doing, this 
truth of his own word, that a man is ac- 
cepted according to what he hath, and not 
according to what he hath not. If it be 
true that a man reaps according to what he 
sows, it follows, of course, that a minister 
who sows the seed of ignorance and folly 
shall reap a crop of ignorance and folly ; 
nor will the Spirit of God, by any process 
of sanctification, cause the seed of tares to 
germinate into wheat, or of nonsense into 
wisdom. He will not break up his own 
established connection between cause and 
effect, to gratify the caprices of ignorance, 
or the whims of self-conceit. Weakness, 
however sanctified, is weakness still. It is 
vigor, which, when sanctified, puts forth an 
efficient growth of holiness, to the praise 
and glory of Him who does all things well. 

In accordance with the sentiments which 
have now been expressed, the object of the 
American Education Society, is to select 
indigent young men of hopeful piety, and 
promising talents, and educate them thor- 
oughly for the gospel ministry. The So- 
ciety continue to urge their claims upon the 
attention of the Christian public, believing 
that the honor of God, and the salvation of 



men, demand of every follower of Christ 
that he should lend his aid, so far as his 
ability allows, to the great work of making 
the Redeemer's kingdom co-extensive with 
the world. The gospel must be preached 
to every human creature, if we would fulfil 
the command of Christ, and manifest to the 
world that the love which dwelt in Him, 
dwells also in us. If the whole world have 
not this gospel preached to them, the fault 
is not in the Father, nor in the Son, nor in 
the Holy Spirit. The fault is entirely ours. 
The work is left for us to do ; and the co- 
operation of God is pledged, if we perform 
our part aright; but not a single promise is 
made for the accomplishment of the world's 
delivery from the bondage of sin, beyond 
what he has already done through the 
atoning sacrifice of his Son, without the 
efforts of men in its behalf. The glad 
tidings of salvation must be borne from 
land to land, and from clime to clime, by 
human aid, and be announced by human 
lips. Whatever can be done by man, man 
must do, in this glorious cause, before God 
himself will manifest what he will further 
do for the redemption of his pledge. Has 
not He already done enough to evince his 
faithfulness, and encourage us to go forward 
with holy ardor in an enterprise so pleasing 
to Him, so benevolent in us, so salutary to 
our fellow men, and so needful to their sal- 
vation ? I repeat it, — we, we alone are to 
blame. Ours is a privilege which angels 
might covet, while we treat it as a painful 
burden, and seek to cast it from us by every 
pretext which unbelief can frame. 

Here, now, I rest the cause of this So - 
ciety. This gospel of the kingdom must 
be preached to every creature by human 
agency, or not at all. If it shall be so 
preached, truly and faithfully, then will the 
kingdoms of this world become the king- 
doms of our God, and of his Christ. But 
they who preach must be well qualified for 
their work, and the effect will be strictly 
in accordance with these qualifications. 
Partial causes will always be followed by 
partial effects, and complete effects will be 
produced by corresponding causes. — Our 
object, therefore, is, to educate young men, 
who are to be preachers of the gospel, in 
the best manner in our power, in order to 
insure their greatest usefulness. We cannot 
conscientiously aim at less. After all, We 
do not expect the accomplishment of our 
wishes in full ; for some will, in spite of all 
our care, and anxiety, disappoint our hopes. 
But by making our standard high, we shall 
accomplish more than we should were it 
low ; shall have abler ministers, and more 
abundant fruits from their labor. Those 
who are able to educate themselves, we 
leave to their own responsibilities; — our 
object is to find out the indigent pious, of 
competent abilities, and of a right spirit, 
and to educate as many of them for the 
ministry as the charity of the Christian 



1834.] 



REV. MR. ELLIS S REPORT 



175 



public shall allow us the means. We intend 
that our efforts shall have no other limit 
than that which shall terminate the charity 
of Christians towards their fellow-men. Let 
Christians ponder well on their duty, their 
privileges, and their ability, in relation to 
this subject. Especially let those in Con- 
necticut attentively consider, whether they 
have done their duty, in contributing but 
little more than half the amount of the funds 
which their own beneficiaries have received 
the past year. — Think once more, how can 
this world be converted to Christ, without 
preachers ? How can preachers be raised 
up, and educated, and sent forth, without 
means, and without effort? Christians of 
Connecticut, Christians of America, do not 
disguise your apathy, and cheat yourselves 
of the reward which awaits the faithful, 
watchful, servants of your Master, by find- 
ing fault with this, and that, scheme of 
operations, and so excusing yourselves in 
your idleness. If you do not like the plan 
which we or others propose, try some dif- 
ferent one. We only wish you to act. 
Fault us as much as you please — but act. 
The destitute of our own country, and the 
heathen throughout the world, demand your 
assistance. Death and hell wait not your 
tardy movements. They are continually 
swallowing up the victims which your 
timely action might have rescued from 
their power. You can never take your 
money with you to heaven ; but you can 
do with it what is immeasurably better — 
you can, by its bestowment in the cause 
which I plead, obtain companions to attend 
you in your upward flight thither, who will 
greatly add to that recompense of reward 
which you hope to receive, and who will 
be additional jewels, placed by your own 
benevolence, in that diadem of glory which 
sparkles on the head of Jesus, your Re- 
deemer. 



Report of Rev. John M. Ellis, 

who has been engaged for a few months past in the State of 
New Hampshire. 

The churches visited since my last report 
with their contributions, are the following, 
viz. Jaffrey, $160 16. Rindge, $168 05. 
W. Boscawen, $187 66. Campton, $142- 
87. Lyme, $63 65. Lebanon, $92 69. 
Haverhill, $50. Bath, $135 IS, including 
the fourth payment of the scholarship of 
I. Goodall, Esq. Canterbury, $65. East 
Concord, $47. New Ipswich, $455 99. 
Hollis, $182 13. Mt. Vernon, $75. Mil- 
ford, $168.— Total, $1,993 3S. 

A part of the collection from New Ipswich 
was accompanied with the following note 
addressed to me as agent. 

Sir, through you I transmit to the American Ed- 
ucation Society, $150 to be appropriated in that 
manner which will best promote the great and be- 



nevolent object of said Society. Tn making this 
donation, I can scarcely refrain from suggesting that 
il. is property which lias fallen to me in 600160110066 

of tin; [ate lamented death of my only Hon, Joseph 
Appleton Barrett, who was a member of Yale Col- 
lege, and of great promise ; and who, probably, had 
his life and health been preserved, would have de- 
voted himself to the Christian ministry. Hut since 
be is gone, it is my earnest desire and prayer to God, 
tjiat this property which was his, may be so appro- 
priated as shall best subserve the same cause. 

JOSEPH BARRETT. 

Perhaps it would aid the cause of benev- 
olence to state a few facts calculated to 
deepen conviction in relation to the direct 
evangelical tendency of this with other 
branches of Christian enterprise. In three 
instances 1 have had the pleasure of plead- 
ing the cause of the Education Society, in 
the midst of protracted meetings with the 
best results, certainly to the funds of the 
Society ; and if I may trust the declarations 
of the beloved brethren in the ministry who 
felt so deeply the responsibility, the results 
were equally happy on the objects of the 
meetings. 

On one of these occasions, a young man, 
who, during the meeting, had become deeply 
convicted of his lost state as a sinner, 
yielded his heart to God, as we joyfully 
trust, at the very moment of circulating the 
cards to receive the subscriptions for the 
Education Society. Seeing others sub- 
scribing, he said to himself, " I know I 
ought to be devoted to so good a cause; but 
I have little money to give ; if the Lord 
will accept me J will pledge my life to it 
forever." He afterwards said to me that 
he had no feeling of submission to God till 
that moment. But from that time, such has 
been the evidence of his Christian character 
that all rejoice to see him laying aside the 
mercantile business to prepare for the 
work of the ministry. 

It is truly encouraging to witness the in- 
creasing sense of responsibility in ministers 
and churches to search out and bring forward 
promising young men to prepare for the 
ministry. As an instance, 1 found a grey 
headed father, who had already given up 
four sons to prepare for the ministry, and 
now was about giving up the fifth and only 
remaining son to the patronage of the 
American Education Society, choosing to 
labor the harder to support his family, rather 
than keep back one promising youth from 
the field of moral desolation. 

I am happy to state, also, that almost 
every week brings new and delightful illus- 
trations of the Bible doctrine, so important 
to the cause of Christ, that " there is that 
scattereth and yet increaseth. ,, In travel- 
ling extensively, both east and west of the 
mountains, as an agent of the Education 
Society, I have found no man who says he 
has given too much, or is the poorer for 
giving ; but the universal testimony is, " I 
know I have been blessed in my business 
much more since I have given liberally to 



176 



NEW HAMPSHIRE BRANCH. 



[Nov. 



the cause of God" " Until four years ago," 
said a contributor to your funds, in New 
Hampshire, " I gave nothing to these so- 
cieties ; but the Lord has opened my eyes, 
and my heart, and I now seek opportu- 
nities to give." Being asked how much he 
had given in that time, he answered, 
"$700." And are you the poorer for it, 
said I ? " No," said he, " I know I am not 
the poorer. God's blessing comes often, so 
as to surprise me, both in the fruits of my 
fields, and the facilities of the market." 

Some of the best collections have been 
received from churches which had just been 
exiled from their accustomed place of 
worship, in the manner that has caused so 
many orthodox churches to be obliged to 
make large sacrifices in building new houses 
of worship. Without exception their de- 
claration is, that " Never have they been 
able to do so much for general benevolence, 
and never with so much satisfaction as since 
they came to the resolution to maintain the 
cause of Christ at any sacrifice. The 
minister of one of these churches said, 
"should our new house be destroyed, we 
could build a second one easier than we 
built the first." And it was said, also, " that 
the church had given more within the last 
three years to public benevolence than all 
it had given before since its existence." 
Another was so poor that they were about 
to lose their pastor, not being able to sup- 
port him ; but from the time they deter- 
mined on building their house, no such 
complaint has been heard. In the case of 
the third, such was the impulse given to 
their moral energies, by their success in 
building their meeting-house, that they 
added also a commodious building for a 
female academy, with results so completely 
satisfactory, that a third building is now 
contemplated for the instruction of males. 

I have learned a lesson both from the 
rich and the poor. Two small country towns, 
paid, in nearly equal sums, over $300. 
The largest donations in both towns were 
from females. In one of the towns a young 
woman, supporting herself by her labor, 
made herself a life member of the State 
Branch, by a donation of $30. She had 
a few months previous, done the same for 
the Bible Society, — " I cannot be satisfied" 
she said, " until I see my money doing 
good." Nor is this a solitary instance of 
the kind. In the other town one of the 
three highest donors is entirely dependent 
on her own industry and the blessing of her 
God. — Happy for a dying world, and happy 
for the cause of Christ, if the rich would 
give like the poor. I thought of the widow 
who " cast in all the living that she had." 
I thought of the rich who cast in their "two 
mites." Will they — can they be accepted 
unless they give " according to what 
they have? " Do they love their money 
more than the cause of Christ and the souls 
pf men ? I know there are noWe exceptions, 



and their record is on high. But my soul 
shudders in view of this fearful comment on 
the words of Christ. " How hardly shall 
they that have riches enter into the kingdom 
of God." 

As to the reception of this object of 
charity by the Christian community, I need 
only say that their favor has made my work 
most delightful ; — the amount bestowed will 
show the rest. 

Francestown, Oct. 13, 1834. 



The Rev. Mr. Mather, secretary of the 
Vermont Branch, has been employed the 
last quarter in that State, and also in Massa- 
chusetts. He is now prosecuting his agency 
with success, as usual, in the county of 
Hampshire. No report has been received 
from him for publication, except the annual 
report of the Branch Society. 

The Rev. Charles S. Adams has spent the 
most of his time for the last quarter in the 
State of Maine. He has labored successfully 
in the county of Cumberland. No report 
for publication has been received from him. 

Mr. William P. Apthorp, who has been 
appointed to a temporary agency, has spent 
a few weeks within the bounds of the Ed- 
ucation Society of Taunton and vicinity. 
No account of his agency has been received. 



Anniversaries of Branch and Aux- 
iliary Societies. 

New Hampshire Branch. 

The annual meeting of this Society was 
held at Meredith Bridge, Sept. 3, 1834. 
The report of the directors was read by 
professor Hadduck, of Dartmouth college. 
The report of the treasurer in his absence 
was read by the Rev. Mr. Bouton of Con- 
cord. The meeting was addressed by the 
Rev. Mr. Willey of Rochester, the Rev. J. 
M. Ellis agent of the Parent Society, the 
Rev. Dr. Tucker of Troy, New York, the 
Rev. Dr. Matheson of Durham, England, 
and the Rev. Dr. Cogswell, Boston. The 
officers of the Society for the year ensuing, 
are the Rev. Nathan Lord, D. D. President 
of Dartmouth college, President ; the Rev. 
C. B. Hadduck, Secretary, and Hon. Samuel 
Morril, Treasurer. An extract of the re- 
port will be inserted at some future time. 



1834. 



FUNDS. 



177 



Vermont Branch. 
The anniversary of this Society took 
place on Tuesday, September 9, 1834, at 
Brandon. The report of the executive 
committee, was read by the Rev. William 
L. Mather, Secretary of the Branch. The 
Treasurer, George W. Root, Esq. presented 
his account, and addresses were offered by 
the Secretary of the Parent Society, the 
Rev. Mr. Tilden of West Rutland, the 
Rev. Oman Eastman, Financial Secretary 
American Tract Society, and the Rev. Dr. 
Ely of Philadelphia. For the ensuing year 
the following are officers, viz. Hon. Samuel 
Prentiss, LL. D. President, the Rev. Mr. 
Mather, Secretary, and George W. Root, 
Esq. Treasurer. We have not room for the 
insertion of the report in this number of the 
Journal. 



Old Colony Education Society, Ms. 
The anniversary of this Society was ob- 
served at Rochester, (Rev. Mr. Robbins's 
parish,) July 30, 1834. The Rev. Sylvester 
Holmes presented the director's report. 
Col. Seab-ury read the treasurer's report. 
The meeting was then addressed by the 
Rev. Mr. Nott, of Wareham, the Rev. 
Thomas Shepard, General Agent of Amer- 
ican Bible Society, and the Secretary of the 
Parent Society. The officers are the follow- 
ing: Doct. Andrew Mackie, President; 
Rev. Mr. Holmes, Secretary, and Col. Alex- 
ander Seabury, Treasurer. An extract from 
the report may be expected in the next 
Journal. 



Essex North Education Society. 
This Society held its annual meeting at 
Andover, May 7, 1S34. The report was 
read by the Rev. Mr. Kimball, an extract 
of which may be expected in the next 
Journal. The Rev. Gardner B. Perry, of 
Bradford, is President; Rev. David T. Kim- 
ball, of Ipswich, is Secretary, and Col. 
Ebenezer Hale, of Newbury, is Treasurer. 



ton, Hitchcock and Brigham of Randolph. 
Tbe officers chosen for the year ensuing, are 
J. C. Starkweather, Esq. of Pawtucket, 
President ; Rev. Chin Fowler, of Fall 
River, Secretary, and Mr. Charles Godfrey 
of Taunton, Treasurer. 



Hampshire Auxiliary Education Society. 
This auxiliary held its anniversary at 
Northampton, October 9, 1834. The meet- 
ing was addressed by Rev. John Todd, of 
Northampton. Mr. Mather is now pleading 
the cause of the Education Society within 
its bounds. The officers of the Society are, 
Rev. John Brown, D. D. Hadley, President ; 
Rev. John Todd, Northampton, Secretary ; 
Hon. L. Strong, Northampton, Treasurer. 



Penobscot County Education Society, Me. 
This county auxiliary held its annual 
meeting at Bangor, September 10, 1834. 
The annual report was read by professor 
Pond, an extract from which will be inserted 
in the next number of the Journal. Hon. 
Thomas A. Hill, President ; professor Pond 
is Secretary, and James Allen, Esq. is 
Treasurer 



FUNDS. 

Receipts into the Treasurtj of the American Edu- 
cation Society, and of its Branches, from 
July 9th, to the Quarterly Meeting, Oct. 8th, 
1834. 

Ellington, Ct. bequest in part of the late Joseph 
Abbott, by Hon. J. H. Brockway, one of 
the executors 250 00 

Norwich, Ct. bequest of Sarah Lathrop, bv D. 

Ripley, Esq. ex. thro' J. Huntington, Esq. 50 00—300 00 

INCOME FROM FUNDS 745 20 

AMOUNT REFUNDED 

AUXILIARY SOCIETIES. 
Suffolk County. 

[Mr. Lorenzo S. Cragin, Boston, Tr.] 
Boston, fr. a Female Friend, by Rev. Dr. 

Wisner 
A Lady 

II. Gates, of Essex St. Asso. 
Park St. Gent. Asso. J. M. Kimball, Tr. 
A Friend, $40 of which to const. Rev. David 

Greene, a L. M. of the A. E. S. 



443 50 



5 00 

1 00 

50 

135 00 



Education Society of Taunton and 
Vicinity. 
The anniversary of this Society was held 
at Fall River, Oct. 14, 1S34. The report 
was read by the Rev. Mr. Fowler. The 
meeting was then addressed by the Rev. 
Messrs. Sheldon of Easton, Maltby of Taun- 



Berkshire County. 

[John Hotchkin, Esq. Lenox, Tr.] 
| From a Friend, by Rev. D. D. Field 



I M 



Barnstable County. 

[Dea. Joseph White, Yarmouth, Tr.] 
Falmouth, fr. Fern. Aux. fid. Soc. to const. 

Rev. Josiah Bent, and Mrs. Paulina Bent, 

L. M. of the County Soc. 31 00 

Sandwich, fr. Ladies of the Soc. of Rev. A. 

Cobb, to const, him a L. M. of the Co. Soc. 15 00 
Fr. Dea. E. Halleit, aim. subs. 1 00 

Fr. Miss Lucia Dillingham 1 00 — 4S 00 

[The above thro' Rev. N. Cogswell, of Yarmouth.] 



178 



FUNDS. 



[Nov. 



Essex County South. 

[David Choate, Esq. Essex, Tr.] 
Hamilton, fr. Rev. J. B. Felt, $5, and Mrs. 

Felt $5 
Marblehead, fr. Fern. Aux. Ed. Sec. by Mrs. 

S. "W. Cozzens, Sec. and Tr. 
Salem, fr. Fern. Aux. Ed. Soc. bal. in Treas. 

by Miss Anna Batchelrler, Tr. 
Fr. individuals of South Ch. and Soc. by Dea. 

D. Lang 
A coll. in Tabernacle Ch. and Soc. by Mr. 

Abel Lawrence 



Essex County North. 

[Col. Ebenezer Hale, Newbury, Tr.] 
Newburyport, fr. Fem. Miss, and Ed. Soc. by 

Rev. L. F. Dimmick 
Fr. the Circle of Industry, 10th serai-annual 
pay't. for Newburyport Ladies 1st Temp. 
Scholarship, by Miss Mary C. Greenleaf, 
Tr. 



106 45—241 70 



37 50 44 97 



Franklin County. 

[Sylvanus Maxwell, Esq. Charlemont, Tr.] 
Warwick, coll. in the Soc. of Rev. Samuel Kingsbury 7 



Hampshire County. 

[Hon. Lewis Strong-, Northampton, Tr.] 
Belchertown, fr. Fem. Ed. Soc. by Dea. D. 



Safford, Boston 
Hadley, Fr. Benev. Soc. on acco. of the Brown 

Temp. Scholarship 
Hatfield, Gent. Ed. Soc. by Dea. Partridge 
Fr. Fem. Ed. Soc. by Mrs. Sophia Smith 
South Hadley, Fem. Soc. toward const. Mrs. 

Susan L. Boies, a L. M. of the A. E. S. by 

Mrs. Lamb, Tr. 
Donation fr. a Friend to the A. E. S. 



75 00 
32 12 
22 25 



40 00 

10 00—186 87 



Middlesex County. 

Holliston, (of the South Conference of Chhs.) 

by Rev. Mr. Demond 1 00 

Fr. Mr. Patten Johnson, Tr. of South Confer- 
ence of Churches 25 25 

Medford, fr. the Evang. Ch. and Cong, by 

Dea. Charles James 5 84 

Newton, fr. Dea. Benjamin Eddy 2 00 

Woburn, Mr. Rufus Pierce, by Rev. J. Bennett 6 00 

West Cambridge, fr. Fem. Ed. Soc. by Mr. 

E. P. Mackintire 8 50 

Wilmington, a Widow's mite, by Rev. F. 

Norwood 1 00- 



Norfolk County. 

[Rev. John Codman, D. D. Dorchester, Tr.] 
Brookline, fr. a Friend, avails of a 

Cherry tree 1 30 

Do. of a charity box 8 35 

Fr. a Friend 2 00 11 65 

Wrentham, fr. the ex'rs. of the Will of Mrs. 
Jerusha George, balance of her bequest, 
($170 being included in the amo. rec'd. 
from this county last quarter) by Dea. B. 
Shepard, Jr. 1 77 

Fr. the Treasurer $100, of which 40 is from 
the Soc. of Rev. John C. Phillips, Wey- 
mouth, North Parish, to const, him a L. 
M. of the A. E. S. 



100 00—113 42 



Old Colony. 

[Col. Alexander Seabury, Tr.] 
Dartmouth, fr. Rev. Mr. Richmond's Soc. 
Fairhaven, fr. Rev. Mr. Gould's Soc. 
Fr. Fem. Ed. Soc. 
Middleboro', fr. Rev. John Shaw 
New Bedford, fr. the Trinitarian Soc. 
Fr. the North Cong. Soc. 
Rochester, fr. Rev. Mr. Robbing's Soc. 
Fr. Rev. Mr. Cobb's Soc. 
Fr. Mrs. Dea. Toby 
Rochester Centre, tr. Rev. Mr. Bigelow's Soc. 

by Misses Hope and Patty Haskell 
Fr. Dr. Haskell 
Wareham, bequest of the late Prince Burgess, 

Esq. 



16 00 
29 65 
14 75 

1 00 
22 00 
75 00 
13 00 
11 42 

1 00 

10 75 
1 50 

50 00—246 07 



Plymouth County. 

Pea. Morton Eddy, Bridgewater, Tr.] 
Halifax, fr. Rev. Mr. Howe 
North Bridgewater, fr. the Soc. of Rev. Wm. 
Thompson, in addition to the sum iec'd. 
last quarter 
Plymplon, fr. Rev. Mr. Howland 
Collection at the anniversary 



Worcester County South. 

[Hon. Abijah Bigelow, Worcester, Tr.] 
milbury, fr. Rev. Joseph Gone 
South Norlhbridge, fr. Mies Sarah Fletcher, 

by Rev. J. Maltby 
Sturbridge, fr. Fem. Char. Soc. by Miss Mary 

H. Dunton, Tr. 
Sutton, fr. Dea. Nath. F. Morse, by Rev. J. 

Maltby 
Uxbridge, fr. Ladies asso. and individ. ladies, 

in Rev. Mr. Grosvenor's Sec. 



1 00 
1 50 
11 42 — 16 92 



2 25 
17 00 

2 00 
35 13 — 56 



Worcester North. 

[Dea. Justus Ellingwood, Hubbardston, Tr.] 
Gardner, fr. individ. 2 37 
Hardwick, fr. the Soc. of Rev. Martyn Tupper 3 25 
Winchendon, individuals 2 00 7 



Rhode Island (State) Aux. Ed. Soc. 
[Mr. Albert Peabody, Providence, Tr.] 
[The following by Rev. Wm. L. Mather, Agt.] 
Barrington, fr. Ladies and Gent. Asso. subs. 

in part 1 00 

Bristol, fr. individuals, sub. in part 18 25 

Little Complon, fr. individuals 25 67 

Newport, fr. individuals, in part to const, their 

pastor, Rev. A. Henry Dumont, a L. M. 

of A. E. S. 30 00 

South Kingston, fr. individuals 13 



$2,823 41 



Bequest of the late Rev. Ebenezer Porter, D. D. of An- 
dover, for the Scholarship Fund, the income of 
which, only, is to be used $15,472 80 



MAINE BRANCH. 
[Prof. Samuel P. Newman, Brunswick, Tr.] 

Brunswick, fr. Rev. Dr. Allen, Pres. Bowdoin 
College, on acco. of Temp. Scholarship 

One year's interest on a scholarship Bond 

Lincoln Co. Aux. Ed. Soc. by Mr. J. Boyn- 
ton, Tr. 

Parsonsfield, by Rev. Chs. S. Adams, 

Agt. fr. the Cong. Ch. 5 00 

Fr. J. D. P. Adams 1 00 

Fr. Miss Betsey Parsons, a Gold Neck- 
lace, sold for 4 00 10 00 

Refunded by a former Beneficiary 68 00—202 00 

Note. Mr. Adams received from Sanford, $30, towards 

constituting Rev. Elisha Bacon a L. M. of A. E. S., which was 

acknowledged in Journal for August. 






20 00 
60 00 



44 00 



NEW HAMPSHIRE BRANCH. 
[Hon. Samuel Morril, Concord, Tr.] 

Cheshire County. 

[Samuel A. Gerould, Esq. Tr.] 
Alstead, bequest of Mr. Elliot Perry, to const, the fol- 
lowing persons L. M. of the Co. Soc. viz. Mr. Ca- 
leb Perry, Alstead, Mrs. Cordelia Baker, Troy, 
Mrs. Deborah Bailey, Jaffrey, Mr. John S. Perry, 
Alstead, Miss Lydia Perry, Alstead, children of 
Caleb Perry, Miss Caroline Perry, grandchild of 
C. Perry, $15 each 

Hillsboro 1 County. 

[Richard Boylston, Esq. Tr.] 
Amherst, 3d pay't. of Aiken Temp. Schol. by 



Mr. A. Lawrence 
Dunstable, fr. Dea. James Patterson 
Fr. Thomas Pearson 
Hollis, it. the Ed. Soc. 



75 00 
5 00 
5 00 

42 85 



1834.] 



FUNDS. 



179 



is iq 
1 oo 

12 05—174 37 



50 00 

7 00 

8 00 



49 00 
15 00 
5 00 

2 00 

3 50 

15 00—191 00 



Hancock, Factory Village, fr. the Ladles Sew- 
ing Circle 
New Boston, fr. individuals 
New Ipswich, fr. Young Ladies Asso. 
Pelham, IV. Daniel <i.isre 
Wilton, fr. Fom. Bd. Bo*. 

Merrimack County. 

[Dea. Jamea Moulton, Jr. Tr.] 
Boscajr^n, fr. individ. includ. fr. John Grce- 

nough, Esq. 10, Mrs. S. G. Peach, 5, L. 

Burbank, 5 
Concord, fr. Fem. Ed. Soc. on acco. of the 

Bouton Temp. Schol. Miss Sarah KhnlxiM, 

Tr. 
Fr. Gentlemen, on acco. of do. 
Fr. individuals 
Concord, (West,) fr. Rev. A. P. Tenney, in 

part to const, himself a L. M. of the Co. 

Canterbury, fr. Mr. John Clongh 

Henriker, fr. Young Men's Ed. Soc. 18, Rev. 
J. Scales 5, A. Conner5, Judge Darling 5, 
Levi Colby 5, O. Pilsbury 5, J. Wilklns 3, 
J. Whitcomb 2, Dea. Childs 1 

Loudon, fr. Rev. Enoch Corser 

Northfield, fr. Rev. Liba Conant 

Salisbury, fr. Rev. Andrew Rankin 

Warner, fr. individuals 

Rev. George Champion 

Rockingham County. 
[Dea. T. H. Miller, Tr.] 
Stratham, fr. Mrs. Hannah Bartlett, in full to 
const, herself a L. M. of the N. H. Branch 
of the A. E. S. by Rev. Mr. Bouton 

Sullivan County. 

[Dr. Alexander Boyd, Tr.] 
Cornish, fr. Mr. Benj. K, Chase 
Newport, Phineas Chapin, Jr. 1, Rev. J. 
Woods 1, Ladies' Asso. 5 



The following sums are by Rev. Charles S. Adams, Agt. 
Strafford County. 

[Mr. William Woodman, Tr.] 

Conway, fr. individuals 13 68 
Moultonboro\ fr. individ. in part to const. 

Rev. Joshua Dodge, a L. M. of N. H. Br, 13 05 

Two Gold Necklaces, sold for 7 25 

Meredith, fr. individuals 18 85 
MerediUi Bridge, fr. individ. to const. Mrs. J. 

K. Youngs a L. M. of the N. H. Br. 26 09 

A piece of shining, sold for 2 65 

Two Gold rings, sold for 1 00 

Sandwich, fr. individuals 3 31 — 9( 

The following sums are by Rev. John M. Ellis, Agt. 

Cheshire County. 

Jeffrey, fr. Miss Rebecca Bacon, to const- her- 
self a L. M. of the N. H. Branch 30 00 

From Mr. Oliver Bacon, to const, himself a 

L. M. of the Co. Society 20 00 

Fr. other individuals 110 16 

Rindge, fr. Miss Sophia Whitney, to const. 

herself a L. M. ol the Co. Society 15 00 

Fr. Miss Mary Kimball, to const, herself a L. 

M. of the Co. Soc. 15 00 

Fr. Miss Arvilla Sawtell, to const, herself a 

L. M. ofthe Co. Soc. 15 00 

Fr. Young Men's Benev. Society 30 00 

Fr. other individuals 93 05—328 21 

Orafton County. 

[Andrew Mack, Esq. Tr.] 

Bath, fr. Ira Goodall, Esq. 4th pay't. on his 
Temp. Schol. 

Fr. other individuals 

Campton, Mr. Moody Cook, to const, himself 
a L. M. of Co. Soc. 

Fr. Mr. Edmund Cook, to const, himself a 
L. M. of Co. Soc. 

Fr. other individuals 

Haverhill, fr. individ. to const. Rev. Henry 
Wood, a L. M. ofthe A. E. S. 

Lyme, tr. individuals 

Lebanon, fr. individuals 

New Hampton, fr. Mr. Obadiah Smith 

Plymouth, fr. John Rodgers, Esq. to const, 
himself a L. M. of the A. E. S. 

Fr. Wm. W. Russell, Esq. to const, himself a 
L. M. ofthe A.E. S. 

Fr. Madam Elizabeth Leavitt, of New Haven, 
to const, herself a L. M. of N. H. Br. 

Fr. individ. (including $10 fr. R. G. Lewis, 
Esq. of New Hampton) to const, the fol- 
lowing ministers L. M. of the N. H. Br. 
viz. Rev. Messrs. Jona. Ward, Drury 
Fairbanks, James Hobort, and George 
Puncuard 



Ilillshoro' 1 County. 
Ifollis, fr. Mr. R. M. Jewett, to const, himself 

■ L. M. ofthe N. 11. Brunch M DO 

Fr. Mr. Jonathan Wheeler, to const, himself 

a L. M. ofthe N. II. Branch 30 00 

Fr. others, to const. Rev. D. Perry, a L. M. 

of A. E. S. 122 16 

Milford, fr. individuals 130 TO 

New l/iswich, fir. Joseph Barrett, ¥.. q. ISO 00 

Fr. Airs. Mary Baitlctt, to const, herself a 

L. M. of the N. II. Branch 30 00 

Fr Mrs. Dolly Kverctt, to const, herself a L. 

M. ofthe N. II. Branch 30 00 

Fr. Mrs. Hannah Johnson, to const, hcrsc-lf a 

L. M. ofthe Co. Soc. 15 00 

Fr. other individuals 230 99—768 85 

Merrimack County. 

Boscawen, East Parish, fr. the father and 
uncle of Miss Mary Cog-swell, to const, 
her a L. M. ofthe N. II. Branch 30 00 

Fr. Messrs. E. & I. Gerrish, to const. Mrs. 

Eunice Wood, a L. M. ofthe Co. Soc. 15 00 

Fr. Mr. Henry Gerrish, to const, himself a 

L. M. ofthe Co. Soc. 15 00 

Fr. Mr. Joseph Genish, Jr. to const, himself a 

L. M. ofthe N. H. Eranch CO 00 

Fr. other individ. to const. Rev. Salmon Ben- 
net a L. M. of the A. E. S. 66 60 

Boscawen, West Parish, fr. Mr. Henry Little 
and Mr. Jeremiah Gerrish, to const, them- 
selves L. M. of the N. H. Branch 60 00 

Fr. Messrs. Enoch Little, Richard Little, 
James Little, and Thomas Coffin, $15 
each, to const, themselves L. M. of the 
Co. Soc. 60 00 

Fr. others, to const. Rev. E. Price, a L. M. of 

A. E. S. 67 66 

Concord, Gen. Robert Davis, to const, his son 

Mr. E. H. Davis, a L. M. ofthe N. H. Br. 30 00 

Fr. Mr. Amos Wood, to const, himself a L. 

M. ofthe N. H. Brauch 30 00 

Fr. other individuals 152 51—556 77 

$3,011 51 



75 00 
60 IS 



50 00 
63 65 
92 69 
5 00 

100 00 



Clothing. 
Fr. Hancock Factory Village, a Box, valued at $18 49 
West Boscawen, fr. the Fern. Ed. Soc. 12 shirts, 13 
collars, and 4 pr. socks, by Mrs. Lucy E. Price, 



NORTH WESTERN BRANCH. 

[George W Root, Esq. Middlebury, Tr.] 

Charlotte, Fr. Ladies Benev. Soc. in part to const, their 

pastor, Rev. Mr. Eaton, a L. M. ofthe Br. 
Corinth, fr. S. Taylor I., S. Hasseltine 1 
Fairlee, fr. Mr. Gilmore 
Hartford, White River Village, by Dea. D. Noyes, 

Boston, 
Jamaica, a coll. by Dea. Nathaniel Kingsbury 
Londonderry, fir. Betsey Gibson 1, Miss"Atwood,25cts. 
Middlebury, fr. Rev. Prof. Hough, ann. subs. 
Newbury, fr. a soldier of the Revolution 5 00 

Fr. the old soldier's Wife 1 00 

Fr. individuals 2 23- 

Rupert, fr. Rev. D. Wilson, by Rev. S. Coleman 
Royalton, Young Ladies' Circle of Industry, 
to const. Rev. A. C. Washburn, a L. M. 
of A. E. S. 40 00 

Fr. Miss Elizabeth Sprague 5 

Weybridge, fr. Fern. Asso. by Miss C. Bryant 

Williamstown, Fr. Asa Smith, Esq. 

West Randolph, fr. Gent. Asso. 9 10 

Fr. Ladies, Asso. 10 25- 

West Rutland, fr. individuals, by Rev. L. Til- 

den 12 00 

Fr. sales fr. Depository 37- 

Refunded by a former Beneficiary 



12 00 
2 00 
2 58 


19 75 
4 37 
1 25 

10 00 



00 
2 00 
2 00 



-12 37 
70 CO 



$215 90 



120 11—736 43 



CONNECTICUT BRANCH. 
[Eliphalet Terry, Esq. Hartford, Tr.] 

Ellington, a contribution, by D. Russell, Tr. 

New Canaan, fr. Lvdian Soc. bsl. of 6th pav't of 
Temp. Schol. by Mrs. S. Bonney, Tr. 

Peltipauge, fr. Ladies' Praying Soc. 6, Fr. Gent. Ed. 
Soc. 18 53, thro' S. Southmayd, Tr. of M. Co. 
Ed. Soc. 

Rocky Hill, fr. Israel Williams, a donation 

Saybrook, a donation fr. a Fern, to const. Rev. Aaron 
Hovey, a L M. of Ct. Br. bv Rev. L. Bacon 

Willington, fr. Ed. Soc. thro' J. R. Flint, Tr. of Tol- 
land Co. Ed. Soc. 

Dividend on Bank Stock 



24 53 
10 00 



10 50 
70 00 



$1S3 03 



180 FUNDS. 



PRESBYTERIAN EDUCATION SOCIETY. 
[Oliver Willcox, Esq. New York, Tr.] 
Rutgers St. Cliurch, fr. Mr. L. Mead 10 00 

Central Agency, Philadelphia 316 00 

Newark, N. J. 2d church, fr. Miss A. Formati 5 00 

E. Furness, Agt. fr. Dr. S. Pride, in part to const. Dr. 

Anderson, a Life Director 50 00 

Western Ed. Soc. fr. the Tr. 100 00 

Fr. Dunkirk, bv Rev. Timothy Stillman 5 CO 

Fr. the Tr. by Rev. W. Fatton 602 81 

Fr. Holiy, bv Mr. Murray 5 00 

Fr. South Bergen, by do. 4 00—716 81 

Bleecker St. Church, fr. Mr. Knowles Taylor, ann. 

subs. 75 00 

Morristown, N. J. fr. Mr. J. Cook, by Rev. 

Mr. Patton 50 CO 

Fr. Gent, of Pres. Church 123 06 

Fr. Ladies of do. «5 62—218 68 

Newark, N. J. 2d church, by Rev. Mr. Cheever 50 00 
Fr. Rev. E. Cheever, to const, his son Henry 

Martyn, a L. M. of P. E. S. 30 00 80 06 

Fishkill, in part by Rev. Mr. Owen 3 75 

Bv Mr. Sherwood 50 25 54 00 

Pleasant Valley, by Rev. Mr. Owen 20 00 

Poughkeepsie, by Rev. Mr. Owen 54 45 

Catskill, by Rev. Mr. Owen, in part 93 50 

Fr. Oren Day, Esq. ami. subs. 75 00 

Fr. Edgar B. Day, by Dr. Porter 10 00 

Fr. C. Austin, bv Dr. Porter 3 00—181 50 

Central Pres. Church, by Tr. of the Session 75 00 

Newark, N. J. 1st Church, fr. Miss Overaker, ann. 

subs, by Mr. Ticknor 75 00 

Napoli, fr. Fern. Ed. Soc. Miss Anna Everett, Tr. 1 00 

New Lebanon, by Rev. Mr. Gilbert 22 58 

Canaan, Four Corners, by do. 21 41 

Canaan Centre, by do. 13 75 

Goslien, Orange County, by do. 21 53 

South Middleton, by do. 42 85 

JRidgeburg, by do. 7 75 

Betlilchem, by do. 45 01 

New Windsor, by do. 20 00 

Canterbury, by do. 15 00—209 88 

Marlboro,' fr. Rev. Mr. Johnson's cong. in part 7 32 

Milton, fr. Pres. Church, by Mr. C. Dubois, Jr. 11 00 

Newark, N. J. fr. 1st Church, in part 146 28 

Fr. 3d Church 15d 87 

Fr. 4th Church 5 65—305 79 

Champlain, fr. Rev. E. D. Kenney, Agt. 9 25 

Coxsackie, fr. Mr. A. Van Dyck, by Dr. Porter 50 00 

West Galway, by Rev. Mr. Owen 15 45 

Johnstown, by do. 17 45 

Fondas Bush, by do. 9 00 

Charlton, bv Mr. Jonathan Leavitt 30 22 

Rockaway, N. J. by Rev. Mr. Kin g 20 00 

Cedar St. Church, fr. R. McCurdy 10 00 

Fr. H. Hinsdale 3, Newton Hays 5 8 00 

" Fr. Wm. Howard 25, Daniel Lee 25 50 00 

Fr. Geo. R. Ives 25, W. H. Smith 25 50 00—118 00 

Murray St. Church, fr. Abraham Richards 5 00 

Central Pres Church, fr. Alfred Edwards 75 00 

Fr. Rufus L. Kevins 75 00—150 00 

Brick Church, fr. Mr. L. Corning 37 50 



$2,928 00 



WESTERN RESERVE BRANCH. 
[Walter Wright, Esq. Hudson, Tr.] 



Hudson, an annual subs. 






4 00 


Charlestown, ann. subs. C. Curtis 






4 00 


Ravenna, an aim. subs. 






3 00 


Eslinburgh, J. Eddy, ann. subs. 






2 00 


Donation, E. Stery 






50 


Elyria, an ann. subs. 






9 00 


Slrongville, W. Strongsdon 






50 00 


Hartford, Ladies' Ed. Soc. 






7 00 


Brownhelm, an. ann. subs. 






1 75 


Clarendon, an ann. subs. 






50 


Hampden, donation 






2 25 


Mesopotamia, an ann. subs. 






9 00 


Avails of a watch 






5 00 


Munro, M. T. an ann. subs. 






16 50 


Donations 






7 50 


Mon. Concert contribution 






8 23 


Brownstown, donation 






25 


Adrian, donation, A. Fitch 






3 00 


Tecumseh, an ann. subs. 






23 37 


Donation 






6 31 


Clinton, an ann. subs. 






2 00 


South Bend, Ind. Horatio Chapin, 


to const, himself a 




L. M. Michigan Ed. Soc. 






5 00 


Mishorocha, Ind. ann. subs. Rev. 


M. Wells 


5 00 


While Pigeon, M. T. Gent. aim. subs. 




4 50 


Fr. Ladies, an ami. sub. to const 


Rev. 


P. W. Wari- 




ner, a L. M. West. Res. Ed. Soc. 




3 00 


Donation 






6 00 


Niles, M. T..Rev. Mr. Brown, an 


. ann 


subs. 


5 00 


Brunson, an ann. subs. 






3 25 


Donation 






6 25 


Richland, Donation 






1 00 


An ann. subs. 






9 50 


Dexter, an ann subs. 






13 65 


Ipsiland, an ann. subs. 
Female Ed. Soc. 






23 00 






15 25 



Nashville, an ann. su'M. - 

Donation 

Ann Arbour, an ann. subs» 

Donation 

Female Ed. Soc. 

Salem, an ann. subs. 

Four Corners, an ann. subs. 

Milan, church in do. 

Berlin, an ann. subs. 

Wakeman, an ann. s-ubs. 

Ridgefield, an ann. subs. 

Western Reserve College, an ann. subs. 

Roolstown, an ann. subs. 

Euclid, Fem. Ed. Soc. 

Thompson, an ann. subs. 

Madison, ann. subs. 

Andon and Cherry Valley, Fem. Ed. Soc. 

Brimfield, ann. subs. 



[Nov. 



1 25 
50 

28 00 

2 00 

4 00 

1 50 

2 00 
15 00 

6 25 

3 00 

3 00 
2 00 

5 50 

4 25 

5 00 

6 50 
5 00 

14 00 

$374 31 



UTICA AGENCY. 
[Mr. Jesse Doolittle, Utica, Tr.] 

Augusta, fr. W. Chandler, ann. subs. 37 50, fr. Fem. 
Ed. Soc. 13, fr. the Pres. Ch. a bal. 2 53 

Canton, by Rev. A. Brainerd 

Clinton, fr. Mrs. Fally Taylor 37 50, fr. Fem. Prayer 
Asso. 6, fr. Cong. Ch. by Deacon Gridley 22 19 

Courtlandville, 

Fairfield, fr. Mrs. Barnes 5, Mrs. Bryan 8, Rev. D. 
Chassel 4, J. Hadley 3, fr. sundry others 11 

Homer, 

Hopkinton, by Z. Culver 

Morrisville, by Dea. Holmes 

Ogdenburgh, fr. J. Fine 10, a Friend 5, Mrs. Glas- 
gorn 5, fr. sundry others 7 20 

Oneida Presbytery, a collect, at its semi-ann. meeting 

Oxford, a bal. to const. Mrs. Laura G. Abell, a L. M. 
of Pres. Ed. Soc. 

Owego, fr. the Infant School Asso. by C. B. Pexley 

Potsdam, 

Rome, 1st Church, fr. I. W. Bloomfield 20, in part to 
const, the Rev. Moses Gillet, a L. M. of P. E. S. 
fr. sundry others 15 06, 2d Church, by B. P. John- 
son 16 

Sangersfield, fr. Pres. Ch. 7 50, fr. Cong. Ch. 7 75 

Smithfield, fr. the Pres. Soc. 15 45, fr. Fern. Ed. Soc. 
8 50 

Vernon Centre, 

Utica, 1st Ch. fr. Fem. Benev. Asso. by M. Bagg 35, a 
balance towards the Aikin Schol. for 1834, fr. a 
Friend, signed Lydia 3, fr. J. Dana 3, a coll. on 
the Sabbath, by Rev. Wm. Patton 37 72 

Fr. 2d Church 

Avails of clothing 



$491 55 
Clothing. 
Fairfield, fr. Mrs. Barns, 2 stocks and 4 collars valued at $2 50. 
Smithfield, fr. Fem. Ed. Soc. 2 pr. of socks. 



53 03 
4 38 


65 69 
19 50 


31 00 
43 91 
2 75 
1 OU 


27 20 
6 70 


5 00 
25 38 
9 33 


51 06 
15 25 


23 95 
5 97 


78 12 
19 93 
1 75 



SUMMARY. 



Parent Society 
Maine Branch 
New Hampshire Branch 
North Western Branch 
Connecticut Branch 
Presbyterian Ed. Society 
W estern Reserve Branch 
Utica Agency 



15,472 80 



Whole am. 

18,296 21 

202 00 

3,011 51 

215 90 

183 03 

2,928 00 

374 31 

491 55 



$10,229 71 $15,472 80 $25,702 51 

Note. Of the above sums, acknowledged under the head of 
Branches, the following have been received into the Treasury of 
the Parent Society, viz. 

From Maine 10 00 

New- Hampshire 2,059 09 
Vermont 23 12 



Present Use. Schol. Fund. 
2,823 41 

202 00 
3,011 51 

215 90 

183 03 
2,928 00 

374 31 

491 55 



$2,092 21 



Clothing rec'd at the Rooms of the Parent Society 
during the quarter ending Oct. 8, 1834. 

Boston, fr. Mrs. Christian Baker, 6 shirts, 6 pr. socks. 

Braintree South Parish, fr. the Fem. Ed. Soc. by Rev. Lyman 
Matthews, 14 shirts, 5 collars, 3 pr. socks, 1 quilt. 

Grafton, fr. the Ladies Sewing Circle, 4 shirts. 

Fr. Miss Read, 1 quilt. 

New Ipswich, N. H. fr. the Reading Char. Soc. Miss Joanna 
Thaver, Tr. a box, valued at $21 18. 

Rowley 1st Par. fr. the Social Reading Soc. Miss Mary H. 
Jewett, Tr. thro' Col E. Hale, 6 shirts and 15 collars. 

Sliaron, fr. the Dorcas Soc. by R«v. Dr. Codman, Tr. of Nor- 
folk Co. Ed. Soc. 1 quilt, 1 pr. sheets, 1 pr. pillow crises. 

From the South Middlesex Conference, 7 shirts, I pr. sock*. 



the 



QUARTERLY REGISTER. 



Vol. VII. 



FEBRUARY, 1835. 



No. 3. 



A LIST OF THE GRADUATES, 

AND THOSE WHO HAVE RECEIVED DEGREES, AT ALL OF THE 

NEW ENGLAND COLLEGES, 

From their foundation, to the time mentioned as follows ; viz. of Harvard, to and including 1834 ; Yale, 1834 ; Brown, 1S30; 

Dartmouth, 1S34 ; Williams, 1833; Vermont, 1828; Bowdoin, 1834; Middlebury, 1832; Waterville, 1834; 

Amherst, 1S34, and Washington, 1834. 

FORMING 

A COMPLETE INDEX TO THE TRIENNIAL CATALOGUES OF ALL THE 
COLLEGES IN NEW ENGLAND. 



By John Farmer, Esq. 

Cor. Sec'ry. New Hampshire Historical Society, 



[Continued from page 132.] 



1829 
1833 
1834 

1796 
1827 

1774 
1781 
1810 
1812 
1S25 
1833 
1833 

1700 
1749 
1771 
1777 
1786 
1788 
1797 
1806 
1818 
1822 
1826 
1826 
1827 
1827 
1833 



Yale Robert 
Wins. William E. 
Wms. James 

Dixwell 
Harv. John, Mr., M. D. 
Harv. Epes S., Mr. 

Doane 
Harv. Isaiah, Mr. 
Harv. Elisha, Mr. 
Ver. David 

Harv. George B., Mr., M. D. 
Harv. Augustus S., Mr., M. D. 
Yale Hiram 
Wash. — George W., D. D., Bp. 

Dodge 



Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Bro. 

Dart. 

Ver. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Harv. 

Wat. 

Bow. 

Dart. 



Daniel 
Ezetciel, Mr. 
Joshua, Mr. 
Nathaniel, Mr. 
William 
Oliver 
Paul 

Josfaux, Mr. 
Nehemiah 
Samuel, Mr 
—David S., M. D. 
Allen W. 
Hervey B. 
Asa, Mr., M. D. '31 
James M. 

VOL. VII. 



M. D. 



1834 Dart. - 


-Roderick L., M. 


1834 Bow. 


John C. 


1834 Amh. 


Franklin 


Doe 




1823 Bow. 


Joseph 


1825 Dart. 


John 


1827 Dart. - 


-Daniel J., M. D. 


Doggett 


1775 Harv. 


Samuel 


1788 Bro. 


Simeon. Mr., Tut 


1821 Bro. 


John L., Mr. 


1829 Bro. 


Theophilus P. 


Dolbeare 


1763 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr, 


Dole 


1771 Harv. 


Greenleaf", Mr. 


1818 Bow. 


Carleton, Mr. 


1832 Bow. 


Albert G. 


Domett 


1762 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


Donnison 


1805 Harv. 


William 


1807 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr, 


Doolittle 


1716 Yale 


Benjamin, Mr. 


1789 Yale 


Elkanah 


1793 Yale 


Benjamin 


1795 Yale 


Jolham I. 



24 



182 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1799 Yale fJoel, Mr. at Mid. 1802, Tut. at 
1804 Yale Marcus. Mr. at Mid. '01 [Mid. 
1832 Mid. John T. 

Dorby 
1747 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. ; and at Yale '53 

Dore 
1793 Bro. —James, Mr. 

Dorman 

1822 Mid. —Ebenezer H., Mr. 
1831 Amh. OrlowM. 

Dorr 

1711 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1742 Yale Edward, Mr. 

1752 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1784 Harv. William, Mr. 

1795 Harv. Samuel A., Mr. 

1817 Dart. Benjamin, Mr. 

1817 Mid. Palmer C. 

1818 Yale —Jonathan, M. D. 

1818 Harv. Ebenezer R., Mr. 

1819 Harv. Edward, Mr. 
1821 Harv. William B„ Mr. 

1823 Harv. Thomas W v Mr. 
1825 Harv. Francis O. 
1825 Harv. Clifford, M. D. 
1827 Bow. Joseph H. 

1830 Bow. —Joseph P., M. D. 

1831 Wms. —Jonathan, M. D. 

1832 Harv. James A. 

Dorrance 
1774 Bro. John, Mr., Tut. 
1786 Dart. Gordon, Mr. 

1800 Bro. John G. 
1809 Bro. James B., Mr. 

1812 Bro. Andrew M. 

1820 Wms. Gardner, Mr., M. D. 

1829 Bro. William P. 

Dorsey 

1830 Yale Samuel W. 

Doty 
1733 Yale Samuel, Mr. 

Doubt 
1747 Harv. Nyott 

Doughty 
1806 Yale Charles J., Mr. 

Douglas 
1760 Yale Benjamin, Mr. 

1798 Wms. Amos 

Douglass 

1813 Yale David B., Mr., and at N. J. '19, 

[at Union 7 25, Prof, at Mil. 
[Acad. 

1813 Mid. Nathan 

1814 Mid. Orson, Mr. 
1814 Bow. John A., Mr. 
1822 Yale Sutherland, Mr. 
1826 Wms. —James, M. D. 
1828 Yale George H. 

1831 Yale Thomas 

Douw 
1777 Yale John De P. 

Dow 
1769 Harv. Moses, Mr., and at Dart. 1815 
1784 Yale Henry, Mr. 
1793 Yale Daniel 
1796 Dart. Moses, Mr. 

1799 Dart. Joseph E. 
1805 Harv. Joseph W., Mr. 
1820 Yale James G. 
1825 Dart. —Jeremiah, M. D. 
1828 Dart. Nathan T., Mr. 
1833 Dart. Joseph 



Dowling 
1834 Bro. —John, Mr. 

Downe 
1736 Harv. Henry 

1738 Harv. William, Mr. 
1740 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1745 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1822 Harv. Leonard 

Downer 
1747 Harv. Silas, Mr. 
1810 Bro. Appleton 
1818 Yale — Alberic, M. D. 
1828 Yale David R. 

Downes 

1812 Harv. George 

Downing 
1642 Harv. George, Bart. 

1739 Harv. Richard 
1834 Bow. Elijah H. 

Downs 
1830 Yale —Myron, M. D. 

Dowse 
1715 Harv. Jonathan 
1725 Harv. Edward 
1766 Harv. Joseph 

Dox 

1807 Wms. Jacob, Mr. 

Drake 
1785 Yale Joseph 

1813 Dart. —Francis, Mr. 
1830 Yale Richard G. 

Draper 
1745 Yale Nathaniel 
1780 Harv. Philip 
1783 Harv. Ichabod 

1789 Bro. Paul, Mr. 

1790 Bro. Aaron 

1797 Bro. Abijah, Mr., M. D. 1819 

1803 Harv. William 

1808 Harv. Jeremiah, Mr. 
1808. Harv. Moses, Mr. 
1833 Harv. Charles 

Dresser 

1823 Bro. Charles, Mr. 

Drew 
1820 Dart. —Oliver W., M. D. 

Drinkwater 
1790 Bro. Nathaniel, Mr. 

Drown 
1773 Bro. Solomon, Mr., and at Dart. '86, 
[and at Penn., M. D., Prof: 
[at Bro. 

Drowne 
1764 Harv. Nathaniel P., Mr. 

Druce 
1738 Harv. John, Mr. 

Drummond 
1830 Bow. Thomas 

Drury 
1776 Harv. Ephraim 

1804 Wms. John 
1813 Bro. fLuke, Mr. 

1824 Mid. —Amos, Mr. 

1829 Yale Asa, Mr. 

Du Bois 

1830 Wash. Abraham 

Dubose 
1807 Yale William 

1825 Yale Isaac 

Dudley 
1651 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



183 



1665 Harv. #t Joseph, Mr., Gov. of Mass. and 
1685 Harv. Thomas, Mr. [N. H. 

1690 Harv. tPaul, Mr., Tut. 
1704 Harv. William, Mr. 

1750 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1751 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
17G7 Harv. Nicholas, Mr. 
17G9 Yale Asahel 

1788 Dart. Elias, Mr. 

Duggan 
1823 Harv. —William B., M. D. 

Duke 
1818 Yale James K. 

Dulles 
1814 Yale Joseph H. 

Dumaresq 
1828 Harv. Philip I., M. D. 

Dummer 
1656 Harv. Shubael 

1699 Harv. Jeremiah, Mr., P. D. at Utrecht 
1745 Harv. Nathaniel 
1814 Bow. Charles, Mr. 

1823 Bow. Richard W. 
1825 Bow. Jeremiah, M. D. 
1827 Bow. Henry E. 

Dumont 

1824 Harv. John T. P. 

Dunbar 
1723 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1760 Harv. Elijah, Mr. 
1767 Harv. Asa 
1775 Harv. Simeon, Mr. 
1783 Dart. Elijah, Mr. 

1789 Harv. John D., Mr. 

1794 Harv. Elijah, Mr., and at Wms. '98, 
[and Tut. at Wms. 
1794 Yale Daniel, Mr. at Wms. 7 98, Tut. 
1800 Yale Asaph 
1807 Bro. John 
1820 Harv. Archibald 

1824 Harv. Alexander C. 

Duncan 
1777 Bro. John 
1810 Harv. Samuel W., Mr. 
1812 Harv. James H., Mr. 
1817 Dart. Thomas W. 

1820 Yale Garnett, Mr at Trans. 

1821 Yale Lucius C. Mr. 

1822 Bow. —John, M. D. 

1823 Yale John N. 

1825 Yale Alexander, Mr. 
1830 Dart. William H. P., Mr. 

1832 Wms. John 

1833 Bow. —Charles M., M. D. 

Duncklee 
1832 Dart. William A. 

Dunglison 
1825 Yale — Robley, M. D., Prof, at Virg. 

Dunham 
1787 Yale —Lewis, M. D. 
1789 Dart. Josiah,Mr. 
1794 Dart. Jacob 
1830 Wms. George 

Dunkin 

1811 Harv. Benjamin F. 
1813 Harv. John 

1834 Harv. —Christopher 

Dunklee 
1817 Dart. John 
Dunlap 

1812 Yale Thomas, Mr. 

1813 Harv. Andrew, Mr. 
1815 Bow. Robert P., Mr. 



1833 Yale Abijah B. 
Dunn 



1795 Bro. 
1819 Harv 
1825 Bow. 
1828 Bro. 
183i Bow. 



—Thomas, Mr. 

James C, Mr. 

Natlwrniel, Mr. at Bro. '28 
— Theophilus C, Mr., M. D 



at 
[Peiin. 



— Andrew, M. D. 

Dunning 
1759 Yale Benjamin, Mr. 
1802 Harv. James S. 
1832 Yale Edward O. 

Dunscomb 
1801 Yale Josiah W. 

Dunscombe 
1792 Bro. — Thomas, Mr. 

Dunster 
1741 Harv. IsaMi, Mr. 

Dunton 

1826 Amh. Samuel 

Dunwoody 

1807 Yale John 

Dupee 

1832 Harv. Horatio 

Duponceau 

1820 Harv. —Peter S., LL. D. 

Durand 
1814 Yale Alexis D. 

1833 Yale William M. 

Durant 
1735 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

1827 Yale Henry, Mr., Tut. 

Durell 
1794 Dart. ||Daniel M. 
1831 Harv. Edward H. 

Duren 
1833 Bow. Charles 

Durfee 

1813 Bro. ||Job 

1824 Bro. Nathan, M. D. at Harv. '31 

Durfey 

1825 Wms. Calvin, Mr. 

Durgin 

1821 Bro. — Obadiah E., M. D. 

Durkee 

1814 Mid. Benjamin 

1826 Bow. —Silas, M. D. 

Durnford 
1813 Bro. John 

Duryee 

1815 Yale Abraham J., Mr., M. D. at N. Y. 

Dustin 

1799 Dart. Alexander, Mr. 

1808 Dart. Oliver 

Dutch 

1776 Bro. Ebenezer, Mr. 

1800 Dart. John 
1829 Yale Aaron H. 

Dutcher 
1812 Ver. James C. 

Dutton 
1787 Yale Ebenezer 
1797 Yale Warren. Mr., and at Wms. 1S00, 

1801 Dart. John [Tut. 

1802 Dart. Nathaniel 

1803 Yale Aaron. Mr. 

1808 Yale Matthew R., Mr., Tut. and Prof. 
1818 Yale Henry, Mr., Tut. 
1826 Yale —Charles H., M. D. 

1828 Wash. Theodate 

1829 Yale Warren B. 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



184 

1831 Harv. Francis L. 

1832 Wms. Thomas 

1833 Yale Samuel W. S. 

1834 Harv. Francis L. 

Dwight 
1687 Harv. Josiah, Mr, 

1721 Yale Daniel, Mr. 

1722 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1724 Harv. Flynt 

1726 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

1736 Yale Josiah, Mr. 

1744 Yale Timothy, Mr. 

1754 Harv. Henry 

1769 Yale Timothy, Mr.. Tut., Prof, and 
[Pies., D. D. at N. J. '87, 
fLL. D. at Harv. 1800 



[Feb. 



1773 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1774 Harv. 


Timothy, Mr. 


1778 Harv. 


IJThomas, Mr. 


1786 Harv. 


Josiah, Mr. 


1790 Dart. 


Elihu, Mr. 


1793 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1794 Yale 


Josiah 


1797 Dart. 


Daniel, Mr. 


1798 Yale 


— ||Theodore, Mr. 


1799 Yale 


Benjamin W., Mr. 


1799 Yale 


Edmund 


1800 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1801 Wms. 


—Nathaniel, Mr., and at Yale '15 


1801 Yale 


Henry, Mr. 


1802 Yale 


John 


1803 Yale 


Sereno E, Mr..Tut., D. D., Pres. 


1809 Yale 


Edwin W., Mr. H am. 


1812 Yale 


John W. 


1813 Yale 


William T., Mr., Tut. 


1813 Yale 


Louis 


1814 Yale 


Theodore, Mr. 


1815 Yale 


Henry E., Mr. 


1815 Harv. 


Henry 


1822 Wms, 


- |[ Henry W., Mr. 


1825 Harv. 


William 


1825 Wms. 


—Morris, M. D. 


18*6 Yale 


William 


1826 Yale 


William W., Mr., M. D. at Harv. 


1827 Yale 


Timothy E. 


1827 Yale 


—Timothy, Mr. 


1827 Amh. 


Timothy 


J827 Harv. 


Thomas 


1827 Harv. 


Francis 


18*8 Bro. 


Gamaliel L. 


1829 Wms. 


Henry A. 


1832 Harv. 


John S. 


Dwinnel 


1808 Yale 


jjJustin 


Dy 


er 


1706 Harv. 


Gyles, Mr. 


1740 Yale 


UtEliphalet, Mr., and at Harv. '44, 


1750 Yale 


Ebenezer, Mr. [LL. D. 


1764 Harv. 


Thomas 


1777 Yale 


Jabcz 


1824 Bro. 


George, M. D. at Yale '27 . 


18*6 Harv. 


Henry, Mr., M. D. 


1829 Wms. 


—Elijah, M. D. 


1829 Wms. 


Lewis 


1829 Bro. 


Elisha 


Dyke 


1812 Yale 


Nathaniel 


Eager 


1794 Dart. 


Paul 


Eames 


1752 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1775 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr., Tut, 


1806 Bro. 


Jacob 


1809 Yale 


Theodore, Mr. 


1831 Harv. 


Charles 



Earle 
1826 Bow. —Homer, M. D. 
1826 Yale Winthrop 

Easburn 
1834 Wash.— George C. V. (Mid.) Mr. 

Easeman 
1703 Harv. Jeremiah 

Eastabrook 
1736 Yale Hobarl, Mr. 

Eastman 



1788 Yale 

1793 Dart. 

1794 Dart. 

1795 Dart. 

1796 Dart. 

1802 Dart. 

1803 Dart. 

1811 Yale 

1812 Dart. 
1814 Wms. 
1817 Wms. 

1820 Bow. 

1821 Yale 

1821 Dart. 

1822 Dart. 
1824 Dart. 
1827 Dart. 
1829 Dart. 

1829 Mid. 

1830 Amh. 
1830 Amh. 
1833 Amh. 



John 
Edmund 
Moses, Mr. 
John 

Tilton, Mr. 
Samuel 
Jonathan, Mr 
Jonathan, Mr, 
Luke 

John L., Mr. 
William 
Philip, Mr. 
Oman, Mr. 
Joseph B. 
-Jacob W., Mi 
Joel 

Joseph A. 
Ira A. 
George C 
George 
Henry E. 
Lucius K. 



V. 



Eaton 
1649 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1729 Harv. Elisha, Mr. 
1735 Harv. Joshua 
1763 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1769 Bro. Joseph, Mr. 

1770 Bro. —Isaac, Mr., and at N. J. & Penn. 
1773 Harv. Joshua, Mr. 

1777 Harv. John E. 

1787 Harv. Peter, Mr., D. D. 

1790 Dart. William, Mr. 

1795 Bro. Joseph 

1799 Wms. Amos, Mr. 

1803 Harv. Asa, Mr., & at Bro. '18, D. D. 
1810 Harv. Joseph, Mr., M. D. [Columb. 
1810 Wms. William 

1816 Wms. Sylvester, Mr. 

1818 Harv. Peter S., Mr. 

1819 Yale —William P., M. D. 
1823 Dart. —Stephen, M. D. 
1825 Mid. Horatio, Mr., M. D. 
1827 Dart. —Leonard, M. D. 
1827 Harv. John H. 

1830 Yale Joshua T. 

1830 Harv. Levi C. 

1832 Harv. Joseph W. 

1833 Dart. Ephraim 
1833 Harv. George 

Ebbets 
1832 Yale John J. A. 

Eccles 
1815 Yale John D. 

Eccleston 

1831 Wash. Joseph R. 

Eckley 

1804 Harv. Thomas J., Mr., and at Bow. '06 

Eddy 
1765 Harv. John, Mr. 
1787 Bro. ||fSamuH, Mr., LL. D. 
1799 Bro. Zechariah, Mr. 

1805 Bro. Stephen W., Mr. 

1806 Mid. Elj 






1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



18o 



1815 

1822 
1832 

1799 
1817 
1828 
1830 



1809 
1824 
1829 

1817 

1777 
1796 

1730 
1775 

1734 
1794 

1822 



1691 
1720 
1720 
1769 
1769 
1769 

1771 

1776 
1786 
1789 
1806 
1810 
1812 
1813 
1814 
1819 
1819 
1820 
1824 
1824 
1825 
1827 
1828 
18-8 
1829 
1832 
1833 



1699 
1728 
1733 



1724 
1755 
1763 
1765 
1779 
1785 
1799 
1821 
18^8 
1828 
1833 

1828 



Bro. —John M., M. D., Adjunct Prof. 
Bro. Richard E. ; Mr. 
Yale Henry 

Edes 
Harv. Henrij, Mr., and at Bro. 1806, 
Dart. Amasa, Mr. [D. D. at Harv. 

Bro. Henry F. 

Bro. Richard S. 

Edgerton 
Yale Erastus 
Mid. Bela 
Dart. Edwin 
Dart. Albert M. 

Edmiston 
Yale Joseph W. 

Edmond 
Yale t||William 
Yale David, Mr., Mid. 1811 

Edson 
Harv. Josiah, Mr. 
Adam 
Jael 

Jesse, Mr. 
Theodore, Mr. 
— A?nbrose, Mr. 

Edwards 
Harv. Timothy, Mr. 

tDaniel, Mr., Tutor 

Jonathan, Mr., Tut., Pres. of N. J. 
— James, Mr. 

— Morgan, Mr., and at Penn. 
—Jonathan, Mr., A. B. at N. J. 7 65, 
[and D. D., Pres. of Union 

Thomas, Mr. 

William 
— Enoch, Mr. 

Jonathan W., Mr., Tut. 

Joseph 

Jnstin, D. D., and at Yale '27 

Samuel L. 

Thomas, Mr. 

David S., M. D. 

Jonathan 

Abraham, Mr. 

Walter 

John M. 

Bela B., Mr., Tutor 
— Hosea, M. D. 

Henry 

John E. 

Tryon. Mr. 

Benjamin 

George W. 
Vale — *||Heiiry W., LL.D., A. B. at N.J. 
[1797, Gov. of Conn. 

Eelles 

Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
Harv. Edward, Mr. 
Eells 



Yale 
Yale 
Dart. 
Harv 

Amh. 



Yale 
Yale 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Yale 

Harv. 

Bro. 

Bro. 

Yale 

Yale 

Wms. 

Yale 

Dart. 

Yale 

Yale 

Harv. 

Yale 

Yale 

Amh. 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 



Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Wms 
Mid. 
Row. 
Yale 



John, Mr. 
John, Mr. 
James, Mr. 
Samvel, Mr. 
Ozias, Mr. 
Roger, Mr. 
James 
Ozias S. 
Edward C. 
Selh W., M. 
William W. 
Eels 
Bow. — SethW.,M. 



D, 



Egenbrodt 


1831 Wash. 


David 


Egery 


1833 Dart. 


—Edward A., M. D. 


Eggleston 


1813 Yale 


Ambrose 


1815 Harv. 


George W., Mr. 


Ela 




1831 Dart. 


Benjamin 


Elam 


1800 Bro. 


— Samuel, Mr. 


Elder 


1813 Dart. 


—Samuel, M. D. 


Elderkin 


1748 Yale 


Joshua, Mr. 


1763 Yale 


Vine, Mr. 


1765 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1767 Yale 


Bela, Mr. 


Eldred 


1834 Yale 


Henry B. 


Eldridge 


1825 Bro. 


— Hezekiah, M. D. 


1829 Yale 


Joseph 


1829 Amh. 


Erasmus D. 


1832 Dart. 


Frederic A. 


Eliot 


1656 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1658 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1660 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1665 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


1681 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1685 Harv. 


John 


1701 Harv. 


Robert 


1706 Yale 


Jared, Mr., and at Harv. 


1720 Harv. 


Jacob, Mr. 


1735 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1737 Harv. 


John 


1737 Harv. 


Andrew, Mr., D. D. at Edin. 


1755 Harv. 


Jacob, Mr. 


1762 Harv. 


Andrew, Mr., and at Yale 14, 


1772 Harv. 


John, Mr., D. D. at Edin. [Tut. 


1774 Harv. 


Richard R., Mr., Tut. 


1780 Harv. 


Ephraim, Mr. 


1799 Yale 


Andrew, Mr. 


1805 Yale 


Harvey, Mr. 


1809 Harv. 


Charles, Mr. 


1815 Harv. 


William H. 


1817 Harv. 


Samuel A., Mr. 


Elkins 


1820 Bow. 


—Jeremiah, Mr. 


JLiilbiy 
1722 Harv. William, Mr., and at Yale '50 


1732 Harv. 


John, Mr. [Lt. Gov. of R. I 


1747 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


1747 Harv. 


|| William, Mr. 


1758 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1772 Harv. 


Nathaniel 


1787 Yale 


Christopher, Mr. 


1791 Harv. 


Abraham R. 


Elli 


ngwood 


1816 Wms. 


—John W., Mr., and at Bow. '24 


Elliot 


1740 Yale 


Augustus, Mr. 


1742 Yale 


Joseph, Mr. 


1774 Yale 


William, Mr. 


1784 Yale 


Joseph 


1786 Yale 


John, Mr., D. D. 


1789 Yale 


Nathan, Mr. 


1791 Yale" 


Stephen, LL. D., and at Harv. 


1794 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1802 Yale 


Achilles 


1802 Harv. 


James H., Mr., and at Bow. '06 



186 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1808 Dart. Moses 


1808 Wms. 


Noah 


1813 Dart. Daniel, Mr. 


1810 Yale 


Elias H., Mr. 


1813 Ver. Israel 


1813 Yale 


William 


1813 Yale George A. 


1820 Wms. 


Judah, Mr. 


1825 Dart. —John S., M. D. 


1826 Yale 


—Edwin D., M. D. 


1826 Dart. William 


1829 Yale 


Joseph M. 


1826 Amh. Caleb B. 


1830 Wms. 


Samuel 


1829 Dart. Charles F. ; Mr., M. D. 


1831 Yale 


— James, Mr. 


Elliott 


1831 Wash. 


Elias P. 


1809 Harv. William, Mr. 


1833 Yale 


Z. Rogers 


1818 Harv. Ralph E., M. D. 


Emerson 


1824 Harv. Stephen 


1656 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


Ellis 


1675 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1737 Harv. Jonathan 


1689 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1750 Harv. John, Mr., and at Yale '53 


1717 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1786 Yale Jonathan 


1726 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1791 Bro. James, Mr. 


1737 Harv. 


Moses, Mr. 


1793 Harv. ||fCaleb, Mr. 

1802 Bro. Ferdinand, Mr., Tutor 


1739 Harv. 


Daniel, Mr. 


1743 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1803 Harv. Joel. Mr. 


1756 Harv. 


Jacob, Mr. 


1818 Harv. Francis, Mr. 


1761 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1822 Dart. John M., Mr. 


1764 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1829 Amh. —Calvin D., Mr., & M. D. at Bow. 


1771 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1829 Bow. —Calvin, M. D. 


1774 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1830 Wms. —Edward, M. D. 


1775 Harv. 


Joseph 


1832 Harv. —Walton N., M. D. 


1776 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1832 Bow. — Asher, M. D. 


1778 Harv. 


Brown, Mr. 


1833 Harv. George E. 

Ells 

1834 Wms. Gushing 


1785 Harv. 
1789 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr., M. D. 

William, Mr., & at Dart. '92, & 


1794 Harv. 
1798 Harv. 


Daniel, Mr. [at Yale '92 
Joseph, Mr., Tutor 


Ellsworth 


1798 Dart. 


Reuben, Mr. 


1785 Yale John 


1799 Dart. 


Luther 


1790 Yale — tOliver, N. J. '66, LL. D. at 


1802 Dart. 


Brown 


[Yale '90, at Dart. '97, and 
[at N. J. 


1805 Dart. 


Benjamin D. 


1805 Dart. 


Abner 


1799 Yale Oliver, Mr., Tutor 


1810 Wms. 


Samuel M., Mr., Tutor 


1801 Yale Martin 


1811 Yale 


Ralph, Mr., Tut., Prof, at Ando- 


1810 Yale ||William W., and at Wash. Prof. 




[ver Theol. Inst., D. D. 


1810 Yale Henry L., Mr. 


1813 Harv. 


—Joseph B., M. D. '16. Mr. at 


1824 Wms. —Frederick, Mr. 


1814 Mid. 


Noah [Wms. 


1825 Yale Joseph 


1814 Dart. 


Samuel 


1828 Wms. —Jeremiah, M. D. 


1816 Dart. 


Benjamin 


1830 Yale Oliver 


1816 Harv. 


John 


1834 Yale Henry W. 


1817 Harv. 


George B., Mr., Tutor 


Elmer 


1817 Harv. 


Moses K. ; Mr., M. D. 


1713 Yale Daniel, Mr. 


1818 Harv. 


Charles O., Mr. 


1747 Yale Jonathan, Mr. 


1818 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


Elmore 


1S20 Harv. 


Andrew L., Mr., LL. B. 


1821 Mid. Washington H. 
Elton 


1821 Harv. 
1323 Harv. 


Ralph W., Mr. '27 
William S. 


1824 Harv. 


Edward B., Mr. 


1813 Bro. Romeo, Mr., Prof. 


1825 Dart. 


John F. 


1817 Harv. —Romeo, Mr. '20 


1826 Dart. 


John S. 


Ely 

1745 Yale Simon, Mr. 


1826 Dart. 


Charles M. 


1826 Dart. 


—Isaac B., M. D. 


1754 Yale Richard, Mr. 


1827 Bow. 


—William S., M. D. 


1759 Harv. Justin, Mr., and at Yale 


1828 Harv. 


Charles C, Mr., LL. B. 


1764 Yale Samuel, Mr. 


1830 Dart. 


Daniel H., Mr. 


1769 Yale David, Mr., & at Dart. '82, D. D. 


1830 Yale 


Joseph 


1772 Yale Samuel 


1831 Amh. 


Luther 


1778 Yale Henry, Mr. 


1832 Dart. 


Edward B. 


1779 Yale Zebulon, Mr. 


1833 Yale 


Brown 


1780 Yale Worthington, Mr. 


1834 Yale 


Alfred 


1785 Yale Richard 


Emery 


1786 Yale John, Mr. 


1691 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1786 Yale Benjamin 


1730 Harv. 


Stephen, Mr. 


1787 Yale ||William 


1736 Harv. 


Anthony 
Jacob, Mr. 


1787 Yale William 


1761 Harv. 


1792 Yale Enoch 


1768 Harv. 


Thomas 


1792 Harv. Justin, Mr. 


1774 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr., and at Yale '81 


1800 Yale David, Mr. 


1795 Dart. 


Nicholas, Mr. 


1803 Yale . Elisha, Mr. 


1808 Dart. 


Stephen 


1804 Yale Ezra S., Mr., D. D. at Wash, in 


1814 Bow. 


Stephen, Mr. 


1804 Yale Sumner [Tenn. 


1818 Bow. 


Moses 


1806 Yale Isaac M., Mr. 


1330 Dart. 


Woodward J. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



187 






1830 Ilarv. Samuel M. 

1831 Amh. Joshua, Jr. 

1831 Amh. Samuel II. 

Emmons 
1767 Yale Nathanael, Mr., and at Dart. '86, 
1795 Dart. Eli [D. D. at Dart. 

1805 Bro. Williams, Mr., Tutor 

1818 Wms. Ebenezer, M. D., Prof. 
1825 Ver. Alden 

1828 Pro. Francis W. 
1830 Dart. —Lewis, M. D. 

Endicott 
1822 Harv. William P. 

English 
1807 Harv. George B., Mr. 
1827 Harv. _ James L., Mr. 

Ennis 

1819 Bro. William 

Enos 
1794 Dart. Pascal P. 

Ensign 
1815 Yale Edward F. 

Epes 
1669 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1669 Harv. Daniel 

1751 Harv. Samuel, Mr., and at Yale ; 54 
1758 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

Ernst 

1832 Yale Frederick S. 

Erskine 
1788 Yale — John, Edin. D. D. and at Glas. 

Ervin 
1797 Bro. OJames 
1797 Bro. Samuel 

Erving 
1747 Harv. John, Mr. 
1753 Harv. William, Mr. 
1757 Harv. George, Mr. at Glasgow 
1777 Harv. —Shirley, Mr. 1810 

Estabrook 
1664 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1690 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1696 Harv. Samuel 

1771 Harv. Jedidiah 

1776 Dart. Experience, Mr. 

1782 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1810 Harv. Turner 

1815 Dart. Joseph, Mr., and at Wms. ; 20 

1818 Wms. Joseph H., M. D. at Harv. ; 21 

Esten 
1792 Yale fJames C. 

Esty 
1821 Yale Isaac 

Eustis 

1772 Harv. ||*William, Mr., LL. D., Gov. of 

[Mass 
1804 Harv. Abraham, Mr. at Bow. '06 
1810 Harv. John 
1815 Harv. George, Mr. 
1830 Harv. Horatio S. 
1830 Harv. William 

Evans 
1713 Yale David, Mr. 

1739 Yale Samuel, Mr. 

1740 Yale Joel 

1769 Bro. —Caleb, Mr., D. D. 7 89 

1770 Bro. —Abel, Mr. 
1770 Bro. —Hugh, Mr. 
1777 Harv. Joseph 

1792 Dart. — Israel, Mr., A. B. at N. J. ; 72 

1814 Harv. —Amos A., M. D. 

1815 Bow. ||George, Mr. 



1819 Bro. — Jokn,LL. D. 
1821 Bow. Daniel 
1827 Wat. William A. 

1827 Wat. Harvey 
1827 Dart. —Ira, M. D. 
1829 Mow. Richard 

1831 Yale Thomas L. 

1832 Wms. DanaD. 

Evarts 

1802 Yale Jeremiah, Mr. 
1829 Dart. James M. 
1832 Yale John J. 

Eveleigh 
1742 Harv. George, Mr. 

Eveleth 
1689 Harv. John 
1738 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

1814 Bow. John, Mr. 
1825 Bow. Joseph J. 
1825 Amh. Ephraim 

Everest 
1808 Mid. Udney H., Mr. 
1811 Wms. Cornelius B., Mr. at Yale '15 
1816 Yale —Solomon, M. D. 

Everett 

1771 Harv. Moses, Mr. 

1775 Yale Noble, Mr., and at Dart. '80 

1779 Harv. Oliver, Mr. 

1779 Yale —Daniel, Mr. '85 

1790 Dart. Richard C, Mr. 

1795 Dart. David 

1796 Harv. Moses, Mr. 

1797 Bro. Horace, Mr. 
1802 Bro. Miletias 

1802 Harv. James '20, Mr. '21 
1806 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1806 Harv. Alexander H., Mr., and at Yale, 
[LL. D. at Ver. 
1811 Harv. \\Edward, Mr., Tut. & Prof., P. D. 
[at Got., LL. D. at Yale "33 
1813 Dart. Ebenezer 

1815 Harv. Stevens, Mr. 

1818 Harv. John, Mr., Tut. at Trans. 
1821 Bro. Oliver, M. D. at Dart. '24 

1823 Yale — Hovey, M. D. 

1824 Dart. — Alvan, M. D. 
1832 Harv. Oliver C. 

Everts 

1828 Mid. Samuel 

Evertson 
1787 Yale Nicholas 

Ewer 
1777 Dart. Gamaliel 

Ewers 
1820 Wms. Simon C., Mr. 

Ewing 

1819 Yale George W. 

Ewins 
1783 Harv. John 

Eyre 
1718 Harv. John 

Eyres 
1773 Bro. —Thomas, M. D., and at Yale 

Fabens 

1832 Harv. William 

Faber 
1824 Harv. Joseph W., Mr. 
Fabyan 

1833 Bow. —George, M. D. 

Fairbank 
1797 Bro. Drunj, Mr. 



.88 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1810 Dart. Joseph 
Fairbanks ■ 
1775 Bro. Eleazar, Mr. 

1784 Dart. Rufus 
1791 Bro. Elisha, Mr. 

1796 Yale Thaddeus 
1802 Harv. John, Mr. 

Fairchild 
1773 Yale John, Mr. 

1785 Yale Reuben 
1793 Yale Robert 
1813 Yale Joy H., Mr. 
1820 Wms. Edward, Mr. 
1822 Mid. —Joel, M. D. 

1831 Yale —Ezra, Mr. at Amh. 

Fairfield 
1732 Harv. John, Mr. 
1757 Harv. John, Mr. 

1809 Mid. Micaiah 
1825 Dart. Josiah 

Fairservice 
1783 Harv. George 

Fales 
1711 Harv. Timothy, Mr. 
1773 Harv. Samuel, Mr., and at Bro. '90 

1802 Harv. Nathaniel 

1803 Harv. Henry, Mr. 
1806 Harv. William A. 

1810 Harv. Stephen, Mr., and at Bow. '15, 
1820 Bro. Joseph J., M. D. [Tut. at Bow. 
1825 Harv. Samuel B. 

1331 Amh. Dexter 

1832 Bow. Edward G. 

Fancher 
1831 Mid. Bela 

Fanning" 
1757 Yale Edmund, Mr., and at Harv. '64, 
[LL. D. at Oxf., Yale and 
[Dart. 
1769 Yale Phineas, Mr. 
1822 Yale Andrew M. 
1831 Wms. —Nelson, M. D. 

Fanshaw 

1830 Yale William H. M. 

Fargues 

1797 Harv. Thomas 

Farley 

1798 Dart. Abel, Mr. 

1804 Dart. Stephen. Mr. 

1804 Harv. Benjamin M., Mr. '08 

1810 Harv. Joseph S. 

1815 Harv. —Henry W., M. D. 

1816 Harv. George F., Mr. 

1818 Harv. Frederick A., Mr. at Bro. 
1820 Bow. William J., Mr. 

1827 Harv. Charles A. 

1831 Harv. Massillon 

1832 Yale Benjamin F. 

Farmer 

1819 Harv. William, Mr. 

1822 Dart. —John, Mr. 

Farnam 
1827 Amh. Lucian, Mr. 

1833 Wat. Jonathan E. 

Farnham 
1739 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 
1771 Bro. Benjamin, Mr. 
1808 Harv. Timothy 

1811 Harv. John H., Mr. 

1823 Mid. David L., Mr. 
1829 Yale —Bela, M. D. 
1832 Amh. Thomas J. 



Farns worth 
1736 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
f813 Harv. —Amos, M. D. 
1813 Dart. Samuel, Mr., M. D. 
1813 Dart. Benjamin F., Mr. 
1818 Harv. James D., Mr. 
1821 Harv. Ralph, Mr. at Dart. '25 

1821 Mid. —Nathan, M. D. 

1822 Dart. Seth, Mr. 

Farnum 
1761 Harv. John, Mr. 
1800 Bro. Royal 
1822 Bro. Joseph W. 
1829 Bow. —John S., M. D. 

Farr 
1818 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

Farrand 
1724 Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 
1743 Yale Daniel, Mr. 

1777 Yale —Daniel, Mr., A. B. at N. J. '50 
1781 Yale fDaniel 

1798 Yale William P., and at N. J. 1802 
Farrar 

1751 Harv. George, Mr. 
1755 Harv. Stephen, Mr. 
1767 Harv. fTimothy, Mr. 
1767 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1793 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1794 Dart. Humphrey 
1794 Dart. Joseph 

1797 Harv. Samuel, Mr., Tut. 

1800 Dart. George, Mr., M. D. 

1801 Dart. William 

1803 Harv. John, Mr., Tut., Prof. 

1807 Dart. Timothy, Mr. 
1826 Wat. Samuel 
1831 Mid. Ephraiin H. 
1834 Bow. Calvin 
1834 Bow. Luther 

Farrington 
1773 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1775 Bro. Daniel 
1817 Bro. Pardon B. 

Farriss 
1815 Harv. Robert P., Mr. 

Farwell 

1808 Harv. John, Mr. 
1817 Harv. Richard, Mr. 
1829 Mid. Cyrus 

Faulkner 

1797 Harv. William E. 

1802 Harv. Luther, Mr. 

Fawcett 
1792 Bro. — John, Mr., D. D. 1810 
Faxon 

1752 Harv. Azariah, Mr. 
1787 Bro. John 

Fay 

1778 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
1790 Harv. Nahum, Mr., M. B. 
1790 Yale John 

1798 Harv. Samuel P. P., Mr. 
1798 Wms. Joseph D., Mr. 
1800 Wms. Hiram 

1807 Harv. Warren, Mr., D. D. at Dart. '29 
1817 Harv. Edwin, Mr. 
1821 Bro. Eliphaz, Mr. 
1825 Harv. Richard S. 

1825 Yale —Charles M., M. D. 

1826 Bro. Gilbert 

1827 Yale —Jonathan P., M. D. 

1828 Amh. Samuel A. 
1828 Harv. —John O., M. D. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



189 



1829 Harv. Charles, Mr. 

Fayerweather 
1743 Harv. Samuel, Mr. at Oxf. and Camb., 
182G Bro. John A., Mr. [and at Yale '53 
1831 Yale James R. 

Fayette (See Lafayette) 
Fearing 
1776 Yale Benjamin 
fPauJ 
Noah 
Elislia P. 
Henry S., Tut. 
Joseph W,, Mr. 
•David, M. D. 



1785 Harv 
1791 Harv 
1807 Bro. 
1823 Bro. 
1823 Bro. 
1830 Harv. 

Felch 
1758 Yale John 
1819 Bro. —Cheerer, Mr. 
1827 Bow. Alpheus 

Felder 
1804 Yale ||John M. 

1822 Yale Nathaniel F. 

Fellowes 
1810 Bow. Jeremiah 

1826 Amh. Francis, Mr. 

Fellows 
1783 Yale John 
1802 Wms. Henry 
1832 Yale Richard S. 
1832 Wms. —Benjamin F., M. D. 

Felt 
1813 Dart. Joseph B., Mr. 

Felton 
1821 Mid. Nathan B. 

1827 Harv. Cornelius C. Mr., Tut., Prof. 
1834 Harv. Samuel M. 

Fenn 

1725 Yale Benjamin 

1775 Yale Nathan, Mr. 

1790 Yale Stephen, Mr. 

1813 Yale Benjamin 

1815 Yale Elisha R. 

1823 Yale —Horatio N., M. D. 

Fenner 
1789 Bro. James, Mr., Gov. of R. I., Sen 

[in Cong 

Fenton 
1794 Dart. Ashbel 
1799 Dart. Jacob 

Ferguson 
1827 Wms. —Charles R., M. D. 

Fernald 

1824 Bow. —John S., M. D. 

Ferre 
1832 Wms. —Henry, M. D. 
Ferris 

1823 Yale Joshua B. 

1824 Ver. John A. 
1824 Ver. Lynde C. 

Ferry 
1821 Wms. Adolphus, Mr. at Union '26 

Ferson 
1797 Dart. William, Mr. 



Fessenden 



1701 Harv. 
1718 Harv. 
1737 Harv. 
1737 Harv. 
1746 Harv. 
1758 Harv. 
1768 Harv. 
1796 Dart. 



Nicholas, Mr. 
Benjamin, Mr. 
Stephen, Air. 
William, Mr. 
Benjamin 
Thomas, Mr. 
William, Mr. 
Thomas G. 

VOL. Til. 



1798 Bro. 


John, Mr. 


1806 Dart. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1812 Dart. 


Thomas 


1817 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


1818 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


J 81 8 How. 


Joseph P. 


1823 Bow. 


William P. 


1833 Amh. 


Charles B. H. 


1833 Wms. 


Thomas K. 


1834 Bow. 


Samuel C. 


Feveryear 


1751 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


Field 


1732 Yale 


Seth, Mr. 


1745 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1762 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1785 Yale 


Simeon, M. D. 


1792 Dart. 


Joseph, Mr., and at Yale '95 


1795 Dart. 


Bohan P. 


1797 Yale 


Timothy, Mr. 


1798 Wms. 


Martin, Mr. at Dart. 1805 


1799 Wms. 


Levi, Mr. 


1802 Yale 


David D., Mr. 


1807 Wms. 


John 


1807 Yale 


Henry 


1808 Dart. 


Warren A. 


1808 Bro. 


William G. 


1809 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1821 Wms. 


Lucius, Mr. Amh. ; 26 


1821 Bro. 


Barnum, Mr. 


1822 Dart. 


Joseph R. 


1822 Mid. 


Charles K. 


1822 Mid. 


Roswell M. 


1822 Amh. 


Pindar, Mr. '26 


1824 Dart. 


—Seth, M. D. 


1825 Wms. 


Constanline, M. D. 


1827 Bow. 


Charles 


1827 Bow. 


Henry C. 


1830 Wms. 


— Constant, A. B. 


1832 Wms. 


Jonathan E. 


1833 Amh. 


C. Clesson 


1834 A'.nh. 


Thomas P. 


Fields 


1829 Yale 


—Edward, M. D. 


1831 Yale 


— Junius L„ M. D. 


Fifield 


1804 Dart. 


Ebenezer O. 


1822 Mid. 


— Greenleaf, M. D 


Filer 


1666 Harv. 


John 


Fillebrown 


1831 Bow. 


— George, M. D. 


Filley 


1829 Wash. 


Mark L. 


Finch 


1828 Yale 


Sherman 


Finley 


1803 Bro. 


— James E. B., Mr. 


Finn 


1778 Dart. 


Nehemiah 


Finney 


1815 Dart. 


Alfred, Mr. 


1832 Wms. 


Noble H.. M. D. 


Fish 


1719 Harv. 


Thomas 


1728 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1750 Harv. 


Elislia, Mr. 


1760 Yale 


Eliakim. M. D. 


1779 Harv. 


Elisha, Mr. 


1790 Dart. 


Hallouav. Mr. 


1306 Vale 


Henry. M. B. at Dart. "10 


1807 Harv. 


PHitieas, Mr. 


1809 Yale 


Howland 



190 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Fisher 






1818 Harv. 


Robert T. P., Mr., M. D. 




1706 Harv. 
1726 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 
Jeremiah, Mr. 






1819 Harv. 
1825 Harv. 


Thomas 
Augustus H. 




1763 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 






1825 Bro. 


David W. 




1766 Harv. 


Joshua. Mr. 7 M. D. 






1825 Bro. 


George 




1769 Harv. 


Elius, Mr. 






1826 Bro. 


Calvin P., M. D. at Harv. 


'29 


1788 Bro. 


Jabez P., Mr., and at 


Dart. 


1829 Bro. 


Albert W. 




1789 Harv. 


Nathaniel 






1834 Amh. 


David 




1792 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr. 






Fitch 




1799 Wms. 


Samuel, Mr., Tut., D. 


D. 


at N. J. 


1694 Harv. 


Jabez, Mr., Tutor 




1803 Harv. 


Jesse, Mr. at Yale '15 




[1827 


1721 Yale 


*fThomas, Mr., Gov. of Conn. 


1805 Wms. 


William 






1724 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 




1810 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 






1727 Harv. 


John, 31r. 




1812 Ver. 


Abial 






1728 Harv. 


John, Mr. 




1813 Harv. 


Mason 






1729 Yale 


Mason, Mr. 




1813 Yale 


Alexander M., Mr., Tut., 


Prof. 


1742 Yale 


Samuel, Mr., and at Harv 


'66 


1813 Bro. 


George 






1743 Yale 


Eleazar, Mr. 




1816 Bro. 


Lewis W., Mr. 






1746 Yale 


Thomas, Mr. 




1818 Dart. 


—Harvey, M. D. 






1748 Yale 


Jonathan, Mr., and at Harv. '54 


1819 Bro. 


George, Mr. 






1750 Yale 


Perez,. Mr. 




1820 Bro. 


John D. ; and at Mid. 


'21 


M. D. 


1753 Yale 


Jonathan, Mr. 








£ 


t Harv. 


1756 Yale 


Ephraim 




1821 Bro. 


Daniel, Mr., M. D. a 


irv. '24 


1760 Yale 


James, Mr. 




1825 Harv. 


Joshua F., Mr. 






1765 Yale 


Elijah, Mr., and at Harv. 


'70 


1826 Yale 


James C. 






1766 Yale 


Jonathan, Mr. 




1826 Amh. 


Nathaniel W., Mr. 






1777 Yale 


Ebenezer, Mr., Tutor, D. 


D. at 


1828 Amh. 


Ezra 








[Harv. 1800, Pres. of 


Wms. 


1828 Bow. 


Josiah 






1790 Bro. 


John 




1828 Bro. 


Malurin L. 






1798 Wms. 


Thomas 




1831 Amh. 


Nathaniel H. 






1801 Yale 


George, Mr. 




1834 Harv. 


-Nathaniel A., M. D. 






1802 Wms. 


Thomas 




Fisk 






1803 Yale 


John 




1704 Yale 


PJiineas, Mr., Tutor 






1807 Dart. 


Luther, Mr. 




1708 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 






1810 Yale 


Eleazar T., Mr. '17, Prof, 


D.D. 


1721 Harv. 


Shepard, Mr. 








nr • [al 


Penn. 


1743 Yale 


Samuel, Mr., Tutor 






1812 Mid. 


Martin 




1747 Yale 


Benjamin, Mr. 






1815 Wms. 


Mason C. 




1770 Yale 


lehabod E., Mr. 






1818 Wms. 


Charles 




1786 Dart. 


Moses, Mr., and at Yale '93, Tut. 


1825 Mid. 


Cliauncy W., Mr., Prof, at 


Ken. 


1791 Dart. 


John, Mr. 






1826 Mid. 


Ferris 




1798 Dart. 


John B., Mr. 






1827 Wat. 


Thomas 




1302 Dart. 


Moses M. 






1830 Wms. 


— Jared W., M. D. 




1805 Bro. 


Amasa 






1831 Dart. 


—Francis P., M. D. 




1809 Wms. 


Ezra, Mr., & at Yale 


'17 


D. D. 


1831 Harv. 


Jeremiah G. 




1812 Ver. - 


-llJames, Mr. 


[at Ham. 


1834 Wms. 


Chester 




1814 Dart. 


Allen 






Fitts 




1814 Mid. 


Pliny, Mr. 






1826 Amh. 


Harvey 




1815 Bro. 


Wilbur, Mv., D.D., Pres.Wes.U. 


Fitt.z 




1821 Bro. - 


-David, M. D. 






1831 Dart. 


Moses H. 




1824 Harv. 


Benjamin F. 






Fit 7 




1824 Bro. 

1825 Mid. 

1826 Yale 


Charles R. 
Joel, Mr. 
Charles B. 






1813 Dart. 
1822 Dart. 


Daniel 
George, Mr. 




1829 Yale 


William L. 






Fitzgerald 




Fisl 
1662 Harv. 
1702 Harv. 


e 

Moses, Mr. 
John 






1723 Harv. 

Fla 

1725 Harv. 


James, Mr. 
Ebenezer, Mr. 




1754 Harv. 


Nathan, Mr., D. D. 






1761. Harv. 


John, Mr. 




1759 Harv. 


Sumuel', Mr. 






1794 Harv. 


Samuel A., Mr. 




1772 Harv. 


William 






1800 Yale 


Hezekiah 




1774 Harv. 


Abel, Mr. 






1803 Bro. 


Chasdler 




1785 Harv. 


Thaddeus, Mr., D. D. 


at Columb. 


1806 Dart. 


Edmund 




1787 Harv. 


Oliver, Mr., M. D. 






1811 Yale 


Henry C. 




1793 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 






1315 Harv. 


—Josiah F., M. D. 




1795 Bro. 


Elisha, Mr., Tut. 






1816 Harv. 


John, Mr. 




1798 Harv. 


Isaac, Mr. 






1820 Harv. 


Charles 




1801 Harv. 
1803 Bro. 


Timothy- 
Philip M. 
Charles, Mr. 






1823 Bow. 
1825 Amh. 


— Melzar, M. D. 
Horatio 




1805 Harv. 






Fla 


nders 




1808 Bro. 


Josiah J., Mr. 






1308 Harv. 


Charles 




1812 Bro. 


Isaac 






1828 Bow. 


—David, M. D. 




1815 Harv. 


John M., Mr. 






1831 Dart. 


Waiter P. 




1816 Harv. 


Luke, Mr. 






1832 Dart. 


—Thomas, M. D. 




1817 Dart. 


Nathan W., Air , Tutor, Prof, at 


Fleet 




1818 Bro. 


Elias 




[Amh. 


1785 Harv. 


John, Mr., M. D. 





1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



im 



Fleming 
1802 Harv. —Thomas, D. D. 

Flemming 

1825 Yale William, '29 

Fletcher 

1735 Harv. Oliver, Mr. 

1769 Harv. Elijah, Mr. 

17 ( J3 Harv. Nathaniel II., Mr. 

1806 Dan. Richard 

1808 Dart. Isaac, Mr., and at Ver. '25 

1810 Vcr. Elijah 

1810 Dart. Samuel, Mr. 

1814 Dart. Oliver, Mr. 

1815 Dart. John 

1823 Harv. Levi 

1824 Yale Samuel II. 

1824 Dart. Thomas G. 

1825 Dart. Mark W. 
1825 Mid. —Thomas, Mr. 

1830 Bow. —Franklin P., M. D. 

Feury-de-la-Gorgendiere 

1831 Wms. Oliver, M. D. 

Flint 
1773 Yale Royal, Mr., and at Harv. '86 
1785 Yale Abel, Mr., and at Bro. '88, Tut. 
[at Bro.. D. D. at Union 1818 
1794 Harv. Jacob, Mr.' 
1798 Dart. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1800 Harv. Timothy 

1802 Harv. Jacob, Mr., D. D. 

1811 Mid. Jeremiah 
1814 Harv. Waldo, Mr. 

1820 Harv. Joshua B., Mr., M. D. 

1820 Ver. Samuel 

1821 Dart. Abner 
1825 Harv. —John, M. D. 
1825 Harv. —Joseph, M. D. 
1825 Harv. —Austin, M. D. 

1825 Wms. —Horatio N., M. D. 
1831 Amh. Kendall 

Floyd 
1814 Yale Augustus 

1822 Yale — Richard, M. D. 

Flucker 

1773 Harv. Thomas 

Flynt 
1664 Harv. Josiah, Mr. 
1693 Harv. Henry, Mr., Tutor 
1733 Harv. Ephraim, Mr. 
1780 Harv. Abel 

Fobes 

1762 Harv. Perez, Mr., LL. D. at Bro. '90, 

1803 Bro. —Nathan. Mr. [Prof, at Bro. 

1804 Bro. Seth 
1830 Amh. Ephraim 

Fogg 

1730 Harv. Jeremiah, Mr. 

1764 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

1768 Harv. Jeremiah, Mr. 

1774 Harv. William, Mr. 

1823 Bow. —James, M. D. 
1829 Bow. —Jonathan, M. D. 

Follansbee 

1826 Dart. —William, M. D. 

Follet 
1810 Ver. Timothy 
1825 Mid. Walter, Mr. 

Folsom 
1796 Dart. Peter, Mr. 
1813 Harv. Charles, Mr., Tutor 
1820 Dart. Charles L. 

1824 Harv. —Thomas O. M. D, 
1822 Harv. George, Mr. 



| 1825 Bow. —David, M. D. 
1828 Dart. Nathaniel ,S\, Prof, at Hud. 

Folwell 
1792 Bro. William W., Mr. 

Foord 
1823 Dart. — Alvin, M. D. 
1826 Dart. — Sylvester, M. D. 
1833 Dart. —James W., M. D. 

Foot 
1765 Yale John, Mr. 
1778 Dart. Durid, Mr. 
1787 Yale Joseph, M. D. 

1790 Yale John A. 

1791 Vale Enos 
1797 Yale William L. 

1797 Yale ||*Samuel A., LL. D. 1834, Gov. 

[of Conn., Sen. in Cong. 

1798 Dart. Alvan, Mr. 

1799 Dart. Lorenzo 
1805 Yale Ziba 

1815 Mid. Lucius C, Mr. 

1816 Yale —Lyman, M. D. 

1820 Yale Jared, Mr. 

1821 Mid. John, Mr. 
1823 Yale John A. 

1826 Mid. Solomon, Mr. 

1828 Bro. —Joseph I, Mr., A. B. at Union '21 
1331 Wms. John B. 

Foote 
1811 Yale Jonathan 
1811 Mid. Calvin 

1816 Yale William II., Mr. 
1818 Ver. Luman 

1820 Yale Horatio 

1821 Bow. — Erastus, Mr. 

1827 Wms. Asahel. Mr. 

1832 Yale William C. 

Forbes 
1751 Harv. Eli, Mr., D. D. 
1787 Harv. John M., Mr. 
1790 Dart. David 
1815 Bro. Charles E. 
1820 Wms. Abner 
1825 Bro. Thomas J. 

1827 Bow. —Daniel, M. D, 

1833 Amh. Franklin 

Forbus 
1811 Yale Alexander, Mr. 
Forbush 

1828 Amh. John 

1829 Amh. Charles 

Force 

1813 Bro. Ebenezer 

Ford 

1768 Yale John 
1798 Wms. Simeon 

1802 Yale , Thomas 

1803 Yale llenrv, Mr. 

1814 Bro. James, Mr. 

1822 Mid. —Frederick. M. D. 
1825 Bow. —Samuel, M. D. 
1825 Wms. Zelotus, M, D. 
1825 Yale Seabury 

Fordharn 
1658 Harv. Jonas 

Forrester 
1801 Harv. John, Mr. 
1803 Harv. Simon 
1813 Harv. Charles 

Forsaith 
1807 Dart. Josiah 

Foisvth 
1832 Amh. * William W 



192 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Fortier 

1830 Bow. — Octavius C., M. D. 

Forward 
1754 "Yale Justus, Mr. 
1768 Yale Abel, Mr. 

Fosdick 
1746 Yale Thomas, Mr. 
1779 Harv. Nathaniel F. 
1803 Dart. John M. 

1831 Amh. David, Jr. 

Foss 
1833 Bow. —Simeon, M. D. 

Foster 
1667 Harv. John 
1671 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 
1739 Yale —Isaac, Mr. 

1744 Harv. JJedidiah, Mr. 

1745 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1752 Harv. William, Mr. 
1754 Harv. Jacob, Mr. 
1756 Harv. \\Abiel, Mr. 
1758 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 

1770 Bro. Theodore, Mr., <fc at Dart. '86, 
1773 Bro. —Henry, Mr. [Sen. in Cong. 

1773 Dart. Emerson, Mr. 

1774 Bro. Dwjght, Mr., & at Harv. '84, 

[Sen. in Cong-. 
1774 Yale Benjamin, Mr., and at Bro. '86, 
[D. D. at Bro. '92 
1774 Yale —Dan, Mr., and at Dart. '74 

1776 Yale Isaac. Mr., and at Dart. '78 

1777 Dart. Daniel, Mr., and at Harv. '85 

1777 Dart. Joel, Mr. ' 

1778 Yale Edmund, Mr., and at Harv. '84 
1783 Dart. John, Mr., & at Harv. '87, D D. 
1787 Harv. Bossenger, Mr. [at Harv. 1817 

1798 Bro. Theodore D., Mr. 

1799 Harv. Freeman 

1800 Harv. Andrew, Mr., M. D. at Penn. 
1800 Bro. Theodore A., Mr. 

1800 Wms. Festus, Mr. 
1802 Yale Eleazar 
1802 Harv. John 

1805 Harv. Thomas, Mr., M. D. at Penn. 

1806 Harv. James 
1809 Mid. Benjamin 
1811 Ver. Luke B. 
1811 Bro. George 
1813 Harv. John 

1819 Harv. Alfred D., Mr. 

1821 Dart. Stephen, Prof. E. Ten. 

1821 Dart. —John H., M. D. - 

1822 Dart. Aaron, Mr. 
1822 Dart. Asa E., Mr. 

1822 Dart. Amos 

1823 Dart. Abiel 

1823 Wat. Elijah, Tutor 

1824 Wms. —Jeremiah, M. D. 

1825 Bow. David H. 
1825 Harv. Charles P. 
1825 Ver. —Jesse H., M. D. 
1828 Yale Lemuel 

1828 Dart. Isaac 
1828 Wat. Charles 

1828 Bro. Lafayette S. 

1829 Amh. Benjamin F. 

1829 Harv. William E., Mr., M. D. 

1830 Harv. George J. 

1831 Bow. —Silas P., M. D. 
1831 Yale Lewis 

1831 Amh. —Galen 

1833 Harv. Andrew 

1834 Yale Eleazar K. 
1834 Amh. John P. 

1834 Dart. — Nahum P., M. D. 



1834 Wms. John 

Forsyth 
1834 Harv. —James B., M. D. 

Foulke 
1827 Yale —John B., Columb. Mr. 

Fowle 

1731 Harv. James, Mr. 

1732 Harv. John, Mr. 
1747 Harv. John, Mr. 
1765 Harv. William, Mr. 
1776 Harv. Ebenezer S., Mr. 
1786 Harv. Robert 

1811 Dart. Jonathan, Mr. 
1826 Harv. William H., Mr. 

Fowler 
1743 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
1753 Yale Amos, Mr. 
1768 Yale Samuel, Mr. 
1773 Yale Bildad 
1775 Yale Abraham, Mr. 

1779 Yale Stephen, Mr. 

1780 Yale William 

1783 Yale Andrew, Mr. 

1784 Yale Saul 
1790 Yale John H. 

1796 Yale Bancroft, Mr., & at Wms. 1800, 
[& at Mid. 1805, Tut. at Yale 
[& Mid., & Prof, at Bangor 

1804 Wms. Edward 

1806 Yale Royal, M. D. at Wms. '26 

1807 Yale James, Mr. 
1813 Yale John D., Mr. 

1815 Yale Orin, Mr. 

1816 Yale William C, Mr., Tut., Prof, at 

1817 Yale Joseph, Mr. [Mid. 

1818 Yale —Warren K., M. D. 
1822 Yale Joseph R. 

1826 Bow. —Benjamin, M. D. 

1833 Dart. Asa 

1834 Yale Joseph 
1834 Amh. Orson S. 

1834 Wms. —Edmund, M. D. 

Fowles 
1831 Yale James H. 

Fox 
1665 Harv. Jabez, Mr. 
1698 Harv. John, Mr. 
1727 Harv. Jabez, Mr. 
1801 Harv. Abel, Mr., M. D. 

1806 Bro. William 

1807 Dart. Abraham S. 
1809 Bro. Jabez 

1813 Dart. Charles, Mr., and at Harv. '25 

1816 Yale James A., Mr. 

1818 Dart. Joseph 

1822 Harv. George, Mr. 

1828 Harv. Thomas B., Mr. 

1831 Dart. James C. 

1831 Amh. JohnL. 

1834 Harv. Edward 

Foxcroft 
1712 Harv. Francis, Mr. 
1714 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1746 Harv. Daniel. Mr. 
1754 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1758 Harv. John, Mr. 
1764 Harv. Francis, Mr. 
1807 Harv. John, Mr. 
1329 Harv. Francis A., Mr. 

Foye 
1735 Harv. William, Mr. 

Francis 
1792 Bro. —John, Mr. 
1792 Bro. —Benjamin, Mr. 






1835. 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



]93 



1808 P>ro. John B. 

1809 Dart. John, Mr. ■ 
1815 Harv. Corners, Mr. 
1819 Mid. Amzi, Mr. 

1822 Bro. — Henrv, M. D. 
182G Yale James H. 
1826 Wins. George W. 

Franklin 
1753 Harv.— PBenjamhi, Mr., & at Yale '53, & 
[at Wins. & Mary '56, LL.D. 
[at Oxf. and at St. Andrews, 
[Gov. of Penn. 
1826 Yale Sidney S. 
1828 Yale Thomas E. 

Frary 

1831 Amh. Jesse L. 

Frazer 

1823 Wms. —Alexander G., Mr. 

Frazier 
1784 Harv. Nathan, Mr. 

Freeland 
1826 Wms. —Chester J., M. D. 

Freeman 
1725 Harv. Samuel 
1729 Harv. Enoch, Mr. 
1733 Harv. Edmund, Mr. 
1767 Harv. Edmund. Mr. 

1777 Harv. James, Mr.. & at Bow. '90, D. D. 

1778 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. [at Harv. 

1786 Bro. Edmund 

1787 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

1795 Dart. — ||Jonalhan, Mr. 

1796 Dart. Peyton R., Mr. 

1797 Dart. James O., Mr. 
1800 Harv. Samuel D , Mr. 

1804 Harv. William, Mr. 

1805 Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 
1810 Dart. Asa, Mr. 
1812 Bow. Charles, Mr. 

1812 Bow. George 

1813 Dart. —Samuel, M. D. 

1820 Ver. Silas C. 
1822 Dart. George, Mr. 

1826 Wms. Daniel 

1827 Wat. Enoch W. 

1834 Dart. —Nathaniel, Jr., M. D. 

Freese 
1831 Harv. Henry F., '32 

French 
1748 Harv. Samuel 
1771 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
1781 Harv. Peter, Mr. 

1798 Harv. Ralph H. 
1798 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1812 Dart. Benjamin F. 

1813 Ver. David 

1814 Bro. Ansel, Mr. 

1817 Mid. Justus W., Mr., Tut. 

1821 Yale —Lewis, M. D. 

1824 Dart. Ebenezer 

1825 Bro. —Levi, Mr. 

1827 Yale Stiles 

1828 Dart. Eli, Mr. 

1829 Dart. —John, M. D. 

1831 Wms. James M'K. 

1832 Wash. John W. 
1834 Wms. Ozro 

1831 Yale —Andrew, M. D. 
1834 Yale Henry S. G. 

Friend 
1779 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

Fnese 
1831 Harv. Henry F. 



Prink 

1722 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1758 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1802 Dart. John 
1824 Harv. — Cyrus. M. I). 
L834 Bow. John N., Mr. 

Frisbie 
1722 Yale Josiah, Mr. 
1771 Dart. Levi, Mr. 
1778 Yale Jonathan 
1802 Harv. Levi, Mr., Tut. and Prof. 
1822 Vale James VV. 
1824 Wms. —William S., M. D. 

Frisby 
1832 Yale James E. 

Frissell 
1820 Wms. Mason, Mr. 
1831 Wms. John, Mr. 

Frizell 
1724 Harv. John, Mr. 

Frost 

1729 Harv. Simon, Mr. 

1730 Harv. Charles, Mr. 

1739 Harv. Stephen, Mr. 

1740 Harv. Amariah, Mr. 
1767 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1770 Harv. Amariah, Mr. 
1793 Harv. Joshua 

1802 Yale Hezekiah 

1804 Yale Henry 

1804 Bro. El i as, Mr., M. D. '24 

1806 Mid. John, Mr. 

1808 Bro. Daniel 

1813 Yale Thomas D. 

1820 Mid. Edmund, Mr. 

1822 Bow. —George, M. D. 

1822 Harv. Edward, Mr., M. D. 

1822 Harv. John, Mr. 

1826 Bow. Obadiah E. 

1830 Bow. —Moses, M. D. 

1830 Harv. Barzillai 
Frothingham 

1771 Harv. John, Mr. 
1799 Harv. William, Mr. 
1811 Harv. Nathaniel L., Mr. 



Frye 



1723 Harv. Jonathan 

1744 Harv. Peter, Mr. 

1761 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
1804 Harv. George W.. Mr. 
1819 Harv. Oliver 

1821 Harv. Enoch 

Fuller 

1721 Yale Daniel, Mr. 

1758 Yale Caleb, Mr. 

1760 Harv. Timothy, Mr. 

1762 Yale Daniel, Mr. 
1762 Yale Oliver 

1764 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

1765 Harv. Andrew, Mr. 
1773 Bro. — Benjamin, Mr. 
1775 Dart. — John, Mr. 

1782 Yale Israel 

1783 Yale Jonathan 

1786 Dart. Stephen, Mr. 

1787 Harv. Timothy 

1791 Dart. Samuel, Mr., and at Wms. 1805 

1796 Bro. —Andrew, Mr., D. D. at Yale and 

1798 Yale Daniel [N. J. 

1801 Dart. Henry W.. Mr. 

1801 Harv. ||Timothy, Mr. 

1808 Yale Daniel 

1S11 Harv. Henry H., Mr. 

1812 Mid. Henry 



194 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1813 Harv. William W.. Mr. 
1815 Harv. Elisha, Mr. 
1817 Mid. Uriel 

1820 Dart. —James M., M. D. 

1822 Bro. —Jacob, M. D. 

1823 Yale — Josiah, M. D. 

1823 Yale —Silas, M. D. 

1824 Bow. —Simeon, M. D. 

1824 Amh. Elisha L. 

1825 Yale William, Mr. 

1826 Yale —Warren A., M. D. 
1826 Wms. Edward C. ; Mr. 

1826 Wms. David T. 

1827 Bow. — Archelaus P., M. D. 

1827 Mid. Joseph 

1828 Bow. Henry W., Mr. 
1828 Amh. Edward J. 
1828 Yale — Jared, M. D. 
1831 Yale —Daniel, M. D. 

1833 Bow. Ezra B. 

1834 Harv. Eugene 

Fullerton 
1796 Dart. Walter, Mr. 

1821 Dart. Thomas S. 

1821 Mid. Henry IN.. Mr. 

1824 Mid. Nathaniel A. 

Fulton 
1775 Bro. James 

1825 Yale William M., Mr. 

Furber 

1830 Amh. Thomas L. 

1831 Harv. Frederick 
1834 Yale Isaiah 

Furbush 
1325 Harv. James 

Furman 
1792 Bro. —Richard, Mr.. D. D. 1800 
1799 Bro. Wood, Mr. 
1834 Bro.' —Samuel, Mr., Prof, at Theol. Ins. 

[S. C. 

Furness 
1820 Harv. William H., Mr. 

Fyler 
1830 Yale —John, Mr. 

Gadsden 
1804 Yale Christopher E., D. D. at S. C. 
1804 Yale John, Mr. 
1806 Yale James, Mr. 
1818 Harv. Thomas 
1320 Yale Philip 

Gage 

1798 Dart. Samuel 
1815 Harv. —Moses, M. D. 

1822 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr., Tutor 

1827 Bow. Franklin, M. D. 

1828 Bow. —Thomas E., M. D. 

1828 Amh. William 

Gager 
1721 Harv. William, Mr. 

Gair 
1777 Bro. Thomas, Mr. 

Galatty 

1829 Yale Stephen 

1830 Yale Pantoleon 

Gale 
1733 Yale Benjamin, Mr. 
1783 Yale Benjamin 
1810 Harv. William, Mr. 

1822 Dart. Wakefield, Mr. 

1823 Bro. —Ezra B., M. D. 

1824 Bro. — Amory, M. D. 

1826 Yale Charles C. P. 
1829 Bow. —Stephen, M. D. 



1830 Dart. 


—Amos G. ; M. D. 


1830 Dart. 


—Israel N., M. D. 


1833 Dart. 


Jacob 


1833 Bow. 


—John, M. D. 


Gallaudet 


1805 Yale 


Thomas H, Mr., Tutor 


1815 Yale 


William E. 


Gallison 


1774 Harv. 


William 


1778 Harv. 


Henry 


1818 Harv. 


—John, Mr. 


Gallup 


1787 Dart. 


Oliver, Mr. 


1798 Dart. 


—Joseph A., M. B., M. D. '14, Mr. 




[at Mid. '23 


1304 Dart. 


Elias, Mr. at Yale '07 


1823 Yale 


Nathan 


1827 Yale 


Joseph H. 


1828 Dart. 


George G. 


1833 Wms. 


—John C, M. D. 


1834 Dart. 


—William, M. D. 


Galpine 


1715 Harv. 


Calvin, Mr. 


Galusha 


1794 Dart. 


Gershom 


1820 Bro. 


—Elon, Mr. 


Gamage 


1767 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1802 Harv. 


William, Mr., M. D. 


Gambling; 


1702 Harv. 


fBenjamin, Mr. 


1734 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


Gammel 


1817 Bro. 


—William, Mr. 


Gannett 


1763 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr. 


1763 Harv. 


Caleb, Mr., Tutor 


1785 Harv. 


||Barzillai 


1802 Harv. 


John M., Mr., and at Yale 


1809 Harv. 


Thomas B., Mr., and at Yale 


1820 Harv. 


Ezra S., Mr., and at Yale 


1826 Dart. 


Allen 


Gano 


1776 Bro. 


Daniel 


1800 Bro. 


—Stephen, Mr., M. D. 


Garcelon 


1823 Bow. 


—Daniel, M. D. 


1830 Bow. 


—Seward, M. D. 


Gardiner 


1736 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1736 Yale 


David, Mr. 


1759 Yale 


David, Mr., and at N. J. 


1791 Harv. 


—John, Glas. Mr. 


1795 Yale 


Jonathan 


1801 Harv. 


Robert H., Mr. 


1803 Harv. 


—John S. J. Mr., D. D. at Penn. 


1804 Yale 


David 


1804 Yale 


John 


1807 Yale 


Robert S. 


1809 Wms. 


Samuel S. 


1816 Harv. 


William H., Mr. 


1824 Yale 


David J., Mr. 


1830 Harv. 


Robert H. 


Gardner 


1696 Harv. 


Andrew, Mr. 


1707 Harv. 


Joshua, Mr. 


1711 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1712 Harv. 


Andrew , Mr. 


1715 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1723 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1732 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1732 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1739 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 



J 



1835. 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



195 



1746 
1747 
1750 
1755 
1759 
1702 
1765 
1786 
1786 
1788 
1793 
1797 
1798 
1799 
1802 
1802 
1803 
1805 
1807 
1810 
1811 
1813 
1815 
1816 
1821 
1822 
1824 
1831 
1832 
1833 
1834 

1828 

1816 

1757 

1782 

1803 
1831 

1820 

1795 

1826 

1779 
1779 
1802 
1804 
1807 
1814 
1823 

1714 

1737 
1740 
1759 
1760 
1775 
1787 
1789 
1789 
1805 
1810 
1814 
1816 
1817 
1823 

1730 
1739 



Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

llarv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Bro. 

Bro. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Dart. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Wms. 

Bro. 

Harv. 



Samuel, Mr. 
Isaac, Mr. 
Henry, Mr. 
Francis, M r. 
Samuel 
George, Mr. 
Henry, Mr. 
Elisha, Mr. 
Samuel P., Mr 
James, Mr., M. 
|| Francis, Mr. 
Henry, Mr. 
Henry, Mr., M. D 
Aaron 
Malbone 
Joseph, Mr. 
Abner, Mr. 
Isaac S.,Mr. 
— Samuel J., Mr. 



1). 



John, Mr., M. D. 

Thomas C. 

John F., Mr., M. D. 

William F. 

Richard, Mr. 

John L., Mr. 

Silas 

■Johnson, M. D. 

Francis 
Wms. —George W. ; M. D. 
Yale Robert D. 
Harv. Miles T. 

Garland 
Dart. Edmund 

Garfield 
Yale John M., Mr. at W^ash. '27 

Garnsey 
Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 
Yale Lemuel 
Garvin 

Dart. Isaac, Mr. 
Amh. James, Jr. 

Gary 
Bro. George 

Gassett 
Harv. Henry, Mr., and at Bro. 1801 

Gaston 
Harv.— HWilliam, LL. D., A. B. IN J. 1796 

Gates 
Harv. — Horatio, LL. D. 
Harv. — Robert 
Harv. Isaac 
Wms. Aaron 
Ira 

Elijah 
Samuel, M. D. 



Wms. 
Harv. 
Dart. - 
Gay 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Yale 
Harv. 
llarv. 
Yale 
Yale 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Vale 
Harv. - 



Ebenezer, Mr., D. D. 

Ebenezer, Mr., D. D. 

Samuel 

Fisher, Mr. 

Bunker, Mr. . 

Samuel, Mr. 

Ebenezer, Mr., Tutor 

William, Mr. 

Ebenezer, Mr. 

Samuel, Mr. 

George, Mr. 

Ebenezer, Mr. 

Robert H., Mr. - 

William C., Mr. 

Martin, M. D. 
Gaylord 
Yale William, Mr. 
Yale Alexander 



1774 Yale 


Nathaniel 




1804 Wms. 


A sal ad 




1816 Wms. 


Flavel ft, Mr. 




1826 Yale 


Samuel 




1834 Yale 


Reuben 




Gee 






1717 Harv. 


Joshua, Mr. 




1722 Harv. 


Ebenezer 




1744 Harv. 


Joshua, Mr. 




Geer 




1757 Yale 


Amos 




1763 Yale 


Robert 




Gel. 


ston 




1791 Yale 


Mult by, Mr. 




1827 Yale 


Mallbij, Mr. 




George 




1762 Yale 


William C., and 


at Columb. 


1797 Bro. 


Richard, Mr. 




1819 Dart. ■ 


—Austin, M. D. 




1830 Bro. 


Nathan 




Gerardus 




1779 Yale - 


—Conrad A., LL. 


D. 


Gere 




1818 Yale 


Edward 




1827 Yale 


William, Mr. 




Gerrish 




1669 Harv. 


Joseph 




1700 Harv. 


Joseph 




1730 Harv. 


Robert E., Mr. 




1733 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 




1733 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 




1752 Harv. 


Joseph 




1762 Harv. 


Moses 




1793 Dart. 


Samuel, Mr. 




1797 Dart. 


Joseph 




1812 Harv. 


Francis, Mr., M 


D. at Dart. ; 15 


Gerry 




1762 Harv. 


*Elbridge, Mr. 


,LL.D.,Gov.of 




[Mass., Vice Fres. of U. S. 


1813 Harv. 


Elbridge, Mr. 




1814 Harv. 


Thomas R., Mr. 




Gey 


er 




1794 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr. 




1813 Harv. 


Frederick W. 




Gibaut 




1786 Harv. 


John, Mr. 




Gibbes 




1812 Harv. 


Allston, Mr., Tutor 


1813 Harv. 


Washington 




Gibbins 




1706 Harv. 


John, Mr. 




1740 Harv. 


John, Mr. 




Gibbons 




1832 Amh. 


Lyman 




Gibbs 




1685 Harv. 


Henry, Mr. 




1726 Harv. 


Henry, Mr. 




1734 Harv. 


Wilham, Mr. 




1750 Harv. 


Robert 




1766 Harv. 


Henry, Mr. 




1800 Bro. 


—George, Mr., and at Yale '08 


1808 Yale 


Henry W., Mr. 




1809 Yale 


Josiah W., Mr., 


& at Harv. 'IS. 


1814 Yale 


Henry [Tutor 


<fc Prof, at Vale 


1832 Harv. 


William P. 




1832 Wms. 


George C. 




Gibson 




1719 Harv. 


Benjamin, Mr. 




1730 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 




1804 Mid. 


James B. 




1808 Yale 


William 




1812 Yale 


Robert 





196 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Giddinr/e 


1827 Bro. 


Charles 


1823 Bow. 


George P. 
dings 


1831 Bow. 


—Noah, M. D. 


Gid 


1833 Dart. 
Gil 


— Sumner, M. D. 


1811 Wms. 


Salmon, Mr., Tutor 


more 


1833 Wat. 


Rockwood 


1774 Dart. 


— George, Mr. 


nilhoTt 


1797 Harv. 


Robert 


1759 Yale 
1775 Dart. 
1778 Yale 
1783 Yale 
1786 Yale 
1796 Dart. 


►Samuel, Mr. 

||Sylvester ; Mr., and at Yale '88 
j|Ezekiel 

Hezekiah 

Benjamin J., Mr., and at Dart. 

Daniel, Mr. 


1800 Bro. 
1805 Bro. 
1805 Bro. 
1828 Bow. 
1828 Harv. 
1834 Yale 
Gil 


Jonathan, Mr. 
David 
Melvin 
—Henry, M. D. 
Robert 
James 


1797 Harv. 


David 


mour 


1800 Yale 


James 


1805 Yale 


John McK. 


1801 Dart. 


Charles 


Gilpin 


1812 Bro. 


Ralph, Mr. 


1829 Wash. 


William 


1817 Yale 


Charles C. 


1831 Wash. 


John B. 


1818 Yale 


Joseph M. 


Gitchell 


1822 Yale 


—George A., M. D. 


1826 Wat. 


George C. 

asnn 


1824 Mid. 


Lijman, Mr. 


Gle 


1825 Yale —Theodore, M. D. 

1826 Yale Arad, Mr. 
1826 Yale Hollister B. 
1826 Wms. Washington, Mr. 
1829 Yale Edwin R. 

1829 Yale Matthew J. 

Gilchrist 
1828 Harv. John J. 

Gildersleeve 
1814 Mid. Benjamin, Mr. 
1820 Mid. Thomas, M. D. 
1820 Wms. William 

Gile 
1804 Dart. Samuel, Mr. 

Giles 


1738 Harv. Charles, Mr. 
1802 Bro. Benjamin, Mr. 
1828 Wms. Horatio 

1828 Yale Henry, Mr. '32 
1834 Harv. Zebina 

Gleren 
1798 Wms. Levi, Mr. 

Glidden 
1815 Dart. Elisha 

1829 Dart. Joseph M. 
1831 Wat. Samuel 

Glover 

1650 Harv. John, M. D. at Aberd. 

1651 Harv. John, Mr. 


1723 Harv. 


Nathaniel 


1763 Yale 


William 


1781 Harv. 


Benjamin S. 


1829 Harv. 


Joel, Tutor 


1808 Bro. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1831 Harv. 


John 


1816 Yale 


Abie) B., Mr. 


Gil] 




1824 Harv. 


Lewis 


1725 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr. 


1825 Wat. 


Willard, Mr. 


1771 Harv. 


John 


1825 Yale 


— John, Mr., and at Columb. 


1784 Harv. 


Moses, Mr. 


1826 Yale 


Samuel, Ham. 


1805 Harv. 


Moses, Mr. 


1832 Harv. 


Lewis J. 


1832 Wins. 


—Samuel, M. D. 


- Glynn 


Gillet 


1828 Wash. 


— James, Mr. 


1758 Yale 


John, Mr. 


Go 


ddard 


1770 Yale 


Alexander, Mr. 


1731 Harv. 


David, Mr. 


1787 Dart. 


Daniel O., Mr. at Wms. & N. J. 


1761 Harv. 


William, Mr. 
Edivard 


1791 Dart. 


Eliphalet, Mr., D. D. at Ver. 


1764 Harv. 


1798 Wms. 


Nathan, Mr. 


1770 Harv. 


Nathan, Mr., and at Dart. "80 


1802 Dart. 


Jacob, Mr. 


1777 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1804 Yale 


Moses 


1786 Dart. 


lltCalvin 
William G., Mr., Prof. 


1804 Wms. 


Timothy P., Mr., Tut. 


1812 Bro. 


1815 Mid. 


Alfred 


1812 Harv. 


Francis E., Mr. 


1820 Dart. 


—Jasper, M. D. 


1814 Yale 


Charles B., Mr. 


1829 Yale 


Francis 


1815 Harv. 


William, Mr., M. D. 


1829 Yale 


Horatio C, M. D. 


1815 Wms. 


Charles, and at Yale 


Gillpatrick 


1816 Wms. 


Joseph B. 


1834 Dart. 


-Rufus, M. D. 


1818 Harv. 


Warren, Mr. 


Gilinan 


1820 Yale 


George C. 


1724 Harv. 
1746 Harv. 
1757 Harv. 
1791 Dart. 


Nicholas, Mr. 
Nathaniel, Mr. 
Tristram, Mr. 
Allen, Mr. 


1822 Harv. 
1826 Yale 
1828 Yale 
1828 Wash. 
1831 Harv. 
1831 Harv. 
1833 Yale 
1833 Bow. 


George A., Mr. 
Charles, Mr. 
Levi H., Mr. 
Paul B. 
Benjamin 
Nathaniel 
John C. 
John 


1794 Dart.- 
1796 Dart. 
1800 Dart. 
1811 Harv. 


-||*John T., Mr., LL. D , Gov. of 
John T., Mr. [N. H. 
Tristram 
Samuel, Mr., Tut. 


1813 Bro. 


Benjamin I., Mr. 


Godding 


1814 Ver. 


Constantine 


1825 Bow. 


—Alva, M. D. 


1818 Harv. 


Joseph 


Go 


dfrey 


1819 Harv. 


Samuel T. 


1793 Bro. 


Jones, Mr. 


1826 Bow. 


John T., M. D. 


1802 Bro. 


John, Mr. 






1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



197 



Goffe 


1690 Harv. 


Edmund, Mr. 


1791 Dart. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1826 A mh. 


Joseph, and at Harv. 


Going 


1309 Bro. 


Jonathan, Mr.. & at Ver.T2, D.D. 


Gold 


1719 Harv. 


Hezekiah, Mr. 


1778 Yale 


Thomas, Mr. 


1786 Yale 


||Thomas It. 


1806 Yale 


Thomas It. 


1806 Wms. 


Thomas A., Mr. 


1834 Yale 


J. Swift 


Goldsborouorh 


1827 Wash. 


Samuel C. 


Goldsbury 


1820 Bro. 


John, Mr. 


Goldsmith 


1760 Yale 


Benjamin, Mr. 


1833 Bow. 


Alfred . 


Gooch 


1720 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1747 Harv. 


Joseph 


1823 Bow. 


James 


1825 Bow. 


—William B., M. D. 


Goodale 


1759 Harv. 


Nathan, Mr. 


1834 Amh. 


Montgomery S. 


Goodall 


1777 Dart. 


David, Mr. 


Goode 


1822 Mid. 


Hamilton 


Goodell 


1761 Yale 


Jesse, Mr. 


1810 Mid. 


William, Mr., Tutor 


1817 Dart. 


William, Mr. 


1829 Amh. 


Abner 


Goodenow 


1774 Harv. 


Asahel, Mr. 


1820 Bow. 


— Daniel, Mr. 


Goodhue 


1699 Harv. 


Francis, Mr. 


1755 Harv. 


Josiah 


1764 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1766 Harv. 


Ben jamin, Mr., &s at Yale 1804, 


1769 Harv. 


William, Mr. [Sen. in Cong. 


1792 Dart. 


Samuel B. 


1800 Dart. 


—Josiah, M. B., M. D. '08 


1818 Yale 


—William S.. M. D., A. B. at Union 


1821 Mid. 


Josiah F, Mr., Tut. ['16 


1829 Yale 


—Josiah C, M. D. 


1831 Amh. 


John N. 


1833 Amh. 


James M. 


Goodloe 


1831 Yale 


David S. 


Goodman 


1811 Wms. 


Horatio H. 


1816 Dart. 


Fpaphras 


1830 Wash. 


Edward 


Goodrich 


1752 Yale 


Elizur, Mr., Tut., D. D. at N. J. 




['S3 


1776 Yale 


HChauncy, Mr., Tut., Lt. Gov. of 


1778 Yale 


John. Mr. [Conn., SeH. in Cong. 


1779 Yale 


||Elizur, Mr., Tut., Prof. 


1783 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1784 Yale 


Elihu C, Mr. 


1785 Yale 


Russell, Mr. 


1735 Yale 


Hezekiah, Mr. 


1786 Yale 


Charles A. 


1788 Yale 


Hezekiah 


1797 Yale 


Charles 




VOL. VII. 



1806 
1806 
1810 
1812 

L814 

1821 
1822 

1827 
1828 
1828 

1831- 

1726 
1764 

1724 
1724 
1322 
1826 

1820 
1820 

1725 
1761 
1778 
1805 
1806 
1807 
1807 
1309 
1811 
1811 
1821 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1824 
1825 
1826 
1830 
1832 
1832 
1333 

1817 
1824 

1669 
1675 
1703 
1731 
1830 

1762 
1772 
1779 
1779 
1786 
1788 
1795 
1806 
1811 
1817 
1818 
1824 
182,3 
1826 
1829 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1832 
1834 



Dart. Sowall 

Wins. Elizur, and at Yale 

Yale Chauncij A., Mr., Tut., Prof. 

Yale Charles A. 

Yale Horatio, Mr. 

Yale Joseph 

Dart. Charles B., Mr. 

Wms. — Charles S., M. D. 

Wms. —Drew, M. D. 

Mid. John 

Wms. — Osman D., M. D. 

Goodridge 
Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
Harv. Seirall, Mr. 

Goodsell 
Yale Thomas, Mr. 
Yale John, Mr. 
Yale —Thomas. M. D. 
Yale Isaac, M. D. 

Goodwillie 
Dart. Thomas 
Dart. David 

Goodwin 
Harv, 
Yale 
Harv. 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Harv 
Bro. 
Dart. 
Dart. 



Thomas, Mr. 

Hezekiah, Mr. 

Henry, Mr. 

Timothy, Mr. 

George 

Richard E., Mr. 

Ezra S., Mr. 

Henry 

Dominicus, Mr. 

James S., Mr., M. D. 
Harv. Amos G. 
Yale Roswell 
Bro. Daniel L. B., Mr. 
Yale Edward 
Mid. Harleij, Mr. 
Bro. Henry B., Mr. 

Harv. Hersey B., Mr. 
Bow. —George W., M. D. 
Bow. Daniel R,. 
Bow. Frederic J. 
Wms. James B. 

Goodyear 
Yale —Miles, M. D. 
Yale George, Mr. 

Gookin 
Harv. Daniel, Mr. 
Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
Dart. Warren D. 

Gordon 
Harv. — Charles, Mr. Aberd. 
Harv. — William, Mr., and at Yale *73, 
Harv. James [D.D. at N.J. 

Harv. ||William 
Dart. Daniel, Mr. 
Harv. Adam, Mr. 
Bro. James 
Harv. William 
Dart. William, Mr. 
Dart. Adam, Mr., LL. B. at Harv. 
Harv. — Y"orick S., and at Union '18 
tfow. —Timothy, M. D. 
Mid. George D. 
Harv. William A., Mr., 31. D. 
Wash. James W. 
Bro. Charles 
Yale John M. 
Yale Wellington 
Harv. —Charles, M. D. 
l r ale Alexander B. 

26 



198 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1834 Wms. Thomas 

Gore 
1702 Harv. John, Mr. 

1776 Harv. • Christopher, Mr., LL. D., 
[Gov. of Mass., Sen. in Cong. 

1829 Bow. —Thomas, JVI. D. 

Gorham 
1733 Harv. David, Mr. 
1759 Harv. John 
1792 Harv. John, Mr. 
1795 Harv. ||Benjamin, Mr. 
1801 Harv. John, Mr., M. D., Prof. 
1821 Harv. David W., M. D. 

1831 Harv. William C. 

1832 Harv. John W. 

Goss 
1737 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1820 Dart. Jacob C. 

Gould 
1723 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 
1751 Yale Hezekiah, Mr. 
1771 Yale William, Mr. 

1782 Harv. Daniel, 31 r. 

1783 Yale Orchard, Mr. 
1786 Bro. Jonathan, Mr. 

1791 Yale tJames, Mr., Tut., LL. D. 

1797 Harv. Lewis, Mr. 

1797 Wms. Vinson, Mr., and at Yale 1800, 

1811 Yale William R. [Tut. 

1812 Harv. James F. 

1814 Harv. Benjamin A., Mr. 

1815 Mid. David 

1816 Yale William F., Mr. 

1824 Yale James R. 

1825 Harv. Augustus A., Mr., M. D. 

1825 Arab. Nahum 

1826 Wat. Moses 

1827 Bow. —Moses, M. D. 

1827 Yale George 

1828 Wms. —Benjamin, M. D. 
1828 Wms. —Humphrey, M. D. 

1830 Dart. —Abraham, M. D. 

1831 Bow. —Levi, M. D. 

1832 Bow. Samuel L., M. D. 

1833 Yale Alfred K. 

1834 Wat. Walter 
1834 Wat. Samuel L. 
1834 Amh. David 

Goulding 

1821 Yale John, M. D. 

Gourdin 
1821 Harv. Robert M. 
1821 Harv. John G. K. 

Gourgas 
1824 Harv. John M., Mr. 

Gove 
176S Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
1793 Dart. John 
1805 Mid. Jesse 

1817 Dart. Charles F., LL. B. at Harv. 

Gowdy 

1819 Mid. Ralph, M. D. 

Gracie 

1818 Harv. —Robert, Mr. at Yale '25 

Grafton 

1804 Bro. —Joseph, Mr. 

Gragg 

1820 Harv. William 

Graham 
1737 Yale —John, Mr. '37 
1740 Yale John, Mr. 
1747 Yale Chauncy, Mr., and at N. J. '52 
1760 Yale Richard C. 



1768 Yale John A., Mr., M. B. at Columb. 
1770 Yale — Jonathan, and at Columb. 
1790 Bro. Andrew, Mr. 

1819 Yale —William, Mr. 

1829 Amh. John 

1830 Wash. _ Charles 

Grainger 
1730 Yale Daniel, Mr. 

Grammer 
1817 Yaie John 

Granger 

1760 Yale Gideon, Mr. 
1787 Yale Gideon 

1810 Yale Ralph 
1816 Wms. Otis P. 
1826 Bow. Daniel T. 
1829 Wash. Joshua 

Grant 
1726 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 
17-11 Yale John, Mr. 

1761 Yale Friend 
1765 Yale Roswell, Mr. 
1794 Bro. William, Mr. 
1800 Dart. Stephen 
1812 Dart. —John, M. D. 

1828 Harv. Patrick, Mr. 

1829 Bow. —Nathaniel, M. D. 

1830 Yale Elijah P. 

1833 Wms. Charles W., M. D. 

Grave 
1768 Yale Josiah, Mr. 

Graves 
1656 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1703 Harv. fThomas, Mr. 
1726 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1765 Yale Starling, Mr. 

1766 Yale Bloses, Mr. 

1784 Harv. Thomas R., Mr. 

1785 Yale William, Mr. 1801 
1791 Dart. Rufus, Mr. 

1793 Bro. —Samuel, Mr. 
1812 Mid. Allen, Mr. 

1825 Amh. Frederick W. 

1826 Yale Horatio N., Mr. 

1834 Wms. —Josiah G., M. D. 

Gray 

1715 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1716 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1734 Harv. Ellis, Mr. 

1763 Yale Ebenezer, Mr., and at Dart. '73 

1771 Dart. Samuel, Mr., and at Yale '75 

1782 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

1784 Harv. Cadwallader 

1786 Harv. Robert, Mr. 
1786 Harv. James 

1790 Harv. Thomas, Mr., D. D. 

1800 Harv. William R., Mr. 

1805 Yale Ebenezer 

1805 Mid. Daniel, Mr. 

1809 Wms. Cyrus W., Mr., Tutor 

1809 Harv. Francis C, Mr. 

1811 Harv. Samuel C, Mr. 
1811 Harv. John C, Mr. 
1811 Bro. Arnold 

1815 Yale Thomas 

1816 Harv. Henry G., Mr. 
1819 Harv. Horatio, Mr. 

1822 Mid. Horatio N. 

1823 Bro. John 

1823 Harv. Thomas, Mr., M. D. 

1824 Harv. John H. 

1829 Harv. William, Mr. 

1830 Dart. —Henry C, M. D. 

1 1831 Harv. Francis H., M. D. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



199 



1831 Yale Ninian E. ■ 

1833 Harv. Henry Y. 

1834 Amh. Alonzo 

Greaton 
1754- Yale James, Mr., and at llarv. ; G0 



1802 
1813 

1804 
1825 

1680 
1695 
1719 
1720 
1726 
1744 
1746 
1749 
1758 
1760 
1765 
1766 
1781 
1782 
J 1784 
1784 
1789 
1791 
1792 
1798 
1798 
1804 

1805 
1807 
1807 
1808 
1811 
1813 
1815 
1816 
1817 
1817 
1818 
1818 
1819 
1819 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1825 
1825 
1826 
1826 
1826 
1827 
1827 
1827 
1828 
1828 
1828 
1829 
1830 
1834 
1834 



Greele 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
Dart. Augustus, Mr. 

Greely 
Dart. Allen, Mr., and at Mid. '07, Tut. 
Bow. —Samuel, M. D. [at M,id. 

Green 

Harv. Percival, Mr. 

Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Harv. John, Air. 

Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Harv. Jacob, Mr. at N. J. 

Harv. Joseph, Mr., and at Yale '52 

Harv. Joshua, Mr. 

Harv. Roland, Mr. 

Harv. Francis, Mr. 

Harv. Ezra, Mr. 

Harv. Peter, Mr. 

Harv. ||Isaiah L., Mr. 

Bro. John M. 

Harv. Joshua, Mr. 

Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

Harv. Aaron, Mr. 

Dart. William, and at Yale 

Bro. Elijah D. 

Bro. William E. 

Bro. — Thomas, Mr. 

Bro. John, Mr., & at Harv. ; 15, M. D. 
[at Harv. 

Bro. —John, Mr. 

Dart. Oliver 

Wins. Asa, Mr. at Ver. ; 1 1 

Wms. By ram 

Dart. Charles 

Wms. Asa 

Mid. G. Hamilton 

Harv. Samuel, Tutor at Bow. 

Harv. James D., Mr. 

Harv. John O., Mr., M. D. 

Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

Harv. Joshua, Mr., M. D. 

Mid. Beriah, Mr., Prof. Hud. O. 

Harv. Jonas 

Bow. —Benjamin F., M. D. 

Bro. —Asa, M. D.. and at Wms. '27 

Dart. Charles G., Mr. 

Bro. Joseph, M. D., Mr. 

Bow. — Samuel, Mr. 

Yale —Charles, M. D. 

Yale —Edward W., M. D. 

Bro. Isaiah L., Mr. 

Bro. —Albert C, Mr. 
Wms. —Aaron, M. D. 



Yale 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Mid. 

Bow. 

Dart. 

Amh. 

Bow. 



Jacob, M. D. 
Albert G. 
— Henry B. G, M. D. 

— Jonathan S., Mr. 

Alexander R. 

William H. 

Henry S. 
—Ezra, M. D. 



Greene 
1768 Harv. David, Mr., and at Yale '72 
1772 Bro. Benjamin 
1776 Bro. —Nathaniel, Mr., and at N. J. ; S1 
1784 Harv. William 
1784 Yale Ray, Mr., Sen. in Cong. 
1786 Bro. Timothy, Mr. 



1789 
1799 
i 800 
1800 
1802 
1806 
1807 
1810 
1812 
1812 
1814 
1817 
1819 
1820 
1821 
1824 
1826 
1827 
1828 
1829 

1699 
1723 
1751 
1777 
1784 
1806 
1813 
1817 

1823 
1824 
1825 
1832 
1834 

1748 

1759 
1774 
1804 
1805 
1822 
1824 
1825 
1828 
1828 
1833 

1685 
1690 
1709 
1717 
1721 
1739 
1806 
1808 
1814 
1824 

1787 
1811 
1824 

1825 
1826 
1828 
1828 



Bro. Samuel 
Pro. Franklin, Mr. 
Dart. — Zeckariah 

llarv. David 1., .Mr. 

Charles \V., Mr. 
—Benjamin, M.D. 

Oliver 

Simon R. 

Richard W., Mr. 

Benjamin J). 

William P., Mr. 

William, Mr. 
—Henry 15. C, M. I). 

Alix-ri G. 

David, Mr. 

Richard S. 
—John, M. D. 
— Charles W., Mr., and at Harv. 

John S. C, Mr., M. D. 

Moses B. 

Greenleaf 

Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

Stephen, Mr., and at Yale ''50 

Benjamin, Mr. 

William 

Thomas 

Thomas, Mr. 

Benjamin, Mr. 
Bow. — Simon, Mr., LL. D. at Harv., 
[Prof, of Law 

Henry, Mr. 
— Jonathan, Mr. 

Patrick H., Mr., and at Wash. 

Charles H. 

James 
Greenman 
Yale Nehemiah, Mr. 

Greenough 
Yale John. Mr., and at Harv. ? 63 
Yale William, Mr., and at Harv. ; 79 
Harv. Ebenezer 

David S., Mr., and at Yale 
—Caleb, M. D. 

John 

Horatio 

Elbridge F. 

Jeremiah 

David S. 



llarv. 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Bro. 

Pro. 

Harv. 

llarv. 

Bro. 

Harv. 

Bro. 

Yale 

Bro. 

Harv. 

Bro. 

Harv. 

Amh. 



Harv. 
llarv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Dart. 



Dart. 
Bow. 
Bow. 
Dart. 
Dart. 



Harv. 

Bro. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Harv. 



Greenwood 
Harv. Isaac 
Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
Harv. John, Mr. 
Harv. Isaac, Mr., Prof. 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
Dart. Ethan A., Mr. 
Bow. — Andrew, Mr. 
Harv. Francis W. P., Mr. 
Harv. Alfred 

Gregg 

Dart. William, Mr. 

Dart. David A. 

Dart. Daniel H., Mr. at Amh. '27 

Dart. — Samuel, M. D. 

Dart. — EzraM.,M. D. 

Dart. Jarvis, Mr., Tutor 

Amh. Thomas D. 



Gregorie 
1828 Yale Thomas H. 

Gregory 
1816 Yale —Samuel, M. D. 

1827 Wms. David D., Mr. 

1828 Amh. Oscar H. 

1829 Yale —Ira E., M. D. 



200 

1774 

1808 

1725 
1751 
1773 
1781 
1783 
1784 
1788 
1808 
1814 
1815 
1816 
1817 
1819 

1830 

1784 
1790 



COMPLETE LTST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Greg-son 
Bro. — Moses, Mr. 

Grennel 
Dart. ||George, Mr. 

Gridley 
Harv. Jeremy, Mr. 
Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
Yale Isaac, Mr. 
Yale Elihu 
Yale Uriel 
Yale Elijah 
Yale Elijah, Mr. 
Yale TimoLhv J., Mr.. M. D. 
Yale Ralph W., Mr. 
Yale Horatio, Mr. 
Yale Frederick, Mr. 
Mid. — Selah, Mr. 
Yale Elnathan 

Grieg" 

Yale David 
Griffin 



at Dart. 
['12 



1797 
1822 
1824 
1833 
1834 

1786 

1742 
1790 

1783 



1807 
1810 

1717 

1721 
1747 
1749 
1757 
1779 
1780 
1780 

1786 
1787 
1789 
1793 
1793 
1794 
1806 
1808 
1808 
1812 
1812 
1816 
1817 
1818 
1818 
1821 
1821 
1824 
1826 
1829 
1830 
1834 



Harv. Samuel 

Yale Edward D., Mr., and at N. J., 
■ [D. D. at Union 1808, Prof, 
[at Andover, Pres. of Wms. 
Yale George 
Yale Francis, Mr. 
Yale George 
Wms. Charles A. 
Wms. Nathaniel H. 

Griffing- 
Yale Nathaniel 

Griffith 
Yale Timothy, Mr. 
Dart. —Ralph, LL. D. 

Griggs 
Yale Isaac 
Yale Leverett, Mr., Tut. 

Grimke 
Yale Thomas S., LL. D. '31 
Yale Frederick 

Griswold 
Yale George, Mr. 
Yale John, Mr. 
Yale Daniel, Mr. 
Yale Benjamin, Mr. 
Yale Sylvanus, Mr. 
Yale — ^Matthew, LL. D., Gov. of Conn. 
Yale Matthew, Mr. 
Yale tl|*Roger, Mr., LL. D..& at Harv., 
[Gov. & Lieut. Gov. of Conn. 
Yale Stanley, Mr., V. D. M., Sen. 
Yale ||Gaylord [in Cong. 

Dart. John, Mr. 
Yale Joab 
Yale Deodate J. 
Dart. William A. 
Yale Shubael F. 
Yale Charles, Mr. 
Wms. Darius O., Mr. 
Harv. — Alexander V.. D. D., and at Bro. 
Wms. Horatio ['11, and at N. J. ; 11 
Yale George W. 
Yale Jared, Mr. 
Yale Roger W. 
Yale Samuel, Mr. 
Bro. George 
Yale Flavel, Mr. 
Yale George 
Yale James B. 
Yale Richard S. 
Yale —George W., M. D. 
Wms. — Wayne, M. D. 



Groce 
1808 Harv. Nahum H. 
Gross 

1784 Dart. Thomas, Mr. 

1806 Ver. Ezra C. 

Grosvenor 
1693 Harv. William, Mr. 
1759 Yale Ebenezer, Mr., and at Harv. 7 63 
1765 Yale Thomas, Mr. 
1769 Yale Daniel, Mr., & at Dart. '92 

1785 Yale Pearley 
1800 Yale ||Thomas P. 

1807 Yale Ebenezer 

1813 Ver. Ebenezer C, M. D. at Harv. '16 
1818 Dart. Cyrus P., Mr. 

1821 Bow. Godfrey J. 

1822 Dart. Moses G. 

1826 Yale David A. 

1827 Yale Clmrles P. 
1827 Yale Mason, Mr. 

Groton 

1814 Bow. Nathaniel, Mr. 

1821 Bow. Isaac, Mr. 

Grout 

1787 Dart. Jonathan, Mr. 

1790 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1793 Dart. Paul 

1795 Dart. George 

1831 Amh. Alden 

Grover 
1773 Dart. Joseph, Mr. 

1786 Dart. Stephen, Mr. 
1829 Bow. William, M. D. 

1832 Dart. Nathaniel 

Guarnsey 
1789 Dart. James K. 

Guild 
1734 Harv. John 
1769 Harv. Benjamin, Mr., Tutor 
1795 Harv. Curtis 
1804 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1807 Harv. Josiah Q., Mr. 

1822 Harv. Curtis, Mr. 

Guilford 
1812 Yale Nathan 

Guiteau 
1832 Wms. Gridon, M. D. 

Guitteau 

1829 Mid. Sheridan 

Gunn 
1748 Yale Moses, Mr. 
1810 Yale Frederick 

Gurley 

1772 Dart. Ebenezer, Mr. 

1773 Yale John 

1793 Dart. Jacob B. 

1794 Dart. Royal 

1799 Yale —John W., Mr. 
1818 Yale Ralph R. 
1827 Yale Charles G. 

Gurney 
1785 Harv. Dai-id, Mr., and at Bro. 1805 

1795 Bro. James 

Gushe 
1798 Bro. Abraham 

Gushee 
1834 Harv. Almond, M. D. 

Habersham 
1831 Harv. Robert 

Hackett 

1830 Amh. Horatio B. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF CRADUATES. 



201 



1705 
1805 

1647 

181G 
1819 

1809 
1833 

1798 
1823 
1831 

1821 
1828 

1803 
1816 
1829 
1831 

165? 
1686 
1699 
1703 
1721 
1722 
1731 
1734 
1739 
1740 
1742 
1765 
1766 
1769 
1771 
1773 
1773 
1779 
1785 
1791 
1794 
1796 
1802 
1804 
1804 
1806 
1813 
1814 
1818 

1819 
1820 
1822 
1825 
1827 
1827 
1827 
1827 
1828 
1829 
1831 
1831 
1833 
1833 

1713 

1716 

1722 
1724 
1726 



Hacklcy 
Yale Levi 
Wins. || Aaron 

Hadden 
Harv. George, Mr. 

Iladduck 
Dart. Charles B., Mr., Prof. 
Dart. William T., Mr. 

Hadley 
Dart. James, Mr., Prof. Ham. 
Ami). James 13. 

Hagar 
Harv. Uriah, Mr., M. D. 
Mid. Benjamin, Mr. 
Harv. Moses 

Haile 
Bro. Levi, Mr. 
Bro. Daniel M. 

Haines 
Dart. Samuel, Mr. 
Mid. Charles G. 
Bow. Allen 
Dart. William P. 

Hale 
Harv. John, Mr. 
Robert 
Moses 

James, Mr., Tut. at Yale 
Robert, Mr. 
Moses, Mr. 
Henry, Mr. 
Moses, Mr. 
•Nathan, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. 
Elizur 
Josiah, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. 
Nathan, Mr. 
Moses, Mr. 
Enoch, Mr. 
Nathan. Mr. 
John, Mr., Tut. 
David, Mr. 
David, Mr. 
Elias W. 
Samuel, Mr. 
Stephen, Mr. 
Nathan, Mr., and at Yale 
Thomas E., Mr. 
William 
—Enoch, M. D. 

Samuel, Mr., and at Harv. '18 
Benjamin, Mr., and at Dart. 7 27. 
[Tut. & Prof. 
Jonathan L., Mr. 
Christopher S. 
—Moses, M. D. 
William 
John P. 
Henrrj J. 
Albert, Mr. 
Thomas C. 
Joseph 
— Ebenezer, M. D. 
George. Mr. 
Charles' G. C. 
—Daniel M., M. D. 
— Syene, M. D. 



Harv 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Yale 

Harv. 

Yale 

Harv. 

Yale 

Yale 

Harv. 

Yale 

Dart. 

Yale 

Dart. 

Harv. 

Wins. 

Mid. 

Wms. 

Harv. 

Bow. 

Bow. 

Mid. 
Bro. 
Mid. 
Bow. 
Bow. 
Wat. 
Yale 
Dart. 
Harv. 
Dart. 
Wms. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Dart. 
Hall 

Harv. 

Yale 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 



Hugh, Mr. 

Samuel. Mr., Tut. 

Willard, Mr. 

David, Mr., D. D. at Dart. '77 

Richard, Mr. 



1727 Yale Theophilus, Mr. 

1731 Vale Elibu. Air. 

1736 Vale Jonathan, Mr. 

17)7 Vale Rice 

L742 Harv. Harper 

17 17 Harv. Pills, Mr. 

1717 Vale ||*Lyman, Gov. of Geo. 

1750 Yale Richard, Mr. 

17.-;2 Vale Caleb, Air. 

1754 Yale Samuel, Mr. 

1754 Vale Benjamin, Mr. 

1758 Harv. Aaron, Mr. 

1759 Vale AUteric, Mr. 

1760 Harv. John, Mr. 

1764 Yale Elisha 

1765 Harv. Stephen, Mr., Tut. 

1766 Harv. William, Mr., and at Dart. '98 
1769 Yale John, Air. 

1772 Yale Aaron, Air., and at Dart. ; 88 

1774 Harv. Joseph, Air. 

1775 Harv. Isaac, Air. 

1776 Harv. Ephraim 
1781 Harv. Joseph, Air. 

1781 Harv. George H., Air., M. B. 
1786 Bro. Jairus, Air.' 
1786 Yale William B. 

1788 Yale Prince B. 

1789 Yale Lee 

1790 Bro. Benjamin H. 
1790 Dart. Nathaniel, Air. 

1793 Dart. Ira 

1794 Bro. Lloyd B.. Air. 

1798 Dart. Horace, Air. 

1799 Harv. Willard, Air. 

1802 Yale John, Mr., Tut. 

1803 Yale George 

1803 Dart. Frederic, Air., and at Alid. '06, 
[and at Harv. '10, Prof, at 
[Mid. and Wash., LL. D. at 
[Alid. 

1805 Alid. Daniel, and at Dart. '05 

1806 Alid. —William, Air. 

1807 Yale Amos P.. and at Wms. '07 

1808 Wms. Gordon,' Mr. 
1S08 Alid. Richard, Air., Tut. 

1809 Bro. Silas, Air. 
1812 Alid. Friend M. 

1814 Dart. Aloses 

1815 Yale —Philip. Al. D. 

1815 Alid. David A. 

1816 Harv. Jonathan P., Mr. 

1817 Yale Jonathan P. 
181 S Wms. Parker L. 

1819 Harv. — Robert, D. D. 

1820 Alid. William F. 
1820 Vale — David E.. AI. D. 
1820 Harv. David P., Air. 
1820 Harv. Edward B., Air. 

1820 Bro. Lemuel 

1821 Dart. —Charles. AI. D. 

1822 Bow. —James, Al. D. 

1823 Dart. Thomas 

1823 Bro. — Abiel, AI. D. 

1824 Yale Willis 

1824 Amh. Joseph A., Air. '29 

1825 Bro. William W. 

1825 Harv. James D. 

1826 Dart. —William, Air. 
1828 Dart. Sherman 

1828 Wash. Alfred 

1826 Alid. Edwin, Air., Tut. 

1829 Amh. Jeffries 

1830 Yale Eli 

1830 Amh. Job 

1831 Yale Junius 

1832 Amh. William 



202 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1832 Dart. —Nathaniel, M. D. 

1833 Amh. Chauncey A. 
1833 Dart. —Joseph P., M. D. 

1833 Dart. —Lyman, M. D. 

1834 VVms. John 
1834 Yale Daniel E. 

Halladay 
1737 Yale Moses 

Hallam 
1737 Yale Nicholas, Mr. 
1756 Yale Amos, Mr. 
1827 Yale Robert A., Mr. 
1830 Wash. Isaac W. 

Hallet 
1816 Bro. Benjamin F., Mr. 

Halliock 
762 Yale Benjamin 

Hallock 
1788 Yale —Jeremiah, Mr. 
1788 Yale Moses 

1810 Wms. Jeremiah H. 
1814 Yale Minor 

1819 VVms. William A., Mr. 

1819 Wms. Gerard, Mr. 

Halsey 
1737 Harv. James 
1786 Yale Edward 
1793 Bro. Thomas L., Mr. 

1811 Wms. Herman 
1314 Yale Hugh 

1820 Bro. Charles B., Mr. 

Ham 

1797 Dart. John, Mr. 

Hamilton 
1792 Harv. —Alexander, LL. D., and at Dart. 
['90, at N. J. '91, and at 
[Bro. ; 92 

1798 Harv. John, Mr. 

1812 Wms. Charles W. 
1817 Wms. Luther 

1819 Dart. Cyrus B., M. D. 

1821 Yale —Horatio, M. D. 
1823 Yale Frederic W. 
1825 Ver. — Jamin, M. D. 

1825 Mid. Israel 

1826 Harv. Alexander J., Mr. 

1827 Wms. —Charles W., M. D. 
1830 Wms. —Lorenzo A. 

1830 Wms. —Erasmus E. 

Hamlin 

1728 Yale Jabez, Mr. 
1769 Yale Jabez, Mr. 

1799 Yale Alanson, Mr. 

1819 Bro. Elisha L., Mr. at Wat. '28 

1823 Bow. —Castillo, M. D. 

1828 Bow. —Cyrus, M. D. 
1834 Bow. Cyrus 

Hammatt 
1766 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

Hammett 
1816 Harv. William 

Hammond 
1787 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1802 Dart. Elisha, Mr. 
1802 Yale Elisha 
1808 Harv. Timothy, Mr. 

1814 Yale Asa 

1815 Yale Charles H, Mr. 
1821 Bro. William G. 

1824 Dart. —George W., M. D. 
1827 Harv. William D., Mr. 

1827 Bro. Justin, M. D. at Harv. '30 
1830 Yale Edward 



1834 Wms. — Josiah S., M. D. 

Hampton 
1804 Yale fJohn P. 
1804 Yale Benjamin F. 

Hanaford 
1829 Bow. —William G., M. D. 

Hancock 
1689 Harv. John, Mr. 
1719 Harv. John, Mr. 
1721 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

1727 Harv. Belcher, Mr., Tutor 

1728 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 

1754 Harv. PJohn, Mr., and at N. J., LL. D. 

[at Yale '69, and at Bro. 

['88, Pres. of Cong, and Gov. 

[of Mass. 
1760 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1767 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1829 Harv. Charles L. 

Hand 
1813 Yale Joseph W. 
1322 Mid. Richard C, Mr. 

1829 Yale George E., Mr. 
1831 Wms. Stephen D. 
1831 Wms. Aaron H. 

Handerson 

1820 Dart. — Phineas, Mr. 

Hanford 
1800 Yale Enoch 

1807 Yale David 

1808 Yale William 

1830 Yale Frederic A. 

Hanna 
1783 Yale — William, Mr. 

Hanners 
1823 Yale George M., Mr., M. D. 

Hanson 
1742 Yale Henry H. ; Mr., and at Harv. 

Hapgood 
1813 Dart. Hutchins 

Harding 
1745 Harv. Elisha, Mr. 

1805 Dart. Alpheus 

1809 Bro. Daniel F. 
1819 Bro. —Elisha, M. D. 

1821 Bow. Charles 
1833 Harv. Fisher A. 
1833 Wms. Leander 

Hardy 
1789 Dart. Daniel, Mr., Tutor 
1794 Dart. Aaron, Mr. 
1803 Dart. Nehemiah 

1807 Dart. Thomas, Mr. 

1808 Dart. Nathaniel K. 
1812 Dart. Noah 

1812 Dart. Thomas 

1822 Dart. Aaron 
1824 Mid. Solomon 

1832 Amh. Seth 

Hardy ear 
1818 Yale —Jabez G., M. D. 

1833 Wash. Edward 

Hare 

1806 Yale —Robert, Mr., M. D. at Harv. '17, 

[Prof, at Penn. 

Harleston 
1815 Yale Edward 

Harlow 
1826 Yale William 

Harman 
1793 Dart. Martin 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



203 



Harmon 


1792 Yale William 


1825 Mid. 


Merill, Mr. 


1795 Yale — Abijah, Mr. 


Harper 
1829 Bow. —William, M. D. 
Ilarreford 


1797 Yale Ira, Mr. 
1802 Bro. Levi 
1807 Yale Luther, Mr. 
1817 Yale William B. 


1825 Bro. 


—Levi R., M. D. 


1817 Harv. Samuel, Mr., M. D. 


Harriman 


1822 Yale Henry C, M. D. 


1667 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1823 Yale Simeon, Mr. 


Harrington 


1823 Yale — David S., M. D. 


1728 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 


182(5 Yale —Henry A., M. D. 


1737 Harv. 


Timothy, Mr. 


1827 Yale —William B.. M. D. 


1769 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 


1830 Yale —Samuel, M. D. 


1776 Harv. 


Timothy, Mr. 


1831 Yale John C. 


1803 Yale 


Joseph, Mr. 


Hartley 


1807 Bro. 


IN ah urn, Mr. 


1829 Bow. John F. 


1809 Ver. 


Isaac R. 


Hartshorn 


1812 Harv. 


Abraham, Mr. 


1732 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 


1825 Bro. 


Jubal 


1813 Dart. Levi 


1829 Amh. 


Fordijce 


1815 Yale Elijah, Mr. 


1829 Wms. 


—Lemuel, M. D. 


1828 Yale —Isaac, M. D. 


1831 Amh. 


Moody 


1833 Harv. Charles W. 


1832 Mid. 

1833 Harv. 
1833 Amh. 


Caleb B. 
Joseph 
Eli W. 


Hartshorne 
1817 Yale Robert, Mr. 
Hartwell 


1834 Harv. 


Henry F. 


IJgrviQ 


1762 Yale Moses, Mr. 


1727 Harv. 
1772 Bro. 
1783 Bro. 

1786 Harv. 

1787 Harv. 


Stephen 
Joseph 
Luther 

William, Mr., D. D., Prcs. of 
[Columb. 
Thaddeus M., Mr., D. D. 


1779 Harv. Jonas, Mr. 
1787 Dart. Jonas, Mr. 
1806 Dart. Cyrus, Mr., M. B. 
1809 Dart. Jonathan, Mr. 
1819 Bro. Jesse 
183 i Bow. William B. 
Harvey 


1787 Dart. 


Waller, Mr., D. D. 1826 


1788 Bro. 


Harding, Mr. 
tJohn, Mr. 


1789 Yale Rufus 


1791 Harv. 


1794 Dart. Joseph, Mr. 


1799 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1806 Dart. ||*Matthew, Mr., Gov. of N. H 


1802 Harv. 


Richard D., Mr. 


1808 Yale Joseph, Mr. 


1804 Dart. 


Joel, Mr. 


1824 Wms. William, Mr., Tutor 


1805 Mid. 


Timothy, Mr. 


1832 Amh. Adiel 


1811 Bro. 


Luther M. ; Mr. 


Hanvood 


1815 Dart. 


James H. 


1828 Wins. —Myron, M. D. 


1815 Harv. 


Thaddeus W., Mr. ; M. D. 


1828 Bow. —Daniel, M. D. 


1821 Mid. 


Rosivell 


Hasbrouck 


1826 Dart. 


—David, M. D. 


1831 Yale Janson 


1826 Dart. 
1826 Yale 


Edward P., Mr. 
— Andrews, M. D. 


Hasbroucq 


1827 Wms. 


Oscar, Mr., Tutor 


1810 Yale ||Abraham B., Mr. 


1827 Bow. 


— Jerome, M. D. 


Hascall 


1833 Bow. 


Samuel 


1806 Mid. Daniel, Mr. 


Harrison 


Hasell 


1736 Yale 


Jared, Mr. 


1799 Yale William S., Mr. 


1791 Yale 


Roger 


Hasey 


1815 Yale 


— Eosdick, Mr. 


1762 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 


1820 Harv. 


William B. 


1771 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1790 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 


1823 Yale 


— Increase, M. D. 


1825 Harv. 


— Jesse B., LL. B. 


Haskell 


1825 Yale 


—David. M. D. 


1831 Yale Hugh T. 

Harrower 
1805 Wms. —David, Mr. 


1789 Harv. Benjamin, Mr., M. D. 

1790 Yale Samuel 
1795 Dart. John, Mr. 
1799 Harv. Elnathan 


Hart 


1802 Yale Daniel, Mr., Pres. of Ver. 


1703 Yale 


John, Mr., Tutor 


1811 Yale Ezra 


1732 Yale 


William, Mr. 


1815 Harv. —Abraham, M. D. 


1760 Yale 


Levi, Mr., and at Dart. '84, D. D. 


1827 Dart. —George, M. D. 


1762 Yale 


Josiah, Mr. [at N. J. 1800 


1832 Amh. Benjamin 


1764 Yale 


Asahel, Mr. 


1834 Bow. William B. 


1768 Yale 

1769 Bro. 
1771 Yale 


Jonathan, Mr. 
—Oliver, Mr. 
John, Mr. 


Haskins 
1781 Harv. John, Mr. 


1776 Yale 


John 


1820 Dart. Nathan 


1776 Bro. 


John 


1823 Bow. Romulus 


1784 Yale 


Seth 


1S26 Harv. George F. 


1786 Dart. 


William S., Mr., and at Yale '90 
William, Mr. 


Haslarn 


1791 Bro. 


1821 Harv. — John, Mr. 



204 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Haslett 
1819 Harv. John, Mr. 

Hassard 
1826 Yale Samuel 

Hastings 
1681 Harv. John, Mr. 
1730 Harv. Jonathan. Mr. 
1730 Harv. Walter, Mr. 
1762 Harv. Joseph S., Mr. 
1768 Harv. Jonathan. Mr. 

1771 Harv. Walter, Mr. 

1772 Harv. John, Mr. 
1780 Harv. Aaron 
1782 Harv. ||Setb, Mr. 
1790 Harv. Walter, Mr. 
1815 Yale Johannes 

1817 Harv. William S., Mr. 
1825 Bro. Charles C. P. 
1831 Harv. John G. 

Hatch 
1742 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1777 Yale James 
1779 Dart. Ashur 

1797 Harv. Nymphas 

1800 Yale Moses, Mr. 
1810 Wms. Lorrin C. 

1812 Ver. —Uriel C. 

1813 Mid. Junius H. 

1814 Dart. Horatio, Mr., M. D. 

1815 Yale Roger C, Mr. 

1817 Harv. Daniel G., Mr. 

1821 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1823 Yale —Johnson, M. D. 

1824 Bow. William, Mr., M. D. ? 27 
1824 Dart. — Elisha, M. D. 

1828 Yale — Jethro, M. D. 
1830 Dart. Joseph D. 

Hatfield 

1829 Mid. Edwin F. 

Hathaway 
1759 Yale Asahel, Mr. 
1793 Bro. John, Mr. 

1798 Bro. Washington 

1801 Tale Asahel 
1814 Bro. Abner A. 

1818 Bro. Elnathan P. 
1818 Harv. Nathaniel 
1820 Bow. Joshua W. ; Mr. 
1820 Bro. Joseph 

1822 Bro. George W. 
1824 Bro. George 

1827 Wms. George W., Mr. 

Hatheway 
1738 Yale Shadrach, Mr. 
1787 Yale Joshua 

Hathorne 
1798 Harv. John 

1830 Bro. Benjamin H. 

Haughton 
1818 Yale Richard 
Hauley 

1674 Harv. Joseph 

1709 Harv. Thomas 

Haven 

1733 Harv. Elias, Mr. 

1737 Harv. Nathan 

1749 Harv. Samuel, Mr., D. D. at Edin. and 

1753 Yale Nicoll, Mr. [at Dart. ; 73 

1754 Harv. Jason, Mr. 
1757 Harv. John, Mr. 
1765 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1772 Harv. Samuel, Mr., and at Yale ; 78 
1774 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 



1776 Harv. John 

1777 Yale HJonathan N., Mr. 
1779 Harv. ||Nathaniel A., Mr. 
1782 Harv. Moses 

1785 Harv. Jacob, Mr. 

1789 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1804. Harv. Charles C., Mr. . 
1807 Harv. Nathaniel A., Mr. 

1809 Bro. AVilliam 

1810 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1813 Harv. John A., Mr. 
1820 Harv. Alfred W., Mr. 
1826 Amh. Samuel F., Mr. 

1828 Dart. George W. 
1834 Amh. John, Jr. 

Havens 
1806 Yale Charles H. 

Hawes 
1728 Harv. Prince, Mr. 
1787 Bro. Oliver, Mr. 

1790 Bro. Peter, Mr. 
1790 Bro. Elias 
1800 Wms. Josiah 
1805 Wins. Prince 

1813 Bro. Joel, D. D. 

1814 Yale Lowman 

1825 Bro. William T. 
1834 Yale Welles 

Hawkes 

1810 Dart. James, Mr. 

1811 Wms. Roswell, Mr. 

1814 Bro. — Micajah, M. D. 
1818 Yale —Francis L., Mr. 

1826 Wms. — Elihu S., M. D. 

Hawkins 
1826 Yale Alexander T., Mr. 

Hawley 
1742 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
1749 Yale Gideon, Mr., and at Harv. 
1759 Yale Stephen, Mr. 
1767 Yale Rufus, Mr. 
1787 Yale William 
1792 Harv. James, Mr., Tutor 

1803 Yale Zerah, Mr. 
1813 Yale Charles, Mr. 

1815 Wms. William A. 

1817 Yale Isaac A. 

1829 Yale — Almon, M. D. 
1829 Yale —Joel E., M. D. 

1829 Mid. —Noah, Mr. 
1833 Yale George B. 
1833 Yale Z. Kent 

Hawthorne 
1825 Bow. Nathaniel, Mr. 

Haxall 
1823 Yale Robert W. 

Hayden 

1804 Wms. ||Moses 

1818 Wms. Gardner 

1820 Harv. John C. ; Mr., M. D. 

Hayes 
1782 Harv. Reuben 

1805 Dart. William A., Mr. 

1815 Harv. — Pliny, M. D. 

1816 Wms. Parsons O. 

1819 Bow. David, Mr. 
1823 Yale Gurdon 

1823 Yale Samuel 

1824 Yale Amasa A. 

1825 Yale William R. 
1825 Wms. Stephen, Mr. 

1830 Amh. David A. 

1831 Dart. John L., Mr. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



205 



Hayden 

1834 Harv. Aaron 

Hay ford 
1824 Wat. Joel P. 

Haygarth 

1794 Harv. — John, M. D. 

Hayner 
1826 Yale Henry Z. 

Haynes 
1656 Harv. John, Mr. at Camb. 
1658 Harv. Joseph 
1689 Harv. fJohn 
Joseph 
— Lemuel, Mr. 
Joseph 

Nathaniel, Mr. 
—John P., M. D. 
Seltlen 
William P. 
Hays 
L773 Yale Joel, Mr. 
1830 Yale Thomas A. 

Hay ward 
1726 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
Jonathan, Mr. 
Lemuel, Mr., M. D. 
Beza, Mr. 
JNaihan, Mr.,M. D. 
Philip, Mr. 
Oliver. Mr. 
John W., Mr. 
Charles, Mr. 
Barziliai 

George, Mr., and at Yale, M. D. 
Elisha [at Penn. 

Joshua H., Mr., M. D. 
James, Mr., Tut. and Prof. 
Tilly B., Mr. 
Azel 
wood 
815 Yale —Benjamin, M. D 
820 Yale — Ulisha, M. D. 

Hazard 
770 Yale —[Nathaniel, N. J. '64, Mr. 



1714 Yale 
1804 Mid. 
1818 Dart. 
1823 Bow. 
1823 Bow. 
1826 Yale 
1831 Dart. 



1756 Harv. 
1768 Harv. 
1772 Harv. 
1785 Harv. 
1796 Bro. 

1804 Bro. 

1805 Harv. 

1806 Harv. 
[807 Bro. 
1809 Harv. 
1817 Bro. 
818 Harv. 
.819 Harv. 
820 Harv. 
1824 Mid. 



Hay 1 



792 Bro. 
792 Bro. 
792 Bro. 
794 Bro. 

794 Bro. 

795 Bro. 
830 Wash. 



Thomas C. 
Benjamin 
UNathaniel, Mr. 
Enoch, Mr. 
William T. 
John A. 
John O. 



Hazeltine 



777 Dart. 
779 Yale 
787 Dart. 
810 Dart. 
815 Wms. 
829 Dart. 



Ebenezer 
Silas 
David 

-Richard, M. B. 
Abner 
Moses G. 



Hazen 



806 Yale 

807 Dart. 
812 Dart. 
818 Yale 
834 Yale 



John 

Austin, Mr., and at Mid. '10 
Asa, Mr. 

Reuben S., Mr. '24 
James A. 
Hazlchurst 
.828 Wash. Isaac 

Hazzen 
1717 Harv. Richard, Mr. 

Head 
804 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1812 Harv. George E. 
1824 Mid. —Samuel, M. D. 

VOL. VII. 



Heald 

1793 Dart. David 

1791. Dart. Thomas, Mr. 

1823 Bow. —Asa, M. D. 

Healey 
1777 Harv. iNaihaniel, Mr. 

Heard 
1795 Harv. John, Mr. 
1812 Harv. George W., Mr., M. D. 

Hearsey 

1823 Harv. —Isaac P., M. D. 

Heart 

1801 Yale Alcis E. 

Heath 
1721 Yale Pdeg, Mr., and at Harv. 
1776 Harv. William, Mr. 

1825 Dart. Robert R. 

1826 Dart. William, Mr. 
1826 Dart. Solomon 
1826 Bow. —Asa, M. D. 

1829 Dart. —Horatio W., M. D. 

Heaton 
1728 Yale Samuel 
1733 Yale Stephen, Mr. 
1790 Bro. Benjamin, Mr. 
1829 Dart. —Charles. M. D. 
1832 Dart. —George,' M. D. 

Hebard 
1816 Mid. —Ebenezer, Mr. 
1828 Amh. Story 
1832 Yale Alfred 

Hebert 
1826 Yale — Surville, M. D. 

Hecock 

1802 Yale Simeon, Mr. 

Hedding 

1824 Yale —Elijah, Mr. 

Hedge 
1724 Harv. Barnabas, Mr. 
1759 Harv. Lemuel, Mr., and at Yale 

1783 Harv. Barnabas, Mr. 

1784 Harv. Lemuel, Mr., and at Dart. '88 
1792 Harv. Levi, Mr., & at Bow. 1808, Prof., 

[LL. D. at Yale '23 
1799 Dart. —Abraham, M. B. 
1820 Harv. Isaac L., Mr. 

1820 Harv. William L., Mr., and.LL. B., 

[and at Trans. 

1825 Harv. Frederic H., Mr. 
1828 Harv. Edward H., Mr. 
1828 Harv. Josiah D., Mr., M. D. 

Hedges 
1764 Yale Jeremiah, Mr. 
i792 Yale Jesse 

Helme 
1819 Bro. Nathaniel, Mr. 

Helyer 
1738 Harv. " Jonathan, Mr. 

Hemenway 
1730 Harv. Phinehas, Mr. 
1815 Mid. Daniel, Mr., Tutor 
1819 Mid. Caleb, Mr. 

Heminway 
1704 Yale Jacob, Mr. 

Hemmenway 
1755 Harv. Moses, Mr., D. D. 
1S25 Bro. —Robert E. ; M. D. 

Hampsted 

1821 Yale John A. 

Henchman 
1717 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

27 



and at Dart. 
[■92 



206 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1747 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

Henderson 
1815 Harv. Arthur M. 

Hendley 
1740 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

Henley 
1776 Harv. Ezekiel, BIr. 

Hennen 
1806 Yale Alfred 

Henry 
1806 Dart. —John, Mr. 

T. Carlton, D. D. at Yale '24 
—John V., N. J. 1785, and Mr. 



1814 Mid. 
1823 Mid. 
1825 Dart. 
1828 Wms. 
1828 Yale 

1833 Dart. 

1834 Dart. 



Caleb S. 

James H., M. D. 
John 
Hugh H. 
-John C, M. D. 
Henshaw 
1748 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
Joshua, Mr. 
Andrew, Mr. 



[LL. D. 



Samuel, Mr. 

Joshua 

Daniel, Mr. 

John P., & at Harv., Mr., D.D, 

George S. 



D. 



1763 Harv. 
1768 Harv. 
1773 Harv. 
1785 Yale 
1806 Harv. 
1808 Mid. 
1812 Mid. 

Herbert 

1800 Dart. George 
1822 Dart. —Richard, M 

Heriot 
1815 Harv. William F. 

Heron 
1806 Yale Maurice 

Herpin 
-1741 Yale John, Mr. 

Herreshoff 

1825 Bro. John B., Mr. 
1828 Bro. Charles F. 

Herrick 

1732 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1767 Harv. Henry, Mr. 

1772 Harv. Martin 
1777 Harv. Jacob, Mr. 
1796 Yale Edward 
1798 Yale Claudius, Mr. 
1822 Yale Henry, Mr. 

1822 Dart. —Israel, M. D. 
1824 Yale John P., M. D. 
1824 Ver. Stephen L. 

1826 Dart. Osgood 
1834 Dart. Horace 

Hersey 
1728 Harv. Ezekiel, Mr. 
1820 Bro. Henry, Mr. 

Hervey 
1824 Bro. Eliphalet W., M. D. 
1834 Amh. Thomas 

Hewett 
1812 Bro. Daniel, Mr. 

Hewins 
1804 Harv. James 

Hewit 

1808 Yale Nathaniel, D. D. at Amh. 

1823 Yale —Henry, M. D. 

Hevvson 
1822 Harv. —Thomas, M. D. 
Hextall 

1773 Bro. — William, Mr. 

Heyliger 

1809 Yale Alfred 



Heyward 

1794 Yale Benjamin 

Heywood 
1775 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1781 Harv. Abiel, Mr., M. D. 

1795 Dart. Joshua 
1808 Dart. Levi 

1812 Dart. Benjamin F., M. D. 

Hibbard 
1772 Dart. Augustine, Mr. 

Hibbert 
1748 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Hichborn 
1768 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

1802 Harv. Benjamin A., Mr. 
1816 Harv. Doddridge C, Mr. 

Hickock 

1821 Ver. William C. 

Hickok 

1798 Yale Horatio 

1801 Wms. Henry P. 

1803 Yale Norman 
1806 Yale Lyman 

Hicks 

1724 Harv. Zechariah, Mr. 

1729 Harv. Zechariah, Mr. 

1770 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1799 Bro. Galen, Mr. 
1829 Wms. William 

Hidden 
1791 Dart. Samuel, Mr. 

Hide 
1759 Yale Ephraim, Mr., and at Harv. 

Higgins 

1785 Yale David, Mr. 

Higginson 
1670 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1717 Harv. John, Mr. 
1745 Harv. Andrew 
1825 Harv. Francis J., M. D. 
1833 Harv. Daniel W. 

Higley 

1802 Yale Silas, Mr. 

1825 Mid. Hervey O. 

1826 Mid. Nelson 

Hildretb 
1805 Harv. Hosea, Mr., and at Dart. '17 
1805 Harv. Benjamin W. 
1811 Harv. William 
1814 Harv. Ezekiel 
1818 Harv. Abel F., Mr. 

1823 Harv. — Charies T., M. D. 
1826 Harv. Richard 

Hill 
1735 Harv. 
1737 Harv. 
1737 Yale 
1750 Harv. 
1756 Harv. 
1756 Harv. 
1756 Harv. 
1759 Yale 
1762 Harv. 
1764 Harv. 
1766 Harv. 
1768 Harv. 
1772 Yale 
1772 Harv. 
1776 Harv. 
J784 Harv. 

1786 Harv. 

1787 Harv. 



Samuel, Mr. 
Abraham, Mr. 
Nathaniel, Mr. 
Samuel 
John 

William, Mr. 
Henry, Mr. 
Andrew, Mr. 
Thomas, Mr. 

Alexander S., Mr., and at N. J. 
John, Mr. [ r 68 

Samuel 
Henry 
Edward 
Aaron, Mr. 
Jonathan C, Mr. 
Ebenezer, Mr. 
-Jeremiah. Mr. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GItADUATES. 



;>07 



1788 Harv. William 

1807 Bro. Jacob 

1808 Ver. Ira, Mr. 

1816 Dart. —Thomas P., M. D. 

1816 Yale George 

1817 Wms. —Oliver, Mr. 

1818 Dart. George S., and at Harv, 

1819 Yale Joseph A. 
1821 Harv. Joseph B. 

1821 Harv. John B., Mr. 

1822 Harv. Alphonso, Mr. 

1823 Yale Whitwell J. 

1824 Ver. —Isaac, Mr. 

1825 Bro. Solon 

1827 Yale —Christopher E., M. D. 

1829 Bro. Stephen P. 

1830 Harv. —Joseph F., M. D. 

1831 Dart. —Moses, M. D. 

1831 Wash. Frederic C. 

1832 Dart. Silas H. 
1834 Wms. Walter F. 

Hillard 
Harv. George S., Mr., LL. B. 
Yale David J. 

Hiller 
Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Hillhouse 
Yale James A., Mr., Tut. 
Yale IIJabies, Mr., LL. D. 
Yale William, Mr. 
Yale —William, Mr. 
Yale James A., Mr. 
Yale Augustus L., Mr. 

Hilliard 
Harv. Timothy, Mr., Tutor 

Joseph, Mr. 

Timothy, Mr. 

Abraham, Mr. 

'Timothy, Mr., M. D. 

William. Mr., LL. B. 

William' T. 

John H. 



1830 

1705 

1749 
1773 
1777 

1792 
1808 
1810 

1764 
1793 
1793 
1800 
1809 
1821 
1826 
1827 

1772 
1814 
1816 
1825 
1830 

1770 
1786 



1814 

1740 
1781 
1785 
1810 
1813 
1819 
1823 
1829 
1830 

1805 
1805 
1812 

1797 
1815 

1827 



Harv. 
Harv. 
Dart. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Bow. 
Bow. 

Hills 
Harv. John, Mr. 
Dart. —John, M. D. 
Dart. — Rums, M. D. 
Bow. — Ebenezer P., M. D. 
Amh. Israel 

Hillyer 
Yale Andrew, Mr. 
Yale ^lsa ; Mr. ; & at N. J. 1800, D. D. 
[at Alleg. 

Hilton 
Bow. Winthrop, Mr. 

Hinckley 
Harv. Isaac, Mr. 

Yale Samuel, Mr., and at Harv. '85 
Yale Dyer T. 
Yale George, Mr. 
Harv. Edward, Mr. 
Dart. Orramel S., Mr., Tut., Prof, at 
Dart. Bushrod \V. [Tenn. 

Yale Asa J. 
Wms. Samuel L., Mr. 

Hinds 
Harv. Enhraim 

Wms. E'lisha, Mr., and at Hnrv. '18 
Wms. —Abraham, Mr., and at Harv. '"21 

Hine 

Yale Homer 
Yale Jeremiah 

Hinkley 
Dart. —Israel, M. D. 



1831. Harv. Samuel L. 
Hinks 

1701 Harv. Samuel 

Hinman 

1762 Yale Simeon, Mr. 

177G Yale Sherman, Mr. 

1784 Yale Timothy 

1784 Yale Simeon 
17JJ9 Yale Cyrus 

1804 Yale Loyal R., Mr. 

1822 Mid. Chester, and at Yale '27 

Hinsdale 

1762 Yale Theodore, Mr. 

1815 Yale Charles J., Mr. 

1821 Yale Theodore, Mr. 

1833 Yale Abel K. 

Hinsdell 
1727 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 

Hinton 
1803 Bro. — James, Mr., D. D. ; Mr. at Oxf. 

[and N.J. 

Hirst 
1723 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

Hitchcock 
1743 Harv. Caleb, Mr. 
1743 Harv. Gad, Mr., D. D. 
1761 Yale Daniel, Mr., and at Bro. '71 

1767 Harv. Enos, Mr.. & at Yale 85, D. D. 

1768 Harv. Gad, Mr. [Bro. '88 
1777 Harv. Samuel 

1785 Harv. Pelatiah 

1786 Yale Reuben, Mr. 
1799 Bro. Jonathan P. 
1801 Yale ||fPeter, Mr. 
1806 Wms. Urban 

1809 Yale Samuel J. ; Mr., Tut. 
1811 Ver. Henry 

1811 Mid. Calvin 

1817 Mid. Samuel 

1818 Mid. Dexter, Mr. 

1818 Yale —Edward, Mr., Prof, at Amh. 
1825 Bow. —Gad, M. D. 

1825 Ver. —Lucius, M. D. 

1826 Yale Reuben 
1828 Wms. Harvey R. 
1832 Yale Henry L. 

1834 Wash. Solomon G. 
1834 Bow. Bela T. 

Hitchings 
1832 Amh. Benjamin H. 

Hixon 
1825 Bro. Asa 

Hoadley 
1768 Yale Jehiel, Mr. 

Hoadly 

1801 Yale George, Mr., Tutor 
1817 Yale Loammi I., Mr. 

Ho a o-l and 
1832 Yale —Christopher C, M. D. 

Hoar 
1650 Harv. Leonard, Pres., M. D. at Camb, 
1740 Harv. Jonathan. Mr. 

1802 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1810 Harv. Nathaniel P., Mr. 

Hobart 

1650 Harv. Joshua, Mr. 

1650 Harv. Jeremiah, Mr. 

1667 Harv. Gershom, Mr. 

1667 Harv. Japhet 

1667 Harv. Nehemah, Mr. 

1714 Harv. Nehem iah , M r < 

1724 Harv. Noah, Mr. 



208 

1757 Yale 

1774 Harv. 

1775 Harv. 
1784 Harv. 
1794 Dart. 

1804 Bro. 

1805 Bro. 
1815 Dart. 
1825 Wat. 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



tJoHN S., Mr., LL. D. ; Sen. in 



Hobbs 



William, Mr. 
Peter, Mr. 
Nathaniel 
James, Mr. 
Benjamin, Mr. 
||Aaron, Mr. 
Caleb, Mr, 
Benjamin 



[Cong. 



1748 Harv. 
1759 Harv. 
1814 Harv. 
1817 Harv. 
1820 Bow. 

1822 Harv. 

1823 Bow. 
1326 Bow. 



James, Mr. 
Benjamin 

Ebenezer, Mr., M. D. 
Frederic, Mr. 
Josiah H., Mr. 
Warren 
Hiram H. 
-Daniel S., M. 



D. 



Hobby 

1723 Harv. Wensley, Mr. 
1725 Harv. William, Mr. 
1814 Yale Alfred McK. 

Hobson 
1814 Dart. Humphrey 

Hodge 
1739 Harv. Nicholas, Mr. 
1791 Harv. William, Mr. 
1799 Harv. Michael, Mr, 

Hodgedon 
1827 Bow. John 

Hodges 
1803 Harv. Benjamin 



1804 Bro. 
1811 Yale 
1815 Harv. 
1821 Mid. 
1823 Bro. 
1829 Wash. 



Tisdale 

William F., Mr. 
Richard 31., Mr. 
Silas H., Mr. 
Rufus 
Charles D. 
Hodson 
1693 Harv. Nathaniel 

Hoes 
1832 Amh. John C. F. 
Hoffman 

1827 Yale Philip R., Mr. 

1828 Yale George B. 

Hogeboom 

1827 Yale Henry, Mr. 

Hogge 

1828 Dart. Robert 

Hoisington 

1828 Wms. Henry R. 

Hoit 
1822 Mid. —Moore, M. D. 

1829 Dart. Albert G. 

1831 Dart. William H. 

1832 Dart. —David D., M. D. 

Holbrook 
1719 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 
1734 Harv. Samuel 
1788 Bro. Josiah, Mr, 
1791 Bro. —Joseph, Mr. 

1800 Harv. Abiel 

1801 Yale Samuel 

1807 Dart. Amos 

1808 Harv. Moses 

1810 Yale Josiah, Mr. 

1811 Ver. Levi 

1813 Harv. —Amos 

1814 Bro. Willard, Mr. 

1815 Bro. John K., M. D. at Penn., Prof, at 
1815 Bro. Silas P. [S. C. 
1828 Mid. —John, Mr. 



1774 
1809 
1828 

1800 

1812 

1645 
1779 
1824 
1831 

1799 
1803 
1813 
1816 
1822 
1828 

1825 

1787 

1816 

1795 

1700 
1797 
1803 
1819 
1826- 
1828 
1830 
1831 

1724 
1752 
1782 
1783 



1784 
1796 
1796 
1302 
1806 
1815 
1816 
1819 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1823 
1825 
1826 
1829 
1829 
1830 
1832 
1832 
1833 

1802 

1738 
1739 
1757 
1767 
1784 
1790 



Holcomb 
Yale Reuben, Mr. 
Wms. Frederic 
Yale Hiram 

Holcombe 
Bro. —Hennj, Mr., D. D. at S. C. 

Holden 
Yale Edward 

Holland 
Harv. Jeremiah 
Dart. Abraham. Mr. 
Yale William M., Mr., Tut., Prof, at 
Harv. Frederic W. [Wash. 

Holley 
Wms. Myron 

Yale Horace, Mr., Pres. of Trans., 
Harv. Orville L. ' [LL. D. at Cin. 
Mid. —Samuel H., Mr. 
Yale John M., Mr. 
Yale _ Piatt T., Mr. 

Hollinbeck 
Wms. — Elias R., M. D. 

Hollis 
Harv. —Thomas B., LL. D. 

Hollister 
Mid. Edward 

Holly 
Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 

Holman 



Harv 
Bro. 
Bro. 



John, Mr. 
Nathan, Mr. 
David, Mr. 



Harv. —Silas, M. D. 
How. — Eliakim A.. M. D. 
Bow. —Sullivan, M. D. 
Wms. Sidney 
Yale George P. 

Holmes 
Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
Yale Stephen, Mr. 
Dart. Hugh 

Yale Abiel, Mr., Tut.. Mr. at Harv. '92, 
[D. D. at Edin., LL. D. at 
[Alleg. 
Yale ||Uriel 
Bro. Joseph, Mr. 
Bro. John, Mr., Sen. in Cong. 
Harv. Caleb, Mr. 
Bro. Henry 

Yale Edward 
Yale Uriel 
Bro. James S., Mr. 

Bro. Ezekiel, M. D. 

Harv. Stephen K.. 
Bow. William B., Mr 
Bro. —S\K ester, Mr. 
Yale —Henry, M. D. 
Bow. — Job.M. D. 
Bro. Charles H. 

Harv. Oliver YV. 
Amh. George L. 
Harv. John 
Dart. — Azel, Mr. 
Yale Silas 

Holroyd 
Bro. John, Mr. 

Holt 
Harv. James. Mr. 
Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
Harv. Nathan, Mr. 
Harv. Moses, Mr. 
Yale Thomas, Mr. at Harv. 
Harv. Peter, Mr. 



at Bow. '24, Mr. 
[at Wat. '24 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



1803 Dart. 


Jacob 




1810 Mid. 


Fifield 




1814 Dart. 


Joshua 




1823 Yale 


Eleazar, Mr. 




llolton 




1804 Dart. 


Alexander 




1805 Dart. 


John 




1814 Ver. 


Isaac 




1824 Wat. 


Calrin 




1831 Bow. 


—Joel, M. D. 




Holyoke 




1662 Harv. 


John 




1705 Harv. 


Edward, Mr., Tut., Pres. 


1746 Harv. 


Edward A., Mr., M. 


D., LL. D. 


1750 Harv. 


Elisor, Mr. 




1751 Harv. 


John 




1789 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. at Dart 


'91 


1817 Harv. 


Edward A., Mr., M. 


D. 


Homans 




1772 Harv. 


John 




1812 Harv. 


John, Mr., M. D. 




Homer 




1777 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr., and at Dart. '88, 




[at Bro. ; 90, D 


D. at Bow. 


1803 Harv. 


Jonathan 




1827 Harv. 


Eugene A., Mr. 




1834 Amh. 


George F. 




Homes 




1830 Amh. 


Henry A. 




Honey wood 




1782 Yale 


St. John, Mr. 




Hook 




1798 Harv. 


Moses 




1823 Bow. 


Josiah S., Mr., M. D 


. at Harv. 


1827 Harv. 


Edward W., M. D. 




Hooker 





1653 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1700 Harv. 


Daniel, Tut. at Yale 


1723 Yale 


William 


1729 Yale 


Nathaniel, Mr. 


1751 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1755 Yale 


Nathaniel, Mr. 


1782 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1789 Yale 


Asahel, Mr. 


1796 Yale 


John 


1805 Yale 


Edward, Mr., and at Mid. '08 


1810 Yale 


James 


1810 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1814 Yale 


George, M. D. 


1814 Mid. 


Edward W., Mr. 


1815 Yale 


Horace, Mr., Tutor 


18J5 Yale 


Josiah 


1819 Wms. 


Anson, M. D. at Harv. '22 


1820 Wms. 


Edward 


1820 Yale 


Charles, M. D. 


1821 Mid. 


Hennj D., Mr. 


1825 Harv. 


—William 


1825 Yale 


Worihinglon, Mr., M.D. at Harv. 


1827 Yale 


Richard ['29 


1831 Mid. 


John M. 


Hooper 


1760 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1761 Harv. 


Stephen. Mr. 


1763 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1765 Harv. 


Robert, Mr. 


1777 Harv. 


Joseph 


1789 Harv. 


Hezekiah, Mr. 


1789 Harv. 


Thomas W., Mr., & at Dart. '92 


1808 Harv. 


Stephen, Mr. 


1811 Harv. 


Robert, Mr. 


1815 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1819 Harv. 


Nathaniel L., Mr., and at Yale 


1830 Harv. 


Robert W., Mr. 



1831 Yale —Samuel H., Mr. 



Hopkins 



1718 Yale 


Finn iid, Mr. 




1714 Yale 


Samuel, Mr., D. 


D. at Bro. '90 


1749 Yale 


Samuel, Mr., Tu 


L, D. !>., Mr. at 
fllarv. '54 


1758 Yale 


Daniel, Mr., D. D. i 


1758 Yale 


Mark, Mr. 




1775 Bro. 


Esek 




1777 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 




1784 Yale 


— Lemuel, Mr. 




1784 Hro. - 


-||*Stephen, LL. D. 


, Gov. of R. I. 


1795 Hro. 


Amos 




1804 Mid. 


Daniel C, Mr. 




1806 Dart. 


Abiathar 




1810 Bro. 


Philip R. 




1813 Ver. 


Samuel G. 




1813 Mid. 


— Josiah, Mr. 




1813 Mid. 


Thomas 




1814 Yale 


Charles 




1821 Mid. 


Hiram B. 




1824 Wms. 


Mark, Mr., M. D 


, Tut. and Prof. 


1826 Wms. 


Albert, Mr., Tut 


and Prof. 


1826 Yale 


Asa T. 




1827 Dart. 


Charles, Mr. 




1827 Dart. 


Samuel, Mr. 




1828 Mid. 


Frederic W., Mr 




1830 Dart. 


Erastus, Mr. 




1831 Yale 


—William F., Mr. 




1832 Amh. 


Samuel 




Hopkinson 




1830 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr. 




1831 Harv. 


—|1 Joseph, LL. D., 


and at Columb., 
[&atN. J. 'IS 


Hoppin 




1828 Yale ' 


William W., Mr 




1832 Mid. 


William J. 




Hopson 




1757 Yale 


John, Mr. 




1827 Wash. 


Oliver 




Home 




1829 Wash 


— Thomas H., D. D. 


Hort 




1808 Yale 


Benjamin S. 




Horton 




1731 Yale 


Simon 




1735 Yale 


Azariah, Mr. 




1772 Yale 


— Ezra, Mr., A. B 


at N. J. '54 


1824 Harv. 


William 




1828 Bro. 


Francis 




Hosack 




1826 Harv. 


—Nathaniel P. 




H os ford 




1826 Dart. 


Isaac 




Hosie 




1823 Ver. 


Warren 




Hoskins 




1811 Wms. 


Ebenezer 




1820 Dart. 


Nathan 




Hosley 




1779 Harv. 


John 




Hosmer 




1699 Harv. 


Stephen 




1732 Yale 


Stephen, Mr. 




1757 Yale 


||Titus, Mr. 




1782 Yale 


^Stephen T., Mr. 


LL. D. 


1800 Harv. 


Hufus, Mr. 




1800 Harv. 


—John, M. B., M. 


D. 11 


1823 Harv. 


—Hiram, M D. 




1826 Harv. 


George \V '., Mr. 




1828 Harv. 


—Alfred, M.D. 




1831 Dart. 


Elbridge 




1834 Harv. 


Ruffes 





210 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Hotchkin 
1794 Yale —Beriah, Mr. 

1800 Wms. James H. 

Hotchkins 
1822 Yale — Heman, M. D. 

Hotchkiss 
1748 Yale John, Mr., and at Harv. '65, at 
[JN. J. '72, and at Dart. '73 
1766 Yale Caleb, Mr. 
1774 Yale Gabriel, Mr. 
1778 Yale Obadiah, Mr. 
1778 Yale Frederic W.' Mr. 

1801 Dart. Elisha 
1813 Yale Miner, Mr. 



Hough 



1765 Yale James, Mr. 
1802 Yale John, Mr., and at Mid. '07, & at 
[Wms. '06, and Prof, at Mid. 
—Dan, M. B. 
Justus S., Mr. 
Daniel 
Ailing, Mr. 
—Isaac I.. M. D. 

Alfred 
— Alanson H., M. D. 



1803 Dart 
1810 Mid. 
1812 Dart 
1820 Bro. 

1823 Yale 
1830 Yale 
1832 Yale 

Houghton 
1767 Yale Israel 
1816 Yale — Ephraim, M. D. 

1824 Ver. G*eorge W. 
1832 Bow. —Lewis W., M. I 

Houston 
1805 Yale Robert J., Mr. 
1832 Amh. John F. 
1834 Yale John W. 

Hovey 
1725 Harv. John, Mr. 



1735 Harv. 
1740 Harv. 
1798 Dart. 
1804 Harv. 
1813 Harv. 

1819 Yale 

1820 Bro. 
1825 Wat. 
1828 Dart. 



Ivory, Mr. 
James, Mr. 
Aaron 
Joseph, Mr. 
Rufus P., Mr. 
Sylvester, Mr., 
—Isaac B., M. D. 
John 
Edmund O., Mr. 



Tutor, Prof, at 
[Amh. & Wms. 



How 

1758 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1810 Harv. Isaac R., Mr. 

Howard 

1729 Harv. Abiel, Mr. 

1758 Harv. Simeon, Mr., Tut., D. D. at Edi 

1763 Yale Joshua 

1781 Harv. Bezaleel, Mr., Tut., D. D. 

1784 Harv. ZecJiariah 

1790 Harv. John C, Mr. 

1797 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

1797 Bro. Francis, Mr. 

1807 Yale James 

1810 Yale John 

1815 Bro. JohnE. 

1818 Yale —Nathan, M. D. 

1821 Bow. Joseph, Mr. 

1823 Amh. David 

1825 Harv. John C, Mr., M. D. 

1827 Amh. Joseph, Mr., M. D. at N. Y. 

1827 Yale John L. 

1828 Mid. Leland, Mr. 

1829 Dart. Roger S., Mr. 

1830 Wms. Jacob M. 

1831 Mid. Daniel 

1832 Wms. —Richard H. L. 
1834 Yale Jarvis C. 
1834 Amh. Chauncey 



Howe 

1731 Harv. Perley, Mr. 

1765 Yale Joseph, Mr., & at Harv. '73, Tut. 

1776 Yale Eleazer W. 

1777 Dart. Solomon 
1783 Dart. Tilly 

1786 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

1790 Dart. Perley, Mr. 

1794 Dart. William, Mr., and at Yale '99 

1794 Harv. James B., Mr. 

1798 Dart. Phineas, Mr. 

1800 Dart. Estes 

1801 Dart. Abner, Mr., M. B. 

1804 Wms. Samuel, Mr. 

1805 Bro. John 

1809 Dart. — Zadok, M. B. 

1810 Mid. ZimriA., Mr. 

1811 Dart. Luke, Mr., M. D. 

1812 Dart. — Adonijah, M. D. 
1815 Harv. Appleton, Mr., M. D. 
1817 Dart. James, Mr. 

1817 Mid. Henry, Mr., Tutor 
1821 Bro. Elbridge G., Mr. 

1821 Bro. Samuel G., and at Harv., M. D. 

[at Bro. 

1822 Mid. George, Mr., & at Dart. '27, Prof, 
[at Dart, and Columb. 

Dart. — Josiah, M. D. 
Yale Samuel 
Bow. —Oliver B., M. D. 
Bro. Mark A. D. W. 
Mid. Samuel S. 
Dart. Josiah 
Harv. Estes 
Wash. John B. 
Wat. William 
Yale Cheney 



1824 
1827 
1828 
1828 
1829 
1832 
1832 
1832 
1833 
1833 

1721 

1772 



1772 
1789 
1795 
1831 

1809 

1741 

1800 
1824 

1727 

1831 

1827 
1827 

1792 
1813 
1814 
1821 
1821 
1822 
1824 
1825 
1826 
1829 
1830 

1642 
1653 



Howell 
Yale John 
Yale — llDavid, N. J. ! 66, Mr., & at Bro. 

['69,Tut.,Prof.atBro.,LL.D. 

[at Bro. '93 
Bro. Elias, Mr. 

Bro. Jeremiah B., Mr., and at Dart. 
Yale Thomas ['91, Sen. in Cong'. 

Amh. Thomas M. 

Howes 

Wms. William, Mr. 

Howland 
Harv. John, Mr. 
Yale Joseph, Mr. 
Amh. Freeman P., Mr. 

Howlett 
Harv. William 

Hoxey 
Wms. —Edward C, A. B. 

Hoxsey 
Wms. Benjamin F., Mr. 
Wms. Edward C, M. D. 

Hoyt 
Yale Amos 
Mid. Otto S., Mr., Tutor 
Y'ale John B. 
Dart. — Enos, M. D. 
Mid. Ova P., Mr. 

Dart. Aaron B. 
Dart. — Epaphras, Mr. 
Dart. —Hiram, M. D. 
Wms. — George, M. D. 
Mid. Romeo H. 
Yale Melancthon 

Hubbard 
Harv. William, Mr. 
Harv. Richard, Mr. 






1835.] 

1695 Harv. 
1698 Harv. 
1721 Harv. 
1721 Yale 
1724 Yale 
1727 Yale 
1727 Yale 
1732 Harv. 
1712 Harv. 
1744 Yale 
1744 Yale 

1747 Yale 

1748 Yale 
1751 Yale 

1758 Yale 

1759 Yale 

1765 Harv. 

1766 Yale 
1769 Yale 
1777 Harv. 
1781 Harv. 
1785 Harv. 
1785 Yale 
1785 Yale 

1785 Dart. 

1786 Harv. 
1788 Yale 
1790 Harv. 
1792 Yale 
1792 Yale 

1795 Yale 

1796 Yale 
1799 Yale 

1802 Yale 

1803 Yale 
1803 Dart. 
1803 Wms. 

1805 Harv. 

1806 Yale 
1809 Wms. 
1811 Wms. 
1811 Dart. 
1813 Dart.- 

1813 Yale 

1814 Dart. 
1816 Dart. 

1816 Bro. 

1817 Yale 

1818 Yale 

1819 Yale 

1820 Yale 

1820 Dart. 

1821 Harv. 

1822 Yale 
1824 Dart. 
1824 Harv. 

1824 Yale 

1825 Dart. 
1825 Yale 

1827 Wms. 

1828 Wms. 

1828 Yale 

1829 Amh. 
1829 Harv. 
1829 Yale 
1829 Yale 
1829 Amh. 

1829 Yale 

1830 Bow. 
1829 Wms. 
1832 Mid. 

1832 Wms. 

1833 Wms. 

1834 Harv. 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



.Ill 



John, Mr. 
fNalhanieJ, Mr. 

Thomas, Mr. 

David, Mr. 

Jonathan, Mr. 

John, Mr. 

Daniel, Mr., Tut. 

Nathaniel, Mr. 
fLeverett, Mr. 

Leverett, Mr. 

John, Mr. 

John, Mr. 

Daniel, Mr. 

Russell, Mr. 

Beta, Mr., and at Columb., D. D. 

Nathaniel, Mr. 

Moses, Mr., and at Yale 

Stephen W., Mr. 

Robert, Mr. 

Ebenezer, Mr. 

Daniel 

John 

William G. 

William, Mr. 

John, Mr. ; Prof. 

Dudley 

Lucius 

Gilbert H., Mr. 

Bela 

Henry 

Elijah 

Ruggles 

HThomas H., Mr. 

Samuel, Mr. 

George, Mr. 

Henry, Mr., Sen. in Cong. 

Robert, Mr. 

Ebenezer 

Russell, Mr. 

John 

Elisha 
—Oliver, M. B. 
-HtJonathan H., Mr. 

Richard 



Hubbell 

1723 Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 



John W. 

John 

James 

Anson 
—Thomas, M. D. 

Samuel D. 

William J.. Mr. 
—Benjamin t., M. D. 

George J. 

Thomas G., M. D. 
—Moses, M. D. 

Lucius V. 

Austin O., Mr. '31 
—Benjamin T., M. D. 

Jabez B., Mr. 
—Charles, M. D. 

Fordyce M., Mr., Tutor 

Oliver P., Mr. 

George 

John, Mr. 

John M. 

Thomas R. ; Mr. 
Ochus G. 
— Denison H., M. D. 

Samuel D. 
—Hiram F., M. D. 

Elijah K. • 
—William A. 
—John M. 
—Henry B. ; M. D. 
Hubbart 
1822 Harv. Joseph S., Mr. 



1769 Yale 
1798 Wms. 
1805 Ver. 
1810 Wms. 
1813 Ver. 
1818 Yale 
1824 Mid. 
1826 Yale 



Levi 
Silas 
Oliver 
Calvin, Mr. 
Luke, Prof. 
Horace W. L. 
Frederick A. 
Stephen, Mr. 



Hudson 
1732 Harv. ■ Eleazer, Mr. 
1824 Mid. Cyrus 
1824 Yale Jonathan T. 

1827 Yale William \V. 

1828 Wms. —Erasmus D., M. 
1830 Yale —William, Mr. 

Huger 
1813 Harv. Benjamin, M.D 
Huggeford 

1817 Harv. Henry H., Mr. 

Huggins 
1757 Yale Zenas 
1784 Yale Heaton, Mr. 
1804 Mid. Thomas D., Mr. 

1818 Yale James S., Mr. 

Hughes 
1780 Harv. James, Mr. 
1817 Mid. Enos B. M. 

Hugh: 



D. 



1822 Bro. —Dyer, M. D. 




Hulbert 




1795 Harv. John W., Mr. 




1824 Yale William E. ; Mr. 




Hulburd 




1806 Mid. Oliver, Mr., Tut. 


, Prof. 


1829 Mid. Calvin T. 




Hulburt 




1828 Mid. Hiland, Mr. 




Hulett 




1822 Mid. John G. 




Hull 




1735 Yale Daniel, Mr. 




1758 Yale Eliphalet, Mr. 




1772 Yale *Wi!iiam, Mr., and at Harv. ; 8 


1785 Yale David 


[Gov. of Mich. 


1785 Harv. Ambrose 




1805 Harv. Abraham F. 




1807 Yale Arcctius B., Mr., 


Tut. 


1814 Yale Hezekiah, Mr. 




1814 Bro. —Stephen, Mr. 




1830 Wash. James O.K. 




Hume 




1809 Bro. Robert, Mr. 




1833 Wms. —Julius M., M.D. 




Humphreville 




1763 Yale Silas 




Humphrey 




1744 Harv. James, Mr. 




1805 Yale Heman, Mr., D 


D. at Mid. J3 


1813 Mid. Luther 


[Pres. of Amh 


1821 Bro. Thomas J. 




1825 Wms. —Aaron, Mr. 




1828 Amh. Chester 




1828 Amh. E (heard P. 




1831 Amh. James 




1832 Harv. Francis J. 




Humphreys 




1732 Vale Dutriel, Mr. 




1 1757 Yale Daniel, Mr. 





212 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1771 Yale 



1796 Yale 
1803 Yale 
1818 Yale 



David, Mr., and at Harv. 7 87, at 
[Columb., at N.J. '83,LL.D. 
fat Bro. 1802, & at Dart. 1804 

John, Mr. 

David, Mr. 

Hector, Mr., Prof, at Wash., and 
[Pres. of St. Johns, D. D. 

John W. 

Hosea D. 



1823 Wms. 
1833 Amh. 

Hungerford 
1809 Yale William 

Hunkins 

1808 Dart. —Benjamin, M. B. 

Hunn 
1731 Yale Nathaniel, Mr. 
1766 Yale Zadok ' 
1813 Yale David L., Mr. 

Hunnewell 
1787 Harv. Waller, Mr., M. D. 

Hunt 
1700 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1729 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
1734 Harv. John, Mr. 
1734 Harv. John, Mr. 

1763 Harv. John, Mi. 

1764 Harv. Ebenezer. Mr., M. D. 

1764 Harv. John, Mr.' 

1765 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1766 Harv. John, Mr. 
1768 Harv. William, Mr. 
1768 Yale Seth, Mr. 
1770 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1787 Yale Ebenezer 
1789 Harv. John 

1791 Bro. Joseph S. 

1795 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1798 Harv. William, Mr. 
1800 Dart. Frederick 
1804 Dart. ||Samuel, Mr. 

1806 Dart. —Jacob, M. B. 

1807 Dart. Jonathan, Mr. 

1809 Harv. George B. 

1810 Harv. William G., Mr., and at Trans. 
1810 Harv. John L. 

1810 Harv. Benjamin F., Mr. 

1811 Harv. Moses 

1815 Harv. Ezra, Mr. 

1816 Bro. Peter B., Mr. 
1818 Yale —David, M. D. 
1820 Wms. William W., Mr. 
1822 Dart. —Ebenezer, M. D. 
1826 Yale — Josiah F., M. D. 

1826 Yale — Eleazar, M. D. 
1828 Amh. Daniel 

1830 Wms. Nathan S. 
1832 Dart. Caleb 

1832 Amh. Samuel 

1833 Yale Ebenezer K. 

Hunter 
1791 Bro. William, Mr., LL. D., Sen. in 
1806 Mid. Daniel, and at Dart. '06 [Cong. 

1809 Bow. Lilhgow 
1824 Dart. —Galen, M. D. 
1824 Mid. — Eli, Mr. 
1824 Ver. —Henry, Mr. 

1827 Wms. —James M., M. D. 
1827 Bro. Thomas R. 



1693 Harv. 
1722 Harv. 
1725 Harv. 
1735 Yale 
1767 Yale 
1804 Yale 



Hunting 



Nathaniel, Mr. 
Nathaniel, Mr. 
Edward, Mr. 
Jonathan, Mr. 
Samuel 
Jonathan 



1324 Yale 


James M., Mr. 


Huntington 


1733 Yale 


Daniel, Mr. 


1741 Yale 


Simon, Mr. 


1741 Yale 


Jabez. Mr. 


1743 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1744 Yale 


Hezekiah 


1747 Yale 


Nathaniel, Mr. 


1757 Yale 


Gurdon, Mr. 


1758 Yale 


Jabez, Mr. 


1759 Yale 


Enoch, Mr. 


1759 Yale 


Eliphalet, Mr. 


1761 Yale 


UtBenjamin, Mr., LL.B. at Dart '80 


1762 Yale 


Joseph, Mr., D. D. at Dart. '80 


1763 Harv. 


Jedediah, Mr., and at Yale ; 70 


1763 Harv. 


—John, Mr., and at N. J. ; 59 


1768 Yale 


Thomas 


1772 Yale 


Nathaniel 


1773 Dart. 


David, Mr., and at Yale 


1775 Yale 


||Ebenezer, Mr., and at Harv. 


1779 Yale- 


-t*Samuel, Mr., LL. D. at N. J. ; 80, 




[Pres. of Cong. & Gov. of Ct. 


1783 Dart. 


Henry, Mr. 


1784 Yale 


Jabez, Mr. 


1785 Yale 


t*Samuel. Mr., and at Dart. '85, 


1785 Yale 


Enoch, Mr. [Gov. of Ohio 


1786 Dart. 


Asahel, Mr. 


1788 Yale 


Lynde, Mr. 


1789 Yale 


Jonathan 


1791 Yale 


Eraslus 


1794 Yale 


Dan, Mr., and at Wms. ; 98, Tut., 


1798 Wms. 


Thomas [and at Wms. 


1800 Yale 


Samuel G., Mr. 


1803 Dart. 


Nehemiah 


1804 Yale 


Joshua, Mr., and at Harv. '08 


1806 Yale 


||Jabez'W. 


1806 Yale 


Nathaniel G. 


1807 Yale 


Daniel, Mr. '16 


1811 Yale 


Leverett I. F., Mr., and at N. J. 




['15, and at Union '15 


1811 Yale 


Henry W., Mr. 


1814 Yale 


Jedidiah 


1815 Yale 


Andrew, M. D. 


1815 Dart. 


Elisha 


1817 Mid. 


Thomas 


1817 Yale 


Rufus 


1818 Yale 


Samuel H., Mr. 


1819 Yale 


Asahel, Mr. 


1821 Yale 


Enoch 


1822 Harv. 


Charles P. 


1823 Mid. 


— Ebenezer, M. D. 


1824 Harv. 


William P. 


1825 Yale 


Oliver E., Mr. 


1827 Yale 


George 
Jonathan, Mr. 


1827 Wms. 


1828 Yale 


Peter L. 


1829 Wms. 


— Winslow T., M. D. 


1831 Amh. 


Enoch S. 


1832 Yale 


Joshua 


Huntoon 


1808 Dart. 


Nathaniel 


1817 Dart. 


Benjamin, Mr. 


Hurd 


1747 Harv. 


John, Mr., and at Dart. '73 


1776 Harv. 


Isaac, Mr., 31. D. 


1797 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1806 Harv. 


Isaac, Mr. 


1811 Harv. 


Charles 


1818 Harv. 


—Josiah S., M. D. 


1818 Dart. 


Carlton 


1822 Dart. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1822 Yale 


—Nelson, M. D. 


1830 Yale 


—Theodore C, M. D. 



1830 Wms. —George F. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



213 



Hurlburt 




1830 Mid. 


— Salmon, Mr. 




Hu 


rlbut 




1757 Yale 


George B., Mr. 




1763 Vale 


Salmon, Mr. 




1804 Wms. 


Martin L. 




1813 Harv. 


Rufiis 




1818 Yale 


Joseph, Mr. 




1822 Mid. 


Joseph 




Huse 




1726 Harv. 


Stephen, Mr. 




1788 Dart. 


Jonathan, Mr. 




1802 Dart. 


Nathaniel, 31 r. 




1820 Harv. 


—Stephen, M. D. 




1832 Bow. 


— Jonathan, M. D. 




1833 Bow. 


—Joseph, M. D. 




Hu 


sted 




1823 Yale 


Hiram W. 




Hu 


stis 




1833 Yale 


John 




Huston 




1812 Wms. 


Caleb 




1831 Yale 


Seth C. 




1831 Bow. 


Joseph T. 




Hutching 




1828 Wms. 


Samuel 




Hutchins 




1804 Dart. 


Olis, Mr. 




1807 Bro. 


John L. 




1811 Bro. 


Ezra, Mr. 




1817 Yale 


— Penuel, 31. D. 




1825 Bro. 


—William, 31. D. 




1827 Dart. 


Hamilton, 3Ir. 




1829 Yale 


—Darius, 31. D. 




Hutchinson 




1702 Harv. 


William, Mr. 




1721 Harv. 


Foster 




1727 Harv. 


t*Thomas, Mr., LL. D. 


at Oxf., 


1730 Harv. 


Eliakim, 3Ir. [Gov. 


of 3Iass. 


1734 Harv. 


Elisha, 31r. 




1736 Harv. 


Francis, Mr. 




1743 Harv. 


f Foster, 31 r. 




1747 Yale 


Aaron, 31r. ; &. at Harv. 


, at Dart. 




['80, and at 


N.J. '94 


1748 Harv. 


Edward, 31 r. 




1758 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr. 




1762 Harv. 


Elisha, 31r. 




1762 Harv. 


William, 3Ir. 




1770 Harv. 


William S., Mr. 




1770 Harv. 


Aaron, 3Ir., and at Dart. '90, & 


1775 Dart. 


Elisha, 31 r. [at 


N. J. '94 


1775 Dart. 


James 




1800 Dart. 


Timothy 




1804 Dart. 


Henry, 3Ir. 




1806 Dart. 


James, 31r. 




1811 Ver. 


fTitus, 31r., and at N. J 


1794 


1823 Ver. 


Edwin 




1824 Ver. 


Orramel 




1824 Wat. 


Ebenezer, 3Ir. 




1825 Ver. 


Henry 




1825 Yale 


—Ira, 31. D. 




1826 Bro. 


Eleazer C, 3Ir. 




1828 Yale 


—Elisha, 31. D. 




1834 Wat. 


Enoch 




Huxley 




1822 Wms. 


Milton 




Hyde 




1721 Yale 


William, 3Ir. 




1776 Yale 


Simon, Mr. 




1788 Yale 


Gershom 




1788 Dart. 


Alvan, 3Ir., D. D. 




1803 Yale 


Eli, Mr. 




1803 Yale 


John 
VOL. VII. 





1807 Wms. 


James A., Mr. 


1808 Ver. 


Archibald W. f 3Ir. 


1812 Mid. 


Oren, Mr. at Yale '20 


L813 Wms. 


Lavius, 31 r. 


1815 Wms. 


Alvan, 3Ir. 


1820 Yale 


Joseph 


1822 Wms. 


Joseph, Mr., Tut. 


1834 Yale 


— Allyn, M. D. 


1826 Wms. 


William, Mr. 


1830 Harv. 


—William, 31. D. 


1831 Mid. 


George C. 


1831 Bow. 


— Jonathan A., 31. D. 


Hyslop 


1792 Yale 


—William, Mr., and at N. J. '69 


Ide 




1809 Bro. 


Jacob, Mr. 


1830 Mid. 


George B. 


Ilsley 


1834 Wat. 


Silas 


Ince 


1650 Harv. 


Jonathan, 31r. 


Inches 


1792 Harv. 


Henderson, 3Ir. 


1831 Harv. 


Herman B. 


Ing 


alls 


1790 Harv. 


William, Mr., 31. D., 3Jr. '13, 




[31. D. and Prof, at Bro. 


1792 Harv. 


Jedidiah, 31r. 


1813 Yale 


Lemuel 


1818 Harv. 


Daniel, 31r., 31. D. at Bro. 


1821 Bow. 


-Phineas, 31. D. 


1822 Bro. 


—Daniel, 31. D. 


1823 Dart. 


John 


1829 Dart. 


Charles O. 


1829 Mid. 


— 3Ioses, 3Ir. 


Ingals 


1790 Dart. 


Charles, Mr. 


1792 Dart. 


Calvin, 31r. 


Ingersoll 


1736 Yale 


Jonathan, 31r. 


1742 Yale 


Jared, 31r. 


1761 Yale 


David 


1763 Yale 


David, 3Ir. 


1766 Yale 


fJonathan, 31r., LL. D., Lt. Gov. 




[of Conn. 
||Jared, 3Ir., LL. D. at N. J. 1821 


1766 Yale 


1790 Yale 


John 


1792 Yale 


David B. 


1798 Harv. 


Jonathan 


1808 Yale 


||Ralph I. 


1813 Dart. 


—Henry, 31. D. 


1814 Yale 


John J., 31. D. 


1815 Harv. 


George G., 3Ir. 


1817 Yale 


Samuel B., Mr. 


1821 Mid. 


John 


1827 Yale 


-Charles A., 31r. 


1830 Bow. 


George W. 


1831 Yale 


Edward 


1832 Yale 


Elihu P. 


1834 Yale 


J. V. 


1834 Harv. 


Nathaniel B. 


Ingraham 


1809 Harv. 


Daniel G., 3Ir. 


1815 Mid. 


Ira, 31r. 


1818 Harv. 


John H. 


1819 Bow. 


Edward T., 3Ir. 


1820 Bro. 


—Edward D., 3Ir. 


Ingram 


1831 Amh. 


Solomon B. 


Inman 


1772 Harv. 


George 


Ion 




1803 Yale 


Jacob B. 



28 



214 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1823 
1832 



1750 
1761 
1781 
1784 

1759 
1797 
1811 
1820 
1822 
1828 
1831 

1758 
1777 

1782 
1785 
1786 
1791 
1797 
1799 
1812 
1816 
1819 
1821 
1H22 
1824 
1825 
1830 
1834 

1719 

1726 
1727 
1733 
1753 
1761 
1763 
1764 
1773 
1783 
1787 
1788 
1788 
1790 
1792 
1793 
1793 
1794 
1796 
1799 
1807 
1810 
1812 
1817 
1817 
1821 
1M5 
1828 
1829 
1831 
1833 



Irving 
Yal — John.M.D. 

Harv. — Washington, 



LL. 



Isaacs 
Yale Isaac, Mr. 
Yale Ralph 
Yr.le Benjamin 
Yale Ralph 

Isham 
Yale Joseph, Mr. 
Jirah 
Oran 

Chester, Mr. 
Oliver K., M. D. 
■Nelson, M. D. 
•Pierpoiut, M. D. 



D., J. C. D. 

[at Oxf. 



Yale 
Ver. 

Yale 
Yale - 
Yale - 
Mid. - 
Ives 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Wash 
Yale 



Jesse, Mr. 

Thomas, Mr. 

Joseph, Mr. 

Isaac 

Reuben 

Levi 

Ezra 

Eli, Mr., M. D., Prof. 

Moses B., Mr. 

Robert H. 
— Nathaniel, M. D. 
—Ansel W., M. D. 

Thomas E. 

Matthew, Mr. 

Nathan B., Mr., M. D. 

Caleb S. 
— Edmund J. 



Jackson 



Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Bro. 

Dart. 

Dart. 



Edward, Mr. 

Edward, Mr. 

Thomas, Mr. 

Jonathan 

Joseph, Mr., Tut. 

||Jonathan, Mr. 
—William, Mr. 

Henry, Mr. 
—Richard, LL. D. 

William, Mr. 

Joseph, Mr. 

Charles, Mr. 

George, Mr. 
William, Mr. 

John 



793 Harv. —Hal!, M. D. 
Harv. fCharles, Mr. 
Harv, Edward. Mr. 
Harv. James, Mr., M. D., Prof. 
Dart. Levi, Mr. 
Dart. Joseph H. 
i-.arv. Francis, Mr. 
Harv. Leonard. Mr. 
Bro. Charles,' Mr. 
Bro. Henry, Mr. 

Mid. Samuel C, Mr. 

Harv. John B. S.. Mr.. M. D. 
Harv. James, Mr.. M. D. 
Harv. —Charles T., M. D. 
Dart. William C. 

Harv.-t||*ANDREW, LL. D., Rep. and 
[Sen. in Cong., Pres. of U. S. 
1833 Harv. Charles 

1833 Dart. Charles D. 

1834 Amh. Timothy 

Jacob 
1778 Yale fStephen, Mr., and at Dart. 1803 
1806 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr., M. B. at Dart.'09 



Jacobs 




1787 Dart. Daniel, Mr. 


1822 Bro. —Bela, Mr. 


Jaffrey 


1702 Harv. fGeorge, Mr. 


1736 Harv. George, Mr., and at Dart. '79 


James 


1710 Harv. —John, Mr. 


1770 Bro. —Samuel, Mr. 


1778 Harv. Eleazar, Mr., Tutor 


1805 Bro. Benjamin, Mr. 


1816 Mid. Edwin 


1817 Wms. Lyman 


1820 Bro. —Silas, M. D., and at Yale '21 


1821 Harv. George B., Mr. 


1825 Yale Lawrence, Mr. 


Jameson 


1797 Dart. Thomas, Mr. 


1818 Dart. Thomas 


1821 Dart. John 


1823 Yale Robert 


Janes 


1801 Dart. Ebenezer 


1830 Wms. Francis 


Janeway 


1814 Mid. —Jacob J., D. D. 


Jansen 


1827 Wms. —Egbert, M. D. 


Janvrin 


1728 Harv. John, Mr. 


Jaques 


1707 Harv. Stephen, Mr. 


1720 Harv. Richard, Mr. 


1307 Harv. Abie), Mr. 


Jarvis 


1761 Yale Abraham, Mr., D. D. 


1766 Harv. Charles, Mr. 


1797 Harv. Leonard 


1800 Harv. Leonard 


1805 Yale Samuel F., Mr., D. D. at Penn. 


1810 Dart. Joseph R. 


1811 Wms. — William C. Mr. 


1821 Harv. Charles, Mr., M. D. 


1826 Harv. Edward, Mr., M. D. 


1833 Harv. William P. 

Jay 
1790 Harv.— *John, LL. D., and at Bro. '94, 


[A. B. at Columb. '64, Chief 


[Just, of S. C. of U. S. and 


[Gov. of N. Y. 


1798 Yale —Peter A., Mr., A. B. at Columb. 


['94, LL. D. at Harv. 1833 


Jefferds 


1722 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 


Jefferson 


1786 Yale— ||*THOMAS, William and Mary 




['60, LL. D., & at Harv. '87, 




at Bro. '87, and at N. J. '91, 




Gov. of Virginia <fc Pres. & 




"Vice Pres. of U. S. 


Jeffries 


1708 Harv. David, Mr. 


1732 Harv. David. Mr. 


1763 Harv. John, Mr., M. D. at Aberd. 


1815 Harv. Joh 


n, Mr., M. D., Mr. at Bro. '25 



1780 
1782 
1824 
1824 
1825 



Jenckes 
Harv. Daniel 



Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 



Joseph, Mr. 
Francis C. 
Joseph S. 
Jerathmel B. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



215 



1803 
1813 
1818 
1828 
182!) 

1797 
1810 
1817 
1821 
1829 
1830 

1753 

1803 

1827 
1832 

1774 
1800 
1808 
1828 
1832 

1720 
1724 
1774 
1774 

1782 
1797 
1826 
1827 

1825 

1831 

1798 

1760 

1814 
1815 
1824 

1726 
1736 
1752 
1769 
1769 
1776 
1787 
1795 
1797 
1800 
1801 
1802 
1807 
1810 
1816 
1820 
1821 
1823 
1824 
1826 
1826 
1827 
1828 
1829 
1830 
1831 



Jenkins 

Bro. — Edward, D. D., and at Columb. 

Wins. Charles, Mr., Tutor 

Hiirv. John F., J\lr. ; Tutor, Prof, at 

Yak: Joseph [Transyiv. 

llarv. Solomon M. 

Jenks 



Hnrv. William, Mr 
Bro. Hervey 
Hnrv. Francis, Mr. 
Harv. Theodore R. 
Ainh. Jove|jli VV. 
Harv. Richard P. 

Jenner 
Harv. David 
Harv. —Edward, M. D., LL. D 

Jenney 
Dart. Elisha 
Mid. Ephraim H. 

Jennings 
Bro. — James. Mr. 
VVnis. Ebentzer 
Yale Pfeserved 
Yale —Isaac, M. D. 
Wat. Henry H. 

Jennison 
Harv. 
Harv. 

Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 

Dart. 



Prof, at Bow., and 
[D. D. 1825 



Samuel, Mr. 

William, Mr. 

William 

Samuel, Mr. 

Timothy L., Mr., Tut., M. D. 

John F. 
Harv. -John, M. D. 
Dart. Edwin 

Jenny 

Ver. —Lyman T., M. D. 
Jermain 

Ami). James B. 

Jerome 

Wins. Amasa, Mr. 

Jessup 
Yale Ebenezer 

Jesup 
Yale Charles, Mr. 
Yale William 
Yale Ebenezer 

Jewett 

Harv. Jedidiah, Mr. 

Harv. David, Mr. 

Harv. Dummer, Mr. 

Harv. Jacob, Mr. 

Harv. David 

Dart. Caleb, Mr. 

Yale David M. 

Dart. \\Luther, M. B. 

Harv. Thomas 

Harv. James C, Mr., and at Bow. '06 

Dart. David 

Bro. Paul, Mr., Tutor 

Harv. Aaron 

Dart. Leonard 

Harv. George 

Dart. — Hibbard, M. D. 

Dart. — Calvin, M. D. 

Dart. Merrick A. 

Bro. Henry C. 

Dart. Spojord D., Mr. 

Wat. Albert G. 

Dart. Adams, Mr. 

Dart. Milo P., Mr., Prof, at Mar. 

Wms. —Charles, M. D. 

Harv. Isaac A. 

Amh. William R. 



1833 Bow. Henry J. 

1833 Bow. —William H., M. D. 

1834 Bow. Theodore H. 

Jocelin 
1783 Yale Samuel R., Mr. 

Johnos 
1737 Yale Timothy, D. D. 

Johns 

1809 Yale —Erans, Mr. 
1818 Yale Thomas H. 
1820 Bro. —William, M. D. 
1831 Amh. David L. 

Johnson 

1645 Harv. Robert 

1661 Harv. Thomas 

1714 Yale Samuel, Mr., and at Oxf. nnd 
[Camb., Tut., D. D. at Oxf., 
[Prcs. of Columb. 

1727 Harv. William, Mr. 

1740 Yale Jacob, Mr. 

1743 Yale Stephen, Mr. 

1744 Yale i||WiLLiAM S., Mr., and at Harv. 

[& Columb., LL. D. at Oxf., 
[IVes. of Columb. 
1748 Yale William, Mr., &, at Harv. '53, at 
1748 Yale Jameson [Oxf. and at Camb. 

1759 Y r a!e Abner, Mr. 

1760 Yale Benjamin, Mr. 
1760 Yale James. Mr. 

1764 Yale Deodate. Mr., Tutor 

1767 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

1769 Yale Samuel, Mr. 

1771 Harv. Moses 

1775 Y'ale Joshua. Mr. 

1778 Dart. Ebenezer 

1778 Yale William 

1779 Yale Samuel W„ Mr., and at Columb. 
1783 Yale Robert C, Mr. 

1785 Yale Caleb. Mr. 

1785 Dart. Alfred, Mr. 

1787 Harv. Asa. Mr. 

1788 Y"aie William, Mr. 

1798 Wms. Gordon, Mr. 

1799 Bro. Phineas. Mr. 
1799 Dart. Kendall, Mr. 
1802 Yale Sherman. Mr. 

1802 Y'ale Nathan, Mr., and at Harv. '18 

1806 Bro. Daniel 

1807 Ver. Lewis 

1808 Bow. Alfred, Mr. 

1808 Bro. Arlemas, Mr., M. D. 

1808 Bro. Evan St. 

1808 Harv. James, Mr. 

1810 Harv. Jonathan G., Mr., M. D. 

1812 Mid. Hiram S. 

1813 Yale James D.. Mr. ■ 

1814 Bro. —William P., Mr. 
1814 Harv. Samuel, Mr.. M. D. 

1816 Yale Charles J. 

1817 Bow. Samuel, Mr. 

1818 Harv. —William. LL. D.. and at N. J., 

[Mr. at N. J. 1790, Just, of 
[S. C. of U. S. 

1819 Yale —William S., at Union '16, Mr. 

1819 Harv. Walter R., Mr. 

1820 Yale Daniel H. 

1822 Dart. Haynes, Mr. 

1823 Yale Edwards, Mr. 

1823 Bro. Aholiab 

1824 Bow. —Benjamin. M. D 

1825 Bro. Nathaniel E. 
1827 Amh. Stephen 

1827 Y r ale Sidney L.. Mr., Tut. 

1828 Dart. Osgood, Mr. 

1829 Yale -Samuel, M. D. 



216 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



18 u 29 Wash 
1832 Amh. 

1832 Dart. 

1833 Yale 

1834 Dart. 



1813 Dart. 
1821 Harv. 
1825 Dart. 
1827 Wms. 
1830 Yale 

1832 Bow. 

1833 Yale 

1834 Yale 



1829 Wms. — Ezekiel P., M. D. 
1829 Wms. Oren 

Richard 
Obadiah M. 
Peter, M. D. 
Eber.ezer A. 
Moses 
Johnston 
8 Wms. Isaiah Y. A., Mr. 
Charles 

Thomas J., '33 
Hale A., Mr. 
William M. 
—Robert C., Union '27, Mr. 
John 
W. P. 
William S. 
Johonnot 
1783 Harv. Samuel C, Mr. 

Joice 
1816 Mid. —John, Mr. 

Jones 
1643 Harv. John, Mr. 
John, Mr. 
Thomas, Mr. 
Isaac, Mr. 
Thomas 
Cornelius, Mr. 
Harding 

Timothy, Mr., and at Harv. '61 
Isaac, Mr. 
Daniel, Mr. 
William, Mr. 
Elias, Mr. 
John C, Mr. 
Daniel, Mr. 
— Robert S.. Mr., and at Penn. 
—Samuel, Mr., & at Penn., D. D 



1690 Harv. 

1741 Harv. 

1742 Yale 
1750 Yale 
1752 Harv. 

1756 Yale 

1757 Yale 
1757 Yale 
1759 Harv. 
1762 Yale 

1767 Yale 

1768 Harv. 

1769 Harv. 
1769 Bro. 
1769 Bro. 
1774 Bro. 

1774 Bro. 

1775 Harv. 

1776 Yale 
1778 Harv. 

1778 Dart. 

1779 Dart. 
1782 Bro. 
1788 Dart. 

1790 Yale 

1791 Bro. 

1792 Yale 

1793 Harv. 
1793 Bro. 
1796 Yale 

1798 Wms. 

1799 Dart. 

1800 Yale 

1803 Harv. 

1804 Dart. 
1804 Yale 
1806 Harv. 

1806 Wms, 

1807 Yale 

1808 Yale 
1810 Wms. 

1810 Wms. 

1811 Wms. 

1811 Wms. 

1812 Yale 
1812 Bro. 
1814 Bro. 
1817 Harv. 

1817 Yale 

1818 Yale 
1820 Yale 



Timothy, Mr. 
-David, Mr. 
Stephen, Mr. 
John 

Joseph, Mr. 
Abraham 
John 

Alexander 
Abiel, Mr. 
Samuel, LL, 



['86 



at Col., Chan- 
cellor of N.Y. 



John, Mr. 

Isuac, Mr. 

William, Mr. 
—Morgan, LL. D. 

William H. 

Daniel 

Thomas 

Samuel 

Daniel, Mr. 

Anson 

Timothy 

Thomas M., Mr., and at Bow. 

Henry T. 

Algernon S. 

John T. 

Isaac 
— Horatio, Mr. 

Silas 
—Thomas P., Mr. 

Stephen F. 
—Horatio G., Mr. 

Alexander, Mr. 

Joseph H., Mr., and at Bow. '18 

Joel [Tut. at Bow 

John N. 

Henry, Mr. 



1821 
1823 
1824 
1825 
1826 
1826 
1828 
1828 
1829 
1832 
1834 

1750 
1827 
1830 
1831 

1832 
1832 

1814 

1765 

1826 

1771 
1797 
1811 
1833 

1737 
1741 
1741 

1763 
1765 
1787 
1787 
1791 
1797 
1812 
1820 
1824 
1824 
1827 

1738 
1746 
1763 
1775 
1775 
1775 
1777 
1778 
1787 
1790 
1797 
1799 
1800 
1802 
1803 
1804 
1807 
1809 
1818 

1818 

1821 
1822 
1824 
1826 
1830 
1831 
1832 



Bow. 

Yale 

Wms. 

Amh. 

Amh. 

W T ms. 

Bro. 

Mid. 

Amh. 

Amh. 

Dart. 



Lot, Mr. 

George, Mr., Tutor 
—Henry, M. D. 

John T. 

Edward 
—William H., M. D. 
— William, Mr. 

Amzi, Air. 

Franklin 

Perley C. 

John 



Jordan 
Harv. Samuel 
Bow. Ichabod G. 
Bow. — Nahum, M. D. 
Bow. William V. 
Bow. John 
Dart. Cyrus, M. D. 

Joslen 
Bro. Joseph, Mr., Tut. 

Josselyn 
Harv. Isaiah, Mr. 

Jouve 
Harv. Adolphus P., Mr. ; 31 



Joy- 



Michael, Mr. at N. J. 

John 

Cyrus 

James F. 



Harv. 
Harv. 

Wms. 
Dart. 

Judd 

Yale Timothy, Mr. 

Yale Jonathan, Mr. 

Yale Revhen 

Yale William, Mr. 

Yale John, Mr. 

Harv. William S. 

Dart. Jehiel, Mr. at Yale 1816 

Yale — Benjamin, Mr. 

Yale Bethel, Mr., D. D. at Wash. 1831 

W r ms. Hophni 

Yale — Jonathan, Mr. 

Wms. Charles G., Mr. 

Bro. William H. 
Wash. Spencer P. 

Judson 

Yale David, Mr. 

Yale Ephraim, Mr. 

Yale Ephraim, Mr. 

Yale Adoniram, Mr., and at Harv. '82 

Yale David, Mr. 

Dart. Andrew, Mr. 

Yale Israel 

Yale David, Mr. 

Yale Roswell, Mr. 

Yale Samuel, Mr. 

Wms. Ephraim, Mr. 

Wms. Noah 

Yale Philander 

Bro. John W. 

Yale Isaac E., Mr. 

Yale Curtis, and at Mid. 

Bro. Adoniram, Mr., D. D. 

Yale Philo 

Bro. Waller P. B., Mr., M. D. at 
[Harv. '21 

Bro. — Elnathan, Mr., and at Dart. '23 

Yale Albert 

Yale — Hezekiah T., M. D. 

Yale Frederick J., M. D. 

Yale Everton, Mr. 

Yale —John, M. D. 

Yale David P. 

Yale William 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



217 



1821 

1774 

1816 

1813 
1814 

1831 

1831 

17G9 

1814 

1821 

1826 

1820 
1824 

1709 

1831 

1769 
1802 
1826 
1829 
1834 

1729 
1762 
1771 
1805 
1814 

1819 
1826 

1807 



June 
Mid. Ezra 

Junkins 
Harv. Robert 

Kain 
Yale John H. ; M. D. Penn. 

Kane 
Yale Elias K., Mr., Sen. in Cong. 
Yale John K. ; Mr. 

Kanouse 
Yale —Peter, Mr. 

Karavalles 
Amh. Anastasius 

Kast 
Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Keating 
Harv. Charles 
Harv. Theodore, Mr., LL. B. 

Keeler 
Mid. Seth H., Mr. 

Keely 

Bro. — George, Mr. 
Bro. George W., Tut. 

Keen 

Harv. John 

Keeney 
Yale — George L., M. D. 

Keep 

Yale John, Mr. 
Yale John, Mr. 
Harv. —Nathan C, M. D. 
Amh. John 
Yale John R. 
Keith 

Harv. Ephraim, Mr. 
Harv. Ephraim, Mr. 
Harv. Israel, Mr. 
Bro. Jonathan 

Mid. Reuel H., D. D., Tut. and Prof, 
[at Wm. &. Mary's, <fc at Alex. 

Jairus S., Mr. 

Omen S., Mr. '31 



Kelly 



Bro. 
Harv. 

Kell 

Yale 



John 



Kellogg 
1751 Harv. Giles C, Mr. 
1757 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 
1761 Yale Judah, Mr. 
1763 Yale Joseph 
1767 Yale Charles, Mr. 

1770 Yale —Solomon, at N. J. '66, Mr. 
1775 Dart. David, Mr., & at Yale '78, D. D. 
1778 Yale Aaron 
1785 Dart. Elijah, Mr., D. D. 
1787 Harv. Samuel 
1791 Yale Gardiner 
1800 Yale Giles C. 
1800 Wins. Bela, Mr. 
1803 Yale Jonathan, Mr. 
1807 Yale Ezra 

1810 Yale Ebenezer, Mr., & at Wms. '15, 
1810 Wms. Daniel [Prof, at Wms. 

1815 Yale Henry, Mr. at Wms. '24 
1818 Yale Alfred 
1823 Ver. Orson 

1825 Wms. —Silas R., M. D. 
1827 Bow. Gardiner 

1825 Mid. —John, Mr. 

1829 Wms. — Amasa, M. D. 
1829 Wms. Giles B. 

1832 Yale Martin 

1833 Dart. —Joseph, M. D. 



William, Mr. 
— Erasmus, Mr., and at Penn. 

John, Mr. 

John, Mr. 

Hall J., Mr, and at Harv. '20 

Ebenezer S. 

Henry '/'., Mr. 

Albert L. 

Webster 

Join., '27 

John 
—Nathaniel K., M. D. 
—Samuel, M. D. 

Moses 



1767 Harv. 
1772 Bro. 

1791 Dart. 

1804 Dart. 
1813 Mid. 
1813 Dart. 

1819 Hart. 

1822 Dart. 
1825 Dart. 

1825 Wins. 
1825 Amh. 

1828 Row. 

1829 Dart. 
1834 Harv. 

Kelsey 

1805 Yale Aaron H. 

Kemp 

1792 Harv. — John, Mr., D. D. 

Kendal 
1731 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1782 Harv. Samuel, Mr., D. D. at Yale 1806 

1820 Harv. Payson, Mr. 

Kendall 

1774 Dart. Thomas, Mr. 

1787 Harv. Ephraim, Mr. 

1791 Harv. Duvid, Mr. 

1796 Harv. James, Mr., Tut., D. D. 

1810 Harv. Joseph G., Mr., Tut. 

1811 Dart. Amos 

1816 Harv. — Pierson T., M. D. 

1823 Harv. James A., Mr. 
1827 Amh. John B., Mr. 

1830 Wms. — Gilman 
1834 Yale John N. 

Kendrick 

1810 Bro. Daniel 

1816 Harv. William P. 

1819 Bro. —Nathaniel, Mr., D. D. '23 

1819 Mid. — Clarke, Mr. 

1826 Dart. John, Mr., Prof, at Ken. 

Kenman 
1804 Ver. Jairus, Mr. 

Kennedy 
1803 Yale Joshua 
1307 Yale Lionel H., Mr. 

1825 Yale Algernon S., Mr. 

1826 Harv. Charles R. 

1826 Bow. —Daniel K., M. D.. Mr. at \Yat.'28 
r829 Bow. — Abiel W., M. D. '30 

Kenrick 
1825 Mid. — Adin, M. D. 
Kent 

1727 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

1729 Yale Eli'sha, Mr. 

1731 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1739 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1752 Yale Moss, Mr. 

1763 Yale Ruggles, Mr. 

1781 Yale +James. Mr., LL. D. at Harv. 

[1810, at Columb., at Dart. 

[1815. Prof, at Columb. 
1795 Harv. Amos, Mr. 
1801 Harv. Mood v, Mr. 
1807 Mid. —Dan, 'Mr. 
1814 Dart. George, Mr. 
1816 Yale Aretas. Mr. 

1820 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

1821 Harv. Edward, Mr. 
1824 Wms. Brainard 
1824 Mid. Cephas H. 
1826 Wms. Eliphalet 



218 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Kenyon 
1820 Ver. Jared 

Keous 
1768 Harv. William, Mr. 

Kerr 
1816 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
1830 Harv. John B. 
1833 Yale Samuel C. 

Kettell 
1828 Wat. Jacob Q. 

Kettle tas 

1752 Yale Abraham, Mr., & at N. J. '55 

1792 Yale Philip D., Mr. 

Keyes 

1773 Yale Stephen 

1790 Dart. Elnathan 
1800 Dart. Washington 

1803 Dart. John, Mr. 

1809 Dart. John, Mr. 

1810 Dart. Asa, Mr. 

Keyser 
1826 Dart. —John, M. D. 

Kibbe 

1787 Yale William 

1804 Yale Walter R. 
1815 Yale Simeon T. 

Kidder 

1751 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1755 Harv. Nathan 

1764 Yale Joseph, Mr., and at Harv. '68 

1767 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

1791 Dart. Reuben 

1793 Harv. John 

1821 Mid. Jonathan B., Mr. 

1828 A mil. Cor bin 

1832 Dart. —Frederick T. ; M. D. 

Kilbern 
1720 Yale Hezekiab. Mr. 
1724 Yale Pelatiah 

Kilburn 

1777 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1778 Dart. Josiah, Mr. 
1810 Ver. John 

Kilby 
1723 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 
1789 Yale —Charles, M. D. 

Kilham 
rl777 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

Kimball 
1753 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1774 Yale Timothy 
1778 Harv. True, Mr. 
1780 Harv. Jacob 

1788 Harv. Jacob, Mr. 

1792 Harv. John, Mr. 

1796 Bro. Asa 

1797 Harv. Jabez, Mr., Tutor 

1800 Harv. Daniel, Mr., Tutor 

1801 Dart. Joseph 
1803 Dart. Benjamin 

1803 Harv. David T., Mr. 

1804 Harv. Leonard, Mr. 

1806 Dart. Samuel A., Mr. 

1807 Dart. John W. ; M. D. 

1809 Dart. George 

1810 Dart. Richard, Mr. 

1813 Yale William 

1814 Harv. Edmund 
1816 Yale James 

1816 Dart. -John W. 

1817 Bro. Isaac, Mr. 

1818 Yale David, Mr. 



1818 Yale —John P., M. D. 

1819 Dart. Jesse 

1820 Mid. James 

1821 Dart. John H. 

1822 Dart. John 

1824 Dart. James L., Mr. 
1826 Dart. Caleb 
1826 Dart. Moses 

1826 Amh. Milton, Mr. 

1827 Dart. —Oilman, M. D. 

1828 Wat. —Charles O., Mr., and at Bro. ? 28 

1829 Mid. David T. 
1834 Dart. Richard B. 
1834 Harv. —Horace, M. D. 

Kimberly 
1763 Yale —John, Mr. 
1766 Yale Thomas, Mr. 
1787 Yale Liberty 
1807 Yale Lester 
1812 Yale Dennis 

King 
1759 Yale Alexander 
1777 Harv. Rufus. Mr.. LL. D., & at Dart. 
[1802, at Wms. '03, at Peun., 
[Sen. in Cong. 
1782 Yale Walter, Mr. 
1787 Bro. Eli, Mr. 
1791 Bro. Samuel, Mr. 

1791 Harv. Asa 

1792 Bro. William V., Mr. 
1792 Yale Nathaniel 

1796 Yale Salmon, Mr. 

1796 Bro. David, Mr.. M. D. 
1802 Yale —Asa, Mr. 

1802 Harv. John, Mr. 
1804 Wms. Barnabas 

1804 Yale Francis, Mr. 

1805 Yale Walter, Mr. 

1806 Wms. Aaron 

1809 Wins. Ebenezer 

1810 Harv. James G., Mr. 
1810 Ver. Dauphin 

1814 Bow. Elijah 

1815 Wms. Adolphus 

1816 Wins. Jonas, Mr., Prof, at Amh., D. D. 
1818 Harv. —John G.. Mr. 

1821 Yale Asa H., M. D. at Bow. 

1821 Harv. Frederick G., Mr.. M. D. 
1823 Harv. Daniel P., Mr. 

1823 Bow. William R. 

1824 Bow. —Asa H., M. D. 

1825 Wat. Alonzo 

1825 Bro. George G. 

1827 Dart. —Samuel D., M. D. 
1831 Amh. Samuel P. C. 
1834 Harv. Rufus T. 

Kinghorn 

1828 Bro. —Joseph, Mr. 

Kingman 

1816 Bro. Eliab, Mr. 

1830 Bro Lucius 

Kingsbury 

1759 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1763 Yale Sandford, Mr. at Dart. 1801 

1767 Yale Jonathan, Mr. 

1783 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 

1786 Yale John 

1797 Dart. Ephraim. Mr. 
1801 Dart. Sanford, Mr. 
1808 Dart. Lawson, Mr. 
1812 Bro. Cyrus, Mr. 

1816 Bro. —Samuel A., M. D. 

1822 Bro. Samuel 

1826 Bro. John, Mr. 

1827 Harv. William B. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



219 



1827 
1828 
1829 

1823 

1778 
1799 
1809 
1832 
1832 
1834 

1810 
1318 

1765 
1794 
1804 

1825 

1809 

1822 

1787 
1799 
1822 
1825 
1832 

1831 

1765 
1787 
1815 
1827 
1831 

1768 

1789 



Amh. Enoch, Mr. 
How. San ford A. 
Bow. — Nathaniel, M. D. 

Kingsland 
Yale Thorn S., Mr. 

Kingsley 

Harv. Mail in, Mr. 

Yale James L., Mr., Tut., Prof., LL.D. 

Wins. Justus [at Mid. 

Yale George 
Yale —Oliver, M. D. 
Yale Henry C. 

Kinlock 

Harv. Frederick 
Harv. Cleland 

Kinne 
Yale Aaron, Mr. 
Yale Aaron, Mr. 
Yale William, Mr. 
Mid. Ezra U. ; Mr. 

Kinney 
Mid. Munnis M., and at Wms. 7 09 

Kinnicut 
Bro. Thomas 

Kinsman 
Dart. Aaron, Mr. 
Dart. Nathan, Mr. 
Dart. Henry W., Mr. 
Bow. John D., Mr. 
Dart. —Jonathan B., M. D. 

Kip 

Yale William I. 

Kirby 
Yale Joseph, Mr. 
Yale — Ephraim, Mr. 
Yale — Selah, M. D. 
Yale William, Mr. 
Mid. Samuel A. 

Kirkland 



1790 
1792 
1803 
1831 

1720 
1779 
1789 
1813 
1815 

1810 

1829 
1830 

1795 
1806 
1810 
1811 
1813 
1816 
1320 
1820 
1S21 
1821 
1822 
1825 
1825 



Yale 
Harv 



Yale 
Dart. 
Harv 
Amh. 



-Samuel, Mr., & at Dart.'73, A. B. 

[at N.J. } G5 

John T., Mr., & at Dart. ; 92, at 

[Bro. '94, D. D. at N. J. 1802. 

[LL.D. at Bro. 1810, Pres.oi 

[Harv. 

||Joseph 

George W., Mr. 
Samuel 



Edward 

Kir tl and 
Yale Daniel, Mr. 
Yale Ambrose 
Yale ||Dorrance 
Mid. George W. 

Yale — Jared P., M. D. 

Kissam 
Yale Daniel 
Yale Philip P., M.D. 
Wash. George H. 

Kittredge 
Harv. John 
Dart. Joseph, Mr. 
Harv. Rufus, Mr. 
Harv. — Thomas, M. D. 
Dart. Jonathan 
Harv. Jacob, fit. D. 
Harv. — Theodore, M. D. 
Harv. Ingalls, Mr., M. D. 
Harv. —George W., M. D. 
Wms. William C. 
Harv. —Thomas B., M. D. 
Wms. —Benjamin F., M. D. 
Wms. -William F., M. D. 



1827 Dart. 


Alfred 


1827 How. 


— Benjamin, M. D. 


1828 A mil. 


1 lose 1 


1828 Amh. 


John T., M. D. at Harv. '34 


1828 Dart. 


Charles li. 


1831 How. 


—Edward A., M. D. 


1832 Dart. 


— Jnsiah, M. D. 


1833 Dart. 


Thomas 


1834 Dart. 


Charles 


Knapen 


1822 Mid. 


— Mason, Mr. 


Knapp 


1770 Yale 


Joshua 


1796 Wms. 


David, Mr. 


1800 Wms. 


Isaac, Mr., Tut. 


1300 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1802 Harv. 


Jacob N., Mr. 


1804 Dart. 


Samuel L., Mr., LL. D. at Paris 


1825 Yale 


—Colby, M. D. 


1825 Bow. 


—Cyrus, M. D. 


1S26 Harv. 


Nathaniel P. 


Kneeland 


1743 Harv. 


Samuel 


1744 Harv. 


William 


1751 Harv. 


William, Mr., Tut. 


1761 Yale 


Ebenezer. Mr. at Columb. 


1797 Harv. 


Samuel A., Mr. 


Knight 


1767 Yale 


Isaac, Mr. 


1800 Wins. 


Caleb, Mr. 


1808 Yale 


Jonathan, Mr., Tut., Prof., M. D. 


1812 Bro. 


Henry C, Mr. 


1813 Bro. 


Daniel 


1813 Bro. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1819 Yale 


—Earl, M. D. 


1822 Yale 


—James G., M. D. 


1328 Amh. 


William L. 


1829 Bow. 


—Addison, M. D. 


1829 Bow. 


Isaac 



Knowles 
1768 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 

Knowlton 
1783 Dart. Calvin, Mr. 

1823 Dart. John 

1824 Dart. —Charles, M. D., and at Wms. '27 

Knox 
1768 Yale —Hugh, N. J. '54, Mr., D. D. at 
1793 Harv. —Henry, Mr. [Glas. 

1800 Yale Hugh 
1813 Wms. — Alanson, Mr. 
1822 Yale John R., Mr. 
1830 Yale James 

Kollock 
1786 Bro. Lemuel, Mr., M. D., «fc at Harv. 

[1822 
1 116. 
Tut. 



1806 Harv. 


— Henry, D. D., and at Unioi 




[A. B. at N.J. 1794, & 




[and Prof. 


1811 Bro. 


Oliver H. 


1823 Harv. 


Phineas M. 


1829 Yale 


George J., Mr. 


Kortright 


1819 Yale 


Robert, Mr., M. D. at N. J. 


Labaree 


1828 Dart. 


Benjamin, Mr., Prof, and 



Pres. 



1811 
1834 



1824 
1826 



Lab ere e 

Mid. Joseph, Mr. 

Labranche 
Harv. Drausin 

Lacy 
Yale —Noah A., M.D. 
Yale —Daniel, M.D. 



[Jackson College 



220 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Ladd 


1797 Harv. 


William 


1320 Dart. 


— Laban, M. D. 


1824 Anib. 


Beaufort, Mr. 


1825 Dart. 


—Nathaniel G., M. D. 


1829 Dart. 


Haven 


1832 Mid. 


Daniel 


La 


? ayette 


1784 Harv. 


—Gilbert Motier De, LL. D., & at 




[IN. J. '90, at Bow. 1824, and 
[at Penn., Marquis 




1824 Harv. 


— George W., Mr. 


Laine 


1830 Dart. 


Lewis F. 


Laird 


1832 Wms. 


— Orville P., M. D. 


Lake 


1824 Mid. 


Rial 


Lakemart 


1790 Dart. 


Nathan 


Lamb 


1717 Yale 


Joseph, Mr. 


1818 Harv. 


William D. 


1824 Mid. 


—Edward, M. D. 


1825 Ver. 


Dana, Mr., and at Mid. '34 


Lambert 


1761 Yale 


David, Mr. 


1787 Bro. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 


1798 Dart. 


William, Mr. 


1825 Dart. 


Roger N., Mr.. M. D. at Harv. 

['29 
mson 


La 


1741 Yale 


Joseph, Mr. 


1790 Dart. 


Joseph 


1814 Harv. 


Josiah 


1814 Harv. 


ALvan, Mr., Tut. at Bow. 


1814 Bow. 


George, Mr. 


1828 Bro. 


Samuel 


Lancaster 


1764 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr. 


1821 Dart. 


Daniel, Mr. 


Landfear 


1821 Yale 


Rodolvhus 


Landon 


1763 Yale 


Jonathan. Mr. 


1833 Yale 


Edward R. 


Lane 


1753 Harv. 


David, Mr. 


1764 Yale 


Job, Mr., Tutor 


1772 Harv. 


Oliver W., Mr. '79 


1794 Dart. 


Jedidiah 


1798 Harv. 


Otis, Mr. 


1799 Harv. 


Joshua 


1811 Harv. 


Ebenezer, Mr. 


1815 Dart. 


—Robert. M. D. 


1821 Harv. 


Henry, M. D. 


1823 Bow. 


William A., Mr. 


1824 Dart. 


—Timothy L., M. D. 


1827 Bow. 


—Josiah, M. D. 


1827 Wat. 


Albert G. 


1828 Bow. 


George W., M. D. 


1828 Mid. 


Freeman 


1829 Amh. 


David T. 


1831 Bow. 


— George W. 


Lang 


1815 Dart. 


John S., Mr. 


Langdon 


1740 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr., Pres., D. D. at 
[Aberd. 
Samuel, Mr., and at Harv. ; 92 


1747 Yale 


1752 Harv. 


Ephraim, Mr. 


1764 Harv. 


Josiah, Mr. 



1765 Harv. 


Timothy, Mr. 




1770 Harv. 


Paul. Mr. 




1781 Yale 


Timothy, Mr. 




1783 Dart. 


Joseph 




1785 Yale 


Henry S. 




1787 Yale 


llChauncv, Mr. at Mid. 1803 


1794 Dart. 


William 




1805 Dart.- 


— *John, LL. D., Sen. in 


Cong. & 


1806 Yale 


Timothy, Mr. [Gov. 


of N. H. 


1809 Yale 


John, Mr., Tutor 




1812 Harv. 


William E., Mr. 




1822 Mid. 


—Benjamin F., Mr., A. B 


at Union 


1827 Yale 


—Norman, M. D. 


[18 


1829 Dart. 


—Charles F., M. D. 




Langdon-Elwyn 




1319 Harv. 


John L. 




1823 Harv. 


William A., Mr. 




1826 Harv. 


Charles H, Mr. 




Langrell 




1751 Harv. 


Thomas 




Langstroth 




1831 Yale 


Lawrence L., Tutor 




Langworthy 




1805 Ver. 


Asahel, Mr. 




Lankton 




1777 Yale 


Levi, Mr. 




Lanman 




1783 Yale 


•(•James, Mr., Sen. in Cong. 


1814 Yale 


Charles J. 




Lanneau 




1829 Yale 


John F. 




Lansing 




1804 Yale 


Dirck C, Mr. at Unioi 


, Prof, at 




[Aub. Sem., D. D. 


at Wms. 




['26 




1811 Mid. 


James, Mr. 




1813 Wms. 


Sanders 




1829 Wms. 


Charles B. 




1830 Wms. 


Abraham Y., Mr. 




Lansingh 




1743 Yale 


Mvndert, Mr. 




Larned 




1792 Bro. 


George 




1795 Bro. 


Erastus, Mr. 




1813 Mid. 


Sylvester, Mr. 




1826 Yale 


William A., Mr., Tutor 




Larrabee 




1828 Bow. 


William C, Mr. 




Larry 




1821 Bow. 


James 




Lassell 




1828 Wms. 


Edward, Mr., Tut., Prof. 


Lash 




1829 Bow. 


Augustus F., Mr. 




La 


Terriere 




1789 Harv. 


—Peter de Sales, M. D. 




Latham 




1813 Dart. 


Allen 




1821 Wms. 


— Daniel, Mr. 




1824 Mid. 


Arthur, Mr. 




1827 Bro. 


Williams 




Lathrop 




1743 Yale 


Joshua, Mr. 




1749 Yale 


Elijah, Mr. 




1754 Yale 


Joseph, Mr., D. D., and 


at Harv. 

[1811 

D. D. at 


1768 Harv. 


—John, N. J. '63, Mr., 3 


1787 Yale 


Gurdon 


[Ediu. 


1787 Yale 


Elijah L. 




1787 Yale 


Daniel 




1788 Yale 


Charles 





1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



221 



1789 
1792 

1809 

1811 
1815 

1819 
1822 
1825 

1829 

1703 
1818 

1834 

1787 
1834 

1815 

1G95 
1751 

1753 
1775 
1791 
1792 
1800 
1801 
1803 
1804 
1806 
1814 
1819 
1822 
1822 

1743 
1759 
1776 
1795 
1801 
1811 
1815 
1820 
1823 
1824 
1826 
1829 
1832 
1833 
1834 

1805 
1825 

1780 
1817 

1788 
1819 

1834 

1798 
1828 
1829 
1830 

1745 



John, Mr. 

||SamueJ, Mr. '97 

Gurdon \V. 

Solomon, Mr. 

Leonard E. 

John 11., Mr., Tut., Prof, at Ham. 

William, Mr. 

William McC., Mr. 

John 



M. D. 



Harv 

Yale 
^ ale 
^ale 
Mid. 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 

Latimer 
Harv. John 
Yale Pickett 

Laughton 
Bow. — Sumner 

Laurence 

Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
Harv. Rums B. 

Laurie 
Mid. —James, D. D. 

Law 
Harv. * Jonathan, Mr., Gov. of Conn. 
Yale t||Richard, Mr., LL. D. 
Yale John, Mr. 

Bro. Andrew, Mr., and at Yale '86, 
Yale ||Lyman [LL I), at Alleg. 

Yale Samuel A., Mr., and at JN. J. ; 97 
Yale Prentice . 
Yale William 
Y'ale Jonathan 
Harv. John 
Y r ale Edmund 
Yale John, Mr. 
Harv. Edward E. 
Yale William H. 
Yale John S. 

Lawrence 
Harv. William, Mr. 
Harv. Micah, Mr. 
Yale Roderick, Mr. 
Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
Harv. Luther, Mr. 
Mid. Archy B., Mr. 
Harv. Charles 
Mid. Mvron 
Harv. — Prescott, M. D. 
Harv. Asa F. 

Yale -William B., Columb. '23, 
Mid. Edwin 
Mid. Robert F. 
Dart. Alexander H. 
Dart. Edward A. 

Law ton 



Mr. 



Mid. 
Yale 

Lay 
Y r ale 
Yale - 



John, Mr. 
Sanford 



1783 
1810 



John, Mr. 

-Willoug-hby L., M. D. 
Lazell 
Bro. Ebenezer 
Wms. Cyrus M. 

Lea 
Yale James N. 
Leach 

Wms. Philip 
A mh. Ezekiel W. 
A mh. Giles 
Bro. Daniel 

Learning- 
Yale Jeremiah, Mr., Mr. and D. D. at 
[Columb. 

Lear 
Harv. Tobias 
Bow. Benjamin L., Mr. 

VOL. VII. 



1772 
1781 
1798 
1805 
1810 
1826 
1831 
1831 

1737 
1759 
1771 
1778 
1784 
1804 
1808 
1815 
1817 
1821 
1821 
1825 

1739 
1745 

1758 
1773 
1785 
1802 
1806 
1814 
1815 
1816 
1825 
1827 
1829 

1756 
1768 
1799 
1815 

1824 

1744 

1722 
1729 
1742 
1759 
1763 
1765 
1766 
1769 
1776 
1777 
1781 
1784 
1784 
1791 
1792 
1793 
1799 
1802 
1809 
1814 
1815 
1817 
1319 
1820 
1822 
1823 
1823 
1826 



[1820 



Learned 
Yale ||Ainasa, Mr. 
Harv. Ebenezer, -Mr., M. I), ai Dart. 
Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 
Mid. Joseph D., Mr. 
Yale .Simon 
How. Edward D., '27 
Yale Ebenezer 
Y r ale Billings P. 

Leavenworth 



Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Wms. 

Wms. 

Yale 

Yale 

Ver. 

Yale 

Amh. 



•93 



Mark, Mr. 

Jesse, Mr. 
Mark, Mr. 
Nathan, Mr. 
Melines C. 
Ebenezer L, Mr. 
Seio M. 
Charles 
—Melines C, M. D. 
Henrv 
EliasW. 
Abner J. 



Leavitt 

Harv. Dudley, Mr. 

Yale Freegrace, Mr. 

Yale Jonathan, Mr. 

Harv. Martin, Mr. 

Yale Jonathan, Mr. 

Yale Sheldon C. 

Mid. Oliver 

Yale Joshua, Mr. 

Mid. A. Van Tuvl 

Yale Harvey F., Mr. at Wms. '20 

Amh. Jonathan 

Bow. James T. 

Dart. —Dudley, M. D. 

Le Baron 
Harv. Bartlett, Mr. 
Yale Lemuel, Mr. 
Bro. Lemuel, Mr. 

Dart. — Francis, M. D. 

Le Breton 

Harv. Edmund L. 

Lechmere 
Harv. Anthony 

Lee 

Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Yale Jonathan, Mr. 

Y'ale Seth, Mr., Tut. 

Yale Jonathan 

Harv. Joseph, Mr., and at Y'ale 

Y'ale Andrew, Mr., D. D. at Harv. 1809 

Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Harv. Samuel, Mr. '87 

Y'ale Eiisha 
Harv.— 1| Arthur. LL. D. 

Y'ale Chaunm, Mr., D. D. at Columb. 

Harv. Silas, Mr. 

Harv. Nathaniel C. Mr. 

Harv. George G., Mr. 

Y'ale John 

Wms. Judah A., Mr. 

Harv. Francis L., Mr. 

Yale Jonathan 

Wms. William G. 

Y r ale John S., Mr. 

Mid. Channel/ G. 

Harv. Charles' C, Mr. 

Y'ale Richard H. 

Wms. Charles A.. Mr.. M. D. 

Yale —Henry, M. D. 

Wms. — James. M. D. 

Yale JohnR.. M. D 

29 



222 

1827 
1827 
1827 
1827 

1761 
1783 

1733 

1786 
1807 
1814 
]822 
1827 

1830 

1815 
1815 
1832 

1701 
1805 

1826 

1829 
1831 

1831 

1799 
1806 
1808 
1809 
1814 
1822 
1826 
1826 
1826 

1832 

1735 

1816 



1719 

1736 
1748 
1756 
1758 

1759 
1760 
1765 
1768 
1773 
1783 
1786 
1787 
1788 
1792 
1793 
1793 
1794 
1801 
1C04 
1805 
1809 
1809 
1813 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Yale. Samuel, Mr. 
Wms. —Moses A., M. D. 
Harv. Alfred, Mr. 
Dart. —George H. ; M. D. 

Leeds 
Harv. Daniel, Mr. 
Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

Leete 
Yale William 

Leffingwell 
Yale William, Mr. 
Yale William C, Mr. 
Yale Lucius W., Mr. '25 
Yale Edward H., Mr., M. D. 
Dart. — Elisha, M. D. 

Lehman 
Wms. — William, Mv. 

Legare 
Yale John B v Mr. 
Yale John B. 
Yale Isaac S. K. 

Legge 

Harv. John, Mr. 

Dart. —Edward, D. D., LL. D. 

Leib 
Harv. James R., Mr. 

Leighton 
Bow. — Jonathan, M. D. 
Bow. James, M. D. 

Leishman 
Wat. Thomas 

Leland 
Wms. — John, Mr. 
Mid. Luther, Mr. 

Wms. Aaron W., Mr., and at Bro. '14, 
Mid. Thomas [D. D. at S. C. 

Mid. — Aaron, Mr., and at Bro. '15, 
Bro. Dexter [Lieut. Gov. of Ver. 

Harv. — Sherman, Mr. 
Bow. Joseph VV. 
Bow. — Phinehas W., M. D. 

Lemer 
Yale — LeRue, M. D. 

Lemmon 
Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Lemon 
Yale Sheldon 

Leonard 

Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

Yale Silas, Mr. 

Harv. ||George, Mr., and at Yale '53, 

Yale Eliphalet [LL. D. at Bro. 1804 

Yale Zephaniah, Mr., and at Harv. '63, 
[and at Bro. '93 

Harv. Abiel, Mr., and at Yale '66, D. D. 

Harv. fDaniel, Mr. [at IN. J. ; 77 

Yale Apollos, Mr., and at Harv. '86, 

Harv. Thomas [and at Bro. '91 

Yale Samuel, Mr., and at Harv. '81, 

Yale Elijah, Mr. [and at Bro. '91 

Harv. Jonathan. Mr. 1803, M. D. 

Bro. Oliver, Mr. 

Bro. Joshua, Mr. at Yale '92 

Bro. David, Mr. 

Bro. Zephaniah 

Bro. William A. 

Bro. Zenas L., Mr. 

Bro. Ezra, Mr. 

Bro. — Burnam, Mr. 

Dart. George, Mr., and at Yale '08 

Wms. Cornelius V. V., Mr. 

Wms. — Samuel, Mr., and at Mid. '13 

Dart. Benjamin G. 



1814 Bro. 


Esek S. H., Mr. 


1814 Bro. 


John B. H., Mr. 


1815 Harv. 


Leri W., Mr. 


1823 Harv. 


George, Mr. 


1824 Yale 


Frederic B., M. D. 


1824 Bro. 


George 


1826 Bro. 


Henry F. 


1827 Wms. 


Samuel W. 


1828 Bow. 


—Alfred M., M. D. 


1828 Yale 


—Edward A., M. D. 


1828 Harv. 


—Jonathan, M. D. 


Lesley 


1801 Bro. 


James 


Lesslie 


1748 Harv. 


George, Mr. 


Lester 


1809 Ver. 


Charles G. 


1821 Yale 


William, Mr. '30 


Letombe 


1783 Yale 


— Joseph, LL. D., and at Paris, 




[Mr. at Bro. '91 


Lettsom 


1790 Harv. 


—John C, M. D., and at Edin., 




[LL. D. at Bro. '94 


Leverett 


1680 Harv. 


fJohn, Mr.,Pres. 


1776 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr., and at Yale '79 


1776 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1814 Dart. 


Charles J. 


1821 Harv. 


Frederic P., Mr. 


1822 Dart. 


Samuel S., Mr. 


1824 Bro. 


William, Mr. 


1850 Wash. 


Charles E. 


1834 Yale 


William P. 



Lewes 

1725 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1728 Harv. Thomas 
1731 Harv. James 

Lewis 

1695 Harv. Ezekiel, Mr. 

1707 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

1723 Harv. Lothrop, Mr. 

1723 Harv. Isaiah, Mr. 

1724 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1726 Yale Judah, Mr. 
1730 Yale David, Mr. 

1734 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

1735 Harv. Ezekiel, Mr. 
1737 Harv. Josiah, Mr. 

1741 Yale Thomas, Mr., and at N. J. '50 

1744 Harv. John, Mr. 

1756 Yale Edmund 

1758 Yale Ephraim, Mr. 

1760 Yale Thomas, Mr. 

1765 Yale Ichabod, Mr. 

1765 Yale Isaac, Mr., D. D. 

1768 Yale Amzi, Mr. 

1770 Yale John, Mr., Tutor 

1774 Yale Phineas 

1780 Yale Oliver, and at Harv. '81 

1783 Yale Seth, Mr. 

1788 Yale — Eldad,Mr. 

1788 Yale Daniel W. 

1794 Yale Zachariah, Mr., Tutor 

1794 Yale Isaac, Mr. 

1797 Dart. Daniel 

1798 Yale Thomas. Mr. 1803 

1802 Yale Roswell W., Mr. 

1803 Yale Adin 

1804 Dart. Enos, Mr., M. B. 

1806 Wms. — Eldad, Mr. 

1807 Dart. Amzi, Mr. 
1807 Dart. James 

1810 Dart. —Lyman, M. B. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



223 



1811 
1816 
1319 
1822 
1824 
1827 
1827 
1828 
1828 
1829 
1829 
1829 
1829 
1831 
1833 
1833 

1754 
1812 

1821 

1832 

1824 

1824 

1722 
1754 
1772 
1777 
1780 
1785 
1786 
1788 
1789 
1798 
1800 
1802 
1803 
1806 
1807 
1814 
1820 
1821 
1822 
1822 
1822 
1822 
1823 
1825 
1827 
1828 
1830 
1830 
1831 
1831 

1695 

1728 

1809 

1791 
1810 
1811 
1817 
1826 

1805 
1808 
1817 
1830 



Dart. Charles 

Bow. Stephen I,., Mr. 

Harv. Wiiislow, Mr.. M. D. 

Mid. Henry 

Yale James 

Wins. William 

Yale —Peter, M. D. 

Yale James D. 

Yale John N., Mr. 

Yale Charles A. 

Wash. Alfred J. 

Yale George It. 

Wash. Samuel S., Tutor 

Yale William B. 

Yale Asahel H. 

Wms. Ozias 

L'Hommedieu 

Yale || Ezra, Mr. 
Yale Ezra 

Libbey 
Bow. Joseph, Mr. 

Liggett 
Harv. Thomas 

Lilly 
Wms. Alvah 

Lillybridge 
Bow. —Clark, M. D. 

Lincoln 
Harv. Isaac. Mr. 
Harv. Bela, Mr., M. D. at Aberd. 
Harv. ||Levi, Mr. '76, Lieut. Gov. of Ms. 
Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
Harv. — Benjamin, Mr.,Lieut. Gov.of Ms. 
Harv. Theodore, Mr. 
Harv. Henry, Mr. 
Harv. Abner, Mr. 
Harv. Levi, Mr. 
Harv. Perez, Mr. 
Harv. Isaac, Mr., and at Bow. '06 



Harv. t||*Levi, Mr., LL. D. at Wms. '24, 

Harv. Daniel W., Mr. [Gov. of Mass. 

Harv. Benjamin, Mr., M. D. at Penn. 

Harv. James O., Mr. 

Harv. Jairus, Mr. 

Harv. Calvin, Mr. 

Bow.— #|| Enoch, Mr., Gov. of Me. 

Yale 

Harv, 

Harv, 

Bro. 

Bow. Benjamin, M. D., Prof, at Ver. 

Bro. 

Bow. 

Yale 

Bow. 

Harv. 



Sumner, Mr. 
William 
Luther B., Mr. 
Solomon, Mr. 
Benjamin, M. D. 
Theodore L. 
— Benjamin, 31. D. 
Thomas O., 3Ir. 
William S. 
Henry 



Harv. Daniel W 
Bow. —Isaac, 31. D. 

Lindall 
Harv. Timothy, 31r. 
Harv. Nathaniel, 31r. 

Lining 
Yale Edward B., 3Ir. 

Linsley 
Yale Noah, 3Ir., and at Wms. '95, 
Yale Ammi [Tut., and at Wms. 

Mid. Joel H, 3Ir., Tutor 
Yale James H., 3Ir. 
Yale Jared, 3Ir. 

Lippitt 
Bro. Joseph F., 3Ir. 
Bro. Jeremiah, Mr. 
Bro. Edward R., 3Ir., Prof. Alexan. 
Bro. Francis J. 



1773 
1775 
1810 

1695 
1695 

1710 
1728 
1731 
1734 
1734 
1760 
1766 
1771 
1776 
1777 
1781. 
1787 
1792 
1794 
1797 
1800 
1809 
1811 
1811 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1824 
1825 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1827 
1827 
1829 

1722 
1760 
1792 

1800 
1802 
1802 
1804 
1810 
1823 
1825 
1829 
1830 
1833 
1833 
1833 

1731 
1733 
1737 
1741 
1755 
1757 
1762 
1786 
1789 
1808 
1818 
1819 
1825 
1829 
1834 



1767 
1745 



Litchfield 

Bro. Joseph, 3Ir. 

Harv. Paul, Mr. '79 

Harv. Franklin, 31r. 

Little 

Harv. Thomas 

Harv. Ephraim, JMr. 

Harv. William, 31r. 

Harv. Ephraim, Mr. 

Harv. Otis, Mr. 

Harv. Fobes, Mr. 

Harv. Nathaniel 

Yale Weodbridge, 3Ir. 

Harv. — Daniel, 31r. 

Harv. Thomas 

Dart. Silas, Mr. 

Yale William, 31r., and at Harv. '86 

Harv. Ezekiel, 3Ir. 

Harv. 31oses, Mr. 1804 

Dart. Michael, 3Ir. 

Bro. John P., 3Ir. 

Dart. Edward 

Harv. George, Mr. 

Harv. William 

Dart. Valentine 

Bow. Josiah, 3Ir. 

Yale Thomas P. 

Dart. Jacob, 3Ir. 

Dart. Jonathan K. 

Bow. William A., and at Harv., 31. D. 



Harv. —Henry, 31. D. 



Bow. 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Yale 
Dart. 



Josiah S., 31r. 
Henry 
Charles H 
-Daniel, 31. D. 
Anson 
-Samuel, 31. D. 



[at Harv. '27 



Livermore 
Harv. Matthew, 3Ir. 
Harv. Jonathan, 31 r. 
Dart. — fSAMUEL, N. J. '52, LL. D., 3Ir. 
[at N. J., Sen. in Cong. 
Dart.— 1| f Edward St. L., 3Ir. 
Dart.— ||t Arthur, 3Ir. 
Harv. Solomon K., 31r. 

Samuel 

John F. 

George W. 

Charles 

Arthur, 3Ir. 

George 

Edward 

Abiel A. 

-Oramel 



Harv, 
Dart. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Harv. 
Wms. 

Livingston 
Yale Peter V. B., 3Ir. 
Yale John, 3Ir. 
Yale ||Philip, 3Ir. 

Yale ||*Willian», Mr., LL. D., Gov. of 
Harv. Philip [N. J. 

Harv. Peter, 3Ir. '79 
Yale John H. Mr., D. D. 
Yale || Henry W., 3Ir. 
Yale Peter S., & at N. J. r 89, at Harv. 
Wms. John W. ['90, aud at Cclumb. 
Harv.— tHenry B. ; LL. D., 31r. at N. J. 
Yale Walter ['74 

Yale Charles O.. 3Ir. 
Wms. —Gilbert R., D. D. 
Harv. — ||Edward, LL. D., Sen. in Cong. 

Livius 
Harv.— tPeter, 3Ir. 

Lloyd 
Yale Nathaniel. 3Ir. 



224 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Fi 



1787 Harv. 


J^mes ; Mr., 


LL. D., Sen. in 


1790 Harv. 


— James, M. D 


[Cong. 


1802 Yale 


John N. 




1818 Wms. 


Leicester 




1819 Harv. 


John J., Mr. 




Locke 




1755 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr., 


D. D., Pres. 


1792 Harv. 


John, Mr. 




1797 Dart. 


Joseph, Mr. 




1819 Yale 


—John, M. D. 




1827 Bow. 


Caleb 




1829 Harv. 


Albert 




1834 Bow. 


— Jesse F., M. 


D. 


Lockwood 




1735 Yale 


James, Mr., Tutor 


1745 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. ; 


D. D., Mr. at N. J. 


1766 Yale 


James, Mr. 




1774 Yale 


William, Mr 


, Tutor 


1806 Yale 


James 




1807 Yale 


Stephen 




1815 Yale 


William, Mr. 




1817 Yale 


Peter, Mr. 




1830 Yale 


Benjamin 




1830 Wms. 


Jesse 




1831 Yale 


Rufus A. 




1832 Mid. 


Robinson S. 




Lodge 




1825 Harv. 


Giles'H., Mr 


, M. D. 


Logan 




1791 Dart. 


Sheldon 




Lomax 




1809 Dart. 


William 




Lombard 




1723 Harv. 


Solomon, Mr. 


'27 


1815 Wms. 


Horatio J. 




1834 Amh. 


Otis 




Long 




1653 Harv. 


Joshua, Mr. 




1798 Dart. 


David, Mr. 




1800 Wms. 


Lewis 




1809 Dart. 


Stephen H., 


Mr. 


1812 Yale 


Richard 




1812 Mid. 


Chester 




1818 Harv. 


Joseph E A. 


,Mr. 


1819 Harv. 


Samuel P., Mr. 


1823 Dart. 


— Law&on, M. 


D. 


1824 Dart. 


Samuel, Mr. 


31. D. 


1828 Dart. 


Clement, Air. 


Prof at Hud. 


1823 Yale 


Edward H. C. 


1830 Wms. 


—Orlando D , 


M. D. 


1831 Dart. 


— Benjamin F. 


M. D. 


1832 Dart. 


—Moses, M. D 




Longfellow 




1742 Harv. 


Stephen, Mr. 




1780 Dart. 


Edward, Mr. 




1798 Harv. 


||Stephen, LL 


D at Bow. 1823 


1825 Bow. 


Stephen, Mr. 




1825 Bow. 


Henry W., Mr., Prof. Bow. 


Longley 




1801 Harv. 


George 




1811 Dart. 


—Rufus, M. B. 




Longstreet 




1813 Yale 


t Augustus B. 




Longworth 




1832 Yale 


Joseph 




Loomis 




1750 Yale 


George 




1805 Ver. 


Warren, Mr. 




1807 Yale 


Amasa 




1809 Wms. 


Harvey 




1811 Wms. 


Samuel S. 




1812 Yale 


—Hubbel, Mr., 


and at Union '09 


1815 Wms. 


A r etas 





1817 Mid. 


Jacob N, Mr. 




1818 Yale 


Earl 




1828 Yale 


James C. 




1830 Yale 


Elias 




1831 Yale 


—William O , M. D. 




1832 Bow. 


—Jacob O., M. D. 




Lord 




1691 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 




1714 Yale 


Benjamin, Mr., Tut., D. 


D. 


1717 Yale 


Hezekiah, Mr. 




1718 Yale 


Elisha, Mr. 




1724 Yale 


Richard, Mr. 




1726 Harv. 


Joseph 




1729 Yale 


Epaphras, Mr. 




1729 Yale 


Ichabod, Mr. 




1745 Yale 


John H., Mr. 




1753 Yale 


Joseph, Mr. 




1753 Yale 


Ebenezer, Mr. 




1780 Yale 


Thomas, Mr. 




1783 Yale 


Lvnde, Mr. 




1784 Yale 


William 




1798 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 




1799 Dart. 


John, Mr. 




1801 Yale 


Henry, Mr. 




1805 Harv. 


John P., Mr. 




1809 Bow. 


Nathan, Mr., D. D.. Mr 


. at Dart 




['21, Pres. 


of Dart 


1811 Yale 


Judah, Mr. '20 




1814 Yale 


Daniel, Mr. '20 




1817 Yale 


David N., Mr. 




1821 Yale 


Frederic W., M. D. 




1821 Dart. 


— Eleazar, Mr., and at W 


ms.-'27 


1825 Harv. 


Nathaniel J., Mr. 




1826 Bow. 


Charles A., Mr. 




1830 Amh. 


Daniel M. 




1831 Wat. 


Frederic 




1831 Yale 


Joseph S. 




1831 Amh. 


Chester 




1332 Amh. 


Otis P. 




1832 Dart. 


William H. 




1833 Dart. 


John 




Loring 




1701 Harv. 


Israel, Mr. 




1729 Harv. 


John, Mr. 




1732 Harv. 


Nicholas, Mr. 




1738 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr. 




1772 Harv. 


Benjamin 




1774 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr. '78 




1786 Harv. 


Joseph 




1800 Bro. 


Daniel 




1307 Bro. 


Bailey, Mr. 




1807 Harv. 


Abner, Mr. 




1812 Harv. 


Charles G., Mr. 




1813 Harv. 


William J., Mr. 




1813 Bro. 


Jerome. Mr. 




1820 Harv. 


—William L., M. D. 




1821 Harv. 


Edward G. 




1822 Bow. 


Richmond, Mr., M. D. 




1828 Bow. 


Joseph, '29, Mr. 




1828 Harv. 


Francis C Mr. 




1829 Harv. 


Josiah Q., Mr. 




1833 Wms. 


Willis 




Losey 




1830 Mid. 


Nehemiah H. 




Lothrop 




1726 Harv. 


Isaac 




1733 Yale 


Daniel, Mr. 




1756 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr., M. D. 




1787 Yale 


John H., Mr. '92 




1303 Bro. 


Samuel H. 




1810 Bro. 


Cyrus 




1825 Harv. 


Samuel K. 




1828 Amh. 


Edwin H. 




Lott 




1832 Wms. 


Henry R. 





1835.] 



COMrLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



22o 



Loud 


1801. Ilarv. 


John 


1805 Bro. 


Samuel P. 


1822 Bro. 


Jacob 11., Mr. 


Lovejoy 


17GG Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr. '70 


1825 Wat. 


— Daniel, Mr. 


1826 Wat. 


Elijah P. 


1829 Wms. 


—Isaac, M. D. 


1829 Bow. 


Joseph C. 


Loveland 


1801 Dart. 


Aaron 


1829 Mid. 


— Samuel C, Mr. 


Lovell 


1725 Harv. 


David, Mr. 


1728 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1756 Harv. 


James, Mr. 


1774 Harv. 


Benjamin 


1776 Harv. 


James, Mr. 


1787 Harv. 


James 


1803 Dart. 


Vryliug 


1810 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr., M. D. 


1813 Dart. 


Alexander, Mr. 


1818 Harv. 


—Joseph, Mr., M. D. '11 


1822 Dart. 


Michael 


1832 Bow. 


—Porter K., M. D. 


Loverinp; 


1S06 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1817 Bro. 


Warren 


1828 Bro. 


Amos 


1833 Harv. 


Joseph 


Lovett 


1728 Harv. 


Joseph 


1782 Yale 


llJohn 


18U Yale 


John E., Mr. '31 


Low 


1773 Harv. 


John 


1809 Dart. 


Nathaniel, Mr., M. D. 


Lowder 


1805 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


Lowe 


1816 Dart. 


—Abraham T., M. D. 


Lowell 


1721 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1753 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1760 Harv. 


yjohn, Mr., LL. D. 


1786 Harv. 


John, Mr., LL. D. 


1793 Harv. 


Francis C, Mr. 


1800 Harv. 


Charles, Mr., D. D. 


1815 Harv. 


John A., Mr. 


1821 Harv. 


Francis C, Mr. 


1822 Harv. 


Edward J., Mr., LL. B. 


1826 Harv. 


Charles R., Mr. 


1833 Harv. 


Robert T. S. 


Lowndes 


1824 Harv. 


Thomas 


Lowrey 


1818 Yale 


Romeo 


1824 Yale 


James 


Lucas 


1826 Bow. 


—Ivory H., M. D. 


Luce 


1804 Wms. 


Jashub B. 


1822 Mid. 


—Charles F., M. D. 


1824 Bro. 


Leonard 


Ludlow 


1827 Wms. 


—Henrxi G., Mr., & at Yale '30 


Ludwio; 


1825 Bow. 


—William, M. D. 


1833 Bow. 


— Gardner, M. D. 


Lufkin 


1823 Bow. 


—Aaron, M. D. 



1786 
1820 

1737 
1823 

1821 
1833 

1795 

1795 

1781 



1723 
1830 



1803 



1829 
1833 



1738 
1742 
1745 
1745 
1747 
1748 
1756 
1758 
1763 
1767 
1770 
1770 
1773 
1776 
1776 
1776 
1777 
1783 
1784 
1785 
1787 
1797 
1801 
1802 
1803 
1803 
1804 
1805 
1806 
1809 
1810 
1810 
1810 
1810 
1S14 
1817 
1818 
1819 
1822 
1825 
1827 
1828 
1828 
1329 
1830 
1830 
1830 
1831 
1832 
1833 



Mr. 



Lummus 
Harv. Porter, Mr. 
Bro. —John, M. I). 

Lunt 

Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Ilarv. William P., 

Harv. George 

Bow. John S. 

Luscornbe 
Bro. John, Mr. 

Lusk 
Wms. Chauncy, Mr., Tutor 

Luzerne 
Harv. — Csesar-Annc-deda, LL. D., & at 
[Dart. '82 

Lyde 
Harv. Byfield, Mr. 
Wash. Augustus F. 

Lyell 
Bro. — Thomas, Mr., D. D. 

Lyford 
Dart. —Stephen C, Mr. 
Dart. —Jeremiah H., M. D. 

Lyman 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 



, Tutor 



, Tutor 



Phineas, Mr.. 

Jonathan, Mr 

Daniel, Mr. 

Elihu, Mr. 

Isaac, Mr. 

Elijah 

Job, Mr. 

Jonathan, Mr. 

Phineas 

Joseph, Mr., Tut., D. D. at Wms. 
||Samuel, Mr. [1801 

Yale Daniel, Mr. 

Y r ale Gershom C, Mr., D. D. at Mid. 
Yale Daniel, Mr. [1812 

Yale Eliphalet 
Yale ||William 
Yale Timothy 
Yale Joseph 

Yale William, Mr., D. D. at N. J. 1808 
Yale Micah J. 
Dart. Elijah, Mr. 
Yale Asa, Mr. 
Dart. Simeon, Mr., and at Yale 
Yale Jonathan H., Mr. 
Dart. Elihu 

Dart. —Eliphalet, M. B., M. D. '14 
Dart. Job, Mr. 
Dart. ||Joseph S. 
Harv. George W., Mr. 
Wms. Orange, Mr., Tutor 
Wms. Darius 
Harv. Theodore, Mr. 
Dart. Theodore 
Y"ale Thomas 
Bro. Samuel 

Yale Wyliys, LL. B. at Harv. >20 
Harv. Samuel F., Mr. 
Harv. Charles, Mr. 
Yale Solomon 
Wms. John B. 
Amh. Giles, Mr. 
Wms. David B. 
Yale Joseph 
Amh. Henry 
Harv. Joseph 
Amh. Daniel B. 
Dart. —Joseph W., M. D. 
Yale — INorman, M. D. 
Yale Ephraim 
Harv. John C. 



226 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Lynde 



1685 Harv. 


fBenjamin, Mr. 




1690 Harv. 


Nicholas 




1707 Yale 


tSamuel, Mr. 




1718 Harv. 


t Benjamin, Mr. 




1723 Harv. 


Joseph 




1732 Yale 


Willoughby, Mr. 




1733 Harv. 


William 




1757 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 




1760 Yale 


William, Mr. 




1778 Harv. 


Cornelius, Mr. 




1796 Yale 


John H. 




1810 Dart. 


James 




Lyon 




1735 Yale 


Moses 




1761 Yale 


John 




1766 Yale 


Asa H., Mr. 




1777 Dart. 


Walter. Mr., and at Yale '82 


1790 Dart. 


\\Asa 




1805 Harv. 


Lawson, Mr. 7 09 




1821 Harv. 


Samuel H. 




1834 Wms. 


—James L., M. D. 




1834 Yale 


Amasa U. 




Ly 


3ns 




1823 Wms. 


—Luke, Mr. 




McAlister 




1829 Wms. 


Charles, M. D. 




McArthur 




1810 Bow. 


Arthur 




McBride 




1805 Yctie 


James 




McBurney 




1830 Harv. 


Samuel 




Mace arty 




1691 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr. 




1739 Harv. 


Thaddeus, Mr. 




1766 Yale 


Thaddeus, Mr. 




1826 Yale 


—Charles B., M. D. 




McClay 




1819 Bro. 


—Archibald, Mr. 




McClellan 




1785 Yale 


John 




1816 Yale 


George, M. D. at Penn., Prof, at 


1823 Yale 


— Samuel, M. D. 


[Jeff. 


1825 Wms. 


Robert, Mr. 




1828 Wat. 


Samuel 




1833 Yale 


Christopher R. 




1833 Yale 


John 




Macclintock 




1761 Harv. 


— SamueLN. J. '5l,Mr., 


&atN.J., 




[D. D. at Yale ; 91 


1775 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr., and at Yale ; 78 


McClintock 




1810 Bro. 


Henry K. 




1820 Bro. 


Joseph 




McCluer 




1832 Mid. 


Henry B. 




McClure 




1769 Yale 


David, Mr., & at Dart 


'73,D.D. 


1827 Amh. 


Alexander W., Mr. 


[at Dart. 


McCobb 




1829 Bow. 


Henry B. 




1829 Bow. 


James T. 




McConechy 




1825 Yale 


— James, Mr. 




McConihe 




1812 Dart. 


Isaac, Mr. 




McCorrie 




1814 Bro. 


John 





McCrackan 
1792 Yale John, Mr. '96 



McCrady 

1820 Yale Edward 

McCrate 

1819 Bow. John D. 

McCray 
1829 Wms. —Warren, M. D. 
McCullough 

1821 Yale William B. 

McCurdy 
1787 Yale Richard 

1817 Yale Charles J. 

1818 Yale —John, Union 10, Mr. 

McDermott 

1828 Yale Charles 

McDonald 
1823 Mid. Lewis 

1823 Bow. John 

1829 Yale —Samuel P., Geneva College 

McDougall 

1820 Bow. William, Mr., Tutor, M. D. 

1824 Bow. Thomas 

McDowell 
1751 Harv. Alexander 

1825 Yale John B. 

McElhenny 
1820 Yale James, Mr. 

McEwen 
1799 Yale Charles 
1804 Yale Abel, Mr. 
1823 Dart. James F. 
1827 Yale Robert, Mr., Tutor 
1829 Dart. —Archibald, M. D. 
1834 Wms. George F. 

McFarland 
1793 Dart. Asa, Mr., Tut., D.D.at Yale 1812 

McGaw 
1797 Dart. Jacob, Mr. 
1807 Dart. Isaac, Mr. 
1820 Dart. Thornton 

McGee 

1814 Wms. Jonathan, Mr. 

McGore 
1816 Bro. —John, M. D. 

McGregore 
1774 Dart. David, Mr. 
1799 Dart. David, Mr. 

McGregc-ry 



1829 Dart. —John B 

Mclntire 
1768 Yale Jesse 
1809 Dart. ||Rufus 

Mack 
1804 Wms 
1808 Dart. 
1813 Yale 
1823 Yale 

1830 Wms 
1833 Harv 



M. D. 



Elisha 

Andrew, Mr., Tutor 

Stephen 



David 

Elihu T., Tutor 
William 
Mackay 
1785 Harv. William, Mr. 
1801 W T ms. —Samuel, Mr., Prof. 
1815 Harv. Joseph H., Mr. 
1823 Wms. —Samuel M., Mr. 

McKean 
1782 Dart.— t||*Thomas, LL. D., & at N. J. '81, 
[Pres. of Cong., Gov. of Penn. 
1794 Harv. Joseph, Mr., Prof., LL. D. at N.J. 
[1814, D. D. at Alleg. 
1819 Harv. Joseph W., Mr., M. D. 
1822 Dart. Silas, Mr. 
1828 Harv. Henry S., Mr., Tutor 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



227 



1831 Harv. John G. 




Mag-ill 


McKeen 




1831 Yale 


Sea "rrove W. 


1774 Dart. Joseph, Mr., D. D., Pres. of Bow. 


Magoon " 
1829 Bow. —Calvin B., M. D. 
Magoun 


1811 Bow. John, Mr. 

1817 Bow. James, Mr., Prof., M. D. 


at Harv. 

|/20 


McKenzie 


1823 Bro. 


William, Mr. 


1768 Harv. Kenneth 




Main 


McKesson 
1802 Harv. —John, Mr. 

Mackie 
1800 Bro. John, Mr., M. D., & at Dart. '05, 


1729 Harv. Amos, Mr. 
1800 Harv. Jacob 

Malbone 
1752 Harv. Thomas 

Mallary 


1814 Bro. Andrew, M. D. [& at Mid. 


Mackinnen 
1786 Yale — William, D. D. 




1805 Mid. 
1821 Mid. 


||KoIlin C. 
Charles D. 


McKinstry 
1746 Yale John, Mr. 
1807 Yale Justus 




Mall try 
1808 Yale Garrick 
Maltby 


Mackintosh 
1736 Yale George 
1822 Harv. —James, LL. D., Bart. 




1712 Yale 
1747 Yale 
1779 Yale 
1786 Yale 


Samuel 

John, Mr., & N. J. '50, Tutor 

Jonathan, Mr. 

Isaac 


Macknight 




1821 Yale 


Erastus 


1791 Yale —John, N. J. '73, D. D., 


Pres. of 


1822 Yale 


John, Mr. 




[Dick. 


Man 




McKown 




1665 Harv. 


Samnel 


1807 Wms. James, Mr. 




1731 Harv. 


Hezekiah, Mr. 


1834 Wat. Edward P. 




1764 Harv. 


Ensign 


McLane 




1775 Harv. 


Isaiah, Mr. '79 


1829 Yale James W. 




Mar 


Chester 


M'Laughlin 




1825 Bro. 


Charles F., M. D. at Harv. '28 


1834 Yale Daniel D. T. 
McLean 

1762 Yale Allen, Mr. 




Man 

1821 Harv. 


igault 
Joseph 


1793 Bro. —Archibald, Mr. 




Manley 


1805 Yale Allen, Mr. 




1804 Mid. 


Ira 


1822 Yale —John A., M. D. 




1825 Harv. 


Hiram 


1826 Harv. Cornelius 




Mann 


1830 Bow. —Sherman, M. D. 




1774 Bro. 


Jacob 


McLellan 




1776 Bro. 


Preston, Mr. 


1782 Bro. William 




1776 Harv. 


James, Mr., & at Yale '82, & at 


1799 Bro. Judah A. 






[Bro. '83, M. D. at Bro. 1815 


1822 Bow. Charles H. P., M. D. 




1779 Dart. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 


1826 Bow. Isaac, Mr. 




1787 Bro. 


John M. 


1827 Bow. William P. 




1800 Harv. 


Elias, Mr., M. B. '06 


1828 Bow. —William, M. D. 




1806 Dart. 


Cyrus, Mr., Tutor 


1829 Harv. Henry B. 




1810 Dart. 


Joel, Mr., and at Bro. '16 


McLeod 




1815 Bow. 


Perez B. 


1809 Mid. —Alexander, Union 1798, 


D.D. 


1818 Bro. - 


-Ariel, M. D. 


McNabb 




1819 Bro. 


Horatio, Tutor 


1824 Dart. —John, M. D. 




1822 Bro. - 


—Isaac, Mr. 






1824 Bro. 


George 


McNeil 




1829 Dart. 


Royal 


1771 Yale William 




1832 Dart. 


Lewis 


1810 Yale Daniel F., Mr. '14 




1833 Bow. - 


-Daniel. M. D. 


1831 Yale Hector 
Macomber 




Manning 
1725 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 


1799 Harv. Charles, Mr. 




1730 Harv. 


Joseph, 3Ir. 


1825 Wat. Francis G. 




1751 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


McPhail 




1766 Harv. 


Ebeuezer, Mr. 


1827 Yale John B., Mr. 




1786 Bro. 


James. Mr. 






1797 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr., M. D. 


McPherson 




1808 Harv. 


Joseph B., Mr. 


1814 Bro. James 




1810 Harv. 


John, Mr., M. D. 


McQ,ueston 




1817 Bro. 


Abel, Mr. 


1821 Dart. William 




1819 Harv. 


Charles B. 


1830 Bow. —Calvin, M. D. 




1S22 Harv. 


Samuel 






1828 Yale - 


-Luther, M. D. 


McRay 




1829 Bow. 


Thomas 


1828 Wms. — Lathrop, M. D. 




1830 Dart. 


Stephen N., Mr. 


McWhorter 




1832 Harv. 


John H. 


1776 Yale — Alexander, N. J. '57, D. 


D. 


Manser 


1804 Mid. David, and at Dart, '05 




1825 Dart. 


George B. 



DO 5 



COMFLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



16!*) 

n 

1735 
1741 

1742 

1(67 
1770 
J777 
1784 
1301 
1S03 
■ . 
1833 

1831 

1834 

1807 

1831 

1759 
1S34 
1333 

1722 

1772 
1797 

i : : ; 

1811 

1320 
1325 

17 r 2 
1792 

1761 
1795 

1793 
1808 

1834 

1331 

1323 
1S25 

1761 
1763 

1790 
1330 

1705 
1705 

1726 
172 

1731 
1735 

1~ 

1748 
1761 
1761 
1763 

1764 
1776 
1777 
1734 
1786 



Mansfield 
Barv. Samuel. Mr. 
Yale Moses 
Yale Samuel, Mr. 
Yale Richard, Mr., D.D. 
Harv. Isaac. Mr. 
Harv. Isaac. Mr., and at Da 
Yale Achilles, Mr. 
Y'ale Jared, 3Ir., LL. D. 
Yale William 
Harv. Joseph 
Y'a!e Nathan. Mr. 
Harv. — Georg-*?. M. D. 
Amh. Daniel 

Mansur 
Harv. Joseph \Y. 

Manter 
Bow. —Ezra, M. P. 

Manton 
Bro. Charles 
Amh. Daniel E. 

Manwaring 
Y r ale David. Mr. 

Marble 
Dart. Newton E. 

Marbury 

Amh. Francis F. 

March 
Han 
Harv 
Dart 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Bro. 
Y: e 



Edmund. Mr. 
Clemeut. Mr. 
John. Mr., M. B. 
Daniel 

David. Mr.. M. D. 
Alden. 31. D. 
John C... 3Ir. 
Marchant 
Harv. — Henrv. Mr., and atPenn.. LL.D. 



[at Y'ale -*92 



Y"ale William. 3Ir. 

Marcy 
Y'ale Hadlock, Mr. 
Bro. Simeon 

Bro. —Bradford. 3Ir. 
Bro. * Willi am L. 
[Cong 
Amh. Erastus E. 

Mark ham 
Wms. —Francis L.. 31. D 

Markoe 
3Iid. Francis 
Bow. — 3Iaruu 31. H. 

Marrett 
Han*. Thomas. 3Ir. 
Harv. John. 31r. 
Harv. Da id, 31:-. 
Bow. —William. 31. D. 

Marsh 
Han - . Joxph,Mz. 
Harv. Jonathan 
Harv. John 

Joseph. 3Ir. 
Thomas, 3Ir., Tutor 
Jonathan. Mr. 

Mr., and at Y'ale '40. at 



LL. D... Sen. in 
, 6c Gov. of 2\. Y'. 



M. D. 



Harv. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Harv. 

Y'ale 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Yale 

Dart. 

Y'ale 

Y'ale 

Y^ale 



. Mr. [Dart. <3 

Perez. 3Ir.. and at Y'ale '54 
Christopher B.. Mr. 
John, Mr., Tutor, D. D.. Mr. at 
Joseph W. [Y'a^e '74 

Silas. Mr. 'SO 
Stephen 
Job 

Silas, 3Ir. 
Samuel, 3Ir. 



1786 Y'ale 


Truman 


1736 Dart. 


||Charles. 3Ir.. LL. D. 


1789 Dart. 


—Amos. N. J. '86. Mr. 


17:5 Wms. 


—Daniel, Mr. 


1795 Y'ale 


Ehenezer G., 3Ir.. Tutor 


1S04 Yale 


John. 31r. 


1305 Y'ale 


Frederick. Mr. 


1313 Dart. 


Charles. 31r. 


1315 Wms. 


Henry 


1317 Dart. 


James, 3Ir.. Tut.. Pro r . at Hamp. 




[Syd. and Pres. ofVer., D.D. 


1S19 Dart. 


Lyndon A.. Mr. [at Amh. 'io 


1820 Dart. 


Christopher. 3Ir. 


1320 Dart. 


George P.. 31r. 


1821 Dart. 


Saamdj Mr. 


1323 Han-. 


John 


1324 Amh. 


Justin. 3Ir. 


1324 Dart. 


J siph 


1825 Dart. 


Abram. .Mr. 


Dart. 


Cutting 


1327 Dart. 


Leonard. 31. D. 


1323 Dart. 


Charles C. 


1328 Bow. 


Gilbert H. 


1329 Yale 


—Erastus S.. 31. D. 


1830 Dart. 


—Joseph. 31. D. 


1331 Bow. 


Ezekiel 


Marshall 


1720 Harv. 


J: -':' . 


1721 Han. 


Samuel. 3Ir. 


1754 Harv. 


Samuel. 3Ir. 


1755 Harv. 


Nahum. 31r. 


1790 Dart. 


Ichabod. 3Ir. 


1793 Harv. 


John B., Mr. 


1303 Dart. 


Joseph A. 


1806 Harv. 


— |,Joh>-. LL. D., and at N, J. ; 02, 




[and at Penn.. Chief Justice of 




[S. C. of U. S. 


1315 YTale 


i Thomas A. 


1816 Bro. 


Herbert. 3Ir. 


1823 Harv. 


-John G.. 31. D. 


1823 Y'ale 


Alexander TT'. 


1826 Han. 


Edward C. 


1330 Wms. 


— Q:ed.3I.D. 


1331 Y'ale 


— EHsbaG..3I.D. 


1S33 Y'ale 


Samuel D. 


Marshman 


1310 Bro. 


—Joshua. D. D.,Prof. Coll. Seramp. 


Marston 


1689 Han. 


Benjamin 


1715 Han-. 


Benjamin, 3Ir. 


1749 Harv. 


Benjamin. 3Ir. 


1749 Y'ale 


3i'ymphas. 3Ir. 


1S07 Han. 


Nvmphas. 31r. 


1811 Dart. 


Stephen W., 3Ir. 


1321 Bow. 


Winthrop G. 


1833 Bow. 


— Ephraim. 31. D. 


Martin 


1756 Y'ale 


Ebenezer. 3Ir. 


1807 Bro. 


George W.. 3Ir. 


1807 Bro. 


JohifR.. Mr., 31. B. at Dart. '10 


1315 Dart. 


— Lyman. 31. D. 


1817 Bro. 


Joseph F. 


1822 Dart. 


— Ebenezer. 31. D. 


1823 Bow. 


— Anselm. 31. D. 


1324 Dart. 


Charles L. 


1324 Dart. 


— Noah, 31. D. 


1325 Bow. 


Alfred 


1825 Mid. 


Job H. 


1829 Bow. 


—Stephen. 31. D. 


- Bow. 


-John C. M. D. 


1333 Bow. 


Edward 


1334 Wms. 


— Oramel, 31. D. 









Martindale 
1300 Wms. ! Henrv C. Mr. 
1806 Mid. Stephen, Mr. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



229 



Martyn 


1630 Harv. 


Richard 


1784 ilarv. 


John. Mr. 


i a i 


— MidiaeJ. M. D. 


Marvin 


] T Vale 


RovnolJ. Mr. 


1773 Vale 


Elihu 


17 5 Vale 


Matthew 


1806 Vale 


Charles 


1817 Vale 


George. Mr.. M. D. at Penn. 


. Vale 


Charles A. 


Mascarene 


1711 Harv. 


Johu. Mr. ; and at Yale '51 


Ma 


son 


1666 Harv. 


Daniel 


1728 Harv. 


Thaddeus. .Mr. 


174-2 Harv. 


Barachiah. Mr. 


1744 Yale 


Elijah, Mr. 


Vale 


Hi bail 


1771 Harv. 


John A.. Mr. 


1779 Harv. 


Benjamin. Mr.. M. D. 


1780 Harv. 


Nehemiah 


178 ' Bro. 


Joseph. Mr. 


1737 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1733 Vale 


Jxre.miah. Mr., LL. D. at Bow. 




[1815, at Han*. : 17, and at 




[Dart. '23, Sen. in Cong. 


1791 Bro. 


I'James B.. Mr. 


' I Han-. 


William, Mr. 


171 Wins. 


David. Mr. 


1796 Harv. 


Thonv:is. Mr. 


Dart. 


—Abraham, M. B. 


1808 Dart. 


Elihu 


1811 Harv. 


William P., Mr. 


1312 Wms. 


Steplien 


1813 Dart. 


— Peleg S.. M. D. 


1314 Dart. 


Jonathan 


1316 Harv. 


James W., Mr., M. D. 


1317 Yale 


James F. 


1818 Yale 


— John Y., and at N. C. 


1819 Bosv. 


George M. 


I82S Harv. 


John."Mr..M. D. 


1324 Bow. 


William 


1825 Bow. 


Alfred 


1332 Harv. 


Charles 


1 - Harv. 


—William. M. D. 


13.34 Wms. 


—Venom W.. M. D. 


1334 Dart. 


—Wan! B. ; M. D. 


1334 Harv. 


Charles 


Mastin 


1329 Yale 


William J.. .Mr. 


Masters 


1779 Yale 


Nicholas S.. Mr. 


1733 Yale 


i Josiah, Mr. 


Mastvn 


1327 Dart. 


—David, M. D. 


Matcbett 


1324 Harv. 


William P., Mr. 


Mather 


1643 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. at Camb. ; Oxf. and 


ilarv. 


Nathcmid, Mr. [Dub. 


1656 Harv. 


Eleazar 


Harv. 


Increase, D.D. ; Pres., Mr. at Dub. 


1 71 Harv. 


Samuel 


1678 Han-. 


Cat «, Mr.. D. D. at Glasg. 


1685 Harv. 


Warham. Mr. 


1685 Harv. 


Nathaniel. Mr. 


1690 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1693 Han. 


Samuel. Mr. 


1705 Yale 


Azariih. Mr., Tutor 


1715 Yale 


.A Ikarael 


Harv. 


Samuel, Mr., D. D.. Mr. at Yale 




['24. and Glasg. 


Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 




VOL. VII. 



17 Vale 


Eleazar, Mr. 


Vale 


Mr. D. D. at.N. J. Ll 


Vale 


Samuel. Mr. 


Vale 


Charles Mr. 


1771 Yale 


. Mr. 


Vale 


. net, Mr. 


Vale 


Charles 


Vale 


Samuel. Mr. *T7 


Vale 


. .Mr. 


Vale 


Nathaniel 


1 113 Vale 


Hiram F. 


. Vale 


- :.D. 


. Vale 


Thomas G.. Mr. 


Vale 


— LamuiiS'. M. D. 


Vale 


Frederick E. 


1334 Dart. 


Samuel H. 


Matheson 


1334 Yale 


— Jama, D. D. 


Mathes 


Uart. 


(jerrze P. 


Mathews 


1332 .Mid. 


S. Leonard 


Matson 


1319 Yale 


—John S.. M. D. 


13^3 Vale 


William N. 


Matthews 


r Iarv. 


Mordecai 


1811 Mid. 


Thomas P. 


1816 Harv. 


Frederick. Mr. 


. Mid. 


Luman. Mr. 


. Vale 


— Union "30, D. D. 


1329 Amh. 


S uel 


Mattocks 


1793 Dart. 


William 


1321 Mid. 


Samuel B. 


1323 Mid. 


— |jJohn, .Mr. 


1332 Mid. 


John 


Mattoon 


1776 Dart. 


IJEbenezer, Mr. 


1303 Dart. 


Noah D. 


Mauran 


1816 Bro. 


Joseph. 31r.. 31. D. at N. Y. 


Maverick 


Yale 


Samuel A. 


Maxcv 


1787 Bro. 


Jonathan, Mr.. Tut.. Prof.. Pres. 




[D. D. at Harv. 1301, Pres 




[of Union and S. C. 


Bro. 


Milton 


1804 Bro. 


Virsril 


Maxwell 


1797 Yale 


Sylvester 


Bro. 


William P.. .Mr. 


1802 Vale 


William, Mr. 


1S23 Yale 


Joseph E. 


1324 Amh. 


Solomon. Mr. 


1329 Amh. 


Samuel. Mr. 


May 


1752 Yale 


EUazar, Mr. 


1775 Dart. 


William. Mr. 


1777 Yale 


John. Mr. 


1786 Yale 


Calvin 


1733 Bro. 


William 


1792 Harv. 


Frederick. Mr.. M. D. 


1793 Yale 


Hizekiali ' 


1S10 Harv. 


George W., .Mr.. M. D. 


1314 .Mid. 


George 


1317 Harv. 


S.nmTel J.. Mr. 


1326 Vale 


Wiiliam 


1329 Wrcs. 


—William, 31. D. 


1S29 Han-. 


Samuel 


Mavbin 


1815 Han- 


— Joseph A. 




30 



230 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Mayer 
1831 Yale John L. 

May hew 
1720 Harv. —Experience, Mr. 

1730 Harv. Joseph, Mr., Tutor 

1731 Harv. INaihan 

1744- Harv. Jonathan, Mr., D. D. at Aberd. 
1767 Harv. William, Mr. 
1805 Wins. Davis H. 
1808 Bro. Jeremiah 

1825 Harv. —Julius S., M. D. 

Maylem 
1715 Harv. John, Mr. 

Maynard 
1775 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. '81 

1810 Wms. William H., Mr. 
1829 Yale — Elias F., M. D. 

Mayo 
1787 Harv. Daniel 

1811 Yale Edward C. 
1829 Bow. —James L., M. D. 

Meach 
1807 Bro. —Asa, Mr. 

Meacham 
1710 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1832 Mid. James 

Meachum 
1797 Wms. Israel, Mr. 

Mead 
1739 Yale Abraham 
1748 Yale Solomon, Mr. 
1773 Yale - Thomas, Mr. 
1779 Yale Shadrach 
1784 Yale Lemuel 

1787 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1788 Bro. Samuel 
1802 Yale Marcus, Mr. 
1807 Yale Darius 

1813 Mid. Abiel P.. Mr. 

1814 Yale Whitman, Mr. 

1817 Yale Samuel H. 

1818 Dart. Asa, Mr. 
1820 Yaie Samuel B. 
1823 Yale Ebcnezer, Mr. 

1825 Yale Zechariah 

1827 Yale William E. 

1828 Yale Darius, Mr. 

1829 Yale —Sylvester, M. D. 

1830 Yale Enoch 

Means 
1807 Bow. Robert, Mr. 

1833 Bow. James 

Mears 
1814 Yale John D. 

Medbury 
1801 Bro. Samuel V. 
1828 Wat. Nicholas 

Meech 

1826 Yale Stephen W. 

Meekins 
1S27 Wms. —Thomas, M. D. 

Megquier 
1819 Bow. John L., Mr. 

1827 Bow. —Thomas L., M. D. 

Meigs 
1732 Yale Timothy, Mr. 
1778 Yale Josiah, Mr., Tut., Prof., Pres. of 

[Geo. 
1785 Yale fRETURN J., Sen. in Cong-.. Gov. 
1799 Yale |j Henry, Mr. [of Ohio 

1809 Yale Benjamin C, Mr. '14 



Mellen 

1741 Harv. John, Mr. 

1770 Harv. John, Mr., Tutor 
1784 Harv. Henry 

1784 Harv. fPRENTiss, Mr., LL. D., and at 
[Bow. 1820, Sen. in Cong - . 
1797 Harv. Leonard 
1814 Harv. John W., Mr. 

1818 Harv. Grenville 
1823 Bro. Edward 
1825 Bow. Frederick 

Melville 
1773 Harv. —Thomas, N. J. '69, Mr. 

Melyen 
1696 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

Menard 
1793 Harv. —John B., M. B. 

Mercer 
1827 Yale —Archibald, M. D. 
1S31 Wms. William Y., Mr. 

Meredith 
1827 Harv. George A., Mr. 
1829 Yale _ George S. 

Meriam 
1749 Harv. Oliver 
1753 Harv. Jonas, Mr. '57 

1819 Bro. Joseph, Mr. 
1829 Mid. —Jonathan, Mr. 

1829 Harv. Horatio C, LL. B. 
1833 Yale Marshall 

Merriam 
1759 Yale Matthew, Mr., and at Harv. '65 
1762 Yale Barrage, Mr. 
1808 Dart. Royal A., M. D. 

1826 Bow. Jonas 

1827 Wat. —Isaac, Mr. 

Merrick 

1725 Yale Jonathan, Mr. 

1731 Yale Noah, Mr. 
1773 Harv. Tillv, Mr. 
1776 Harv. Pliny, Mr. 

1783 Yale Jonathan 

1784 Harv. John, Mr. 
1807 Bow. —John, Mr. 
1814 Harv. Pliny, Mr. 
1825 Wms. —Mark, M. D. 

1830 Amh. James L., Mr. 

Merrill 

1732 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1759 Harv. Gyles, Mr. 
1767 Harv. Nathaniel 
1789 Dart. Daniel, Mr. 
1793 Bro. John 

1801 Dart. Thomas A., Mr., & at Mid. '05, 
[Tut., and at Mid. 

1804 Harv. John, Mr., M. D. 

1804 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

1806 Dart. Jesse, Mr. 

1806 Dart. Joseph 

1807 Harv. James C., Mr. 

1807 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1808 Bow. Enos, Mr., Tutor 

1808 Dart. Caleb, Mr. 

1809 Dart. Nathaniel 

1810 Dart. Moses, Mr., and at Bow. T5 

1811 Bow. John, Mr. 

1812 Dart. James 

1813 Mid. Selah H. 

1814 Dart. Joseph 
1819 Dart. — Jesse, M. D. 
1821 Dart. David 

1821 Bro. John G., M. D. at Bow. '24, Mr. 
1824 Dart. —William, M. D. [at Wat. '24 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



231 



1825 
1827 

1827 

1829 
1829 
1832 
1834 

1735 

1789 

1773 

1782 
1802 
1827 
1828 

1790 
1816 

1717 

1762 
1797 
1826 

1703 
1727 
1801 
1802 
1805 
1819 
1820 
1822 
1823 
1828 
1829 

1822 

1813 
1814 

1823 

1663 
1704 
1809 



1647 

1727 
1780 
1787 
1791 
1794 
1817 
1819 
1829 
1831 

1761 



Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 



Wat. Thomas W., Mr. 
Yale David J. 
How. —John, M. J). 
Bow. —Joseph, M. D. 
Dart. Calvin 
Dart. George A. 
Dart. James H. 

Merriinan 
Yale Samuel, Mr. 
Yale Silas 

Merwin 
Yale Noah, Mr. 
Miles, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. 
Timothy T. ; Mr. 
Miles T. 

JVIesser 
Bro. Asa, Mr., Tutor, Prof., Pres., 
[D. D. at Harv., LL.D. at Ver. 
Mid. Asa, Mr. 

Messinger 
Harv. Henry, Mr. 
Harv. James 
Harv. Rosewell, Mr. 
Bro. George W. 

Metcalf 

Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

Harv. William, Mr. 

Bro. —Paul, Mr. 

Bro. Alfred, Mr. 

Bro. Theron, Mr. 

Mid. David 

Bro. John G., Mr., M. D. at Harv. '26 

Wms. Silas, Mr", and at Union ; 25 

Dart. Ralph 

Yale Voluey 

Dart. Kendrick 

Michaux 
Bow. — Andrew, M. D. 

Middleton 
Harv. Henry A., Mr. 
Harv. Arthur, Mr. 

Mighels 
Dart. —Jesse W., M. D. 

Mighill 

Harv. Tliomas, Mr. 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
Dart. David, Mr. 

Mildmay 
Harv. William, Mr. 

Miles 
Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
Dart. Noah, Mr. 
Dart. Asa, Mr. 
Yale Smith 
Bro. John, Mr. 

Harv. Clough R. 
Harv. Solomon P., Mr., Tutor 
Bro. Henrv A. 
Yale Milo N. 

Millard 
Yale Robert 



Miller 

1709 Yale Jeremiah, Mr. 

1722 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr., D. D. at Oxf. 

1752 Harv. John, Mr. 

1756 Harv. Samuel 

1762 Yale Simeon, Mr. 

1778 Yale fAsher 

1781 Yale Joiiallian, Mr. '92 

1785 Yale Phineas, Mr. 

1786 Yale David 



1786 Yale 


William F., Mr. 


1792 Yale 


— Samuel, Mr., and at Penn., at 




[N. J. ; 92, D. D. at Peon, and 

[Union, Prof, at Prince. 




1799 Wms. 


Joseph 


L800 Bro. 


Moses, .Mr., Tutor 


1801 Yale 


— Samuel, Mr. 


1803 Bro. 


Thompson, Mr. 


1804 Dart. 


Jacob 


1805 Dart. 


Jedidiah 


1808 Mid. 


Solomon S., Mr. 


1810 Wms. 


Daniel 


1813 Harv. 


Edward, Mr. 


1814 Bro. 


— Nathaniel, Mr., M. D. '17 


1816 Bro. 


—Caleb. M. D. 


1816 Yale 


Boyer'F. 


1817 Yale 


—Charles, M. D. 


1817 Bro. 


Lewis L., Mr.. M. D. 


1813 Harv. 


William H. 


1819 Yale 


Horatio, Mr. 


1822 Mid. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1823 Harv. 


—Nathaniel, M. D. 


1823 Bro. 


Seth 


1824 Wms. 


Samuel H. 


1325 Harv. 


William 


1826 Yale 


— Bostwick O., M. D. 


1827 Yale 


—John, ML D. 


1828 Harv. 


Ephraim F. 


1830 Wms. 


Abraham O. 


1831 Amh. 


Jeremiah 


1832 Mid. 


Charles 


1833 Yale 


Phineas T. 


1833 Wash. 


Samuel F. 


Millet 


1823 Bow. 


Samuel 


1829 Bow. 


—Charles, M. D. 


1830 Amh. 


Stephen C. 


Millike n 


1829 Harv. 


Edward P. 


1831 Bow. 


—John M., M. D. 


1833 Bow. 


—Ebenezer C, M. D. 


Mills 


1685 Harv. 


Edward, Mr. 


1722 Yale 


Jedidiah, Mr. 


1723 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1737 Yale 


Gideon, Mr. 


1738 Yale 


Ebenezer 


1747 Yale 


Jedidiah, Mr. 


1762 Yale 


Benjamin, Mr. 


1764 Yale 


Samuel J., Mr. 


1765 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1771 Yale 


— William, N. J. '56, Mr., and at 


1775 Yale 


Edmund [N. J. 


1776 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1786 Yale 


Isaac, Mr. 


1792 Harv. 


Lulher, Mr. 


1797 Wms. 


Elijah H., LL. D., Sen. in 


1807 Yale 


Samuel T., Mr. '11 [Cong-. 


1S09 Wms. 


Samuel J. 


1813 Yale 


Gideon J. 


1814 Wms. 


James H. 


1814 Wms. 


Benjamin 


1819 Mid. 


Roswell 


1823 Wms. 


—John, Mr. 


1824 Yale 


Charles L., Mr. 


1825 Yale 


William H. 


1826 Yale 


Sydney 


1826 Yale 


Asa P. 


1827 Yale 


Frederick L 


1828 Dart. 


Caleb, Mr. 


1833 Amh. 


—Henry, D. D., Prof, at Aub. 


1833 Yale 


Charles S. 



Milne 
1785 Yale —George, M. D. 



232 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[F 



EB. 



1774 
1798 

1827 

1726 
1756 
1769 
1796 
1816 
1825 
1825 

1767 
1801 
1801 
1808 
1824 
1834 

1675 
1718 

1725 
1730 
1747 
1751 
1752 
1767 
1778 
1801 
1802 
1814 
1828 
1828 

1827 

1647 
1681 
1687 

1751 

1763 
1775 
1776 
1789 
1792 
1794 
1795 
1801 
1802 
1802 
1803 
1803 
1806 
1809 
1811 
1813 
1815 
1817 
1818 
1820 
1821 
1822 
1823 
1824 
1828 
1830 

1665 
1802 

1690 



Miltirnore 

Dart. James, Mr. 

Dart. William, Mr. ; and at Harv. 1815 
Minard 

Bro. Peter R. 

Miner 

Yale Richardson, Mr. 
Yale William R., Mr. 
Yale Thomas, Mr. 

Thomas, M. D. 

John O., M. D. 

-Burril S., M. D. 

•Thomas, M. D. 

Minor 

Yale Jehu, Mr. 

John R., Mr. 

Matthew 7 Mr. 

Josiah H. 

■Gerry H., M. D. 

Wilham T. 
Minot 
Harv. James 

Timothy, Mr. 

Christopher, Mr, 

Stephen, Mr. 

Timothy, Mr. 

Stephen, Mr. 

George 

John M. 

George R., Mr. 

Stephen 

William, Mr. 

George R. 

George 

Charles, Mr. 
Mireck 
Bow. —David H. ; 31. D. 

Mitchel 
Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

Mitchell 
Harv. David 

Yale fSTEPiiEN M. ; Mr., Tut., LL. D., 
Yale John, Mr. _ [Sen. in Cong. 

Justus, Mr. 

UNahum, Mr. 

Donald G. 

Stephen M. 

Walter 

Stephen 

Asa 

Thomas R. ; Mr. 

Charles 

Minot 

Lewis 

Alfred 

David M. 

Elisha, Mr., Tut., Prof, at N. C. 

James H. 

Sylvanus L. 

William, Mr. 

Matthew E. 

John, Mr. 

Richard B. G. 

Walter H. J. 
—Henry, M. D. 

Edward 
— James, M. D. 



Yale 
Yale 
Ver. 
Bro. 



Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 



Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Mid. 

Dart. 

Harv. 



Yale 
Harv. 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Wms. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale- 
Yale 
Yale 
Harv. 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Harv. 
Yale 
Yale 
Dart. 
Bow. 

Mitchelson 
Harv. Edward 
Yale Howard 

Mix 
Harv. Steplun, Mr 



1720 Yale Samuel, Mr. 
1724 Yale Elisha, Mr. 
1731 Yale Timothy, Mr. 
1751 Yale Jabez, Mr. 
1775 Yale John, Mr. 
1778 Yale John, Mr. 
1827 Yale Silas, Mr. 
Moffatt 

1758 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1793 Dart. Joseph 

Monis 
1720 Harv. — Judah, Mr., Heb. Precep. 

Monroe 
1817 Harv. —JAMES, LL. D., and at Dart. 
[T7, andatJN. J. 7 22, Gov. of 
[Virg., Sen. in Cong., and 
[Pres. ofU. S. 

Monson 

1780 Yale ^Eneas, Mr. 

1815 Yale Alfred S. ; Mr., M. D. at Penn. 

Montague 
1784 Dart. William 
1788 Dart. Joseph 
1814 Wms. Calvin 

1832 Amh. Zebina 

1833 Amh. Philetus 

Montgomery 

1760 Yale —\\Joseph, N. J. '55, Mr., and at 
1773 Yale Samuel [N. J. and Penn. 

1825 Bro. Hugh 

Mo oar 

1824 Wms. Selh 

Moody 

1653 Harv. Joshua, Mr. 

1689 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1697 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1707 Harv. Joshua, Mr. 

1716 Harv. Joshua, Mr. 

1718 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1718 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1727 Harv. John, Mr. 

1746 Harv. Samuel, Mr., and at Dart. 7 79 

1759 Harv. Amos, Mr. 

1761 Harv. Silas, Mr. 

1790 Harv. Stephen, Mr., and at Dart. ; 94 

1790 Dart. Samuel. Mr. 

1793 Dart. —Christopher L., LL. D. 

1795 Dart. Nathan, Mr. 

1798 Dart. William 

1808 Dart. Azor 

1810 Dart. Moses 

1814 Yale Anson 

1814 Mid. Pliny 

1816 Dart. Stephen 

1817 Bow. Joseph G., Mr. 

1820 Mid. —Eli, Mr. 

1821 Dart. William J. 
1821 Harv. George B., Mr. 

1823 Harv. Samuel 

1824 Bow. Theodore L. 

1826 Bow. Benjamin 

1827 Bow. Isaiah P. 

1828 Bow. —Richard, M. D. 

1829 Amh. Stillman 

1830 Harv. —George, M. D. 

Moor 
1793 Dart. Henry, Mr. 

1825 Wat. Henry 
1825 Wat. W. B. S. 

Moore 
1726 Yale Abijah, Mr. 
1741 Yale John 

1761 Harv. Jonathan, Mr., and at Yale '65 
1767 Harv. William, Mr. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



233 



1769 Harv. , Thomas, Mr. 


Morley 


178.3 Harv. Alpheus, Mr. '91 


1829 Wms. 


Sardis B.. Mr. 


1789 Dart. Abraham, Mr. 


Morrell 
1832 Bow. —Isaac, M. D. 
Morril 


1793 Dart. Zephaniah 8., Mr., D. D., Prof., 
[Pres. ot Wins. 181.3, and 
[Amh. 1821 

1799 Harv. Humphrey, 1800 

1804. Dart. William VV., Mr. 


1803 Darl.- 


-*David L., Mr. '19, 31. D. '21, 




[LL. D. at Ver. '25, Sun. in 


1805 Dart. — Edward C, D. D. 




[Cong., Gov. of IN. 11. 


1805 Vale Robert 


1826 Dart. 


—Samuel, M. D. 


1806 Yale Homer 


loot Bow. 


Amos 


1806 Harv. Abraham, Mr. 


Morrill 


1808 Mid. Noadiah, Mr., and Wms. ; 08 


1723 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 


1808 Mid. —Pliny, Mr. 


1737 Harv. 


Isaac, Mr. 


1810 Bro. Martin, Mr. 


1737 Harv. 


Moses, Mr. 


1812 Harv. —Francis, M. D. 


1 too Harv. 


Robie, Mr. '59 


1814 Bro. Mark 


1766 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1814 Ver. Isaac 


1799 Dart. 


Elisha 


1818 Yale Sheldon 


1805 Harv. 


Isaac, Mr. 


1821 Mid. AmasaC.,Mr. 


1820 Bow. 


Samuel, Mr., M. D. 


1822 Dart. Adams, Mr., Tut., M. D. 


1826 Amh. 


John 


182.5 Bro. —Thomas P., M. D. 


1830 Bow. 


—Robert S., M. D. 


1826 Harv. Josiah 


1832 Dart. 


— Alpneus, 31. D. 


1827 Wms. —Jacob, M. D. 


Morris 


1827 Yale Roger S., Mr. 


1732 Harv. 


James 


1828 Amh. Arad 


1746 Yale 


|| Lewis, Mr. '90 
fRichard, Mr. ; 87 


1828 Bow. —Edward B., M. D. 


1748 Yale 


1829 Dart. — Ebenezer G., M. D. 


1775 Yale 


James, 31r. 


1829 Wash. Richard C. 


1786 Dart.- 


-HLewis K., 3Ir. 
Asahel, 31r. '95 


1830 Wms. — Leverett, M. D. 


1789 Yale 


1832 Yaie —Daniel H., M. D. 


1798 Dart. 


John C, 3Ir. 


1832 Bow. Ebenezer 


1801 Wms. 


Oliver B., 31r. 


1832 Harv. —Henry, LL. B. 


1803 Yale 


James 


1833 Yale N. S. 


1804 Yale 


Reuben S., 3Ir. T4 


1834 Harv. George 


1813 Wms. 


Philip V. N., Mr. 
James 


1834 Dart. —Jesse, M. D. 


1813 Yale 


More 


1815 Yale 


George W. 


1787 Dart. Thomas, Mr., and at Yale '92 


1816 Yale 


James Van C. 


Morell 


1818 Yale 


Richard 


1807 Wms. George 


1827 Wms. 


Joseph, 31. D. 


Moreno 


1827 Bro. 


— Charles, Mr. 


1825 Harv. —Manuel, M. D. 


1830 Dart. 
1830 Yale 


Governeur 
William R. 


Morey 


1831 Yale 


Staats S. 


1774 Harv. Nathan 


1832 Amh. 


Henry 


1776 Harv. George, Mr. 


1832 Wms. 


William 


1777 Vale Samuel, Mr. 


Morrison 


1789 Dart. Moulton, Mr. 


1790 Dart. 


Simon G. 


1811 Harv. George, Mr. 


1801 Dart. 


— William, 3Ir. 


Morgan 


1806 Dart. 


William F. 


1702 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
1723 Yale Joseph 


1808 Dart. 


James 


1824 Dart. 


—Moses F., 31. D. 


1762 Yale Consider, Mr. 


1829 Wash. 


Angus R. 


1769 Bro. — Abel, Mr. 


1831 Harv. 


John H. 


1772 Yale John, Mr. 


1833 Wash. 


Hugh L. 


1773 Harv. Abner 


Mors 


1791 Yale Solomon 


1692 Harv. 


John, 31 i . 


1812 Yale Samuel C. 


1695 Harv. 


Joscuii, 31r» 


1813 Yale Frederick, Mr., Tut., M. D. 


Mo^s a 


1819 Wms. Luke 


1734 Harv. 


Parker 


1820 Wms. John C. 

1820 Yale —Nicholson R., N. J. '17, Mr. 


1737 Harv. 


Ebenezer, Mr. 
John, 3Ir. 


1820 Yale —William H., M. D. 


1767 Harv! 


Asarelah, 3Ir. 


1826 Wms. John 

1826 Yale Allen C. 

1827 Wash. John 

1828 Yale Christopher 

1829 Wms. —Lewis S., M. D. 


17S3 Yale 
1787 Dart. 
1791 Harv. 
1791 Harv. 
1791 Bro. 


Jedidiah, 31r., and at N. J. '87, 
Caleb [Tut., D. D. at Edin. 
John, 3Ir. 
Samuel B., 3Ir. 
John 


1831 Yale Thomas N. 

1832 Amh. John 

1833 Yaie George J. 


1796 Harv. 
1803 Dart. 
1808 Harv. 


Leonard, 3Ir. 
Ebenezer B. 
John, 31r. 


Moriarty 


1809 Bro. 


Elijah, 31r., and at Harv. '14. 


1827 Bro. John M., M. D. at Harv. '31 


1810 Dart. 


Ebenezer, Mr., 31. D. 


1830 Bro. Joseph 


1810 Yale 


Samuel F. B., 3Ir. '16 


1834 Harv. —Josiah, M. D. 


1811 Yale 


Sidney E., Mr. 



234 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1811 Dart. 


Samuel 


1812 Yale 


Richard C, Mr. 


1816 Bro. 


Abner, Mr. 


1821 Dart. 


Stephen 


1 823 Dart. 


Horace R. 


1825 Mid. 


—Richard, Mr. 


1827 Bro. 


Sylvar-us 


1829 Harv. 


Isaac E. 


1830 Dart. 


Peabody A. 


1832 Harv. 


John T. 


1834 Ami). 


Humphrey 


Morson 


1822 Yale 


Arthur A. 


Morss 


1800 Harv. 


James, Mr. ; D. D. at N. J. '26 


1832 Wins. 


Austin G. 


Mc 


rton 


1686 Harv. 


Nicholas 


1771 Harv. 


Perez, Mr. 


1787 Harv. 


Ephraim, Mr. 


1795 Bro. 


Andrew 


1797 Bro. 


Job 


1799 Dart. 


Abner 


1804 Harv. 


Charles A. 


1804 Bro. 


HtMarcus, Mr., LL.D., Lieut. Gov 


1812 Mid. 


Daniel O., Mr. [of Ms 


1813 Bro. 


Joshua 


1820 Bro. 


—Cyrus, M. D. 


1831 Harv. 


William S. 


Moseley 


1751 Yale 


Thomas, Mr., M. D. 


1762 Yale 


Isaac, Mr. 


1763 Yale 


Ebenezer, Mr. 


1766 Yale 


Israel, Mr. 


1775 Yale 


William, Mr. 


1777 Yale 


William, Mr. 


1780 Yale 


||Jonathan O., Mr. 


1786 Yale 


Abner 


1786 Yale 


Elizur 


1790 Dart. 


FMsha, Mr. 


1802 Yale 


Ebenezer 


1806 Wms. 


Daniel 


1806 Yale 


Charles, Mr. 


1816 Yale 


William A. 


Mosely 


1729 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1818 Mid. 


Samuel, Mr. at Dart. '23 


1829 Bow. 


—Daniel F., M. D. 


1333 Wms. 


—Luther, M. D. 


Moser 


1825 Wms. 


John R. 


Moses 


1825 Yale 


— Hiram, M. D. 


Moss 


1699 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. at Yale 1702 


1767 Yale 


Daniel, Mr. 


1787 Yale 


Reuben, Mr. '91 


Motley 


1831 Harv. 


John L. 


Mott 


1822 Bro. 


Thomas W. 


Motte 


1821 Harv. 


Mellish I., Mr. 


1832 Harv. 


Rhett J. 


Mottey 


1778 Dart 


Joseph. Mr. 


Moulton 


1767 Harv. 


Josiah, Mr. 


1802 Dart. 


Josiah, Mr. 


1827 Bow. 


George F. 


1830 Bow. 


Jotham T. 


Mo 


antfort 


1702 Harv. 


Ebenezer, Mr. 



1722 Harv. John, Mr. 

Mowe 
1819 Dart. —Daniel, M. D. 

Mower 
1738 Harv. Richard, Mr. 
1810 Harv. Thomas G., Mr., M. D. at N. Y. 

Mowry 

1827 Wms. — Zebina M., M. D. 

Muenscher 
1821 Bro. Joseph, Mr. 

Muir 
1791 Yale —James, D. D. 

Muirson 
1771 Yale Sylvester, Mr. 
1776 Yale Heathcote 

Mulford 

1794 Yale Hervey 
1806 Yale Daniel 

1814 Yale William J. R. 

Mullener 
1826 Wms. Alexander C. 

Mulliken 

1802 Dart. Joseph, Mr. 
1817 Bro. —Joseph, M. D. 
1819 Harv. Samuel, Mr., M. D. 
1821 Dart. —Isaac W., M. D. 

Mulocy 
1831 Bow. — Boothe C, M. D. 

Mumford 
1754 Yale Paul, Mr. '86, Lieut. Gov. R. I. 
1790 Yale Thomas, Mr. 1804 
1790 Yale Benjamin M., Mr. 
1814 Yale William W. 

Munger 

1795 Yale Elijah 

1814 Yale Ebenezer, Mr. 

1828 Mid. SendolB. 

Munro 
1821 Bro. Allen 
Munroe 



1751 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1800 Harv. 


Israel, Mr. 


1819 Yale 


— Hollis, M. D. 


1828 Bro. 


Ephraim 


1830 Harv. 


Nathan W. 


1830 Bow. 


Nathan, Mr. 


1831 Yale 


—Alexander Le B., M. D. 


Munsell 


1794 Dart. 


Jdbez, Mr., and at Yale ; 99 


Munson 


1725 Yale 


Stephen, Mr. 


1726 Yale 


Daniel, Mr. 


1738 Yale 


Amos 


1749 Yale 


Augustine, Mr. 


1751 Yale 


Stephen, Mr. 


1753 Yale 


./Eneas, Mr., M. D., Prof. 


1763 Yale 


Samuel, Mr. 


1768 Yale 


Theophilus, Mr. 


1784 Yale 


Elisha 


1787 Yale 


Israel 


1811 Yale 


Levinus, Mr. '18 


1829 Bow. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1830 Wms. 


—William B. 


Murdoch 


1828 Harv. 


Charles T., Mr., LL. B. 


Murdock 


1755 Yale 


Peter 


1766 Yale 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1774 Yale 


James 


1781 Dart. 


Jasper 


1797 Yale 


James, Mr., Prof, at Ver. & An- 




[dover ; D. D. at Harv. 1819 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



235 



1808 
1812 
1817 
1823 
18"23 
1828 
1834- 

1771 

1772 
1792 
1820 
1824 
1826 
1826 
1830 

1803 



1809 

1786 

1824 

1774 
1793 

1827 

1809 
1825 

1684 



Yale John B. 

Dart. Thomas J., Mr., Tutor 

Yale — Ellice, M. D., A. B. at Union '14 

Dart. Charles 

Wins. —Hiram, M. D. 

Wins. — Alvah, M. D. 

Yale John 

Murray 
Harv. Daniel, Mr., and at N. J. '73 
Harv. Samuel 
Dart. John W. 

Yale Washing-ton, Mr., M. D. at N. Y. 
Yale Hamilton, Mr. 
Wms. Nicholas, Mr. 
Mid. John A., Mr. 
Yale John R. 

Mussey 
Dart. Reuben D., Mr., and at Harv. 
['09, M. D. at Penn. ; Prof, at 
[Dart. 
Bow. John 

Muzzey 

Dart. Nathan 

Harv. Arte mas B., Mr. 

Muzzy 
Harv. Benjamin 
Harv. William 

Myer 

Wash. Jacob C. 

Myers 
Harv. — Samuel 
Yale — Francis 

Myles 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. at Oxf. 

Myrick 



1814 Dart. 


Joseph 


1815 Dart. - 


-Lot, M. D. 


1826 Wat. 


Ebenezer 


Nash 


1748 Yale 


Judah, Mr. 


1770 Bro. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1773 Bro. 


Jacob 


1785 Yale 


Daniel 


1789 Dart. 


Jonathan, Mr 


1791 Yale 


William 


1801 Wms. 


Lonson 


1809 Wms. 


Ansel 


1811 Wms. 


James 


1824 Amh. 


John A., Mr. 


1825 Wms. 


Alvan 


1828 W T ash. 


Charles 


1829 Amh. 


Simeon 


Nason 


1802 Harv. 


Reuben, Mr. 


1834 Bow. 


Reuben 


Natt 


1834 Wash. 


George W. 


Naudain 


1832 Mid. 


Andrew 


Neal 


1720 Harv. - 


—Daniel, Mr. 


1724 Harv. 


Jonathan, Mr. 


1785 Harv. 


Moses L. 


1816 Harv. 


Nathan W., Mr. 


1832 Yale 


Abner 


Needham 


1821 Bro. 


John G., Mr. 


Neeley 


1826 Wms. 


Orlando, Mr. 


Neely 


1830 Yale 


Laurence 



1830 

183t 

1654 
1721 
1771 
1790 
1790 
1791 
1803 
1807 
1810 
1813 
1813 
1822 
1826 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1831 
1832 

1820 

1809 

1816 

1762 

1726 
1793 
1799 

1833 

1830 

1722 
1768 
1793 
1803 
1804 
1307 
1824 
1825 
1829 
1832 

1718 

1727 
1739 
1750 
1751 
1770 
1775 
1781 
1786 
1802 
1805 
1807 
1810 
1812 
1812 
1819 
1822 
1823 
1824 
1827 
1830 
1830 
1830 



Neill 
Yale Benjamin D. 
Amh. Henry 

Nelson 



Ilarv. Philip 
Harv. Pascal, Mr. 
Bro. — William, Mr. 
Bro. Job, Mr. 
Dart. [jJeremiah, Mr. 
Bro. Stephen S., Mr. 

Dart. John, Air. 
Wms. John, Mr., Tutor 
Wms. —Levi, Mr. 
Bro. Morgan 
Mid. fSamuel 
Dart. George, M. D. 
Bow. Horatio 
Amh. William F., Mr. 
Amh. William R. 
Dart. —Robert, M. D. 
Amh. Benjamin D. 
Harv. Albert H. 

Nesmith 
Dart. George W. 

Nettleton 
Yale Asahel, Prof. Theo. Inst., Ct. 

Nevins 

Yale William, D. D. 

New 

Harv. John, Mr. 

Newberry 
Yale Roger, Mr. 
Yale — Roger, Mr. 
Yale Roger, Mr. 1807 

Newbold 
Yale James E. 

Newbury 
Mid. Samuel 

Newcomb 

Harv. William 

Harv. fDaniel, Mr. 

Dart. Richard E. ; Mr. 

Harv. Daniel, Mr., M. D. at Penn. 

Harv. Seth, Mr. 

Dart. Henry S., and at Harv. '08 

Wms. —Horatio G., Mr. 

Wms. Joseph W. 

Yale John E., M. D. 

Amh. George 

Newell 
Yale Daniel, Mr. 
Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
Yale Samuel, Mr. 
Yale Daniel, Mr. 
Yale Abel, Mr. 
Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
Yale Simeon, Mr. 
Yale Samuel 
Yale Gad 
Harv. Timothy 
Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. '11, and at Yale 'II 
Yale Lot, Mr. 
Bro. William P. 
Ver. George 
Bow. Israel, Mr. 
Yale — Oliver, M. D. 
Harv. George 
Harv. William, Mr. 
Mid. —Gordon, Mr. 
Wms. James R. 
Bow. — Selim, M. D. 
Yale William 



236 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1831 Yale 


Chester 


1832 Harv. 


Samuel H. 


Ne 


whall 


1817 Harv. 


Horatio, M. D. 


1818 Harv. 


Ebenezer, Mr. 


Newman 


1687 Harv. 


Hes-iry, Mr. 


1740 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1762 Harv. 


John 


1793 Dart. 


Mark, Mr. 


1801 Harv. 


Henry, Mr. 


1816 Harv. 


Samuel P., Mr. ; Tutor, Prof, at 


1816 Bro. 


— William, D. D. [Bow. 


1825 Bow. 


Mark 


Newmarch 


1690 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1728 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr. 


Newton 


1740 Yale 


Christopher, Mr. 


1758 Yale 


Roger. Mr., D. D. at Dart. 1805 


1773 Bro. 


—John, Mr., D. D. at N. J. ? 91 


1785 Yale 


Roger, Mr. ; Tutor 


1786 Bro. 


— James, Mr. 


1804 Dart. 


Hubbard, Mr. 


1807 Dart. 


Rejoice 


1808 Dart. 


George 


1810 Mid. 


Ephraim H., Mr., and at Wms. 


1815 Dart. 


Enos W. 


1818 Yale 


Joel W. 


1820 Dart. 


Jasper 


18"26 Yale 


Cincinnatus 


1828 Yale 


Alfred, Mr., Tutor 


Neyle 


1821 Harv. 


Henry M. 


Nickels 


1830 Bro. 


Christopher M. 


Nickerson 


1834 Wat. 


Charles 


Nichols 


1725 Harv. 


Israel, Mr. 


1734 Yale 


Joseph 


1762 Yale 


William 


1771 Yale 


James 


1773 Yale 


John, Mr. 


1800 Harv. 


—John, LL. D. 


1801 Yale 


Henry 


1802 Harv. 


Ichabod, Mr., Tut.,D. D. at Bow. 



1804 Harv. Benjamin R., Mr. 

1811 Yale Samuel 

1812 Yale Charles 

1813 Dart. John 

1814 Harv. Joseph P., Mr. 

1816 Dart. David L. 

1819 Mid. — Ammi, Mr. 
1824 Yale George, Mr. 

1824 Yale John C. 

1825 Yale Joseph H., Mr. 

1827 Wms. Cyrus 

1828 Wms. Warren 

1828 Harv. George 

1829 Dart. —Adams, M. D. 

1830 Mid. —Jarvis Z., Mr. 
1833 Wash. Robert W. 

1833 Harv. George H. 

1834 Amh. Washington A. 
1834 Wash. Abel 

Nicoll 

1734 Yale William, Mr.' 

1734 Yale Benjamin, Mr. 

1806 Wms. William H. 

1810 Yale Edward 

1817 Mid. Charles 
1828 Yale Alexander A. 

1820 Yale Robert 



[•21 



Nightingale 


1728 Yale 


Joseph 


1734 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1789 Bro. 


John C, Mr., and at Yale '95 


Niles 


1699 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1731 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1739 Harv. 


Elisha, Mr. 


1758 Yale 


Thomas, Mr. 


1772 Harv.- 


-lltiNathaniel, N. J. '66, Mr., and at 


1796 Dart. 


William [N. J. ? 69, at Dart. ; 91 


1797 Yale 


John 


1811 Dart. 


Benjamin, and at Yale '15 


1816 Harv. 


—Nathaniel, M. D. 


18-20 Dart. 


William W., Mr. 


1823 Wms. 


Ebenezer 


1830 Dart. 


Barron J. 


1830 Amh. 


Mark H„ Prof. So. Han. 


Nims 


1823 Dart. 


—Reuben, M. D. 


1833 Wms. 


— Dvvight, M. D. 


Nixon 


1813 Mid. 


Benjamin 


1816 Mid. 


IN ahum 


Noble 


1755 Yale 


Gideon, Mr. 


1757 Yale 


Oliver, Mr. 


1764 Yale 


David 


1773 Dart. 


—Obadiah, N. J. ; 63. Mr., and at 


1796 Wms. 


Daniel, Mr. [N. J. 


1805 Mid. 


Calvin, Mr. 


1810 Ver. 


William 


1810 Yale 


Birdseye G., Mr. 


1812 Yale 


Joseph 


1815 Wms. 


Charles 


1825 Wms. 


David A. 


1826 Wms. 


Jonathan H., Mr. 


1827 Wms. 


Robert A., Mr. 


1827 Wms. 


Mason, Mr., Tutor 


1829 Wms. 


—Gideon C, M. D. 


1831 Wms. 


Edward W. 


1832 Yale 


William H. 


Norcross 


1815 Yale 


Erasmus 


1826 Yale 


William O. 


Norris 


1816 Bow. 


Dudley 


1819 Yale 


— James, M. D. 


1823 Bro. 


Benjamin, Mr., M. D. 


1828 Dart. 


Moses 


1834 Wms. 


George H. 


North 


1806 Wms. 


Theodore, Mr. 


1813 Yale 


Milo L. 


1825 Yale 


Simeon, Mr., Tut., Prof, at Ham. 


1826 Harv. 


Edward, M. D. 


Northam 


1808 Wms. 


Alfred 


1833 Wash. 


Robert E. 


Northrop 


1762 Yale 


Amos, Mr. 


1776 Yale 


Joel, Mr. '80 


1804 Yale 


Amos, Mr. 


1811 Yale 


Samuel B., Mr. 


1813 Wms. 


William 


1824 Yale 


Bennet F. 


1825 Yale 


—Daniel, M. D. 


Northup 


1821 Bow. 


Immanuel 


1829 Mid. 


Henry B. 


Norton 


1671 Harv. 


John, Mr. 1716 


1723 Yale 


Thomas 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



237 



1725 
1737 
1751 
1765 
1768 
1786 
1790 
1802 
1804 
1804 

1804 
1805 
1805 
1806 
1808 
1812 
1814 
1822 
1829 
1832 
1834 

1771 

1818 
1828 

1720 

1780 
1787 
1795 



1818 
18*3 
1830 



1802 
1812 

1653 
1664 

1659 
1659 
1667 
1695 
1709 
1726 
1727 
1733 
1747 
1753 
1758 
1763 
1765 
1771 
1775 
1777 
1778 
1779 
1781 
1782 
1785 
1793 
1795 
1795 
1796 
1796 
1799 
1800 
1801 
1801 
1812 
1818 



Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Yale John, Mr. 

Yale Seth, Mr., and at Harv. '56 

Yale Samuel, Mr. 

Yale Josiah 

Harv. Jacob, Mr., and at Bro. 1803 

Yale Asaliel S., D. D. at Union 1815 

Bro. William 

Bro. George 

Harv. Andrews, Mr., Tut., Prof., Mr. 
[at Bow. '15, and Tutor 

Yale Seth, Mr., Tut., Prof, at Ham. 

Wins. Ariel 

Harv. Stephen S. 

Yale Heman 

Harv. Richard C, Mr. 

Harv. William S., Mr. 

Yale Frederick A. 

Y'ale Lott, Mr. 

Yale William 

Yale Augustus T. 

Bow. James, M. D. 

Norwood 

Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

Dart. Francis, Mr. 

Harv. John G., Mr. 

Nott 

Yale Abraham, Mr. 

Yale Samuel, Mr., D. D. 

Yale UtAbraham, Mr. 1801 
Bro. —Eliphalet, Mr., U. D. at N. J. 

[1805, Pres. of Union, LL. D. 

[at Bro. 1828 

Yale Richard T., Mr. 

Yale Handel G., Mr. 

Yale Abraham P. 

Nourse 

Harv. Peter, Mr. 

Harv. Amos, Mr., M. D. 

Nowell 

Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

Harv. Alexander, Mr. 
Noyes 

Harv. James 

Harv. Moses 

Harv. Nicholas, Mr. 1716 

Harv. Oliver, Mr. 

Yale Joseph, Mr., Tutor 

Yale James 

Harv. Belcher, Mr. 

Harv. John, Mr. 

Harv. Edmund, Mr. 

Yale John, Mr. 

Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 

Harv. Belcher, Mr. 

Harv. John, Mr. 

Yale John, Mr. 

Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

Yale Joseph, Mr. 

Yale John, Mr. 

Yale William, Mr. 

Yale James, Mr. 

Yale Matthew, Mr. 

Dart. Levi 

Dart. ||/ohn, Mr., Tutor 

Harv. Thomas, Mr., and at Bro. 1817 

Dart. Parker, Mr. 

Dart. Nathan, Mr., M. D. at Mid. 

Dart. Jeremiah, Mr. 

Harv. Bloody, Mr. 

Dart. Josiah, Mr., Tut., M. B., Prof, at 

Bro. Moses, Mr. [Ham. 

Yale Daniel 

Harv. George R., Mr., Tutor 

VOL. VII. 



1819 Mid. 


Moses G. 


1824 Yale 


Burr, M. D. 


1824 Dart. 


—Bradley, M. D., and at Wms. '28 


1825 Dart. 


—Josiah, M. D. 


1825 Yale 


— Samuel, M. D. 


1830 Dart. 


Gilman, Mr. 


1830 Dart. 


John H. 


1831 Dart. 


— Francis V., M. D. 


1832 Dart. 


Daniel J. 


1834 Yale 


John 


Nutman 


1727 Yale 


John, Mr. 


Nu 


ttall 


1826 Harv. 


— Thomas, Mr. 


Nutting 


1712 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1768 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1807 Dart. 


William 


1814 Dart. 

IV 17 


Kufus, Mr., Prof, at Hud. 


lNyt; 
1718 Harv. Cornelius, Mr. 


1771 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1801 Dart. 


John 


1801 Bro. 


Jonathan, Mr., and at Ver. '08 


1803 Dart. 


Salmon 


1806 Wms. 


Ebenezer, Mr. 


1822 Ver. 


Thomas 


Oakes 


1649 Harv. 


Urian, Mr., Pres. 


1662 Harv. 


Thomas 


1678 Harv. 


Urian 


1679 Harv. 


Edward, Mr. 


1708 Harv. 


Josiah, Mr. 


1820 Harv. 


William, Mr., LL. B. 


1820 Wms. 


Isaac, Mr. 


Oakley 


1801 Yale 


||Thomas J. 


1814 Yale 


Jesse 


Oakman 


1771 Harv. 


Melzar T., Mr. 


Oaks 


1827 Yale 


William B., Mr. '31 


O'Erien 


1806 Bow. 


John M., Mr. 


1831 Bow. 


John G. 


Odell 


1823 Bow. 


Lory 


Odin 


1830 Harv. 


John, Mr., M. D. 


Odiorne 


1791 Dart. 


Thomas, Mr. 


1826 Yale 


James C., Mr., A. B. at Harv. '27 


Odlin 


1702 Harv. 


John, Mr. 


1731 Harv. 


Elishn, Mr. 


1738 Harv. 


Woodbridge, Mr. 


1777 Harv. 


Dudlev, Mr. 
John, Mr., M. D. 


1830 Harv. 


Ogden 


1728 Yale 


tDavid, Mr. 


1782 Yale 


—John C, IN . J. '70, Mr., & at N. J. 


1815 Yale 


David L, Mr. 


1817 Yale 


Abraham 


1832 Wash 


David 



Ogilvie 
1748 Yale John, Mr., D. D. at Aberd. and 

[Columb. 

Olcott 
1758 Yale Bulkley, Mr., and at Dart. '86 
1761 Y'ale fSiMEON, Mr., and at Dart. 73, 
1768 } ale Allen, Mr. [Sen. in Cong. 

1789 Dart. Roswell, Mr. 

31 



238 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1790 Dart. Mills, Mr. 

1790 Dart. — fPeter, Mr. ; Lieut. Gov. of Ver. 



1793 Yale 
1800 Dart. 
1805 Yale 
1816 Yale 
1819 Wms. 
1823 Yale 
1825 Dart. 
1827 Dart. 



Michael 

Theophilus, Mr. 

George, Mr. 

Charles 
— James S., Mr. 
—Austin, M. D. 

Edward R., Mr. 

William 



Olds 
1771 Yale Daniel, Mr. 
1794 Harv. Jesse, Mr. 

1801 Wms. Gamaliel S., Mr., Tut., Prof., & 
[at Ver., at Amh., & at Geo. 
IraM. 
Ariel 



1808 Wms. 
1811 Wms. 
Olin 

1820 Mid. Stephen P., Mr., Prof, at Frank. 7 

[D. D., Pres. of Macon Coll. 
1834 MM. —Henry 
Oliver 

1645 Harv. John 
1675 Harv. Peter, Mr. 

James, Mr. 

Nathaniel, Mr. 

Peter 

Thomas, Mr. 

Daniel, Mr. 

Andrew, Mr., Lieut. Gov. Mass. 
tPeter, Mr., LL. D. at Oxf. 

Nathaniel, Mr. 

Peter, Mr. 

William, Mr. 

Edward B., Mr. 

Andrew, Mr., and at Yale '51 

Thomas, Mr., Lieut. Gov. Mass. 

Daniel, Mr. 

Peter, Mr. 

Daniel, Mr. 

Andrew, Mr., and at N. J. '72 

Peter, Mr., M. D. at Aberd. 

Brinley S. 

Thomas F., Mr., and at Bro. '83 

Daniel, Mr. 

Francis J., Mr., and at Yale '99 

Daniel, Mr., and at Dart. ; 21, 

[31. D. at Penm, and at Dart., 

[Prof, at Dart. 

-Benjamin L., Mr., M. D. '15, Mr. 

[at Dart. ; 24 

Nathaniel K. G., Mr. 

Henry K., and at Harv. '18 
Olmsted 
1785 Yale Zechariah, Mr. 

Charles G. 

Denison, Mr., Tutor, Prof., Prof. 

Hawley, Mr. [atN.C. 

Charles H., Mr. 
Olney 
1798 Bro. Nathaniel G., Mr. 
1803 Bro. George I. 

1821 Bow. —Gideon W., Mr., and at Bro. '22 

Ordway 
1764 Harv. Nehemiah, Mr. 
1820 Mid. Moses 

Orgain 
1831 Amh. John 

Ormsbee 
1823 Mid. Edgar L. 

Orne 

1733 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1740 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
1764 Harv. Joshua, Mr. 



1680 Harv. 
1701 Harv. 
1710 Harv. 
1719 Harv. 
1722 Harv. 
1724 Harv. 
1730 Harv. 
1733 Harv. 
1737 Harv. 
1739 Harv. 
1739 Harv. 
1749 Harv. 
1753 Harv. 
1758 Harv. 

1761 Harv. 

1762 Harv. 
1765 Harv. 
1769 Harv. 

1774 Harv. 

1775 Harv. 
1785 Dart. 
1795 Harv. 
1806 Harv. 



1808 Harv. 

1809 Harv. 
1818 Dart. 



1809 Yale 
1813 Yale 
1816 Yale 
1818 Yale 



1765 
1768 
1781 
1804 
1812 
1814 
1815 
1815 
1831 

1792 
1798 
1815 
1818 
1820 
1834 

1765 
1787 
1813 
1824 

1661 
1735 

1749 
1757 
1763 
1775 
1779 
1779 
1784 
1784 
1789 
1799 
1807 
1820 

1739 
1803 
1817 
1818 
1824 
1831 
1833 

1721 

1724 
1733 
1737 
1744 
1770 
1771 
1772 
1775 
1789 
1799 
1803 
1804 
1805 
1806 
1808 
1811 
1813 
1814 
1814 
1815 
1818 
1819 
1823 
1824 
1832 
1832 

1828 



Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Dart. 
Bow. 
Bow. 
Harv. 
Dart. 

Orr 
Harv. 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Yale 
Yale 
Bow. 



Joseph, Mr. 
Timothy, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr., 
Henry H. 
Edward 
Richard E. 
Joseph, Mr. 
-Albert W„ M. D. 



and at Ya'e '04 at 
[Bow. '06 



D. 



Hector, Mr. 1801, M 
||Benjamin 

William, Mr. at Yale '18 
Isaac, Mr. 
Robert 
John 

Orton 

Yale Samuel 

Dart. James, Mr. 

Wms. Azariah 

Yale Milton P., Mr. '29, M. D. 

Osborn 
Harv. Recompence 

John, Mr. 

Daniel, Mr. 
—Sylranus, N. J. '51, Mr. 

Daniel 

Benjamin 

Isaac 

Jeremiah, Mr. 

Ethan, Mr. 

Jacob, Mr. 

Jonathan, Mr. 

Jeremiah 

Isaac H. 

George B., Mr. 
Osborne 
Harv. Woodbury, Mr. 
— George, Mr. 

Thomas B. 

George, M. D. 
—Orson, M. D. 
—John Q., M. D. 

George H. 
Osgood 
Harv. William, Mr. 
Harv. James, Mr. 

John, Mr. 

Joseph, Mr. 

Isaac, Mr. 

||Samuel, Mr. 

David, Mr., D. D. at Yale '97 

Joshua B., Mr. 

Isaac, Mr. 

Jonathan, Mr. 

Daniel, Mr., M. D., and at Harv. 

Thaddeus, Mr. [1820 

Joseph O., Mr. 

Samuel, Mr., D. D. at N. J. '27 

Benjamin B., Mr. 

Samuel, Mr. 

Robert H. 

David, Mr., M. D. 

Peter, Mr. 

Isaac P., Mr. 

||Gayton P., Mr. 

Timothy, Mr. 

Nahum 

Jonathan W. D., Mr., M. D. 

Joseph, M. D. 

Samuel 

Henry B. 

Ostrom 
Wms. James I., Mr. 



Harv. 

Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Harv. 



Bro. 

Yale 
Harv. 

Yale ■ 
Yale ■ 
Wash. 



Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Harv. 

Dart. 

Harv. 

Dart. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Ver. 

Dart. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Bow. 



1835] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



239 



Otis 

1707 Harv. John, Mr. 

1717 Harv. Solomon, Mr. 

1738 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 

1743 Harv. James, Mr. 

175b Harv. Ephrairn, Mr., and at Yale 'o'J 

1759 Harv. ||Samuel A., Mr. 

1775 Harv. James, Mr. 

1783 Harv. Harrison G., Mr., LL. D., 
[Sen. in Cong. 

1789 Harv. Cushing, Mr., M. L>. 

1811 Harv. Harrison G., Mr. 

1815 Harv. George, Mr., Tut., Prof. 

1818 Harv. George W., Mr., M. D. 
1821 Harv. William F., Mr. 

1821 Harv. George A. 

1823 Bow. John 

1825 Harv. Joseph R. 

1825 Harv. Allyne, Mr. 

1828 Wms. Israel T. 

1829 Yale —Charles P., Mr. 

1830 Wms. William S. C. 

Otto 
1787 Bro. —Lewis W., LL. D. 

Oulton 
1774 Bro. — John, Mr. 

Owen 
1723 Harv. John, Mr. 
1756 Yale John 

1827 Bow. John, Mr. 

1828 Mid. John J., Mr. 

Oxnard 

1767 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

Packard 
1750 Harv. Elijah, Mr. 
1777 Dart. Winston, Mr. 
1783 Harv. Asa, Mr. 
1787 Harv. Hezekiah, Mr., Tutor, D. D. 

1796 Dart. Theophilus, Mr., D. D. 

1814 Harv. Frederick A., Mr. 

1816 Bow. Alpheus S., Mr., Tut., Prof. 

1817 Bow. Charles, Mr. 

1821 Bow. George, M. D., '25 

1821 Bro. Austin, Mr. 

1821 Bro. Levi, Mr. 

1823 Amh. Theophilus, Mr. 

1824 Amh. Abel, and at Union 

1825 Bow. Hezekiah 

1831 Bow. Joseph 

Paddleford 

1768 Yale John 

1770 Yale Seth, LL. D. at Bro. '98 
Paddock 

1819 Ver. —James A. 

1820 Yale Seth B., Mr. 
1824 Mid. — tEphraim, Mr. 

Padduck 

1815 Dart. —William, M. D. 

Padelford 
1773 Bro. Philip, Mr. 

1803 Bro. Alpheus, Mr. 

Page 

1729 Harv. Solomon 

1761 Harv. John, Mr. 

1765 Harv. John, Mr. 

1797 Yale William 

1804 Harv. Phineas 

1805 Yale Joel 

1809 Harv. William P., Mr. 

1810 Bow. Robert, Mr. 
1815 Harv. William 

1817 Dart. David 

1818 Bow. Frederick B., Mr.,M. D. at Harv. 
1818 Mid. William ['21 



1820 Bow. 


Caleb F., Mr. 


1822 Yale 


—Alfred, M. D. 


1826 Harv. 


John 11. W. ; Mr. 


1827 Dart. 


—David, M. D. 


1829 Amh. 


Alva C. 


1829 Mid. 


William T. 


1831 Dart. 


Jesse 


1831 Bow. 


—Horatio N., M. D. 


1832 Harv. 


Charles G. 


Paige 


1784 Dart. 


Christopher, Mr. 


1806 Dart. 


Reed, Mr. 


1807 Wms. 


John K., Mr. 


1810 Harv. 


Elijah F., Mr. 


1812 Wms. 


Christopher A., Mr. 


1828 Bro. 


— Winslow, Mr. 


Paine 


1656 Harv. 


Robert, Mr. 


1689 Harv. 


William, Mr. 


1717 Harv. 


Tliomas, Mr. 


1721 Harv. 


Stephen, Mr. 


1748 Harv. 


Timothv, Mr. 


1749 Harv. 


tRobert T., Mr., LL. D. 


1753 Yale 


John 


1768 Harv. 


William, Mr., M. D., and at 


1771 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. [Aberd. 


1775 Harv. 


Nathaniel, Mr. 


1781 Harv. 


IElijah, 31r., and at Dart. '86, 




[LL. D., and at Ver. 1825, 




[Sen. in Cong. 
Joshua, Mr., and at Yale '87 


1784 Harv. 


1785 Harv. 


Amasa, Mr. 


1789 Harv. 


Robert, Mr. 


1792 Harv. 


Robert T., Mr. 


1793 Harv. 


Charles, Mr. 


1799 Harv. 


John 


1802 Dart. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1803 Bro. 


Lemuel 


1813 Harv. 


Martyn, Mr., M. D. 


1813 Bro. 


Emerson 


1814 Harv. 


Elijah, Mr. 


1819 Harv. 


—Frederick W., Mr. 


1820 Harv. 


Charles, Mr. 


1822 Harv. 


Robert T., Mr. 


1823 Amh. 


Elijah, Mr. 


1823 Wat. 


Henrij 


1826 Bow. 


William 


1827 Dart. 


George 


1827 Amh. 


William P., Mr., Tutor 


1827 Harv. 


Charles C, Mr. 


1827 Bro. 


Royal 


1828 Yale 


Samuel C, M. D. 


1830 Wat. 


Henry W., Tutor 


1832 Amh. 


Stephen 


1832 Wash. 


Robert T. 


Painter 


1815 Yale 


Alexis, Mr. '21 


Palfrey 


1815 Harv. 


John G., Mr., Prof., D. D. 


1826 Harv. 


Cazneau, Mr., Tutor 


Palmer 


1727 Harv. 


Eliakim, Mr. 


1727 Harv. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1729 Yale 


Solomon, Mr. 


1739 Harv. 


Job, Mr. 


1747 Harv. 


Joseph, Mr., and at Yale '53 


1750 Yale 


Benjamin 


1760 Yale 


Jonathan 


1761 Harv. 


Thomas, Mr. 


1771 Harv. 


Joseph P., Mr. 


1779 Harv. 


Joseph 


1787 Dart. 


Elihu 


1789 Harv. 


Stephen, Mr. 


1797 Dart. 


David, Mr. 


1802 Harv. 


John 



240 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[F 



EB, 



1813 Mid. Henry G. 
1316 Yale —Joseph, M. D. 
1820 Yale —Joseph, M. D. 
1820 Harv. Joseph, Mr., M. D. 

1824 Yale —Edward, Mr. 

1825 Mid. —David, M. D. 

1826 Yale — Denison B., M. D. 

1827 Wms. —John K., M. D. 

1828 Wms. William P. 

1828 Yale Ezra, Mr., M. D. at Harv. '31 

1828 Yale John C, Mr. 

1830 Wms. — Jedidiah W., M. D. 

1830 Yale Ray 

1831 Dart. Benjamin R. 
1831 Yale —Virgil M. ; M. D. 
1833 Wash. Joseph 

1833 Wms. — Eleazer R., M. D. 

1834 Wms. — David, M.D., Prof, at Woodstock 

Palmes 
1703 Harv. Andrew 
Parcher 

1830 Bow. —George, M. D. 

Pardee 

1793 Yale Amos 

1816 Yale Jared, M. D, 

Paris 
1659 Harv. Thomas 
1721 Harv. Noijes, Mr. 

Parish 

1785 Dart. Elijah, Mr., D. D. 

1788 Dart. Ariel, Mr. 
1813 Yale Russell 
1822 Wms. Daniel, Mr. 
1822 Bow. Moses P. 
1828 Wms. Consider, Mr. 

Park 

1724 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1753 Harv. Solomon 

1776 Bro. — John, Mr., and at Penn. 

1789 Bro. Thomas, Mr., LL. D., Prof, at 
1791 Dart. John, Mr. [S. C. 
1797 Bro. Calvin, Mr., D. D., Prof. 

1824 Bro. Harrison G., Mr. at Amh. '27 
1824 Harv. John C, Mr., LL. B, 

1826 Bro. Edivards A. 

1827 Wms. —Elijah, M. D. 

1831 Amh. Calvin E, 

Parke 
1775 Harv. —John, Mr, 

Parker 
1661 Harv. John 
1718 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 

1726 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1727 Harv. Stephen, Mr. 
1729 Harv. Job, Mr. 
1733 Harv. Enoch, Mr. 
1737 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
1739 Harv. Isaac, Mr. 
1751 Harv. William, Mr. 
1757 Harv. Jedidiah, Mr. 

1762 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 

1763 Harv. Nehemiah, Mr, 
1763 Harv. James 

1763 Harv.— fWilliam, Mr. 

1764 Harv. Samuel, Mr.. D. D. at Penn. 
1768 Harv. Samuel, Mr.' 

1773 Harv. Daniel, Mr. '82 

1774 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 
1779 Harv. Nathaniel 

1782 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. '87, M. D. at 

1784 Harv. Frederick [Dart. 1812 

1784 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 

1786 Harv. tlsaac, Mr., LL. D., Prof. 



1793 Yale Peter M. 

1796 Yale Joseph 

1797 Harv. Jeroboam, Mr. 

1797 Harv. Freeman, Mr. 1802 

1798 Yale Daniel, Mr., and at Wms. 1806 

1799 Harv. Obadiah 

1799 Harv. Samuel D., Mr. 

1801 Dart. Daniel, Mr., and at Harv. '09 

1803 Dart. Edmund, Mr. 

1803 Harv. Nathan, Mr. ; Mr., Tut., & D. D. 

1803 Harv. Thomas I., Mr., M. D. [at Bow. 

1806 Wms. Samuel, Mr. 

1806 Dart. E ijah, Mr. 

1807 Dart. Edward L. 

1808 Dart. Leonard M., Mr. 
1808 Yale Amasa, Mr. 

1811 Dart. fJoel, Mr. 

1812 Harv. George, Mr. 

1812 Harv. George, Mr. 

1813 Harv. Frederick A., M. D. at Bro. '16 
1813 Yale Silas, ; 16 

1813 Ver. Amos A. 

1814 Mid. Willard J. 

1815 Mid. Isaac 

1817 Harv. Richard G., Mr. 

1819 Harv. James 

1819 Harv. Charles A., Mr. 

1820 Dart. James U., Mr. 

1820 Mid. Alvin H., Mr. 

1821 Mid. —Horatio, M. D. 

1822 Harv. Benjamin C. C, Mr. 

1823 Mid. Addison 

1824 Ver. George H. 
1824 Harv. Samuel 
1824 Harv. Samuel 
1824 Dart. Cyrus 
1824 Dart. Gilman 

1824 Dart. —Bradley, M. D. 

1825 Yale Ebenezer, Mr., M. D. at Harv. 

1826 Yale Aurelius D. ['29 
1826 Yale Edward W. 

1826 Harv. Willard, Mr., M. D., Prof, at 

1827 Yale Charles T. [Berk. 

1327 Yale George G. 
1827 Bro. Frederick 

1827 Dart. William 

1828 Mid. John M., Mr. 

1328 Dart. Frederick 

1829 Amh. Benjamin W., Mr. 

1830 Mid. William H. 

1830 Harv. —Matthew B., M. D. 

1831 Wash. Jonathan H. 
1831 Harv. Benjamin F. 
1831 Yale Peter, M. D. 
1833 Dart. —Hiram, M. D. 
1833 Bow. — Daniel, M.D. 

1833 Harv. Frederick 

1834 Dart. —Milton, M. D. 
1834 Harv. Lucius 

1834 Dart. Charles E. 

1834 Wat. Charles 

1834 Amh. James O, 

Parkes 

1822 Yale —Samuel, Mr. 

Parkhurst 

1805 Dart. Phineas, Mr. 

1810 Ver. Jabez 

1811 Harv. John 
1312 Bro. John L. 
1813 Dart. Timothy 
1314 Bro. Lemuel 
1819 Yale Jeremiah 
1819 Dart. —Curtis, M. D. 

Parkin 

1809 Yale John S. W. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



241 



Parkinson 

1808 Bro. — William, Mr. 

Parkis 
1829 Wms. — Gordon R., M. D. 

Parkman 
1721 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr. 
1737 Harv. Elias, Mr. 

1780 Harv. Elias 

1803 Harv. Charles, Mr. 

1807 Harv. Francis. Mr., D. D., A. B. at 

[Yale '07 

1809 Harv. George, M. D. 

1810 Harv. Samuel. Mr. 
1813 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 

1832 Harv. John 

Parks 
1773 Harv. Warham 
1795 Dart. Nathan 

1808 Dart. Beaumont, Mr. at Mid. '11 

1813 Harv. ||Gorham, Mr. 

1814 Mid. Ezekiel C. 

Parlin 
1834 Bow. —Lewis P., M. D. 

Parmele 
1758 Yale Ebenezer, Mr., and at Columb. 
1778 Harv. Elisha, Mr. 

1781 Yale Reuben, Mr. '87 

1809 Yale Philander 
1801 Ver. Quartus 

1808 Yale James H., Mr. at N. J. '14, Tut, 

[at N.J. 

1813 Mid. —Simeon, Mr. 

1826 Yale William 

1826 Mid. —Ashbel, Mr. 

1827 Yale Charles C. 
1827 Mid. Jedidiah C. 

1833 Dart. —Ezra, M. D. 

P arris 

1790 Bro. Martin, Mr. 

1806 Dart. ^Albion K., and at Bow., Sen. in 

[Cong., Gov. of Me. 

1821 Bro. Samuel B., Mr., M. D. at Harv. 

['25 
Parsons 
1697 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 
1705 Harv. David, Mr. '15, A. B. at Yale '05 
1720 Harv. Joseph 
1729 Harv. David, Mr. '33 

1729 Yale Jonathan, Mr., and at N. J. '62 

1730 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1735 Harv. William, Mr. 

1736 Harv. Moses, Mr. 
1752 Harv. Joseph, Mr. 

1756 Harv. Samuel H., Mr,, and at Yale '81 

1757 Yale Noah, Mr., Tutor 
1765 Harv. Edward, Mr. 
1765 Harv. Moses, Mr. 
1768 Harv. Obadiah, Mr. 

1768 Yale Elijah, Mr., D. D. 

1769 Harv. fTheophilus, Mr., LL. D. at Dart. 

[1807, and at Bro. '09 

1771 Harv. David, Mr., D. D. at Bro. 1800 

1773 Harv. Theodore, Mr. 

1773 Yale Lemuel, Mr. 

1777 Yale Jonathan G., Mr. 

1791 Yale Benjamin, Mr. 
1791 Dart. John U., Mr. 

1800 Wms. Joel 

1801 Wms. Levi, Mr., Tutor 
1801 Harv. Charles C, Mr. 
1811 Yale Isaac, Mr. '16 

1814 Mid. Levi, Mr. 

1815 Harv. Theophilus 



1816 Yale Francis 

1818 Harv. —Usher, M D., and at Dart. ' i\ , 
[Prof. <il Dart., Mr. al BfO. 
1818 Harv. —Thomas W., M. D. 

1818 Harv. William, Mr. 

1819 Yale Samuel H., Mr., & at Harv. '21 

1820 Wms. Horatio A., Mr. 
18^23 Bow. Isaac 

1823 How. George L. 

1825 Bow. —El. en, M. D. 

1828 Cow. John U. 

1829 Dart. Charles G., Mr. 

1829 Yale —William, M. D. 
1330 Amh. James 

1830 Bow. —Edwin, M. D. 

1832 Wms. —Samuel C, M. D. 

1833 Bow. Ebenezer G. 

'Partridge 
1689 Harv. William. 
1705 Harv. John, Mr. 

1729 Yale William. Mr. 

1730 Yale Oliver, Mr. 
1762 Harv. ||George, Mr. 
1767 Yale Samuel 
1809 Dart. Ira A. 
1812 Dart. — Alclen, Mr. 
1814 Bro. Moses 

1824 Bro. —Warren, M. D. 

1826 Wat. Orlando H., M. D. Bow. '29 

1827 Amh. Samuel D. 

1828 Wms. Joseph L., Mr. 

1833 Amh. George C. 

Paspati 

1831 Amh. Alexander C. 

Patch 
1799 Dart. Jacob 
1831 Bow. John 

1831 Wat. —Lewis, M. D. 

1805 Dart. — *William, N. J. 1763, LL. D., 
[and at Harv. 1806, and at 
[N. J., Gov. of N. J., and 
[Just. S.C. of U.S. 
Pateshall 

1735 Harv. Richard, Mr. 
Patrick 

1769 Y r ale Joseph, Mr. 

1799 Wms. William, Mr. 

1817 Bro. Joseph 

1834 Wms. Elisha P. 

Patten 

1754 Harv. William, Mr., and at Yale '58 

1780 Dart. William, Mr., and at Yale '85, 
[at Bro. '87, D. D. at Bro. 1807 

1790 Dart. Stephen 

1792 Bro. George J., Mr. 

1803 Dart. Hutchins 

1808 Bow. John. Mr. 

1814 Harv. Oliver 

1318 Bro. WilliamS., Mr. 

1819 Bro. Joseph H., Mr., and at Dart. '32 

1823 Bow. James 

1827 Dart. Abel 

1832 Bow. John E. 

Patterson 

1728 Yale John, Mr. 

1762 Yale John, Mr. 

1812 Dart. Isaac 

1825 Dart. John K. 
1830 Harv. Albert C. 
1832 Amh. William H. 

Pattison 

1826 Amh. Robert E. 



242 



1317 

1818 
1830 

1793 

1832 

1726 
1748 
1759 
1779 
1779 
1784 
1787 
1789 
1790 
lHlli 
1817 
1819 
1824 
1834 

1677 
1716 

1724 
1754 
1758 
1764 
1777 
1778 
1782 
1784 
1793 
1803 
1812 
1817 
1819 
1819 
1828 
1829 
1832 
1833 
1834 

1721 

1745 
1769 
1773 
1791 
1794 
1800 
1803 
1803 
1803 
1816 
1816 
1816 
1821 
1825 
1826 
1826 
1827 
1828 
1831 
1833 
1834 

1827 

1783 
1786 
1793 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



Patton 

Yale Robert B., Mr. at Mid '20, P. D. 
[at Got., Prof, at Mid. &N.J. 
Mid. William, Mr. . 

Yale Charles H. 

Paul 
Dart. Silas 
Wat. —John, M. D. 

Payne 



Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Yale 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Yale 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Yale 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Wash 

Payson 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Harv. 
Dart. 
Harv. 
Yale 
Harv. 
Yale 



Sel.h, Mr. 
Thomas, Mr. 

Joshua, Mr., and at Dart. '92 
Elisha, Mr. 
■Elisha, Mr. 
Elisha, Mr. 
Hiram, Mr. 
Elijah 
Zenas 
John, M. D. 
Benjamin E. 
Elisha D.,M.D. 
William E. 
William 



Edward, Mr. 

Samuel, Mr. 

Phillips, Mr. 

Phillips, Mr., D. D. 

Samuel, Mr. 

John, Mr. 

Seth, Mr., and at Yale '82, D. D. 

Phillips, Mr. [at Dart. 1809 

Samuel, Mr. 

Thomas, Mr. 

Moses P., Mr. 

Edward, Mr., D. D. at Bow. '21 

George, Mr. '19 

John L., Mr. 

Joshua P. 
Harv. Phillips 
Yale John O. 
Dart. Moses P. 
Bow. Edward 
Amh. Albert S. 
Amh. Thomas E. 

Peabody 
Harv. Oliver, Mr. 
Harv. Oliver, Mr. 
Harv. Stephen, Mr., and at Dart. '92 
Harv. Oliver, Mr. 
Dart. — ||Nathaniel, Mr. 
Harv. Stephen, Mr. 
Dart. Nathaniel, Mr. 
Dart. Samuel 

Dart. Augustus, Mr., and at Harv. '09 
Harv. Stephen 

Harv. Oliver W. B., Mr., LL. B. 
Harv. William B. O., Mr. 
Harv. Joseph A., Mr. 
Yale —Joseph, M. D. 
Dart. Josiah 
Dart. —William H., M. D. 
Harv. Andrew P., Mr., Tutor 
Bow. Ephraim 
Dart. David, Mr. 
Yale —Jeremiah N., M. D. 
Dart. —Ira, M. D. 
Bow. —Edward, M. D. 

Mid. Royal W v Mr. 
Pearce 

Yale Amos 
Harv. David 
Bro, —Samuel^ Mr. 



1802 Y r ale Cyrus 

1808 Bro. |]Dutee J., Mr. 
1318 Bro. William, Mr. 

Pearse 
1814 Mid. Richard 

Pearson 
1758 Harv. Joseph 

1773 Harv. Eliphalet, Mr., Prof., and at An- 
[dover, LL. D. at Yale 1803, 
[and at N. J. '12 

1779 Dart. Abiel, Mr. 
1789 Harv. —William, M. B. 

1803 Dart. Samuel A., Mr. 
1816 Harv. Henry B., Mr. 

1820 Mid. Ora 

1834 Dart. —William, M. D. 

Pearsons 
1812 Dart. —Silas, M. D. 

1765 Yale Obadiah 
Peaslee 

1821 Ver. George 

1824 Dart. Charles H., Mr. 

Peck 

1762 Harv. John, Mr. 

1775 Yale William, Mr. 

1782 Harv. William D., Mr., Prof. 

1784 Yale Jabez 

1800 Dart. Joseph 

1816 Bro. So/o/nora, Mr., Tut., Prof, at Amh. 

1818 Wms. Thomas [and Bro. 

1819 Ver. Thomas H. 

1820 Bro. —William, M. D. 

1821 Bro. —Gardner M., M. D. 

1821 Yale Isaac 

1822 Mid. Stephen G. 

1823 Yale Henry E. 

1824 Bro. Allen O. 
1824 Bro. Shubael 

1826 Bro. George B., Mr. 
1826 Amh. Joseph 

1829 Bow. —Kelly, M. D. 

1830 Wms. —Erasmus D., M. D. 

1831 Harv. —Addison S., M. D. 

1832 Wms. —William R., M. D. 

1833 Harv. William D. 

Pecker 
1743 Harv. James, Mr. 
1757 Harv. Jeremiah, Mr. '61 

Peckham 
1831 Yale — Mowry S., M. D. 

Peebles 
1829 Wms. — Corbit, M. D. 

Peele 
1792 Harv. Willard, Mr. 

Peet 
1808 Mid. Josiah, Mr. 

1822 Yale Harvey P., Mr. 

1823 Y'ale Edward W., Mr. 
1823 Yale Stephen, Mr. 

Peirce 

1780 Dart. George, Mr. 

1801 Harv. Benjamin, Mr. 
Henry, Mr. 
Cyrus, Mr. 
•Augustus, M. D. 
James H., M. D. 
Benjamin, Tutor 
Charles H. 
John, M. D. 
Charles H. 



1808 Harv. 

1810 Harv. 
1825 Bow. 
1825 Bow. 
1829 Harv. 
1833 Harv. 

1833 Bow. 

1834 Bow. 

Peirson 

1811 Wms. Job, Mr. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



243 



70 



1812 Harv. Abel L., Mr. ; M. D. 

Pelham 

16)1 Harv. Nathaniel 

16/3 Harv. Edward 

Pell 

1730 Harv. Edward, Mr. 

1757 Yale John 

Pellet 

1804 Yale John 

Pelot 
1771 Bro. —Francis, Mr. 

Pember 

1829 Dart. —Jacob R., M. D. 

Pemberton 
1691 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr., Tutor 
1721 Harv. Ebenezer, Mr., D. D. at N. J 
1732 Harv. James, Mr. 

1742 Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

1781 Yale —Ebenezer, N. J. ; 65, Mr., and at 
[Dart. '82, at Harv. '87, at 
[N. J. '68, LL. D. at Alleg., 
[Tutor 
Pendleton 
1833 Harv. Isaac P. 

Penfield 
17S3 Yale Samuel 
1804 Wms. Henry F. 

Penhallow 
1723 Harv. Benjamin 
1777 Harv. John 
Pennell 

1830 Bow. Lewis 

Penniman 

1723 Harv. Joseph 

1730 Harv. James, Mr. 

1765 Harv. Joseph, Mr. '69 
1774 Bro. Elias, Mr. 
1791 Bro. Chiron, Mr. 
1791 Bro. Obadiah, Mr. 
1822 Harv. Henry H. 

1828 Wms. Edmund B., Mr. 
1828 Yale Silas M. 
1830 Harv. William 

Pentland 
1832 Harv. Abner L. 

Pepperell 

1743 Harv. Andrew, Mr. 

1766 Harv. William, Mr., Bart. 

Percival 
1815 Yale James G., M. D. 

Percy 
1825 Harv. Robert D. 

Perham 

1800 Harv. Benoni 

1827 Bow. —Joseph, M. D. 
Perit 

1801 Yale John W. 

1802 Yale Pelatiah, Mr. 

1803 Yale Pelatiah W. ; Mr. 

Perkins 
1695 Harv. John, Mr. 
1717 Harv. Daniel, Mr. 
1727 Yale Joseph, Mr. 
1734 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 
1738 Harv. Jonathan, Mr. 
1748 Harv. Richard, Mr. 
1758 Harv. William, Mr. 
1774 Yale —Nathan, N. J. '70, Mr., and at 
[N.J., D. D.atN.J. 
1776 Yale Eliphaz, Mr. 
1779 Harv. Thomas 
1781 Yale Enoch, Mr., Tutor 



1785 
1785 
1786 

1787 
1791 
1792 
17U4 
1791 
1795 
17'J9 
1800 
1801 
1803 
1803 
1809 
1809 
1811 
1812 
1812 
1812 
1813 
1813 
1813 
1814 
1814 
1814 
1817 
1818 
1819 
1819 
1821 
1822 
1824 
1824 
1825 
1827 
1827 
1828 
1828 
1829 
1830 
1831 
1831 
1832 
1832 
1832 
1833 
1834 
1834 

1763 
1791 
1791 
1803 
1818 
1819 
1822 
1827 
1828 
1829 



Yale Benjamin 

Yale Samuel, Mr. 

Yale HEIias, Mr. '«.J7 

Vale Elijah, M. D. at Penn. 

Yale John D., Mr. 

Yale William 

Yale Benjamin D., Mr. 

Harv. Joseph, Air. 

Yale Nathan, Mr. 

Yale Matthew, Mr., and at Wms. f9 

Dart. Cyrus, Mr., M. D. ; Prof., 31. D. 

Bro. George W. [at Harv. '23 

Bro. Levi H. 

Yale George 

Harv. Benjamin 

Harv. James 

Harv. Thomas, 'Mr. 

Yale Nathaniel S., Mr., M.D. 

Yale Thomas S., Mr. 

Mid. Matthew 

Bro. Jonas, Mr. 

Yale Charles 

Dart. Elisha B. 

Dart. Ebenezer, Mr. 

Wms. Joseph, Mr. 

Harv. — Lafayette, M. D. 

Yale Samuel H., Mr. ; 23 

Yale Thomas C, Mr. 

Dart. — Jared, M D. 

Harv. William F. 

Mid. —Joseph, M. D. 

Bow. Simeon, Mr. 

Yale George W. 

Harv. Henry C, M. D. 

Yale Benjamin 

Yale Alfred J. 

Harv. William P., Mr. 

Bow. Horatio N. 

Yale George 

Amh. Justin, Mr., Tutor 

Yale Alfred E. 

Wms. — Austin F., M. D. 

Wms. — Augustus T., M. D. 

Harv. John S. 

Wat. —Hiram, M. D. 

Amh. Jonathan C. 

Yale Alfred 

Wash. Luther. H. 

W T ash. Henry 

Perley 

Harv. Samuel, Mr. 

Humphrey C, Mr. 
Nathaniel, flip. 
Jeremiah, Mr. 
George D. 
Daniel J. ? M. D. 
Ira, Mr.. Tutor 
David flf. 
Daniel, M. D. 



Dart. 
Dart. 
Dart. 
Bow. 
Harv. 
Dart. 
Harv. 
Dart. 
Bow. — John L. 



Perot 

1811 Yale Edward 

1816 Y'ale Charles 

Perrin 

1812 Mid. William 

1817 Dart. Truman, Mr. 

Perry 

1752 Harv. Joseph, Mr., and at Yale 'do 

1772 Yale David, Mr. 

1775 Y r ale Joshua, Mr. 

1777 Yale Joseph' 

1777 Y^ale Philo 

1790 Bro. Freeman, Mr. 

179S Wms. David L., Mr., Tutor 

1802 Wms. Frederick, Mr. , and at Y'ale,Tut. 



244 



COMPLETE LIST OP GRADUATES. 



[Feb. 



1802 Bro. 


Samuel, Mr. 


1803 VVms. 


Alfred, Mr. 


1804 Harv. 


— Gardner B., Union '04, Mr. and 


1806 Bro. 


David, Mr. [at Union 


1809 Bro. 


Joshua 


1811 Harv. 


William, Mr.. M. D. 


1811 Dart. 


Joseph, Mr. 


1814 Mid. 


Philanthropos 


1816 Harv. 


Samuel 


1816 Yaie 


—Nathaniel, M. D. 


1817 Harv. 


Baxter, Mr. 


1818 Mid. 


Marcus A. 


1823 Harv. 


Clark 


1824 Dart. 


Jjuvid 


1824 Yale 


Samuel 


1826 Wins. 


—Alfred, M. D. 


1827 Yale 


John M. S., Mr. 


1830 Bro. 


Christopher G. 


1830 Harv. 


—Marshall S., M. D. 


1831 Dart. 


— Asahel, M. D. 


1832 Bow. 


Erasius 


1833 Yale 


David C. 


1833 Bow. 


William F., M. D. 


Peter 


1820 Yale 


John P. C. 


Peters 


1723 Harv. 


Andrew, Mr.* 


1757 Yale 


Samuel A., Mr., and at Columb., 


1759 Yale 


John [LL. D. [uncertain] 


1780 Dart. 


Absalom, Mr. 


1789 Yale 


tJohn T. 


1793 Harv. 


Daniel, Mr. 


1794 Yale 


Samuel A. 


1798 Wms. 


John H. 


1816 Dart. 


Absalom, Mr., D. D. at Mis. 


1818 Yale 


—John S., M. D. 


1818 Harv. 


Henry A. 


1825 Bro. 


Onslow 


1825 Yale 


William T. 


1826 Yale 


Hugh 


1827 Yale 


—Manly, M. D. 


1828 Yale 


—Joseph P., M. D. 


1830 Yale 


—William T., M. D. 


1831 Harv. 


John 


1831 Wash. 


— *John S., LL. D., Gov. of Conn. 


Pe 


trokokino 


1829 Amh. 


Nicholas 


Pettee 


1833 Yale 


Joseph 


Pettengill 


1804 Dart. 


Thomas H., Mr. 


1805 Harv. 


Amos, Mr., and at Mid. ? 12 


1812 Mid. 


Benjamin, and at Dart. '12 


1825 Yale 


Amos, Mr., Tutor 


1829 Yale 


Amos 



Pettibone 



1778 
1800 
1805 
1805 
1806 
1810 
1820 
1828 

1802 

1818 



1744 

1758 
1758 
1759 
1760 



Yale 

Wms. 

VVms. 

Yale 
Yale 
Mid. 
Mid. 
Mid. 



Giles, Mr. 

Sereno 

Rufus 

John O., Mr. 

Chauncy 

John 

Roswell, Mr. 

Ira, Mr. 



Petty 

Mid. Aaron 

Peverly 
Dart. Thomas 



Phelps 



Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 



Alexander, Mr., Tutor 

Bildad 

Aaron, Mr. 

John, Mr. 

Seth 



1761 Yale 


1762 


Harv. 


1775 


Dart. 


1776 Yale 


1776 


Yale 


1780 Yale 


1783 


Yale 


1787 


Harv. 


1788 


Harv. 


1791 


Harv. 


1793 Yale 


1794 Yale 


1794 Dart. 


1795 


Y'ale 


1800 Yale 


1801 


Yale 


1803 


Dart. 


1804 Mid. 


1806 


Wms. 



1811 
1811 
1812 
1823 
1825 
1825 
1826 
1832 
1833 

1650 
1686 
1708 
1712 
1724 
1734 
1735 
1736 
1745 
1769 
1771 

1788 
1795 
1810 
1814 
1815 
1817 
1818 
1819 
1819 
1822 
1825 
1826 
1826 
1827 
1827 
1828 
1829 
1831 

1829 

1801 
1812 
1814 
1827 

1811 

1671 

1781 
1832 



Benajah, Mr. '84 
Solomon, Mr. '79 
Davenport, Mr. 
William, Mr. '80 
Martin, Mr. 
Timothy, Mr. 
Noah A. 
John, Mr. 1812 
Henry, '89 
Charles P., Mr. 
David 

Oliver L., Mr. 
Ralph, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. 1831 
||Elisha 
Roijal, Mr. 
Samuel W. 
Matthew, Mr. 

Abner, Mr., and at Bro. '13, 
[M. D. at Bro.,and at Yale '14 
Samuel S., Mr. at Mid. '14 
— John 
— Charles 
Dudley 
—Edward, M. D. 
— Guido R., M. D. 

Amos A., Mr. 
— Thaddeus, M. D. 
John 
Phillips 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
George, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. '15 
Samuel, Mr. 
Henrv, Mr. 
Samuel, Mr. 

John, Mr., LL. D. at Dart. '77 
John, Mr. 
John, Mr. 
George, Mr. 

Samuel, Mr., LL. D., Mr. at 
[Dart. '74, Lieut. Gov. of Ms. 
John, Mr. 
John, Mr. 

Willard, Mr., Tutor 
Thomas W., Mr. 
Alonzo 
—John, M. D. 
— Jonathan, Mr. 

Samuel, Mr., LL. B. 
||StephenC.,Mr. 
—Allen, M. D. 
John E. 
John C. 
William, Mr. 
Joseph 
—Henry P. 
William 
George W. 
Wendell, LL. B. 
Philpot 
Wash. Edward P. 

Phinney 
Harv. Eli as, Mr. 
Bro. Samuel 

Harv. — Slurgis, M. D. 
Wms. Barnabas, Mr. 

Phippen 
Bro. George 

Phipps 
Harv. Samuel, Mr. 
Harv. Danfbrlh 
Harv. Harrison G. O. 
Phip 



Yale 
Ver. 
Ver. 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Yale 
Wat. 
Yale 



Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Yale 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Mid. 

Bro. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Bow. 

Wms. 

Harv. 

Bro. 

Bro. 

Wms. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Harv. 



1695 Harv. Thomas, Mr. 



1835.] 



COMPLETE LIST OF GRADUATES. 



24o 



1703 Harv. 
1728 Harv. 
1741 H,.rv. 
1746 Harv. 
1757 Harv. 



1759 Harv. 
17G1 Harv. 
1763 Harv. 



1796 Harv. 

1797 Harv. 
1799 Harv. 
1810 Harv. 
1819 Harv. 



Spencer, Mr., Lieut. Gov. of Ms. 
William, Mr. 
David, Mr. 
William, Mr. '50 
Thomaa, Mr. 
Pickens 
1801 Bro. Andrew, Gov. of S. C. 

Pickering 
1719 Harv. Theophilm, Mr. 
John, Mr. 

fJohn, Mr., LL. D. at Dart. '92 
IjTimothy, Mr., LL. D. at N. J. 
['98, and at Bro. '99, Sen. in 
[Cong. 
Jolm, rV!r.. LL. D. at Bow. 1822 
William, Mr. 
Timothy 
Octavius, Mr. 
Richard 
1823 Harv. —Charles, M. D. 

1830 Harv. John 

1831 Harv. Henry W. 

Picket 
1705 Yale John, Mr. 
1732 Yale John 
Pickman 
1759 Harv. Benjamin, and at Yale, Mr. 
William, Mr. 
Benjamin, Mr. 
Thomas, Mr. 
Clarke G., Mr. 
Haskel D. 
Pidgin 
1794 Dart. William, Mr. 
1831 Bow. —Joseph N., M. D. 

Pierce 

1724 Harv. Richard, Mr. 

1728 Harv. Daniel, Mr. '33 

1735 Harv. Josiah, Mr. 

1744 Harv. Charles, Mr. 

1775 Harv. Nathaniel, Mr. 



1766 Harv. 
1784 Harv. 
1791 Harv. 
1811 Harv. 
1815 Harv. 



1777 
1793 
1795 

1796 
1799 
1806 
1811 
1816 
1818 
18 JO 
1820 
1822 
1822 
1823 
1824 
1825 
1825 
1825 
1826 
1828 
1831 

1681 
1685 
1689 
1714 
1715 
1718 
1718 
1721 
1726 
1751 
1785 
1804 
1826 

1789 



1668 
1711 
1729 



Yale 

Harv. 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Dart. 

Yale 

Dart. 

Yale 

l5ow. 

Harv. 

Harv. 

Hro. 

Bow. 

Bow. 

How. 

Bow. 

Dart. 

Yale 

Yale 

Wms. 

Harv. 



John, Mr. 

John, Mr., Tutor, D. D. 
Benjamin F. 

Proctor, Mr., and at Harv. 1814 
Warren. Mr., and at llarv. 1811 
Seth 

David, Mr. 
George E., Mr. 
Josiah, Mr. 
Augustus 

Daniel 11., Mr., M. D. 
John 



Milton 
—Seth, M. D. 
HFranklin 

George W., B 

Charles, Mr. 
—John G., M. I 
— Leonard, M. J 
— Hosea, M. D. 

John T. 



Pierpont 



Harv. James, Mr. 

Harv. Jonathan, BIr. 

Harv. Benjamin, Blr. 

Harv. Jonathan, Blr. 

Harv. Ebenezer 

Yale Samuel, Blr. 

Yaie James, Blr., Tutor 

Harv. Thomas, Blr. 

Yale Benjamin, Blr. 

Yale Joseph. Blr. 

Harv. Robert', Blr. '87 

Yale John, Blr. '20, and at Harv. '21 

Mid. —Robert, Blr. 

Pierrepont 
Harv. James H. ; Blr. 1802, BI. 1). at 
[Dart. 1817 

Pierson 
Harv. Abraham, Rector of Yale 
Yale John, Mr. 
Yale John, Blr. 



Presidents of the New England Colleges. 

As one or two mistakes inadvertently occurred in publishing the list of presidents in 
our last No., pp. 93, 94, we here insert a corrected list of the presidents of the New 
England Colleges, now in office. 

Inducted 
into ojjice. Colleges, Names. 

1817 Yale Rev. Jeremiah Dat, I). D., LL. D. 

1818 Middlebury Rev. Joshua Bates, D. D. 

1820 Bowdoin Rev. William Allen, D. D. 

1821 Williams Rev. Edward D. Griffin, D. D. 

1823 Amherst Rev. Heman Humphrey, I). D. 

1826 Brown Rev. Francis Wayland, D. D. 

1828 Dartmouth Rev. Nathan Lord, D. D. 

1829 Harvard Hon. Josiah Quincy, LL. D. 

1831 Wesleyan U....Rev. Wilbur Fisk, D. D. 

1831 Washington Rev. Nathaniel S. Wheaton, D. D. 

1833 University Vt.Rev. John Wheeler, D. D. 

1833 Waterville Rev. Rufus Babcock, D. D. 



vol. VII. 



32 



246 



CHURCHES AND MINISTERS OP ESSEX COUNTY. 



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CHURCHES AND MINISTERS OF ESSEX COUNTY. 



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